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LLEA 396 (Alpha) European and Latin American Cinema (3)

Study of major developments in European and Latin American cinema studies focusing on a specific area. (B) Topic; (C) Genre; (D) Director; (E) Era. Sophomore standing or higher. Repeatable one time for different alphas.

SUST 260 Introduction to Environmental Humanities (3)

Introduction to the environmental humanities, which rests at the intersection of the arts, humanities, and environmental studies. (Cross-listed as IS 260)

NURS 702 Philosophical Thoughts (3)

Introduces the major fields of philosophy for use in research. Frameworks for the evaluation and critique of philosophical approaches to research will be explored, debated, analyzed, and applied as relevant to the PhD student’s dissertation. NURS majors only. A-F only. (Fall only)

ASAN 303 Bollywood Dance, Music, and Film (3)

Unique course combining mind and body, discussion and dancing. Learn and perform Bollywood dances and the richness of their Indian poetic, classical, and folk traditions. Understand “Bollywood” in the context of cross-cultural fusion and globalization. Repeatable one time. (Cross-listed as IP 303)

SOC 438 Prisons (3)

Prisons, jails, and other detention facilities across historical, social, and/or international contexts. Pre: 300 or consent.

PHIL 270 Love and Sex (3)

Survey of classical and contemporary perspectives of the philosophy of love, marriage, relationships, sex, sexual identity, representations of sex and sexuality. Pre: one PHIL 100-level course or consent of instructor.

DNCE 450 Indigenous Dance Studies (3)

Lecture/ discussion about choreographies of indigeneity and identity with an intersectional emphasis on Native Hawaiian, Pacific, and Asian dance cultures. Repeatable two times.

ICS 369 Computational Media Systems (3)

Intermediate object-oriented programming within the context of interactive media systems and video game development. Topics: classes, objects, inheritance, polymorphism, abstract classes, interfaces, event-driven programming, vectors, geometric primitives, game mechanics, and relevant design patterns. EE, CENG, ICS, CM, THEA, DNCE majors only. A-F only. Pre: 111 or EE 160 or instructor approval. (Cross-listed as EE 369)

PHYS 470 General Relativity & Cosmology (3)

Introduction to general relativity & cosmology. Spacetime metrics, geodesics, Einstein field equations, black holes. Geometry of the universe, redshift, cosmological distances. Cosmological models, dark matters, dark energy. Big Bang nucleosynthesis, recombination, cosmic microwave background, inflation. Pre: 274; MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). Recommended: ASTR 242. (Alt. years: fall) (Cross-listed as ASTR 470)

ASTR 470 General Relativity & Cosmology (3)

Introduction to general relativity & cosmology. Spacetime metrics, geodesics, Einstein field equations, black holes. Geometry of the universe, redshift, cosmological distances. Cosmological models, dark matters, dark energy. Big Bang nucleosynthesis, recombination, cosmic microwave background, inflation. Pre: PHYS 274; MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). Recommended: 242. (Alt. years: fall) (Cross-listed as PHYS 470)

WGSS 433 Gender, Fashion, & Globalization (3)

Explores ethics of the present and historic expansions of the fashion industry and its environmental impact globally. Examines how gender/race/class shape garment production and consumption and fashion activism in world regions. Emphasis on oral/written communication. A-F only. Junior standing or higher. (Cross-listed as GEO 433)

ASTR 760 Modern General Relativity (3)

Differential geometry, special relativity, Einstein equations, gravitational phenomena, equivalence principles, black holes, gravitational waves, cosmology, relativistic stars, experimental tests, computational techniques. Graduate students only in PHYS or ASTR. (Alt. years: fall) (Cross-listed as PHYS 760)

UROP 399 Faculty Mentored Research and Creative Work Project (V)

Directed research for undergraduate students conducting faculty-mentored research or creative work projects. Repeatable three times, up to ten credits. CR/NC only. Pre: consent of UROP director and student faculty mentor. (Summer only)

UROP 299 Transformational Research Experiences for Early Undergraduates (3)

Introduction to exploring discover-based investigation, with hands-on experiences in a wide range of science fields. Divided into 4-week learning modules led by researchers at several UH Mânoa research facilities on and off campus. Repeatable one time. CR/NC only. (Cross-listed as HON 299)

COA 394 On Death and Dying (3)

Aspects of death and dying; relation to our culture and society, to understanding of each other and of ourselves. (Crosslisted as REL 394)

BIOL 401L Molecular Biotechnology Lab-Gene Editing by CRISPR/Cas9 (2)

(1-hr Lec, 3-hr Lab) Laboratory to accompany 401. Students learn advanced gene editing techniques, including CRISPR/Cas9 to engineer prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Repeatable one time. Pre: 275L, or 375L, or MBBE 304, or MBBE 375; or consent. Co-requisite: 401. (Cross-listed as MBBE 401L)

MBBE 401L Molecular Biotechnology Lab-Gene Editing by CRISPR/Cas9 (2)

(1-hr Lec, 3-hr Lab) Laboratory to accompany 401. Students learn advanced gene editing techniques, including CRISPR/Cas9 to engineer prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Repeatable one time. Pre: 304, or 375, or BIOL 275L, or BIOL 375L; or consent. Co-requisite: 401. (Cross-listed as BIOL 401L)

SUST 338 Inter-woven Structures (3)

Studio investigation of threads under tension through the thematic lens of environmental vulnerability and resiliency. Exploration of art practice as embodied knowledge with specific attention to weaving as a means of meaning and place-making. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. (Cross-listing as ART 338)

DATA 484 Data Visualization (3)

Introduction to data visualization through practical techniques for turning data into images to produce insight. Topics include: information visualization, geospatial visualization, scientific visualization, social network visualization, and medical visualization. Junior standing or higher. Pre: ACM 215 or ICS 110(Alpha) or ICS 111. (Cross-listed as ACM 484 and ICS 484)

HWST 434 Ka Mana Mo‘olelo: Topics in Hawaiian and Indigenous Mo‘olelo (3)

Advanced course of study focusing on pressing topics connected with Hawaiian and Indigenous literatures, such as land struggle, climate change, or issues of governance and sovereignty. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: 234 or 235, and 330.

HWST 331 Hawaiian and Indigenous Digital Media (3)

Focus on studying, analyzing, and creating various forms of Hawaiian and Indigenous digital storytelling. Pre: 107 and 234 and HAW 100.

NAVL 202 Navigation (3)

Designed to provide midshipmen with an in-depth study of the theory, principles, procedures, and application of plotting, piloting, and electronic navigation, as well as an introduction to maneuvering boards. A-F only. (Spring only)

NAVL 102 Seapower and Maritime Affairs (3)

Study of the Navy and the influence of seapower upon history that incorporates both an historical and political perspective to explore major events and circumstances that have shaped a bold and proud history. A-F only. (Spring only)

UNIV 140 Introduction to Majors and UH Manoa (1)

Major exploration providing incoming students with an understanding of and tools to navigate UH Mânoa and explore the programs of study available. Introduction to career development, goal setting, and action planning. Freshmen only. Exploratory majors only. A-F only.

QHS 650 Secondary Data Analysis (3)

Will allow students who are new to using secondary data to become comfortable with accessing the data, forming hypotheses, and designing study proposals. Will introduce examples with basic and advanced techniques. A-F only. Pre: 601 or equivalent.

MUS 469 Chinese Music and Sound Culture (3)

Situates the Chinese musical sound in the interdisciplinary field of sound culture. Students will learn to read music literature and listen to historical sounds critically and to analyze aspects of Chinese sound culture. (Cross-listed as THEA 469)

THEA 469 Chinese Music and Sound Culture (3)

Situates the Chinese musical sound in the interdisciplinary field of sound culture. Students will learn to read music literature and listen to historical sounds critically and to analyze aspects of Chinese sound culture. (Cross-listed as MUS 469)

SLS 304 Sociolinguistics of Multilingualism (3)

Explores major themes in sociolinguistics that are relevant to L2/multilingual contexts, including language ideology, language variation, language and culture, and language and identity and how L2 users and multilingual people grapple with these issues. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. (Fall only)

REL 170 Religion and the Environment (3)

Examines the roles contemporary religious groups play in ground movements for sustainability. Introduces students to key scholars, religious leaders, and activists who are implementing sustainable solutions to pressing environmental problems. A-F only.

PHIL 242 Philosophy and Science Fiction (3)

Will use important works of science fiction and philosophy to explore philosophical questions, such as the nature of personal identity and the meaning of human life. A-F only.

TRMD 463 Medical and Urban Entomology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Biology, ecology, health and economic impacts, and control of urban insect pests and medically important arthropods that act as vectors of diseases. Pre: PEPS 363 or BIOL 265, or consent. (Cross-listed as PEPS 463)

NAVL 202 Navigation (3)

Designed to provide midshipmen with an in-depth study of the theory, principles, procedures, and application of plotting, piloting, and electronic navigation, as well as an introduction to maneuvering boards. A-F only. (Spring only)

NAVL 101 Introduction to Naval Science (3)

Overview of the Navy’s mission, customs, traditions, and the duties required of Junior Officers. Provides students with a basic knowledge of damage control, shipboard organization, and safety procedures prior to their first summer training cruise. A-F only. (Fall only)

DATA 435 Machine Learning Fundamentals (3)

Introduction to machine learning concepts with a focus on relevant ideas from computational neuroscience. Information processing and learning in the nervous system. Neural networks. Supervised and unsupervised learning. Basics of statistical learning theory. Pre: 235, or consent. Recommended: MATH 307. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ICS 435)

ME 406 Orbital Mechanics (3)

Basic theory of orbits of space objects, including spacecraft, small satellites, planets and small planets, and other fundamentals of astrodynamics and applications to aerospace engineering. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: grade of C or better in all of the following: 271; 375; MATH 244 or MATH 253A; MATH 302 or MATH 307; EE 160 or ICS 111.

COM 369 Esports and Society (3)

Introduction to professional and collegiate esports (electronic sports) in global context, including theories related to leisure and gaming, and current academic and industry developments. No previous technical or gaming experience is required. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: COM major or consent.

COA 449 Gerontology, Health Care, and the Law (Elder Law) (V)

Provides a basic foundation for studies at the intersection of gerontology, health care, and the law and places an emphasis on proactive and preventive law for older adults in society. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Cross-listed as NURS 449)

ME 408 Optimal Control for Aerospace Applications (3)

Fundamentals of optimal control theory and calculus of variations. Application of this theory to aerospace engineering problems, including mission design problems and a wide range of space maneuvers. A-F only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: grade of C or better in all of the following: 271; 375; MATH 244 or MATH 253A; MATH 302 or MATH 307; EE 160 or ICS 111.

WGSS 485 Women and Disasters (3)

Explores disasters and their consequences for women, with attention to gender, race, sexuality, and class. A-F only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: at least one course in WS, or consent of instructor.

GEO 725 Political Ecology (3)

Introduction to political ecology. Content will examine the historical development of and contemporary scholarship in political ecology from a human and environmental geography perspective.

GEO 433 Gender, Fashion, & Globalization (3)

Explores ethics of the present and historic expansions of the fashion industry and its environmental impact globally. Examines how gender/race/class shape garment production and consumption and fashion activism in world regions. Emphasis on oral/written communication. A-F only. Junior standing or higher. (Cross-listed as WGSS 433)

ES 233 Filipinos in Diaspora (3)

Introduction to Filipinos in diaspora. Topics include: race, empire, migration, representation, cultural production, identity formation, and decolonization.

ASAN 484 Political Violence in Modern Southeast Asia (3)

Why do Southeast Asian governments and political movements engage in mass killings? How do their perpetrators justify these atrocities? How do survivors deal with their trauma and get their voices heard? A-F only. (Fall only)

MBIO 612 Data Science Fundamentals in R (3)

(3 hr Lec/Lab) Introduces project management, data analysis, and mathematical and statistical modeling using R as a platform. Students will learn principles and benefits of programming languages to apply skills to their own research. (Cross-listed as OCN 682)

DATA 434 Data Science Fundamentals (3)

Introduction to critical statistical and probabilistic concepts that underlie data science as well as tools that play a central role in the daily work of a data scientist. A-F only. Pre: 211 or consent. (Cross-listed as ICS 434)

HRM 365 Labor and Social Legislation (3)

Evolution, interpretation, and application of labor and social welfare legislation with special emphasis on impact of labor-management relations.

COA 334 Middle Age and Aging (3)

Change and continuity in midlife and late life from theoretical and applied perspectives. Written assignments communicate information about physical and psychological age-related events, as well as social attitudes, values, to scholarly and community audiences. Pre: 230. (Cross-listed as HDFS 334)

PLAN 623 Coastal Planning and Management (3)

Theory and practice of coastal planning and management in the U.S. and abroad. Case studies investigate topics such as coastal land conservation, marine protected areas, coastal hazards, fisheries, and aquaculture. Repeatable one time with consent. (Crosslisted as GEO 621)

IS 260 Introduction to Environmental Humanities (3)

Introduction to the environmental humanities, which rests at the intersection of the arts, humanities, and environmental studies. (Cross-listed as SUST 260)

LTEC 461 Foundations in Design Thinking (3)

Using real-world problems, students learn a creative problem-solving process that is human-centered and iterative, and practice design thinking mindsets (embracing ambiguity, learning from failure, and bias toward action) as they tackle the problem. A-F only. (Alt. years)

ANSC 430 Poultry Production (3)

Students will learn about poultry health and hygiene, husbandry, production, biosecurity, hands-on skills, and recent advances in poultry farming systems for meat and egg production. ANSC majors only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 301 or 445.

ASAN 120 Politics and Poetics of Climate Change in Asia (3)

Examines the causes and impacts of, and responses to, climate change in Asia through interdisciplinary approaches: natural sciences, politics, economics, as well as legal, cultural, and creative/artistic dimensions. A-F only.

ECON 444 Economics of Happiness (3)

Topics covered include: measuring happiness, what individual and country characteristics contribute to individual well-being, what are the consequences of happiness on behavior, and whether happiness is a cause or an effect. Pre: 301, 321, or consent.

PACS 333 Islands and Archipelagos (3)

Applies an island studies perspective to critically evaluate the commonalities and differences across islands and archipelagos in several world regions. Examines how island geographies influence social identities and movements and are impacted by environmental conditions. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. (Cross-listed as GEO 333)

GEO 333 Islands and Archipelagos (3)

Applies an island studies perspective to critically evaluate the commonalities and differences across islands and archipelagos in several world regions. Examines how island geographies influence social identities and movements and are impacted by environmental conditions. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. (Cross-listed as PACS 333)

DATA 235 Machine Learning Methods (3)

Introduction to contemporary mathematical methods for empirical inference, data modeling, and machine learning. A-F only. Pre: MATH 241, MATH 203, MATH 215, or MATH 251A. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as ICS 235)

QHS 605 Data Management and Visualization for Health Sciences (3)

Data management and visualization is essential to all aspects of health sciences. Through hands-on experiences in R, will introduce data processing, manipulation, visualization and reproducibility, with an emphasis on clinical, medical, and health science problems. A-F only.

PLAN 609 Causality in the Social Sciences: A Relatively Gentle Introduction (3)

An introduction to the statistical methods used to identify plausibly causal effects with non-experimental data. A-F only. Pre: 601 or equivalent. (Alt. years)

PHIL 321 Bodies, Minds, and Selves (3)

Explores the nature of the mind. Questions addressed include: How does the mind relate to the body? What is the nature of consciousness? Are you the same person today as you were yesterday? Pre: any 100-level PHIL course or above, or consent.

PHIL 121 How To Be Happy (3)

Everyone wants to be happy. What is happiness? How do we become happy? Students examine and practice proposals from ancient philosophy and tragedy and recent psychology about the ingredients, methods, and difficulties of living well.

PH 611 Fundamentals to One Health (3)

Familiarizes students with the fundamentals of One Health–an interdisciplinary field of study linking ecosystems to human and animal health. It uses contemporary examples and emphasizes oceans and human health connections. Graduate students only. A-F only.

PH 441 Introduction to One Health (3)

Familiarizes students with the fundamentals of One Health–an interdisciplinary field of study linking ecosystems to human and animal health. It uses contemporary 2021-2022 Courses 519 Key to symbols & abbreviations: see the first page of this section. examples and emphasizes oceans and human health connections. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 201, or ANSC 200, or BIOC 241, or BIOL 101, or BIOL 171, or BOT 101, or ERTH 101, or GES 102, or OEST 101, or OCN 102, or ATMO 150, or SOC 180; or consent.

GEO 685 Human Geography Research Methods (3)

Introduction to research methods in human geography. Explores and provides guided practical experience with research methods and analysis.

COA 411 Introduction to Medicare (3)

Introduces intricacies of Medicare (federal insurance for eligible older adults and disabled) through hands-on understanding, online national training curriculum, and local community partner engagement and service learning in partnership with Hawai‘i State Department of Health. A-F only.

CHEM 100L Chemistry and Society Laboratory (1)

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 100, 110, or SUST 120. Lab introduces fundamental applications of chemistry, with special emphasis on relevant topics and how chemistry relates to the real world. (For students in non-science fields.) A-F only. Pre: 100 (or concurrent), 110 (or concurrent), or SUST 120 (or concurrent).

NURS 364 Principles of Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice (4)

(Lec) Introduction to research application and evidence based practice (EBP). Includes: formulation of EBP questions, identification of evidence sources, literature search and synthesis methods, differentiation of levels and quality of evidence, and determination of clinical significance. NURS majors only. A-F only.

LLEA 247 Gods, Heroes, and Dragons: Germanic Myth, Legends, and Fairy Tales (3)

Study of Germanic myth, legends, and fairy tales. Analysis of narratives from ancient times to the modern era from multiple theoretical perspectives.

ANTH 338 Historical Ecology (3)

Examines the recursive relationship between humans and the environment across deep time. (Fall only)

ANTH 231 Anthropology of Love (3)

Explores love from multiple anthropological viewpoints: biological, cultural, archaeological. (Spring only)

ACM 475 Narrative Feature Screenplay (3)

Builds upon the beginning and advanced screenwriting classes. Students will acquire knowledge and technical skills through critiquing feature length screenplays. Students will write a feature length screenplay that reflects their unique voice. Repeatable one time. ACM majors only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 350 and 450.

PHIL 340 Hawaiian Philosophy: Aloha ‘Âina (3)

Introduction to Indigenous Hawaiian philosophy and how to engage with Aloha ‘Âina relying upon a methodology and pedagogy consistent with the philosophy being discussed. Pre: 100 or above, HAW 100, HWST 107, or consent.

QHS 600 Biostatistics Concepts for Clinical Researchers (3)

Provide biostatistical concepts to clinical researchers. Students will obtain the ability to demonstrate an understanding of key biostatistical concepts in clinical research; and interpret statistical findings most commonly reported in clinical and healthcare literature. Graduate students only.

LIS 659 Archival Access, Representation and Use (3)

Principles and techniques for arrangement and description of archival materials. Topics include basic metadata standards, authority sources, record context, series identification, scope, and content. LIS majors only. Graduate students only. Pre: 654.

IS 350 Pandemic Preparedness and Response: One Health Case Study of COVID-19 (3)

Focuses on the COVID-19 pandemic as a case study of a global health problem that is optimally approached from a One Health perspective. A-F only. Pre: ANSC 200, BIOL 101, MICR 130, PH 201, or consent of instructor. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as TRMD 350)

TRMD 350 Pandemic Preparedness and Response: One Health Case Study of COVID-19 (3)

Focuses on the COVID-19 pandemic as a case study of a global health problem that is optimally approached from a One Health perspective. A-F only. Pre: ANSC 200, BIOL 101, MICR 130, PH 201, or consent of instructor. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as IS 350)

QHS 401 Mathematic Preparation for Quantitative Health Sciences (3)

Mathematics preparation for quantitative health sciences. Includes selective topics in
linear algebra, advanced calculus and probability theory. A-F only.

ME 442 Mechatronics (3)

(2 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Modern mechatronics components and design principles; functionality of products, processes and systems; electrical circuits and mechanical components; programming and control; hands on technology; application case studies. ME, EE, CE, ICS majors only. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Fall only)

HWST 235 Native Hawaiian Composition (3)

Focus on studying and Applying Native Hawaiian composition practices from the nineteenth century into the present day. Pre: 107 and HAW 100.

SUST 659 He Ali‘i Ka ‘Aina; Land, Resources, and Leadership (3)

Seminar focused on leadership challenges in Mâlama ‘Âina to bridge ancestral and contemporary systems to better steward resources, produce abundance, work with and in community, and pivot large institutions for a better Aloha ‘Âina future. (Cross-listed as HWST 659)

CEE 479 Construction Law (3)

In-depth exploration of the legal regimes governing construction. Construction contracts, contractors, and subcontractors. Breach of contracts, claims and litigation in construction
projects. CEE, CNST majors only. Senior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 375. (Spring only)

CEE 478 Construction Safety (3)

Safety and health concepts, laws and requirements for civilian and contractor personnel in construction, including applications in project management and construction activities. CNST, CEE majors only. A-F only. Pre: 375.

ANTH 369 The Archaeology of Domesticity and Daily Life (3)

Focuses on the differences in the composition, activities, roles, and relationships to
be observed archaeologically between households that comprised ancient communities and how these differences inform us about the dynamics of social change. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 210.

COA 342 Adult Development and Aging (3)

Overview from a multidisciplinary, life-span perspective. Includes research techniques, personality development, family relationships, occupational attainment, death. Pre: PSY 100. Recommended: 240. (Cross-listed as PSY 342)

COA 435 Back to the Future: Aging in Today’s Society (3)

By 2050, more than a quarter of the world’s population will be 60 years of age or older. Explores what we know about aging today to encourage a lifetime of aging well. A-F only. Pre: PH 201 or SW 360 or WGSS 305 or PSY 100 or HDFS 230 or NURS 200; or consent. (Cross-listed as PH 435 and SW 435)

ME 201 Space Exploration (3)

Introduction to the science or engineering of Solar System exploration. Covers science instruments, mission trajectories (fly-by, orbit, or lander), and science and engineering constraints imposed on spacecraft design. Lectures, discussions, class projects. A-F only. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as EPET 201)

HON 299 Transformational Research Experiences for Early Undergraduates (3)

Introduction to exploring discover-based investigation, with hands-on experiences in a wide range of science fields. Divided into 4-week learning modules led by researchers at several UH Mânoa research facilities on and off campus. Repeatable one time. CR/NC only. (Cross-listed as UROP 299)

UROP 299 Transformational Research Experiences for Early Undergraduates (3)

Introduction to exploring discover-based investigation, with hands-on experiences in a wide range of science fields. Divided into 4-week learning modules led by researchers at several UH Mânoa research facilities on and off campus. Repeatable one time. CR/NC only. (Cross-listed as HON 299)

COA 353 Survey of Sociology of Aging (3)

Aging as a social phenomenon, including social impacts of growing elderly population and emerging social patterns among the elderly. Important theoretical perspectives and cross-national research. Pre: SOC 100 or a 200-level sociology course, or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 353)

CEE 624 Coastal Modeling (3)

Coastal modeling using the SMS Surface-Water Modeling software. Applications to solving coastal problems for different ocean hazard scenarios by applying models for tides, waves, coastal circulation, wave-current interaction, sediment transport, and/or morphology change. Pre: consent; knowledge of ORE 607 desirable. (Cross-listed as ORE 624 and SUST 624)

SUST 621 Coastal Flood Mitigation (3)

Design and solutions to coastal flood mitigation problems. Topics include climate adaptation; engineering solutions and best practices to mitigate coastal risk under different ocean hazard scenarios; and ecological approaches to mitigate coastal risk. Pre: consent; knowledge of AutoCAD and ORE 661 desirable. (Cross-listed as CEE 621 and ORE 621)

ORE 621 Coastal Flood Mitigation (3)

Design and solutions to coastal flood mitigation problems. Topics include climate adaptation; engineering solutions and best practices to mitigate coastal risk under different ocean hazard scenarios; and ecological approaches to mitigate coastal risk. Pre: consent; knowledge of AutoCAD and ORE 661 desirable. (Cross-listed as CEE 621 and SUST 621)

CEE 621 Coastal Flood Mitigation (3)

Design and solutions to coastal flood mitigation problems. Topics include climate adaptation; engineering solutions and best practices to mitigate coastal risk under different ocean hazard scenarios; and ecological approaches to mitigate coastal risk. Pre: consent; knowledge of AutoCAD and ORE 661 desirable. (Cross-listed as ORE 621 and SUST 621)

SUST 103 An Introduction to Integrative Systems Biology: Hawaiian Biomes as a Framework (4)

Lecture/discussion introduces students to the field of biology through the integration of microbiology and macrobiology into a single, comprehensive systems biology with a focus on Hawaiian biomes and ecosystem sustainability. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as OEST 103)

ME 401 Capstone Project: Producing a Science Satellite (4)

Develops a space mission with a multidisciplinary team of engineers and scientists using
concurrent science and engineering methodologies. Will build a small spacecraft and payload. The project will seek to answer important science questions. A-F only. (Cross-listed as EPET 401)

ME 400 Space Mission Design (4)

Will cover all aspects of spacecraft design, subsystems, science payload, systems engineering, project management, and budgets that are important to producing a fully successful mission. A-F only. Pre: 301. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as EPET 400)

ME 301 Space Science and Instrumentation (4)

Essential techniques for remote compositional analysis of planets; understanding spectroscopy, mineralogy, and geochemistry of planetary surfaces and their measurement. Design of space flight instrumentation. A-F only. Pre: EPET 201, or ERTH 101 and ERTH
101L and ERTH 105, or ERTH 101 and ERTH 107; and CHEM 161 and PHYS 272. (Fall only) (Crosslisted as EPET 301)

JOUR 323 Sports Media (3)

A practice-based approach to learning about the production of sports media in contemporary mediums of all types (text, audio, video, etc.) for various communication contexts (e.g., journalistic, public relations, etc.) A-F only.

COA 499 Directed Reading and Research forJuniors and Seniors (V)

Individual reading or research under supervision of COA-affiliated faculty. Repeatable two
times, up to nine credits. Juniors and seniors only. Pre: consent of instructor.

COA 399 Directed Reading and Research for Freshmen and Sophomores (V)

Individual reading or research under supervision of COA-affiliated faculty.
Repeatable two times, up to nine credits. Freshmen and sophomores only. A-F only. Pre: instructor consent.

ERTH 333 Earth Materials and Structures (4)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Lecture and lab that covers formation, occurrence, and identification of common minerals, rocks, and geologic structures. Lab work will include study of hands-samples, thin-sections, and field experiences. A-F only. Pre: 200. (Fall only)

WGSS 371 Oceanic Gender, Sexual, and Kinship Identities (3)

Oceania-centric perspective. Analysis of imperialism, colonialism, gender, sexuality, race,
ethnicity, and queer(ed) relations and identities in Hawai‘i and the Pacific. Junior standing or higher. Pre: one DS or DH course, or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 391)

SUST 439 Installation/Performance–Material in Context (3)

Studio investigation of the definition/ transformation of space through artist intervention.
Emphasis on the evocative potential of materials in context (ecological, social, political, psychological) as well as experiments in non-object based interventions. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: ART 116. (Crosslisted as ART 439)

SUST 335 Society and Environment (3)

Relationship of humans with natural environment; role of culture in ecological systems. Pre: 152. (Cross-listed as ANTH 335)

ANTH 335 Society and Environment (3)

Relationship of humans with natural environment; role of culture in ecological systems. Pre: 152. (Cross-listed as SUST 335)

SNSK 102 Introduction to Sanskrit II (4)

Continuation of 101. Pre: 101.

PHYS 760 Modern General Relativity (3)

Differential geometry, special relativity, Einstein equations, gravitational phenomena, equivalence principles, black holes, gravitational waves, cosmology, relativistic stars, experimental tests, computational techniques. Graduate students only in PHYS or ASTR. (Alt. years: fall) (Crosslisted as ASTR 760)

ANSC 387 Laboratory Skills in Animal Science (2)

Provides students with basic and essential laboratory skills required in various fields of animal science such as nutrition, genetics, reproductive physiology, meat science, clinical pathology, parasitology, and animal handling. ANSC majors only. A-F only. Pre: 200 or 201, and BIOL 171 and 171L and CHEM 161. (Fall only)

PACE 325 Greek and Roman War Literature (3)

Survey of war-related literature from Greece and Rome, its major themes, and how it reflects the wide range of social, political, intellectual, and literary perspectives on war found in the ancient world. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as CLAS 325)

PHIL 309 Philosophy of Education (3)

Uses tools of philosophical inquiry to explore historical and contemporary perspectives on the nature of education, including concepts of knowledge, teaching, learning, and human flourishing. Repeatable one time. Pre: any course 100 or above in PHIL, or consent.

ECON 630 Econometrics III (3)

Will equip students with the ability to undertake, understand, and critically assess empirical research using state-of-the-at econometric methods. Pre: 628 or consent. (Alt. years)

ECON 621 Macroeconomic Theory III (3)

Will equip students with the ability to understand, undertake, and critically evaluate theoretical and quantitative research in modern macroeconomics with a focus on the application of the search and matching methodology. Pre: 607 or consent. (Alt. years)

COM 345 Information Technology and Health Communication (3)

Combined lecture-discussion on the application of ICTs for health communication from the aspect of technologies, systems, services, and policies. COM majors only. A-F only.

LLL 147 Death and Dying in Literature and Film (3)

Exploration of death and dying in literature and film as manifested across time and cultures throughout the world. Analysis of narratives from ancient times to the modern era from multiple theoretical and cross-cultural perspectives. (Cross-listed as LLEA 147)

LLEA 147 Death and Dying in Literature and Film (3)

Exploration of death and dying in literature and film as manifested across time and cultures throughout the world. Analysis of narratives from ancient times to the modern era from multiple theoretical and cross-cultural perspectives. (Cross-listed as LLL 147)

COA 305 Ethics, Aging & Society (3)

Addresses ethical issues in gerontology and long-term care for older adults as raised by public policy, health care problems, and social attitudes toward elders. Explores established practices and new directions for ethics in aging. A-F only. (Cross-listed as IS 305)

SUST 401 History of the Indian Ocean World (3)

Explores the transnational history of the Indian Ocean world, especially the region connected by the western monsoon. Topics include travel, trade, religion, colonialism, nationalism, diaspora, and globalization, including actors like slaves, sailors, women, and
merchants. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as HIST 401)

SUST 627 Coastal Geology (3)

Geological history and geologic framework of the Hawaiian shoreline. Modern climate change, paleoclimate, focus on sea level change. Modern coastal management and problems in the coastal environment. Coastal planning. Repeatable one time, credit earned one time. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as ERTH 620)

ASTR 791 Cosmology Seminar (1)

Students and researchers will review and discuss the most important and exciting cosmological results in depth. ASTR and PHYS majors only. Graduate students only.

ASTR 758 Programming and Algorithms for Astronomers (2)

Distillation of modern computer science fundamentals and paradigms, with applications
to astronomy. Common algorithms and essential programming techniques. Assignments include extensive Python programming practice. Open to graduate students in any physical science. Graduate students only. (Alt. years)

WGSS 641 Advanced Queer Theory (3)

Advanced graduate seminar on the key ideas within queer theory. Students will become familiar with theories of queer relationality, queer of color critique, globalization of
sexuality, disability and transgender studies, and queer indigeneities. Pre: undergraduate or graduate course work in women’s, gender, sexuality, or LGBTQ studies.

WGSS 482 Indigenous Feminisms (3)

Examines the origins and futures of Indigenous feminist theory and praxis. Topics explored include cultural revitalization, colonialism, and sexual violence in Indigenous
communities, citizenship and sovereignty, and contemporary Native gender roles and identity. Pre: 151 or consent.

HIST 404 Rivers, Seas, and Society in Southeast Asia (3)

The rivers, seas, and extensive coastlines are a dominant environmental feature in Southeast Asia. Focuses on the dynamic interaction of water and society in shaping the history of the region.

HWST 659 He Ali‘i Ka ‘Aina; Land, Resources, and Leadership (3)

Seminar focused on leadership challenges in Mâlama ‘Âina to bridge ancestral and
contemporary systems to better steward resources, produce abundance, work with and in community, and pivot large institutions for a better Aloha ‘Âina future. (Cross-listed as SUST 659)

DNCE 341 Advanced Hip Hop (V)

Hip Hop studio practice, technique, and performance at the advanced level. Repeatable three times, up to 12 credits. Pre: 241 or consent.

SLS 644 Multilingual/EL Pedagogy (3)

Examines practices, theories, research, and perspectives on multilingual/EL teaching approaches. Topics include culturally and linguistically responsive approaches, collaboration, lesson planning, and adapting materials to promote the growth and development of multilingual/ EL learners. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as EDCS 644)

EDCS 644 Multilingual/EL Pedagogy (3)

Examines practices, theories, research, and perspectives on multilingual/EL teaching approaches. Topics include culturally and linguistically responsive approaches, collaboration, lesson planning, and adapting materials to promote the growth and development of multilingual/ EL learners. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SLS 644)

SUST 414 The Ethics of Climate Change and Geoengineering (3)

Provide a scientific basis to examine the consequences of climate change and the
proposed geoengineering solutions, and examine the fundamental ethical basis that underlies environmental policies. A-F only. Pre: OCN 310. (Alt. years: spring) (Cross-listed as OCN 411)

LING 215 Bad Words (3)

An examination of the link between language and society through the use and perception of taboo words.

LAIS 381 Asians and Pacific Islanders in Latin America (3)

Survey of the history and culture of Asian, Polynesian, and Pacific Islander communities in Latin America. Sophomore standing or higher.

DNCE 241 Intermediate Hip Hop (V)

Hip Hop studio practice, technique, and performance at the intermediate level. Repeatable three times, up to 12 credits. Pre: 140 or consent.

COA 206 Introduction to Applied Gerontology: Helping Yourself and Others to Thrive in Later Life (3)

Introduction to essential information on aging and the field of gerontology. Counters ageist stereotypes, develops skills for translating research into practice, and provides an introductory survey course for the undergraduate certificate in aging. A-F only. (Crosslisted as IS 206)

UNIV 699 Directed Reading (1)

Classified graduate students only. Repeatable unlimited times.

UNIV 299 Topics in Liberal Arts (1)

Topics course on the role of the university in the community and the value of a liberal arts education. Emphasizes critical thinking skills and information literacy. Repeatable unlimited times.

CHEM 662 Computational Modeling in Chemistry (3)

Theory and application of computational modeling in chemistry. Statistical theory behind molecular dynamics simulations, application to modeling chemical systems, computer programming, and analysis of results. Graduate students only.

HIST 366 Women in Oceania (3)

Explores historical processes that have impacted the lives of indigenous women in Oceania and women’s engagements with those processes over time, with a focus on women’s voices, agency, and empowerment.

ANTH 669 Household Archaeology (3)

Focus on  the differences in the composition, activities, roles, and relationships to be observed archaeologically between the households that comprised ancient communities, and how these differences inform us about the dynamics of social change. Graduate students only.

ITE 611 (Alpha) Professional Studies III (3)

Planning and methods seminar in conjunction with practice teaching. (B) licensure; (C) non-licensure. Each alpha is repeatable one time, up to six credits. A-F only.

FDM 495 Capstone Portfolio (3)

Integration and application of academic knowledge and critical skills emphasizing professional development. Placement with an approved cooperating supervisor/employer. Pre: 492 and senior standing.

SUST 480 Applied Forest Ecology (3)

Application of ecological theory to sustainable management of forest resources in Hawaii and beyond, including silviculture (production of timber and nontimber forest products), restoration (restoring damaged or degraded forests), and conservation (conserving existing forest resources). A-F only. Pre: 311/NREM 310 and NREM 380 or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as NREM 480)

NURS 321 Women, Newborn, and Family Health (3)

Nursing care and health promotion for women, newborn, and families in acute care and community settings. Utilization of family theories and assessment tools for providing culturally sensitive, client-centered care. NURS majors only. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 220 and 220L and 213.

SUST 112L Introduction to the Environment and Sustainability Lab (1)

Introduction to a variety of quantitative and qualitative approaches and methodologies to describe and assess key components to the environment. A-F only. Pre: (112 or GES 102 or
OCN 102) or concurrent. (Cross-listed as GES 102L and OCN 102L)

PSY 301 Introduction to Educational Psychology (3)

Psychology as applied to education, including major theories and research and development, cognitive, sociocultural, and multicultural approaches to teaching and learning. Incorporates introductions to standardized testing, classroom assessment, motivation, instructional planning and classroom management. (Cross-listed as EDEP 311)

LWPA 569 Human Rights in Asia (V)

A survey of human rights norms, institutions, and implementation mechanism of international human rights law in light of the rapid development of regional cooperation and integration in Asia.

MBBE 422 Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems (3)

Design course focused on fundamentals of electronic interfacing, control and automation, including biological processes. Topics include sensor physics, basic instrumentation, digital communication, and programming of microcontrollers and other portable computer systems. Pre: (160, 211, and BE 350 or MATH 302 or MATH 307 or EE 326)
with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Cross-listed as BE 420 and EE 422)

ACM 419 Virtual and Augmented Reality Programming (3)

Students will learn to develop virtual reality and augmented reality applications with
turnkey tools as well as through programming. Prior programming experience is not required for this course. Pre: any 110(Alpha) or 111 or ACM 215. (Cross-listed as ICS 486).

BOT 357 Tropical forest Ecology (3)

Introduction to the ecological processes and principles of tropical ecosystems, and to conservation issues facing tropical forests, with a particular emphasis on the neotropics.
A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171 and BIOL 172, or BOT 101; and BIOL 265.

ERTH 617 Summer Fieldschool Program: Hydrogeophysics in Volcanic Environments (V)

Will cover the full hydrogeophysical workflow including theory, acquisition design, field data acquisition, data processing, data inversion, and hydrogeological interpretation. Methods include ambient seismic, 3D electrical resistivity tomography and induced
polarization, and self-potential. Pre: consent. (Summer only)

QHS 499 Directed Reading/Research (V)

Directed reading/research in quantitative health sciences. Students will work closely with a QHS faculty member or mentor who will guide them through quantitative methodologies and/or the process of conducting a research study. Repeatable three times or up to 12 credits. A-F only.

LING 417 Language Endangerment and Revitalization (3)

An overview of language endangerment, especially in the Pacific and Asia, and a critical examination of the strategies that are being developed to combat it. Pre: one of Ling 102, 150B, 150C, 105, 320, SLS 150, SLS 301, SLS 441, or consent.

JPN 453 Introduction to Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language (3)

Introduction to instructional approaches for Japanese language classroom teaching that focus on everyday language use. Students develop instructional materials, pedagogical practices, and assessment tools for engaged and effective teaching and learning of Japanese. Pre: 350 (or concurrent) and 401, or consent.

KOR 313 Reading and Translating Korean Poetry (3)

Introduction to modern Korean poetry and translation for students with third-year level Korean abilities. Students will learn how to interpret poems and translate them from Korean to English. Pre: 301 or consent.

UNIV 102 Using Data to Guide the Career Search (3)

Introduction to probability and statistics; including standard deviation, calculations, and inferences about means, normal distributions, and linear correlation. Integrates occupational outlook data from O*NET to understand how to link majors with careers.

WGSS 441 Queer Theory (3)

Intensive survey of the key theories, texts, and questions of the interdisciplinary fields that make up queer theory. Pre: 141 or 151 or 392 or consent.

WGSS 141 Introduction to LGBTQ+ Studies (3)

Introductory survey of the key terms, texts, and histories of Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities. A-F only.

ORE 680 Ocean Engineering and Resilience in a Changing Climate (3)

Focus on understanding the changing ocean conditions (e.g. waves and sea levels)
relevant to the resilience of practical ocean engineering applications. Graduate students only. Pre: 607 or consent. (Spring only)

NURS 321L Women, Newborn, and Family Health Lab (3)

Nursing care and health promotion for women, newborn, and families in acute and community settings. Utilization of family theories and assessment tools when providing culturally sensitive, family-centered care. Emphasis on teaching writing for the profession. NURS majors only. Sophomore standing or higher. CR/NC only. Pre: 220 and 220L and 213.

MBBE 451 Synthetic Biology (3)

Introduction to principles, tools, and applications of synthetic biology; molecular techniques and design/analysis of synthetic gene circuits, synthetic-biology parts/devices, CRISPRbased systems, engineered microbial cell factories, for industrial, agricultural, medical applications. A-F only. Pre: PHYS 152 (or PHYS 272), BIOL 275/275L; or consent. (Alt. years: fall)

MKT 368 Sustainable Marketing (3)

Provides environmental knowledge and managerial tools that help for profit and not-for-profit organizations address pressing issues like global warming, plastic pollution, and fair trade while earning surplus revenue and remaining socially accountable. Pre: BUS 312 or consent.

LIS 636 Responding to Reading in Libraries (3)

Research-intensive seminar that explores the reading process in library contexts and similar settings. Critical examination of ways in which library and literacy services impact reading engagement and interests of library users. LIS majors only. Graduate students only.

HIST 493 Library Treasures: Exploring Special Collections & Archives (3)

Conduct original research using general library materials, special collections, rare books, archives, and manuscripts, maps, and other historical documents that are uniquely available at libraries and archives at UH and beyond. Repeatable one time.

EE 369 Computational Media Systems (3)

Intermediate object-oriented programming within the context of interactive media systems and video game development. Topics: classes, objects, inheritance, polymorphism, abstract classes, interfaces, event-driven programming, vectors, geometric primitives, game mechanics, and relevant design patterns. EE, CENG, ICS, CM, THEA, DNCE majors only. A-F only. Pre: 160 or ICS 111 or instructor approval. (Cross-listed as ICS 369)

EE 345 Linear Algebra and Machine Learning (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Mathematical and algorithmic fundamentals of linear algebra and their applications and illustrations to machine learning. Lab introduces programming with data and uses machine learning libraries for an introduction to commonly used technologies. MATH, EE, CENG, CEE, ME, ICS majors only. A-F only. Pre: MATH 242 or MATH 252A or consent.

ACM 321 Storyboarding and Animatics (3)

Exposes students to the history, application, format, styles, and methods of creating storyboards and animatics. Visual storytelling will be analyzed by examining the foundational components of the visual language of a film. ACM majors only. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent.

COM 645 Digital Storytelling (3)

Focus on development of narrative-based creative activities in all mediums (text, audio, video, etc.) within communication contexts, i.e., journalism, film, public relations, etc. A-F only. Pre: enrolled in the School of Communications MA program, or instructor approval.

DNCE 673 Advanced Dance Technology and Live Performance (3)

Advanced skills in dance and technology in live performance. Emphasis on New Media. Graduate students only. Pre: 362 or consent. (Alt. years: spring)

CHEM 435 Experimental Methods in Materials Research (3)

(1 Lec, 2 2-hr Lab) Common experimental techniques in materials testing and research: x-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy, thermal and mechanical properties,
electrochemical methods—theory and hands-on experience. Pre: 351 (or concurrent) or ME 341. (Crosslisted as ME 435)

SUST 157 Global Environmental History (3)

Explores the influence of nature–climate, topography, plants, animals, and microorganisms–on human history and the way people, in turn, have influenced the natural world around them. (Cross-listed as HIST 157)

SUST 427 Beaches, Reefs, and Climate Change (3)

Global and local aspects of climate change and paleoclimate; beach and reef processes and response to climate change; management of coastal environments; field study local sites. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as ERTH 420)

SUST 204 Historical Ecology of Hawai‘i (3)

The Hawaiian socio-ecosystem is the product of centuries of human land use and resource exploitation. Explores the events and processes that have shaped the islands’ ecology and future sustainability. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ANTH 204)

LIS 692 Masters Seminar II (2)

Seminar for graduating students focused on the refinement and completion of the culminating portfolio or thesis. Peer mentoring, faculty, and student presentations. MLISc degree required course. Graduate students only. CR/NC only. Pre: 691.

SLS 301 Basic Language Concepts for Second Language Learning, Teaching, and Use (3)

Introduction to language structure and function in the domains of sound, words, sentences, and discourse, with specific focus on description, analysis, and research into learner language. Pre: Sophomore standing or higher.

ASL 302 Advanced American Sign Language II (3)

Development of advanced receptive and expressive conversational skills in American Sign Language (ASL). Pre: 301. (Spring only)

SPED 647 Leadership in Special Education (3)

Seminar on topics related to leadership in the field of special education, including issues for teacher leaders, administrators, and teacher preparation personnel. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Fall only)

ASL 301 Advanced American Sign Language I (3)

Development of advanced receptive and expressive conversational skills in American Sign Language (ASL). Pre: 202. (Fall only)

ART 488 Genres of Japanese Cinema (3)

History of Japanese cinema, including silent films, samurai films, monster films, and literary adaptations, analyzed through the lens of genre and genre theory. A-F only. Pre: 175 and 176. (Summer only)

SUST 623 Science and Science Curriculum, PK-12 (3)

Application of recent developments in science, sustainability, curriculum development, and learning theory to pre-kindergarten through secondary school. Science philosophy, content and methodology stressed, including inquiry, nature of science, sustainability, and
science literacy. Repeatable one time. (Cross-listed as EDCS 623)

MCB 275 Cell and Molecular Biology (3)

Integrated cell and molecular biology for life science majors. Modern advances in recombinant DNA technology. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in BIOL 171/171L and CHEM 272. (Cross-listed as BIOL 275)

BOT 220 Biostatistics (3)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to statistical approaches in biology. Students will learn how to formulate hypotheses, test them quantitatively, and present results. Students will
analyze biological datasets using the computer language R. A-F only. Pre: 101 or BIOL 171 or BIOL 172; MATH 134 or MATH assessment exam. (Cross-listed as BIOL 220)

BIOL 220 Biostatistics (3)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to statistical approaches in biology. Students will learn how to formulate hypotheses, test them quantitatively, and present results. Students will analyze biological datasets using the computer language R. A-F only. Pre: 171 or 172 or BOT 101; MATH 134 or MATH assessment exam. (Cross-listed as BOT 220)

ART 315 Experimental Art and Animation (3)

Provides students an opportunity to experiment with new mediums while collaborating with artists from different backgrounds, such as art, theatre, dance, film, and animation. ACM, ART, THEA, DNCE majors only. Pre: 113 or ACM 216 (or concurrent) or THEA 353 (or concurrent) or THEA 356 (or concurrent), or consent. (Cross-listed as ACM 315 and THEA 314)

NURS 449 Gerontology, Health Care, and the Law (Elder Law) (V)

Provides a basic foundation for studies at the intersection of gerontology, health care, and the law and places an emphasis on proactive and preventive law for older adults in society. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Cross-listed as COA 449)

ICS 496 Capstone Project (3)

Project-based course where students work in teams on a software project. Knowledge acquired in the computer science curriculum will be applied to design and implement a software product with potential real-world applicability. Repeatable one time. CS majors only. Senior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: (311 or EE 367) and 314.

GES 102L Introduction to the Environment and Sustainability Lab (1)

Introduction to a variety of quantitative and qualitative approaches and methodologies to describe and assess key components to the environment. A-F only. Pre: (102 or OCN 102 or SUST 112) or concurrent. (Cross-listed as OCN 102L and SUST 112L)

OCN 102L Introduction to the Environment and Sustainability Lab (1)

Introduction to a variety of quantitative and qualitative approaches and methodologies to describe and assess key components to the environment. A-F only. Pre: (102 or GES 102 or
SUST 112) or concurrent. (Cross-listed as GES 102L and SUST 112L)

ACM 452 (Alpha) History and Film (3)

Explores the many relationships between history and film including how film has reflected and shaped society in the past and our relationship to the past. (C) Europe; (E) world/ comparative. Repeatable one time for different alphas. Pre: junior standing or consent. (C Cross-listed as HIST 452C); (E Cross-listed as HIST 452E)

SUST 482 Anthropology and the Environment: Culture, Power, and Politics (3)

Investigates environmental problems from an anthropological perspective, and examines the cultural politics of contestations over resources, rights, and the meanings of nature. Pre: ANTH 152 or ANTH 415 or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as ANTH 482)

NURS 322L Child and Family Health Lab (3)

Nursing care and health promotion lab for children and families. Application of concepts related to the delivery of family-centered holistic, culturally sensitive, therapeutic nursing care to children and families in acute care and community settings. NURS majors only. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 213 and 220 and 220L. Co-requisite: 322.

NURS 322 Child and Family Health (2)

Nursing care and health promotion for children and families. Emphasis on concepts related to the delivery of familycentered holistic, culturally sensitive, therapeutic
nursing care to children and families in acute care and community settings. NURS majors only. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 213 and 220 and 220L. Co-requisite: 322L.

ES 400 Ethnic Studies in the Digital World (3)

The digitally networked world mediates race and ethnicity–and vice-versa. We will challenge racism and discrimination manifested in social media, changing notions of identity and group belonging, ewaste, gaming, big data, and more.

ES 457 Politics of Men and Masculinity in U.S. Culture (3)

Examines American understandings of man, manhood, and masculinity, at the intersection of gender, race, class, and sexuality in the context of American nation and empire building in the 19th and 20th centuries. A-F only. Pre: one of WGSS 151, WGSS 175, WGSS 176, or WGSS 202; or consent. (Cross-listed as WGSS 456)

ES 450 Food, Culture, and Empire in U.S. and Hawai‘i (3)

Examines the cultural, historical, and political processes that have informed our understandings and practices involving food. We will analyze food and foodways in the U.S. and Hawai‘i. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: at least one course in WGSS or ES; or consent by instructor. (Crosslisted as WGSS 450)

WGSS 450 Food, Culture, and Empire in U.S. and Hawai‘i (3)

Examines the cultural, historical, and political processes that have informed our understandings and practices involving food. We will analyze food and foodways in the U.S. and Hawai‘i. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: at least one course in WS or ES; or consent by instructor. (Crosslisted as ES 450)

SUST 495 Sustainability Capstone (3)

Capstone for undergraduate students in interdisciplinary studies focusing on sustainability. The capstone experience provides an opportunity for students to gain knowledge and research experience in an applied setting. Repeatable one time. IS majors only. Senior standing or higher. A-F only.

REL 433 Religion and Food (3)

Seminar exploring foodways as a basic component in the practice of religions. Examines theoretical issues, foodways as creators of community and identity, sustainability, and
other ethical issues, abstinence and fasting, and healing. Pre: 150. (Alt. years: fall)

REL 311 Ka Baibala ‘Ôlelo Hawai‘i (The Bible in Hawaiian) (3)

Survey of and selected readings from the Hawaiian Bible (Baibala Hemolele). Conducted in Hawaiian. Repeatable one time. Pre: HAW 201.

REL 160 Religion and Social Justice (3)

Religious persons and organizations play significant roles in fighting for issues of social justice worldwide. Introduces students to the relationship between religions and social
justice in China, South America, U.S., and Hawai‘i. Repeatable one time. A-F only.

PPC 101 Introduction to Public Policy (3)

Covers a broad overview of the issues facing communities today and various individual and community approaches to navigate and address these issues. A-F only.

PH 425 Tobacco & Community Disparities (3)

Assessing the facilitators and barriers of smoking initiation, cessation, and exposure to second-hand smoke within communities. Use of photovoice and its application to policy and addressing disparities. A-F only. Pre: 201.

PHIL 473 Understanding Place: Philosophical Inquiry and Community (3)

Uses tools of philosophical inquiry, specifically p4cHI pedagogy, to develop a deep understanding of lived environment in a Hawaiian context while drawing on urban planning theories and methods to empower students as agents of change. Repeatable one time. Pre: any course 100 or above in PHIL or PLAN, or consent. (Fall only)

MUS 362 Curtains Up! Broadway Musicals, Then and Now (3)

Traces the history of the Broadway musical in a survey of works from the mid-1800s through the recent “Hamilton” phenomenon, and explores their developmental process, structure, and sociocultural, religious, and political contexts. Pre: 106 or consent.

LING 394 Philippine Sociolinguistics: Language Use, Ideologies, and Identities (3)

Examines the intersection between language and society, specifically Philippine languages in the Philippines and in the Filipino diasporic communities. Will examine how language policies, discourses, and ideologies share people’s use of language. Sophomore standing or higher. (Cross-listed as IP 394)

IP 394 Philippine Sociolinguistics: Language Use, Ideologies, and Identities (3)

Examines the intersection between language and society, specifically Philippine languages in the Philippines and in the Filipino diasporic communities. Will examine how language policies, discourses, and ideologies share people’s use of language. Sophomore standing or higher. (Cross-listed as LING 394)

SOC 337 Criminal Justice Organizations (3)

Examines major criminal justice organizations–police, courts, and prisons. Using organizational theory, identifies the role of organizational goals, structure, resources, legitimacy, culture, and front-line workers in shaping criminal justice policy and practice. Pre: 100 or a 200-level SOC course, or consent.

ES 345 The Sounds of Race and Inequality (3)

Explore inequality as manifested and contested in silence, music, dialect, nature, voice, and acoustic space by listening through a matrix of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexualities. Combination of hands-on work and current scholarship.

ANTH 230 Anthropology of Sports (3)

Explores sports from anthropological viewpoint: biological, cultural, linguistic, and archaeological. Open to nonmajors. Sophomore standing only.

SUST 459 Strategies in Hawaiian Resource Use (3)

Analyzing diverse land and water use strategies of O‘ahu, from traditional Hawaiian, scientific and economic perspectives, through classroom and on-site lectures. Topics include traditional Hawaiian methods, modern development, threatened ecosystems, ecotourism and scientific research. A-F only. Pre: 217/HWST 207 or 317/HWST 307 or SUST/HWST/356. (Cross-listed as HWST 459).

LWPA 569 Human Rights in Asia (V)

Offered to provide advanced human rights courses at the Law School. The purpose is to convey an understanding of the current situation concerning human rights in Asia, and to facilitate a chance to think about what the future may bring.

LAW 575 Art, Law, and Social Justice (V)

Will introduce some of the basic doctrinal issues lawyers face when representing artist, museums, gallers, publishers, collectors and others involved in the production and dissemination of art. Will also explore fundamental questions of jurisprudence through the lens of art.

LAW 556 Feminist Legal Theory (V)

An introduction to Feminist Theory for lawyers, with emphasis on the response of the legal system to gender subordination.

LAW 506 Contracts (V)

Law of private agreements. Focuses on common law doctrines with some attention to key Uniform Commercial Code provisions. Examines the bases of promissory liability, contract formation, defenses to enforcement, contract interpretation, breach, and remedies. (Fall only)

PLAN 668 Facilitation: Facilitating Community and Organizational Change (3)

Advanced conflict resolution course. Covers key issues in the prevention, management and resolution of multiparty conflicts. Combined lecture, discussion, and simulations. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing, or departmental approval. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as PACE 668)

SOC 180 Introduction to International and Global Studies (3)

Introduces undergraduate students to the major political, social, economic, cultural, technological, and historical dimensions of globalization. Special attention will be paid to globalization process that have impacted Hawai‘i and the Asia-Pacific region. A-F only. (Cross-listed as POLS 160 )

BIOL 485L Biology of the Invertebrates Lab (2)

(2 3-hr Lab) Pre: 172 and CHEM 161, or consent. Corequisite: 485.

PHIL 387 The Meaning of War (3)

Exploration of ethical questions related to the many facets of war–e.g., patriotism, tribalism, holy war, self-sacrifice, cowardice, media coverage, propaganda, torture, genocide, pillage, suicide tactics, battlefield immunity. (Cross-listed as PACE 387)

SUST 251 Scientific Principles of Sustainability (3)

Introduction to the scientific principles of sustainability, including the ecology of managed and natural ecosystems, global change biology, ecological principles of natural resource management, renewable energy technologies, and the environmental impacts of humans. (Cross-listed as NREM 251 and TPSS 251)

MBBE 627 Molecular Diagnostics: Principles and Practices (3)

Molecular diagnostics principles, comparative genomics, genome annotation and
bio-informatics, phylogenetics, gene target selection, advanced primer, and probe design. Repeatable one time. Graduate students only or consent. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as PEPS 627)

PEPS 627 Molecular Diagnostics: Principles and Practices (3)

Molecular diagnostics principles, comparative genomics, genome annotation and bio-informatics, phylogenetics, gene target selection, advanced primer, and probe design. Repeatable one time. Graduate students only or consent. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as MBBE 627)

ORE 203L Surf Science and Culture Lab (1)

Focuses on the science of surf and the importance of ocean waves to research pursuits, cultural perspectives in Hawai‘i and the Pacific, navigation, and engineering. A-F only. (Fall only)

ORE 203 Surf Science and Culture (3)

Focuses on the science of surf and the importance of ocean waves to research pursuits, cultural perspectives in Hawai‘i and the Pacific, navigation, and engineering. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. (Fall only)

ACM 470 Directing the Motion Picture (3)

Students direct a narrative live-action short film from prethrough post-production, learning how to develop a directorial vision and how to implement it through storyboarding, scheduling, and collaborative skill sets. ACM majors only. Pre: 310, and 350 or 355, and 370 (or concurrent); or consent.

ART 393 Art of India and South Asia (3)

Art and architecture of South Asia in historical and cultural context. Art of India and South Asia. Pre: 175 or consent.

WGSS 330 Gender and Sport (3)

Explores the influence of gender in sport from cultural, psychosocial, and political perspectives. Examines women’s and men’s role as participants, spectators, and employees of sport and sports organizations. A-F only. Pre: one DS course.

AMST 437 Trans* Studies: Trans(feminine/ masculine/gender nonconforming/sexual) (3)

Focus on various aspects of Trans* identities, biographies, cultural productions, and communities. It also addresses issues on racism, medical intervention, dating, societal condemnation, mental health, and incarceration. Junior standing or higher. (Cross-listed as WGSS 493)

BIOL 430L The Biology of Fungi Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to the morphology and life cycles of organisms in the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on learning how to identify a diversity of fungi based on macro- and microscopic features. Field trips to collect specimens. Pre: 430 (or concurrent) or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BOT 430L and TPSS 432L)

TPSS 432L The Biology of Fungi Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to the morphology and life cycles of organisms in the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on learning how to identify a diversity of fungi based on macro- and microscopic features. Field trips to collect specimens. Pre: BOT 430 (or concurrent) or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BIOL 430L and BOT 430L)

SUST 442 Environmental Management Systems (3)

Introduction to the process of developing Environmental Management Systems that address the principles outlined in ISO14001:2015. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as OCN 442 and TIM 462)

TPSS 432 The Biology of Fungi (2)

Will introduce the diversity, ecology, evolution, and biology of the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on our current understanding of fungal evolution and diversity and how fungi interact with environments and hosts. Pre: BOT 201, BIOL 172; or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BIOL 430 and BOT 430)

BIOL 430 The Biology of Fungi (2)

Will introduce the diversity, ecology, evolution, and biology of the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on our current understanding of fungal evolution and diversity and how fungi interact
with environments and hosts. Pre: 172, BOT 201; or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BOT 430 and TPSS 432)

WGSS 466 Gender in Action Cinema (3)

Investigates gender representation in the evolving genre of American action cinema through combined stylistic and cultural analysis, with special attention to the relationship of gendered action to categories of morality, race, class, and nation. Junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 446)

THEA 314 Experimental Art and Animation (3)

Provides students an opportunity to experiment with new mediums while collaborating with artists from different backgrounds, such as art, theatre, dance, film, and animation. ACM, ART, THEA, DNCE majors only. Pre: 353 (or concurrent) or 356 (or concurrent) or ACM 216 (or concurrent) or ART 113, or consent. (Cross-listed as ACM 314 and ART 315)

ACM 314 Experimental Art and Animation (3)

Provides students an opportunity to experiment with new mediums while collaborating with artists from different backgrounds, such as art, theatre, dance, film, and animation. ACM, ART, THEA, DNCE majors only. Pre: 216 (or concurrent) or ART 113 or THEA 353 (or concurrent) or THEA 356 (or concurrent), or consent. (Cross-listed as ART 315 and THEA 314)

MBBE 411 Food Engineering (3)

Principles and applications of thermodynamics, electricity, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, psychrometry, and material and energy balances of food processing and preservation. Pre: (BIOL 171, CHEM 162 or CHEM 171 or CHEM 181A, MATH 243 or MATH 253A, PHYS 151 or PHYS 170) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as BE 411 and FSHN 411)

THEA 641 Historic Costume and Decor (3)

Overview of visual styles in fashion, textiles, architecture, ornament, and furniture for production and entertainment design through lecture, lab, and discussion.

PHYL 499 Directed Reading or Research (V)

Students will learn fundamental concepts and multiple techniques in molecular biology, physiology, and histology for cardiovascular research through the projects in the lab. Repeatable unlimited times, but credit earned to two credits only. Junior or senior standing only. CR/NC only.

PHIL 222 Existentialism: Freedom, Being, Death (3)

Introduction to the major thinkers and the fundamental concepts and debates of Existentialism, taking Existentialism as a global movement expressed not just in philosophical texts, but also in literature and film. A-F only.

OCN 411 The Ethics of Climate Change and Geoengineering (3)

Provide a scientific basis to examine the consequences of climate change and the proposed geoengineering solutions, and examine the fundamental ethical basis that underlies environmental policies. A-F only. Pre: 310. (Alt. years: spring) (Crosslisted as SUST 414)

MUS 652 Introduction to Research in Music Education (3)

Introduction to research techniques in music education, including topic selection, literature review, and presentation of information in written form. A-F only. MUS majors only. Graduate students only. Pre: 651 (with a minimum grade of B-)

ME 648 Nanosystems (3)

Fabrication, design, and analysis of physical systems, sensors, and actuators at the nanoscale and microscale, including electrostatic and electromagnetic interactions, signal transduction, and measurements. Course work will focus on literature review and integration of current research. Engineering majors only. Graduate students only. (Spring only

MATH 620 Key Elements of Topology (1)

Key concepts of Topology for graduate students in mathematics; topological spaces; separation axioms, compactness, connectedness; continuity. MATH majors only. Graduate students only.

MATH 610 Key Elements of Linear Algebra (1)

Key concepts of linear algebra for graduate students in mathematics. Specific topics include vector spaces, linear transformations, multilinear forms, and Jordan decomposition. May not receive credit for both MATH 411 and MATH 610. MATH majors only. Graduate students only.

MATH 600 (Alpha) Career Skills for Graduate Students in Mathematics (1)

Seminar addresses issues important in the career of a mathematician, beginning from their time in graduate school, through navigating the job market and on to their eventual work in industry or academia. (B) teaching. Repeatable unlimited times, repeatable one time for (B). MATH majors only.  Graduate students only.

ICS 637 Deep Learning with Neural Networks (3)

Graduate course on deep learning with artificial neural networks. Provides practical techniques for modeling image, video, text, and graph data with supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning approaches. Includes instruction in the latest software frameworks. Graduate students only. Pre: 635 (or concurrent) or consent.

ICS 486 Virtual and Augmented Reality Programming (3)

Students will learn to develop virtual reality and augmented reality applications with
turnkey tools as well as through programming. Prior programming experience is not required for this course. Pre: any 110(Alpha) or 111 or ACM 215. (Cross-listed as ACM 419).

HIST 368 Global History of Sport (3)

Explores the relationship between sport and society in historical perspective. Analyzes global processes of imperialism, nationalism, globalization, and international relations,
and studies themes such as the politics of race, class, and gender.

DNCE 259 Topics in Dance (V)

Readings, research, and/or field and movement experiences. Repeatable two times, up to nine credits.

ATMO 640 Paleoclimate Model-Proxy Synthesis (3)

Basics of Earth System Model development, parameterizations, intermodel variability and design of paleoclimate simulations. Types of proxies, tools and techniques for paleoclimate record development and reconstructions. Hypothesis testing and methods for proxy-model comparison studies. ATMO, GEO, EPET, NREM, OCN, and ORE majors only. Graduate students only. (Alt. years: spring)

ASAN 658 Telecom and the Internet in East Asia (3)

Offers interdisciplinary approach to study of internet and telecommunications in East Asia. Examines growth and development of telecommunications networks in China, Japan, South and North Korea. Focuses on contemporary social media and government policy. A-F only. (Alt. years: spring)

ART 621 Materials in Contemporary Art (3)

Explores the physical, historical, symbolic, and contextual capacity of materials, as well as the mutually constitutive roles of artist and materials within the creative process. A-F only. (Spring only)

ART 620 Methods in Contemporary Art (3)

Examines processes of inquiry and experimentation within studio practice. Students explore a range of research methods as a way to challenge habitual methodologies and expand notions of art and art making. A-F only. (Fall only)

ANTH 424 Islands as Model Systems: Human Biogeography of the Pacific (3)

Applying the concept of islands as “model systems;” explores the impacts of human populations on the natural ecosystems of oceanic islands, and the reciprocal effects of anthropogenic change on human cultures. A-F only. Pre: 323 or consent.

ANTH 360 Primate Behavioral Ecology (3)

As primates are our closest living relatives, studying the range of variation in areas like life history, diet, communication, and social systems within the order primates can inform on how we ourselves evolved.

ANTH 329 Indigenous Peoples and Cultures of North America (3)

Survey of Indigenous peoples of North America. Integrates documentary records, ethnography, and archaeology to explore variability among native communities. Contemporary topics include political recognition and self-determination, health and education, and natural resources and economic development.

ANTH 204 Historical Ecology of Hawai‘i (3)

The Hawaiian socio-ecosystem is the product of centuries of human land use and resource exploitation. Explores the events and processes that have shaped the islands’ ecology and future sustainability. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 204)

ACM 486 Capstone Creative Production (3)

Emphasis on advanced production skills in creating a capstone film project to deepen understanding of cinematic storytelling with individuals taking on the role and responsibilities of key crew positions in collaboration. Repeatable one time. ACM majors only. Pre: 405 or 410 or 420 or 455

MATH 353 Introduction to Euclidean and NonEuclidean Geometries (3)

Axiomatic geometry and introduction to the axiomatic method; Euclidean geometry; hyperbolic geometry, and other nonEuclidean geometries. Pre: 243 or 253A, and 321 (or concurrent); or consent. (Fall only)

SPED 202 Global and Historical Perspectives of Disability in the Media (3)

Explores the history of disability representation across cultures. Emphasis is placed on examining evolving perceptions of disability as depicted in art, literature, print, film, and digital media. A-F only. FGB

PORT 203 Intensive Intermediate Portuguese (6)

Intensive Intermediate Portuguese course covers content of 201 and 202 combined. Hybrid format combines 3 credits online and 3 credits face to face. Pre: 102 or 103. (Spring only)

ENG 473 Studies in Cultural and Literary Geographies (3)

Intensive study of selected questions, issues, traditions, genres, or writers relating to space
and place as the basis for literary inquiry. Topics may include migration, diaspora, and local histories. Repeatable one time. Pre: ENG 320 and one other 300-level ENG course; or consent.

ENG 472 Studies in Cultural Identities and Literature (3)

Intensive study of selected questions, issues, traditions, genres, and writers in relation to
cultural identities such as race, ethnicity, class as the basis for literary inquiry. Repeatable one time. Pre: 320 and one other 300-level course; or consent.

EDCS 696 Graduate Certificate Capstone (3)

Independent study and/or seminar for students working on a capstone for a graduate certificate. Repeatable three times. CR/NC only.

EDCS 417 STEM Pedagogy (V)

Provides introductory information to individuals new to the field of STEM education. Designed to integrate educational theory, pedagogy, content, and practical concerns into teaching practices in the STEM fields. Repeatable three times, up to 12 credits.

LTEC 782 Design-Based Research in Education (3)

Provides an introduction to design-based research in education. Reviews different design-based methods and guides students through the process of conducting original design-based research. Focuses on the gap between research and practice. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 667 (with a minimum grade of B) and 668 (or concurrent).

ME 448 Nanosystem and Microsystem Design (3)

Fabrication, design, and analysis of physical systems, sensors, and actuators at the nanoscale and microscale. Microfabrication/nanofabrication, fabrication process design, electrostatistic and electromagnetic interactions, signal transduction, measurements. Course work will focus on process and system design. ENGR majors only. Pre: 331 (with a minimum grade of C-), 375 (with a minimum grade of C-), or consent.

ICS 427 Programming Approaches to Software Quality Assurance (3)

Examination of best practices associated with developing and supporting software
applications with respect to potential security risks. Will augment software engineering practices learned in other courses with the basic principles of cybersecurity. Pre: 314 or consent.

EDEP 489 Applied Psychology: Advanced Topics (3)

Coverage in-depth of some areas of theory and research. Repeatable to six credit hours. Pre: PSY 100. (Crosslisted as PSY 489)

LLEA 415 Culture of Two Germanies: 1945-1989 (3)

(taught in English) Literature, culture, and film of East and West Germany, 1945-1989. Credit cannot be earned for both LLEA 415 and GER 415. Sophomore standing or higher.

ENG 467 Studies in Literary Forms, Genres, and Media (3)

Intensive study of selected questions, issues, traditions, or movements in literary forms, genres, and media. Repeatable one time. Pre: ENG 320 and one other 300-level ENG course; or consent.

ENG 401 Theories and Methods of English Studies (3)

Intensive study of questions, issues, traditions, and movements in the field of English Studies. Recommended for students planning to pursue postbaccalaureate degrees. Pre: ENG 320 and one other 300-level ENG course; or consent.

ENG 388 Literature and the Environment (3)

Basic concepts and representative texts for the study of intersections between literature and the environment, including issues such as climate change, technology, pollution, land and land use, interspecies relationships. Pre: One ENG DL course or consent.

ENG 365 Fiction (3)

Basic concepts and representative texts for the study of the form, function, and development of fiction genres such as short story and the novel in English. Repeatable one time for different topics. Pre: one ENG DL course or consent.

SUST 608 Literacy Across the Disciplines (3)

Explores theoretical and practical principles of literacy and sustainability across academic disciplines, investigating the role of language and literate practices of reading, writing, speaking, visualizing, and representing in social, cultural, and educational contexts. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Crosslisted as EDCS 608)

CLAS 211 Understanding Ancient Religions (3)

Comparative and historical survey of the religious beliefs and practices in ancient times throughout Egypt, Mesopotamia, Syria-Canaan, Anatolia, Persia, Greece, and Rome. A-F only. (Cross-listed as REL 211)

REL 211 Understanding Ancient Religions (3)

Comparative and historical survey of the religious beliefs and practices in ancient times throughout Egypt, Mesopotamia, Syria-Canaan, Anatolia, Persia, Greece, and Rome. A-F only. (Cross-listed as CLAS 211)

ARCH 201 Beginning Design Studio I (4)

Exploration of critical judgment and means to conceptualize, develop, represent, and both visually and orally communicate form and space, including freehand drawing, mechanical drawing, physical model making, diagramming, and computer graphic techniques. ENVD majors only. A-F only. Pre: 102 or 132.

ARCH 102 Design Fundamentals Studio II (4)

Continued exploration of design processes. Introduction to CAD technologies, material exploration, and creative exploration including the relationship between digital, physical, and materials aspects of design. ENVD majors only. A-F only. Pre: 100 and 101.

EDEF 771 Seminar in Comparative/International Education (3)

Advanced reading, research and writing in selected topics dealing with comparative and international education, including such themes as policy studies, minority education and educational reform. A-F only. Pre: consent.

EDEF 761 History of American Higher Education (3)

Genesis and evolution of college and university from

EDEF 751 Recent History of American Education (3)

Contemporary American education in recent historical perspective; focuses on the educational changes brought about by WW II, the Cold War, civil rights and other social movements. A-F only. Pre: consent.

EDEF 725 Education and Social Change (3)

Study of classical and contemporary theories of social change as these relate to school, the profession of teaching, planning of change, and social stability. Pre: consent

EDEF 650 Education in the Classical Tradition (3)

Classical European, Chinese, Indic, and Islamic traditions in the history of education; emphasis on ways in which they shift, interact, and collide from the early modern period to the present.

SOC 176 Introduction to Data Analysis (3)

Basic analytic skills widely used in quantitative analysis of social science data, including descriptive statistics, rates and probability, comparison of groups, introduction to causal relationships, and application of these techniques to real life examples. A-F only.

ARCH 100 Introduction to the Built Environment (3)

Introduction to the breadth of design in today’s global culture. Exploration of human responses to place, climate, culture, communication, and technology, with emphasis on the impact of scientific knowledge on environmental design. Open to
nonmajors. A-F only.

NREM 460 Sustainable Nutrient Management in Agroecosystems (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Biological, chemical, and physical processes governing the cycling of nutrients in agroecosystems, crop and livestock production, and the effects on surrounding unmanaged ecosystems. Pre: 304 and CHEM 161, or consent. (Cross-listed as TPSS 450)

PHIL 100A Introduction to Philosophy Survey of Problems (3)

Introduction to the kinds of problems that concern philosophers and to some of the solutions that have been attempted.

EDEF 352A The History of Education in Hawai‘i From Pre-contact to Statehood (3)

History of educational though and practices from pre-contact Hawaii through statehood. Social, intellectual, political, and cultural influences on indigenous, territorial, and state educational institutions; emphasis on white-settler colonialism, multiculturalism, assimilation, resistance, indigenous, and immigrant experiences. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Spring only

AMST 202A American Experience: Culture and the Arts (3)

Interdisciplinary course that examines diversity and changes in American values and culture– literature, film, visual arts, and architecture.

WGSS 753 (Alpha) Research Seminar in Chinese Literature (3)

Study of authors, a genre, a period, or a problem. (M) modern; (T) traditional. Repeatable one time for (M). A-F only for (M). Pre: 613, 615, 650, or EALL 611; or consent for (M); CHN 612 or consent for (T). (Cross-listed as CHN 753 (Alpha))

WGSS 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Pre: classified graduate standing and consent of chair.

WGSS 650 Research in Feminist Studies: Capstone Experience (2)

Provide women’s studies graduate certificate students with an opportunity to design, develop and complete a research project culminating in a publishable quality work and a professional quality seminar presentation. A-F only. Pre: classified graduate status and consent.

WGSS 647 Gender: Law and Conflicts (V)

Examines how international law and domestic legal systems address and resolve conflicts regarding women’s rights, gender roles, and gender identity. Takes a comparative approach with emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region. (Cross-listed as LAW 547 and PACE 637)

WGSS 625 Feminist Criminology (3)

Key themes in feminist criminology are explored including focus on masculinities and crime, race and intersectionality, global criminology, and the ways in which the criminal justice system controls women and girls. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SOC 625)

WGSS 623 Topics in Feminist Social Policy Research (3

Feminist social scientists from a variety of fields have explored issues of gender, social change and social justice. Draws from their work to critically examine strategies for conducting social policy research that is feminist in values and impact. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing, no waiver.

WGSS 620 Feminism and Its “Others” (3)

Relationship between feminist and other sites of critical insight and scholarship that have contributed to creating anticolonial, antiracist, antihomophobic theory, method and action. Questions the legacy of feminist coalition practices and engages the ongoing transformations that have begun to produce new alliances and coalitions that disrupt traditional boundaries of identity and power. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing, no waiver.

WGSS 618 Writing and Publishing in an Interdisciplinary Field (3)

Writing-intensive and publishing-focused class, students learn how to publish in an interdisciplinary field. Readings and assignments are designed to help students succeed in academic publishing. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: consent.

WGSS 615 Feminist Theory (3)

Selected ideas from contemporary feminist theory concerning power, knowledge, and self; articulating women’s voice; deconstructing gender. Repeatable one time. (Cross-listed as POLS 615C)

WGSS 613 Feminist Research and Methods of Inquiry (3)

Examination of an emergent body of literature about how to shape questions concerning gender, sex, race, class, colonialism, and other vectors of power. Includes methods from social sciences and humanities and debates in the philosophy of science. Repeatable one time. Pre: classified graduate status and consent.

WGSS 612 Women in American Culture (3)

Historical/contemporary status of women in the U.S.; women’s roles as defined by legal, educational, political, economic, and social institutions; implications for social science method. (Cross-listed as AMST 612)

WGSS 610 Faculty Seminar Series (1)

Seminar/ discussion to introduce students pursuing the Graduate Certificate to the Woman’s Studies faculty and their areas of research, and to initiate student’s graduate studies in a woman’s studies field. Repeatable one time. Pre: classified graduate status (or status pending) and consent.

WGSS 602 Transnational Feminist Teaching and Research (3)

Introductory graduate seminar designed to develop common vocabulary and explore the core debates in transnational feminist teaching and research to encourage critical reflection about teaching assumptions, approaches, and techniques in the contemporary college or university environment. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing and no waiver.

WGSS 499 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Repeatable one time, up to six credits. WS students only. Pre: consent.

WGSS 496 Teaching Women’s Studies (3)

Strategies for teaching women’s studies; addressing complex issues of gender, race, nation, class, sexuality and culture in a contemporary multiethnic campus environment. Emphasis on classroom techniques, teaching pedagogies, and hands-on experience. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 151 and one or more WS course with a grade of B or better in all relevant courses, instructor recommendation; or consent.

WGSS 495 Selected Topics (3)

Problems and issues for reading and research: feminist theory, criticism, affirmative action, etc. Repeatable two times. Pre: any WS course in appropriate area.

WGSS 493 Trans* Studies: Trans(feminine/masculine/ gender nonconforming/sexual) (3)

Focus on various aspects of Trans* identities, biographies, cultural productions, and communities. It also addresses issues on racism, medical intervention, dating, societal condemnation, mental health, and incarceration. Junior standing or higher. (Cross-listed as AMST 437)

WGSS 492 Women and Revolution (3)

Conditions under which women’s activism and participation in protest and revolutionary movements developed in the 19th- and 20th-centuries. Cross-cultural comparisons. (Cross-listed as ASAN 492 and HIST 492)

WGSS 489 Social Sciences Internship (V)

Internship in public, private, or non-profit organizations providing opportunity for practical experience and application of social sciences concepts and theories. Three to six credits per semester; repeatable two times, up to 12 credits. Consent of instructor. (Cross-listed as SOC 494 and SOCS 489)

WGSS 483 Studies in Literature and Sexuality and Gender (3)

Intensive study of selected problems and issues in the construction and representation of sexuality and gender in specific genres, social and cultural contexts, thematic or figurative clusters. Repeatable one time. Pre: ENG 320 and one other 300-level ENG course; or consent. (Cross-listed as ENG 482)

WGSS 481 Women and Film (3)

Exploration of film as a philosophical and artistic form in the context of gender, race, and sexuality. Pre: one of 151, 175, 176, or THEA 201; or consent.

WGSS 465 Science, Sex, and Reproduction (3)

Explores anthropology’s critical analysis of approaches to reproductive health and procreation, primarily in developing countries. Examines sex and reproduction as sites of intervention from public health, development, and biomedical specialists, while also considering local strategies. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 151 or ANTH 152 or ANTH 301. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as ANTH 465)

WGSS 463 Gender Issues in Asian Society (3)

Construction of gender identities in contemporary Asia. How these interface with other aspects of social difference and inequality (e.g. with class, religion, ethnicity). (Cross-listed as ASAN 463)

WGSS 462 Women and Globalization in Asia (3)

History, culture, and contemporary reality of Asian women in Asia and the U.S. Includes critical analysis of American feminist methodology and theory. Pre: one of 360, 361, 439, AMST 310, AMST 316, AMST 318, AMST 373, AMST 455, POLS 339; or consent. (Crosslisted as AMST 438 and POLS 372)

WGSS 460 Feminism, Nation and Empire (3)

Examines U.S. feminist movements in the 19th and 20th century by exploring how U.S. racism, nationalism and imperialism have provided the context from which feminism emerged. A-F only. Pre: 151, 360; or consent.

WGSS 456 Politics of Men and Masculinity in U.S. Culture (3)

Examines American understandings of man, manhood, and masculinity, at the intersection of gender, race, class, and sexuality in the context of American nation and empire building in the 19th and 20th centuries. A-F only. Pre: one of 151, 175, 176, or 202; or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 457)

WGSS 454 Gender, Sexuality, and Global Popular Culture (3)

A study of gender, race, and sexuality as constructed in contemporary global popular culture, including music, films, novels, television shows, and internet culture. A-F only. Junior standing or higher.

WGSS 453 Gender Issues in Education (3)

Examination of current and historical issues in education and how they are impacted upon by gender, with particular reference to gender as it intersects with ethnicity and class, locally and globally. Pre: 151 or consent. (Cross-listed as EDCS 453 and EDEF 453)

VIET 699 Directed Reading/Research (V

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

VIET 461 Introduction to Vietnamese Literature (3)

Selected readings in major genres; emphasis on analysis. Modern literature. Pre: 402 or consent.

VIET 402 Fourth-Level Vietnamese (3)

Continuation of 401. Pre: 401 or consent.

VIET 401 Fourth-Level Vietnamese (3)

Continuation of 302. Emphasis on cultural understanding through modern literary Vietnamese. Pre: 302 or equivalent.

VIET 302 Third-Level Vietnamese (3)

Continuation of 301. Pre: 301 or consent.

VIET 301 Third-Level Vietnamese (3)

Continuation of 202. Emphasis on increased proficiency and cultural understanding through interaction with Vietnamese media, including newspapers, radio, film, etc. Pre: 202 or equivalent.

VIET 202 Intermediate Vietnamese II (3)

Continuation of 201. Pre: 201 or consent.

VIET 201 Intermediate Vietnamese I (3)

Continuation of 102. After completion, most students should be able to use all major sentence patterns to produce sounds, combinations of sounds, tones, and intonation and have some understanding of Vietnamese culture. Pre: 102 or equivalent.

VIET 102 Elementary Vietnamese II (3)

Continuation of 101. Pre: 101 or consent.

VIET 101 Elementary Vietnamese I (3)

Listening, speaking, reading, writing. Structural points introduced inductively. Meets one hour, three times a week.

URDU 205 Reading and Writing in Urdu (1)

Introduces students to the Nastaliq (Urdu) script, alphabets, their various forms, and combination rules. Reading and writing is emphasized. A-F only. Pre: HNDI 102 or consent. Co-requisite: HNDI 201 or consent. (Fall only)

PLAN 800 Dissertation Research (1)

Research for doctoral dissertation. Repeatable unlimited times. S/U only. PhD student only. Pre: consent.

PLAN 754 Urban Design Studio (6)

Group experience in defining urban and regional design problems and potentials, developing and evaluating alternatives, formulating strategies for implementation. PLAN and ARCH majors only. A-F only. Pre: (600 and 601) with a minimum grade of B, or consent.

PLAN 752 Directed Project (V)

Individual project in analysis, plan preparation and evaluation, and policy/ program evaluation. PLAN majors only. Pre: 600, 601; and consent.

PLAN 751 Planning Practicum (6)

Team experience in defining and addressing a current planning problem; identification, substantive review, research design, preparation and presentation of analysis. Topic varies. Limited to 10 students. Pre: 600, 601; and consent.

PLAN 741 Seminar in Planning Practice (3)

Project planning, programming, and similar topics. Pre: 600 and 601, or consent.

PLAN 740 Seminar in Planning Theory (3)

Special topics in theory, history, analysis. Pre: 600 or consent.

PLAN 721 Homeland Security: Terrorism (3)

Combined lecture/discussion in disaster management and humanitarian assistance track focusing on developing a multidisciplinary understanding of international terrorism and anti-terrorism planning and response. Pre: 670 or consent. (Once a year)

PLAN 700 Thesis Research (V)

Limited to MURP students under Plan A. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

PLAN 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent of instructor and department chair.

PLAN 686 Housing and Community Services in Asia and Pacific (3)

Application of analysis and construction technology to problems associated with physical development of suburban and neighborhood communities. Development of design and construction programs. Emphasis on low and intermediate technology solutions. Open to nonmajors. (Cross-listed as ARCH 681)

PLAN 683 Housing and Community Development Practicum (V)

Laboratory and field testing of selected topics related to housing design and technology; site development and infrastructure; social, health and economic community development; and housing implementation strategies. Repeatable one time. PLAN and ARCH majors only. Pre: 600.

PLAN 680 Land Use Management and Control (V)

Survey course of public land use management. (Cross-listed as LAW 580)

PLAN 678 Site Planning (3)

Fundamental principles that guide site planning, including planning and design determinants of the site taking into account its regional context, site-specific characteristics and applicable codes, ordinances, and standards. PLAN and ARCH majors only. (Fall only)

PLAN 677 Historic Preservation Planning (3)

Local-level historic preservation, with an emphasis on historic districts, design guidelines, regulatory controls, and community consensus-building. (Cross-listed as AMST 677)

PLAN 676 Recording Historic and Cultural Resources (3)

Techniques in recording and evaluation of historic buildings and other resources, with an emphasis on field recordings and state and federal registration procedures. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 676 and ANTH 676)

PLAN 675 Preservation: Theory and Practice (3)

History and philosophy of historic preservation movement. Analysis of values and assumptions, methodologies and tactics, implications for society and public policy. (Cross-listed as AMST 675 and ARCH 628)

PLAN 674 Disaster Recovery: Theory and Practice (3)

How do communities recover from disaster? Provides students with an overview of recovery theory and an understanding of how planners, policy makers, and ordinary citizens rebuild communities, cities, and nations following catastrophic events. A-F only. Graduate standing only.

PLAN 673 Information Systems for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (3)

Combined lecture/laboratory in disaster management focusing on essential methodological and practical issues that are involved in spatial analyses using GIS and other information technologies to inform decision making related to natural hazards, disasters, and human attempts to respond to these through mitigation and planning activities. Pre: 473 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

PLAN 672 Humanitarian Assistance: Principles, Practices and Politics (3)

Combined lecture/ discussion aimed at understanding the theoretical basis and working structure of humanitarian assistance programs and international responses to natural and human-induced disasters. Pre: 670 or consent. (Once a year)

PLAN 671 Disaster Management: Understanding the Nature of Hazards (3)

Combined lecture/ discussion in disaster management focusing on the scientific understanding of the forces and processes underlying natural hazards; and human attempts to respond to these through mitigation and planning activities. Pre: 670 or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ERTH 604)

PLAN 670 Interdisciplinary Seminar in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (3)

Overview to the field of disaster management and humanitarian assistance with a specific focus on risk reduction. Includes background knowledge and skills for preparedness, response, recovery, mitigation, and adaptation to hazards and threats. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Once a year)

PLAN 661 Collaboration Between Sectors (3)

Examine theories and practices of multisector collaboration (public, private, nonprofit). The use of collaboration as an alternative way of solving public problems.

PLAN 655 Planning Research Methods (3)

Advanced methods and deterministic and stochastic models used in urban and regional planning.

PLAN 654 Applied Geographic Information Systems: Public Policy and Spatial Analysis (3)

Use of advanced and specialized spatial methods and models in urban and regional planning. Uses GIS software and builds upon 601. Skills are useful applied to planning, economic development, and environmental planning and resource management. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

PLAN 652 Policy Implementation and Program Evaluation (3)

Implementation and evaluation in public policy analysis; philosophical and methodological issues; impact of policies and plans; use of evaluation research in program implementation.

PLAN 650 Research Design Seminar (3)

Research design and preparation of thesis proposal. Normally taken after admission to candidacy in MURP. Pre: (600, 601, 603) with a minimum grade of B, or consent.

PLAN 649 Asian Cities: Historical Evolution of Urban Form (3)

Examination of the impact of economy, society, and history on urban form; case studies of the evolution of Asian urban form. Pre: 310 or ASAN 312. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ASAN 649)

PLAN 648 Urban Transportation Policy and Planning (3)

Theory and practice of urban transportation planning in developed and developing countries with an emphasis on the U.S., Asia, and Pacific region. A-F only.

PLAN 647 Urban and Regional Planning for Sustainability (3)

Focus on ideology, conceptual models, accounting frameworks, appropriate technologies, and indicators of planning for sustainability. Central and local policies, plans, and best practices in various countries and settings will be covered. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 647)

PLAN 645 Land Use Planning (3)

Issues and methods of urban land use planning practice and plan making. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ARCH 641)

PLAN 643 Project Planning and Management (3)

Examines project management in theory and practice and the roles and responsibilities of the project manager. Focuses on planning, organizing, and controlling the efforts of projects. A-F only.

PLAN 642 Planning Urban Infrastructure (3)

Introduction to the planning of various urban infrastructures. Explores approaches and tools to plan, evaluate, and regulate urban infrastructure systems in support of sustainable and resilient cities and communities.

PLAN 641 Neighborhood and Community Land Use Planning (3)

Land use planning for urban neighborhoods and small towns. Theory and practice of neighborhood planning. Neighborhood and community dynamics, reinvestment, and stabilization.

PLAN 640 Land Use Policies and Programs (3)

Land use public policy planning in urban and regional settings. Growth management and land use guidance systems. A-F only.

PLAN 639 Community-based Natural Resource Management (3)

Concepts and theories of community, resource access, and governance. Practical challenges to CBNRM in contemporary political economy. Pre: graduate standing. (Cross-listed as GEO 639)

PLAN 638 Asian Development and Urbanization (3)

Theories of globalization and sustainability in development, impacts of globalization and sustainability on development planning and policy formation, selected case studies of Asia-Pacific development. Pre: (630 or ASAN 600) with a grade of B or above. (Cross-listed as ASAN 638 and GEO 638)

PLAN 637 Environment and Development (3)

Theories and practice of development; how changing development paradigms shape different ideas concerning the environment and the management of natural resources; emerging debates in development and environment in post-modern era. (Cross-listed as GEO 637)

PLAN 636 Culture & Urban Form in Asia (3)

Cultural and historical impact on urban form, contention of tradition and modernity in urban space, spatial expression of state and society, perception and utilization of urban design, evolution of urban form in selected Asian capitals. Pre: 310, 600, or ASAN 312. (Cross-listed as ARCH 687 and ASAN 636)

PLAN 634 Shelter and Services in Asia (3)

Examines government and non-government organizations’ responses to urban and rural shelter issues and services in Asia.

PLAN 633 Globalization and Urban Policy (3)

Urbanization and urban policies in the Asia and Pacific region with focus on the international dimension of national and local spatial restructuring.

PLAN 632 Planning in Hawai‘i and Pacific Islands (3)

Urban and regional planning in island settings. Experiences in Hawai‘i, Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. Pre: graduate standing. (Cross-listed as SUST 632)

PLAN 630 Urban and Regional Planning in Asia (3)

Key issues and policies in urban planning, rural-urban relations, rural regional planning, and frontier settlement in Asia and the Pacific. Repeatable one time. (Cross-listed as GEO 630)

PLAN 629 Negotiation & Conflict Resolution (3)

Negotiation as a foundational skill of conflict resolution; mastery of negotiation skills for strategic dispute resolution; non-routine problem-solving, creating partnerships and alliances; crafting optimal agreements. Students participate in simulations and acquire vital leadership skills. Graduate standing only. Pre: one of the following courses: 627; or PACE 429, PACE 447, PACE 477, PACE 647, PACE 652, or PACE 668; or COMG 455 or SOC 730; or LAW 508; or MGT 660. (Cross-listed as PACE 629)

PLAN 628 Urban Environmental Problems (3)

Seminar that examines environmental problems associated with urbanization. Reviews strategic approaches and collaboration among key actors to address such problems. (Cross-listed as SUST 628)

PLAN 627 Negotiation and Mediation in Planning (3)

Applicability and limitations of selected approaches; role of planners; impact on planning.

PLAN 626 Topics in Resource Management (3)

for different resource systems including land, water, energy, coastal resources, forests and fisheries. Course focus varies from year to year. Repeatable one time. A-F only.

PLAN 625 Climate Change, Energy and Food Security in the Asia/Pacific Region (3)

Analysis of planning responses to human-induced climate change and related environmental problems. Part of the Asia/Pacific Initiative taught in collaboration with universities throughout the region via videoconferencing. (Cross-listed as SUST 625)

PLAN 624 Environmental Valuation and Policy (3)

Build valuation skills to assess best use, conservation, and policies relating to environmental amenities. Provides an overview of policy solutions to environmental degradation used by planners.

PLAN 622 Advanced Environmental Impact Assessment (3)

Theory and practice of environmental impact assessment. Policy and planning frameworks supporting environmental assessment in the U.S. and abroad. Cumulative environmental effects and strategic environmental assessment. (Cross-listed as GEO 622)

PLAN 621 Environmental Conflict Resolution (3)

Explore how environmental conflicts emerge and the efforts to find common ground for resolution. Examine the issues, debates, and theoretical aspects that help to explain and frame environmental conflict. Graduate students only. (Cross-listed as PACE 621)

PLAN 620 Environmental Planning and Policy (3)

Overview of urbanization and environmental change. An examination of environmental laws, policies, planning and urban design strategies designed to minimize and mitigate urban impacts. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 620)

PLAN 619 Multiculturalism in Planning and Policy (3)

Graduate seminar focuses on issues of governance, policy and planning in diverse multicultural societies. Differences in backgrounds, languages, privilege, preferences and values are often expressed in planning and policy controversies such as affirmative action and land use planning. Will examine these controversies and explore theories of governance in a multicultural setting.

PLAN 618 Community Economic Development (3)

Community-based economic development approaches and methods explored with an emphasis on low income communities. Repeatable one time.

PLAN 616 Community-Based Planning (3)

Planning and programmatic aspects of community-based development projects. East-West and local planning perspectives on participatory development and intentional communities.

PLAN 615 Housing (3)

Housing delivery systems as an aspect of urban and regional planning.

PLAN 610 Community Planning and Social Policy (3)

Social issues and conditions; consequences of social policies experienced by different groups; community social plans and programs organized by various kinds of agencies and organizations. Repeatable one time.

PLAN 608 Politics and Development: China (3)

Consists of three parts: key theories for socialist transition as basis for seminar discussion, policy evolution to illustrate the radical changes, and emerging and prominent current development and practice. (Cross-listed as ASAN 608 and POLS 645C)

PLAN 607 Introduction to Public Policy (3)

Perspectives on policy analysis; basic approaches to the study of public policy, political economy, and policy evaluation. (Cross-listed as POLS 670)

PLAN 606 Comparative Planning Histories (3)

Provides students with an overview of the history of urban and regional planning in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, and the role that planning has played in shaping contemporary urban settlements. Graduate standing only. A-F only.

PLAN 605 Planning Models (3)

Allocation, decision, derivation, and forecasting models used in the analysis of demographic, economic, land use, and transportation phenomena in urban and regional planning. Repeatable one time. PLAN majors only.

PLAN 604 Qualitative Methods in Planning (3)

Provides a general introduction to qualitative research methods for planning and planning research. Includes data collection methods (focus groups, interviews, ethnography, participant observation, and participatory action research) and various analytic methods and approaches. Graduate standing only.

PLAN 603 Urban Economics (3)

Reviews and builds skills in applying basic theories and principles of urban and regional economics in contemporary U.S., Hawai‘i and Asia-Pacific. Repeatable one time. PLAN majors only.

PLAN 602 Advanced Planning Theory (3)

Advanced planning theory for PhD students (others by petition) to prepare for careers in planning education and/or high level professional practice. Covers key contemporary planning policy issues and themes from the perspective of values, explanations of the real world, policy alternatives and implementation. Students must have passed 600 or equivalent (by petition) with a B or better. Repeatable one time. PhD students only or by consent. A-F only. Pre: 600 or consent.

PLAN 601 Planning Methods (3)

Introduction of the basic methods in planning, including problem definition, research design, hypothesis testing, statistical reasoning, forecasting and fundamental data analysis techniques required by the planning program and the planning profession. Repeatable one time. PLAN and ARCH majors only. Pre: one of ECON 321, GEO 380, or SOC 476.

PLAN 600 Public Policy and Planning Theory (3)

Designed to a) impart a historic and comparative perspective on the evolution of urban and regional planning in public policy; b) explore the spatial and built environment dimensions of society, planning and policy; c) assess the justifications for planning and differing processes of planning in the U.S. and AsiaPacific with a focus on the role of the planner in policy formulation and implementation. Graduate students only or with permission. A-F only. Repeatable two times.

PLAN 495 Housing, Land, and Community (3)

Analyzes availability for housing, particularly affordable housing, and its relationship to use of land and building of community. Examines public policies impacting housing, land use, and community development and ways they can be improved.

PLAN 473 GIS for Community Planning (3)

Exploration of geographic information systems (GIS) area analysis techniques for spatial information management in community planning. Students will learn the basic concepts and principles, and practical skills of GIS through lectures, discussions, and labs. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher.

PLAN 449 Asian Cities: Evolution of Urban Space (3)

Reviews the evolution of Asian urban space. Political history, migration, culture, and production are the determinants of urban changes. Uses visual material to illustrate the change in Asian cityscape. Pre: 310 or ASAN 310 or ASAN 312, or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 449)

PLAN 442 Principles of Environmental Management Systems (3)

Introduction to the process of developing Environmental Management Systems that address the principles outlined in ISO14001:2015. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Spring only)

PLAN 438 Sustainable Asian Development: Impact of Globalization (3)

Investigates the impact of globalization on sustainable development in Asia. Globalization and sustainability often contradict, raising serious planning issues. Examines how these issues affect Asian development policies and urban planning. Pre: 310 or ASAN 310 or ASAN 312, or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 438)

PLAN 421 Urban Geography (3)

Origins, functions, and internal structure of cities. Problems of urban settlement, growth, decay, adaptation, and planning in different cultural and historical settings. Dynamics of urban land use and role of policies and perceptions in shaping towns and cities. Pre: GEO 102 or GEO 151 or GEO 330, or consent. (Cross-listed as GEO 421)

PLAN 414 Environmental Hazards and Community Resilience (3)

Investigation of the forces behind natural and technological hazards, and human actions that reduce or increase vulnerability to natural disasters. Junior standing or higher.

PLAN 412 Environmental Impact Assessment (3)

Introduction to analytical methods for identifying, measuring, and quantifying the impacts of changes or interventions in resource, human-environment, and other geographic systems. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Alt. years)

PLAN 399 Directed Reading in Planning (V)

Independent research on topics in urban and regional planning. Pre: 310.

PLAN 310 Introduction to Planning (3)

Perspectives on planning; planning tools and methods; specific Hawai‘i planning–research problems from a multidisciplinary approach. Pre: junior standing or consent.

PLAN 301 Survey of Urban Sociology (3)

Urban processes and social problems, such as poverty, crime, racial segregation, homelessness, housing policy, urbanization, and neighborhood ethnic diversity. How places shape identity and opportunity. Research methods applied to communities, places, and neighborhoods of Hawai‘i. Pre: SOC 100 or a 200-level SOC course, or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 301)

PLAN 101 Sustainable Cities (3)

How do we plan and design cities to meet our long-term economic and environmental needs? Students will learn how sustainability applies to key urban issues like energy, transportation, land, and food. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 114)

UNIV 499 Directed Reading or Research (V)

Individual reading or research. Repeatable one time, up to six credits. Junior standing. A-F only. Pre: consent.

UROP 399 Faculty Mentored Research and Creative Work Project (V)

Directed research for undergraduate students conducting faculty-mentored research or creative work projects. Repeatable three times, up to ten credits. CR/NC only. Pre: consent of UROP director and student faculty mentor. (Summer only)

UNIV 387 Collaborative Learning: Foundations of Tutoring (3)

Theory and practice of collaborative learning in academic contexts. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: consent.

UNIV 370 Financial Literacy Peer Educator Training Course (3)

Intensive course designed for peer educator trainees to learn principles of personal finance, including budgeting, credit, insurance, buying a home or automobile, savings, and financing education. Trainees will develop communication, facilitation, and practical leadership skills. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Summer only)

UNIV 450 Mânoa Peer Advisor Leader Training and Leadership Practicum (6)

A reflective apprenticeship in which Peer Advisor Leaders solidify their understanding of advising and learn more about leadership and deepen their facilitation, communication, collaboration, and leadership skills by mentoring a cohort of peer advisor trainees. Repeatable two times. A-F only. Pre: 350 (or equivalent course) (with a minimum grade of B). (Summer only

UNIV 350 Mânoa Peer Advisor Training Course (6)

Intensive course designed for peer advisor trainees to learn General Education requirements, university policies and procedures, and campus resources. Trainees also develop skills and strategies necessary to provide quality advising to their fellow students. A-F only (Summer only)

UNIV 340 Academic Exploration Through Advising (3)

Major exploration designed to assist exploratory students in the process of researching personal, career, and educational goals and the impact of these goals on the decision-making process. Emphasis on self-reflection and identity. Sophomore standing. A-F only.

UNIV 240 Fresh-More Experience (1)

Seminar provides students with the knowledge/skills to thrive in college and beyond. Utilizes writing as a tool for research/analysis; topics include major/ career exploration. May not be taken concurrently or after UNIV 340. Freshmen and sophomores only. Exploratory designations only. A-F only.

UNIV 132 Academic and Career Exploration (1)

Seminar introduces exploratory students to major and career exploration resources, guides students in developing personal, academic, and career goals and plans, and encourages frequent self-reflection. Instructor approval required. A-F only. (Spring only)

UNIV 131 Academic and Personal Exploration (1)

Seminar introduces students to goal setting, time management, major exploration, academic planning, service-learning opportunities, student/faculty meetings, financial literacy, and encourages frequent self-reflection. Instructor approval required. A-F only.

UNIV 421 Passages (3)

Interactive course develops mentoring skills and relationships with peers, mentors, and “elders.” Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. (Summer only)

UNIV 327 Metacognitive Strategies for College Success (3)

Theories of the memory processes and the application of the Information Processing Systems in developing metacognitive strategies for college classroom success. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only.

TPSS 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

TPSS 711 Special Topics (V)

Specialized topics from various areas of plant and soil research such as experimental techniques, growth regulation, morphogenesis, genetics and breeding, culture and nutrition of tropical crops. A-F only. Pre: consent.

TPSS 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

TPSS 699 Directed Research (V)

In-depth study of specialized problems. Repeatable unlimited times. CR/ NC only. Pre: consent.

TPSS 695 Plan B Master’s Project (3)

Independent study for students working on a Plan B master’s project. A grade of Satisfactory (S) is assigned when the project is satisfactorily completed. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing in TPSS program.

TPSS 680 Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resource Data (3)

The application of geostatistics to estimate spatial dependence to improve soil and regional sampling; provide insight into underlying soil, geographic, and geologic process, and to provide quantitative scaling up of point measurements to fields, regions, and watersheds. State-space modeling also will be included. A-F only. Pre: GEO 388 or ZOOL 631; or consent. (Cross-listed as GEO 680)

TPSS 674 Plant Growth and Development (3)

Contemporary literature is used as the basis for understanding the physiology for whole plant growth and development. Aspects covered include vegetative and reproductive development, seed dormancy, senescence, abscission, and relevant biochemical and molecular processes. Pre: 470 and MBBE 402, or consent.

TPSS 670 Interdisciplinary Methods for Agrarian Systems (3)

Interdisciplinary methodologies for conducting research and impact analyses on agrarian systems, sustainable development, and resource management. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as NREM 670) (Alt. years: fall)

TPSS 667 Graduate Seminar (1)

Presentation of research reports; reviews of current literature in plant and soil sciences. Repeatable four times. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

TPSS 664 Orchidology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Classification, culture, cytogenetics, breeding of orchids. Pre: consent. Recommended: 200/SUST 211 and 402.

TPSS 658 Environmental Landscape Technologies and Systems (3)

Understanding the science and art of green landscape technologies, with a comprehensive understanding of LID (low impact design) principles and practices; to increase knowledge to help produce more viable and enduring built landscapes. TPSS majors only. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ARCH 658)

TPSS 657 Grant Writing for Graduate Students (1)

Combined lecture/discussion on grants and grant writing. Designed to introduce graduate students to grants and grant proposal writing through lectures, class discussion, writing assignments, and peer review. Open to CTAHR graduate students only; others with consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 657 and FSHN 657)

TPSS 656 Environmental and Cultural Landscape Studio (4)

Exploring, understanding, and implementing Hawaiian and Western cultural and environmental landscape design principles. A concentrated look at how to think about creating and respecting a sense of place through landscape design. TPSS and LAND majors only. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ARCH 656)

TPSS 654 Communications in the Sciences (1)

(3-hr Lec/Lab combination) Laboratory-type course for improving communication abilities in the sciences and engineering. Presentations to lay audiences are emphasized. Hands-on experience in techniques and methods is provided.

TPSS 652 Information Research Skills (1)

Examines the use of libraries and information technology for scholarly investigation in support of scientific research; provides experience utilizing and critically evaluating a variety of print and electronic sources in basic and applied sciences. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 652, FSHN 652, and NREM 652)

TPSS 650 Soil Plant Nutrient Relations (4)

(2 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Soil-plant interactions, emphasis on characteristics of tropical soils and plants influencing nutrient uptake by plants. Diagnostic methods to identify nutrient deficiencies and element toxicity. Pre: 450 or consent.

TPSS 640 Advanced Soil Chemistry (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Physio-chemical processes in soils and soil solutions, with emphasis on ionic equilibria, mineral stability, organic complexation, and surface sorption of major plant nutrients and heavy metals. A-F only. Pre: 435 and CHEM 351, or consent.

TPSS 634 Landscape Plants: Identification and Use (3)

Introduction to the identification, recognition, and use of plants in landscape design and built environment applications. Students will be introduced to a variety of landscape plants commonly used in Hawai‘i and the tropics. TPSS majors only. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ARCH 634)

TPSS 615 Quantitative Genomics and Evolution (3)

Overview and lab-based course exploring theory and methods to understand genome evolution and adaptation; focus will be on a range of organisms. Pre: 453 and 603, or consent.

TPSS 614 Molecular Genetics of Crops (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Applications of molecular genetics to crop improvement. Pre: 453 and MBBE 402; or consent.

TPSS 610 Nutrition of Tropical Crops (3)

(1 2-hr Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Mineral nutrition of plants in relation to plant metabolism, mechanisms of ion uptake, long-distance transport of solutes, and interactions at the root-soil interface. Special emphasis on problems associated with tropical crops. Pre: 450 and 470, or consent. (Alt. years)

TPSS 604 Advanced Soil Microbiology (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Study of biochemical and biogeochemical transformations mediated by soil microorganisms, emphasis on processes important to plant growth productivity and environmental quality. Pre: 304 and MICR 351, or consent.

TPSS 603 Experimental Design (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Design of experiments and variance analyses in biological and agricultural research. Pre: graduate standing or consent. Recommended: ZOOL 632. (Cross-listed as ANSC 603)

TPSS 601 Crop Modeling (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of modeling crop growth and development, model types, techniques, simulation. Modeling influence of climate/environment on phenology, growth, development of horticultural crops. Pre: BOT 470 and NREM 310, or consent.

TPSS 499 Directed Studies (V)

Supervised individual instruction in field laboratory and library. Repeatable up to six credits. CR/NC only. Pre: 364 or consent.

TPSS 492 Internship (1)

Integration and application of academic knowledge and critical skills emphasizing professional development. Placement with an approved cooperating supervisor/employer. Pre: consent.

TPSS 491 Experimental Topics (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics, problems. Offered by visiting faculty and/or for extension programs. Repeatable. Pre: consent.

TPSS 481 Weed Science (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Weed classification, identification, adaptations for weediness; principles of weed control; properties, uses, and action of herbicides. Lab: pesticide application equipment and techniques, no-till farming, greenhouse and field experiments. A-F only. Pre: 200/ SUST 211 and CHEM 152, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as PEPS 481)

TPSS 480L Life in the Soil Environment Lab (1)

Laboratory to accompany 480. Technical examination of bacteria, fungi, protists, nematodes, arthropods, and other invertebrate, and the essential functional roles these organisms contribute to sustainability of the planet. Repeatable one time. Pre: BIOL 171L and 172L, or MICR 351L, or consent. Co-requisite: 480. (Crosslisted as BIOL 480L)

TPSS 480 Life in the Soil Environment (3)

An interdisciplinary study of the diverse life in the soil beneath our feet that includes bacteria, fungi, protists, nematodes, arthropods, invertebrate, viruses, and the essential functional roles these organisms contribute to sustainability of the planet. Repeatable one time. Pre: TPSS/PEPS/SUST 371 or BIOL 375, or MICR 351, or consent. (Cross-listed as BIOL 480)

TPSS 475 Plant Nutrient Diagnosis in the Tropics (3)

Designed for students to identify essential nutrients required by plants; diagnose nutrient disorders in plants; and propose environmentally sound solutions to correct disorders. Pre: 304/NREM 304 (or concurrent) and BIOL 172. (Cross-listed as NREM 475)

TPSS 473 Post-Harvest Physiology (3)

Comparative physiological and biochemical processes during growth, maturation, ripening, and senescence in fruits, vegetables, and flowers related to changes in quality and storage life. Tropical commodities emphasized. A-F only. Pre: 200/SUST 211, BIOL 171, or BOT 201; CHEM 152; or consent.

TPSS 470L Principles of Plant Physiology Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Principles of experimentation in plant physiology, includes individual investigations. A-F only. Pre: consent.

TPSS 470 Plant Physiology (3)

Integration of form and function from cellular to whole plant levels in processes from seed germination, through photosynthesis, growth, and morphogenesis, to flowering and senescence. A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171 or consent.

TPSS 463 Irrigation and Water Management (3)

Basic soil-water-plant relationships, irrigation water requirements, irrigation efficiencies, different methods of irrigation, planning, design and management of an irrigation system, fertigation and impact of irrigation on soil and water quality. Pre: NREM 203 (or equivalent) and NREM/TPSS 304 (or equivalent), or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as NREM 463)

TPSS 460 Soil Plant Environment (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Bio-physical processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum that influence crop growth and development. Methods to estimate the impact of soil and climate on crop performance. Use of crop models to simulate effects of planting date, plant spacing and density, fertilizer rate, rainfall or irrigation, and daily weather on crop yield and farm income. Pre: 304 and either PHYS 151 or PHYS 170, or consent.

TPSS 453 Plant Breeding and Genetics (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Unique aspects of plant genetics and applications to crop improvement, with emphasis on breeding plants in Hawai‘i. Pre: BIOL 375 (or concurrent) or consent.

TPSS 450 Sustainable Nutrient Management in Agroecosystems (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Biological, chemical, and physical processes governing the cycling of nutrients in agroecosystems, crop and livestock production, and the effects on surrounding unmanaged ecosystems. Pre: 304 and CHEM 161, or consent. (Cross-listed as NREM 460)

TPSS 440 Tissue Culture/Transformation (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Application of plant tissue culture for plant scientists; study of the growth and development of plant tissues in culture as influenced by chemical and environmental factors, and the regeneration of plants following plant transformation by biolistics and other molecular approaches. Pre: 420 or consent. Recommended: BOT 410.

TPSS 435 Environmental Soil Chemistry (3)

Study of soil chemical processes such as weathering, adsorption, precipitation, and ion exchange; causes of soil acidity, alkalinity, and salinity; reactions between soils and fertilizers, pesticides, or heavy metals. Management strategies to minimize environmental contamination by nitrate, phosphate, and trace elements such as As, Pb, and Se. A-F only. Pre: 304 or consent. (Fall only)

TPSS 431 Indigenous Crops/Food Systems (1)

Schemes for managing sequences and combinations of crops and crop production activities. Ecosystem and social determinants. Multiple cropping. Analysis of alternative cropping systems. Repeatable unlimited times, but credit earned one time only. Junior standing or higher.

TPSS 430 Nursery Management (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Management practices in production and operations of commercial nurseries in Hawai‘i. Pre: 200/SUST 211 and 364; or consent.

TPSS 429 Spreadsheet Modeling for Business and Economic Analysis (3)

Introduction to quantitative decision-making methods for effective agribusiness management in resource allocation, scheduling, logistics, risk analysis, inventory, and forecasting. Emphasis on problem identification, model formulation and solution, and interpretation and presentation of results. Pre: ECON 130 or NREM/ SUST 220, and ECON 321 or NREM 310; or consent. (Once a year)

TPSS 421 Tropical Seed Science (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of seed science, seed physiology, seed production, and genetic modification. Hawai‘i’s seed industry and biotechnology. A-F only. Pre: 364 (recommended) and 420 (recommended), or consent.

TPSS 420 Plant Propagation (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Theoretical and applied aspects of seed and vegetative propagation technology involving fruits, flowers, vegetables, and landscape plants. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or consent.

TPSS 418 Turfgrass Pest Management (3)

Provides students with knowledge and real world experience on common turfgrass pests and management strategies in Hawai‘i, with emphasis on integrated pest management. Common cool-season turfgrass and pest management are also discussed. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as PEPS 418)

TPSS 416 Introduction to Social, Ethical and Political Issues Associated with Biotechnology (3)

Introduces concepts of biotechnology, fundamental issues associated with use of this technology, with special emphasis on agricultural biotechnology. A-F only. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or BIOL 171 or NREM 210, or consent. (Alt. years)

TPSS 415 Extension Education & Outreach (2)

Introduces an essential component of the Land Grant Mission. Students will explore the foundational components of extension education including agent expectations, program development and evaluation, audience engagement, building partnerships, funding structures. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Cross-listed as TAHR 415)

TPSS 410 Sustainable Soil and Plant Health Management (2)

Provides knowledge and understanding of soils, agroecology, and sustainable approaches for plant health management, and prepares students for applied research in various tropical cropping systems. A-F only. (Alt. years: spring) (Cross-listed as PEPS 410 and SUST 410)

TPSS 409 Cultural Biogeography (3)

Co-evolution of human societies and plants over the last 10,000 years. Foraging, farming and urban societies economies; spread and modification of selected plants; issues of preservation of genetic resources and traditional plant knowledge. The form and function of gardens. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent.

TPSS 405 Turfgrass Management (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Adaptability and selection, establishment, and cultural practices of grasses for various types of turf. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or consent.

TPSS 403 Tropical Fruit Production (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Botanical aspects and horticultural management practices of selected tropical and subtropical fruit crops, with emphasis on small scale commercial production in Hawai‘i. Pre: 300 or consent.

TPSS 402 Flower and Foliage Crop Production (4)

Biology and production of cut flowers, blooming potted plants, foliage plants under field and protected cultivation in Hawai‘i and globally. Pre: 300 or consent.

TPSS 401 Vegetable Crop Production (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Crop biology, requirements, and production techniques for commercial vegetable production in Hawai‘i will be stressed. Pre: 300 or consent.

TPSS 371 Genetics: Theory to Application (3)

Fundamentals of genetic theory using traditional breeding and biotechnological procedures in insect and plant pathogen management for sustainable agricultural production. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Cross-listed as PEPS 371 and SUST 371)

TPSS 369 Ornamental Plant Materials (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Identification, origin, use, and cultural requirement of trees, shrubs, vines, and groundcovers used in Hawaiian landscapes. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or consent.

TPSS 364 Horticulture: Theory and Practice (3)

Techniques of culture and management of horticulture crops. Pre: consent.

TPSS 354 Tropical Landscape Planting Design Studio (4)

Students will develop basic skills of residential landscape graphic and design processes in order to clearly articulate the ability to think, analyze, and extend a physical solution in the proper scale. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as ARCH 354)

TPSS 353 Landscape Graphics Studio (4)

Basic skills of landscape graphic communication through a creative process model. Learning free hand and technical drafting techniques to creative effective landscape graphics. Pre: consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as ARCH 353)

TPSS 352 Landscape Architecture History (3)

Survey of the history of landscape architecture from Mesopotamia to present. Review of the physical, cultural, social, economic, and political factors, as well as the environmental concerns, horticultural techniques, and technological innovations of historic landscapes. A-F only. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as ARCH 352)

TPSS 351 Enterprise Management (3)

Introduction of practical concepts and methods used in business management. Introduce broad range of business strategies. Understand the critical role each strategy plays. Facilitate student’s practice of analytical and critical thinking through case studies. (Cross-listed as NREM 351)

TPSS 350 Tropical Landscape Practices (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Concepts and techniques of landscape installation and management in the tropics. Pre: 200/ SUST 211 and 369; or consent.

TPSS 341 Managerial Accounting (3)

Principles and methods of agricultural accounting. Preparing and interpreting financial statements. Sources and costs of credit, capital budgeting, tax management, estate planning. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: ECON 130 or NREM/SUST 220, or consent. (Cross-listed as NREM 341)

TPSS 336 Renewable Energy and Society (3)

Combined lecture/discussion regarding the ability of renewable energy technologies to meet local, national, and global energy demands and their potential impacts on the environment and society. Pre: consent.

TPSS 322 Farm & Food Marketing (3)

Problems, agencies, functions, costs, prices, regulations affecting marketing: proposed improvements. Pre: ECON 130, NREM/SUST 220; or consent. (Alt. years)

TPSS 311 Current Topics in Plant Science (1)

Undergraduate seminar that provides the presentation and discussion of topics of current relevance to students preparing for careers in applied plant sciences. Oral focus designation. A-F only. Pre: 200/ SUST 211 or NREM 210, or consent. (Cross-listed as NREM 311)

TPSS 304L Fundamentals of Soil Science Laboratory (1)

Field and analytical methods for exploring the origin, development, properties, and management of soils, with an emphasis on tropical and Hawaiian soils. A-F only. Pre: CHEM 161 and CHEM 161L. Co-requisite: 304. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as NREM 304L)

TPSS 304 Fundamentals of Soil Science (3)

Origin, development, properties, management of tropical soils; classification of Hawaiian soils. A-F only. Minimum prerequisite grade of C or consent. Pre: CHEM 161 and 161L, or consent. Co-requisite: 304L. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as NREM 304)

TPSS 300 Tropical Production Systems (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Comparisons and contrasts of crop management systems, techniques, and technologies in protected and open field production of tropical crops. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or consent.

TPSS 251 Scientific Principles of Sustainability (3)

Introduction to the scientific principles of sustainability, including the ecology of managed and natural ecosystems, global change biology, ecological principles of natural resource management, renewable energy technologies, and the environmental impacts of humans. (Cross-listed as NREM 251 and SUST 251)

TPSS 220 Organic Food Crop Production (2)

Combined lecture/lab on the theory and practice of certified organic food production. Field visits to organic farms/markets included. Open to nonmajors. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SUST 221)

TPSS 210 Aquaponics (3)

Basic online course integrates aquaculture (raising fish and prawns) with hydroponics plant cultivation in water. Includes the basic design and construction of an aquaponics feed system. Repeatable one time. (Summer only)

TPSS 200 Agriculture, Environment, and Society (3)

Relationship of plants, soils, and the environment, and how they relate to cultural practices and society in agroecosystems with an emphasis on Hawai‘i as a model system. (Cross-listed as SUST 211)

TPSS 156L Natural History Field Trips on Hawai‘i Island (1)

Field trips for Natural history and Conservation of the Hawaiian Islands. A-F only. Co-requisite: 156. (Summer only)

TPSS 156 Sustainable Food and Energy (Field Course) (V)

Examines the nexus of food, energy, and water in Hawai‘i for sustainable development. Repeatable two times, up to nine credits. (Cross-listed as SUST 156)

TPSS 120 (Alpha) Plants for People (1)

The origins: social, cultural, and ceremonial traditions; culture; food and nutritional properties. Processing of a variety of tropical horticultural plants are presented, with tasting sessions and optional field trips. Topics will rotate among (B) beverage crops (e.g., coffee, tea, chocolate, kava, fruit juices); (C) herbs, spices, and flavoring (selection of examples to be determined); (D) tropical fruits (assortment offered depends on availability during semester); (E) ornamental plants (flowers, houseplants, popular landscape plans, bonsai, ethnic ornamentals). Does not count towards TPSS major. Pre: consent.

TRMD 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Research for doctoral thesis. Approval of department faculty is required. Repeatable unlimited times.

TRMD 705 Special Topics in Tropical Medicine (V)

Advanced instruction in frontiers of tropical medicine and public health. Repeatable unlimited times. A-F only. (Cross-listed as PH 756)

TRMD 700 Thesis Research (V)

Research for master’s thesis. Approval of department faculty required. Repeatable unlimited times.

TRMD 699 Directed Research (V)

Directed research in medical microbiology (bacteriology, parasitology, virology). Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

TRMD 695 Plan B Master’s Project (3)

Independent study for students working on a Plan B master’s project. A grade of Satisfactory (S) is assigned when the project is satisfactorily completed. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing in TRMD.

TRMD 690 Seminar in Tropical Medicine and Public Health (1)

Weekly discussion and reports on current advances in tropical medicine and public health. Repeatable unlimited times. (Cross-listed as PH 755)

TRMD 675 Epidemiology of Tropical Infectious Diseases (3)

Epidemiology of infectious diseases as it relates to tropical medicine. Lecture/seminar format. A-F only. Pre: TRMD graduate standing or consent. (Spring only)

TRMD 673 Advanced Medical Bacteriology (2)

Role of bacteria in infectious diseases, with emphasis on clinical aspects and identification of etiological agents. Pre: 605 or equivalent, or consent.

TRMD 672 Advanced Medical Virology (2)

In-depth study of the major groups of viruses pathogenic for human; virus replication, host range, pathogenesis, immunology, and epidemiology. Pre: 605 or equivalent, or consent. (Alt. years: fall)

TRMD 671 Advanced Medical Parasitology (2)

Consideration of ultrastructure, physiology, biochemistry, in-vitro cultivation and host-parasite relationship of parasites of medical importance. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Alt. years: fall)

TRMD 655 Fundamentals of Biostatistics (3)

Fundamental biomedical statistics concepts and tools will be introduced, as well as their applications to biomedical data. Students will perform hands-on analysis using statistical software and learn to interpret and present the results. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as QHS 601)

TRMD 654 Advances in HIV/AIDS (2)

History of HIV, basic biology and virology, epidemiology, HIV pathogenesis and immunology, clinical features, and co-morbidities. Treatment and prevention of HIV/ AIDS, including research methods, statistics, cultural competence, genetics, pathophysiology, drug and vaccine development. Repeatable unlimited times. A-F only. Pre: 604 and 605, or consent. (Fall only)

TRMD 653 Bioinformatics I (3)

Provides fundamental concepts in bioinformatics with strong emphasis on hands-on training. Topics such as molecular biology, sequence alignment, biological databases, phytogeny, and genomics including microarray and RNA-sequence analysis. Repeatable one time, but credit earned one time only. Open to nonmajors. A-F only. Pre: 604 (or concurrent) and 605 (or concurrent) or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed with QHS 610)

TRMD 652 Advanced Genetics and Evolution of Infectious Diseases (2)

An evolutionary perspective to examine the interactive responses between infectious agents and the immune system. Topics will include natural selection, life history evolution, population genetics of pathogens and hosts, and anti-microbial resistance. A-F only. Pre: 604 (or concurrent) and 605 (or concurrent), or consent. (Alt. years: spring)

TRMD 651 Vaccinology (2)

History/evolution of vaccines, current and next generation vaccines, vaccine immunology, adjuvants, vaccine strategies, vaccines for viral, bacterial, and parasitic diseases, vaccine-proof-of-concept and downstream developmental studies; vaccine safety production processes. Repeatable one time. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: (604 and 605) with a minimum grade of B. (Spring only

TRMD 650 Ecological Epidemiology (2)

Applications of population biology, pathogen/host life history, and population genetics to infectious disease epidemiology, including micro- and macroparasites, and implications to disease control and prevention of strategies. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Alt. years: spring) (Cross-listed as PH 650)

TRMD 610 Infection and Immunity (3)

Combined lecture/discussion of interactions of pathogens with the innate and acquired immune systems. Topics will include the role of novel receptors in pathogen detection, inflammation in disease pathogenesis, pathogen immune evasion, and neuroimmunology. Repeatable two times. A-F only. Pre: 604, MICR 461, or consent. (Alt. years: fall)

TRMD 609 Advances In Medical Immunology (3)

Presentations/discussions of current literature concerning recent advances in immunology relevant to disease and to disease processes. Pre: consent. (Alt. years: spring)

TRMD 608 Infectious Disease Microbiology III (3)

Basic structure, physiology, epidemiology, and genetics of pathogenic bacteria as well as the host response to these organisms. Correlation of these characteristics to disease pathogenesis in humans and animal models. A-F only. Pre: 604 or consent. (Spring only)

TRMD 607 Neurovirology (2)

Seminar on neuroinvasive viruses giving basics of viruses causing nervous system diseases and discussing recent advances in the research field of neurovirology. Pre: MICR 351 or equivalent; or consent. (Fall only)

TRMD 606 Tropical Medicine Laboratory Rotations (V)

Practical experience in use of equipment and procedures in infectious disease and immunology research; introduction to research in tropical medicine. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: 604 (or concurrent), or consent.

TRMD 605 Infectious Disease Micro II (3)

Will cover different families of animal viruses of importance to human diseases. The genome, structure, replication, as well as host immune responses, epidemiology, clinical features, and animal models will be presented. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 604 and MICR 351, or consent. (Cross-listed as PH 667)

TRMD 604 Concepts in Immunology and Immunopathogenesis (2)

Immunological concepts relating to infectious diseases and host pathogen interactions. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: MICR 461 (or equivalent) or consent. (Cross-listed as PH 665)

TRMD 603 Infectious Disease Microbiology I: Medical Parasitology (3)

Epidemiology, pathogenesis, immunobiology and diagnostic aspects of human parasitic infections; principles of host-pathogen interactions; public health aspects of parasitic infections. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: MICR 351 or equivalent. (Fall only)

TRMD 602 Laboratory Methods in Tropical Medicine (2)

Microbiologic methods and techniques for identification of pathogenic viruses, bacterial, and parasitic organisms including specimen handling, culturing, and laboratory safety. Repeatable one time. Graduate standing only. A-F only. (Fall only)

TRMD 601 Tropical Medicine Journal Club (1)

Students gain experience in the presentation and discussion of topics of current interest in the fields of tropical medicine and infectious diseases. Repeatable unlimited times. Graduate students only.

TRMD 599 (Alpha) Selected Research Topics in Infectious Diseases (V)

Research elective for medical students; (B) infectious diseases; (C) parasitology; (D) epidemiology; (E) immunology. MD majors only. CR/NC only. Pre: MDED 554 or consent. (Fall only)

TRMD 595 (Alpha) Selected Topics in Infectious Diseases (V)

Elective for medical students; (B) infectious diseases; (C) parasitology; (D) epidemiology; (E) immunology. MD majors only. CR/NC only. Pre: MDED 554 or consent.

TRMD 590 Selected Topics in Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases (V)

Elective for medical students in Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases. Repeatable six times, up to 12 credits. Medical students only. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

TRMD 545 Topics in Tropical Medicine (V)

Elective for fourth-year medical students for advanced study of selected topics within the field of tropical medicine and medical microbiology. Pre: fourth-year standing or MD degree.

TRMD 499 Reading and Research (V)

Directed reading and research in laboratory; diagnostic aspects of bacterial, parasitic, and viral infections. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

TRMD 442 Research Abroad (5)

Hands-on research experience at assigned international sites. Students learn research and analytical skills in the field and laboratory setting, and present data to peers and faculty upon completion of the training. MHIRT cohort only. A-F only. (Summer only)

TRMD 441 International Health Disparities (2)

Overview of biosciences research related to health and health disparities in a global setting as well as in Hawai‘i. Workshop topics include health research, Native Hawaiian health, global health, and cultural competency. MHIRT cohort only. A-F only. (Summer only)

TRMD 440 International Training in Biosciences Research (3)

Combines weekly lectures by faculty for discussion of the 9 Steps of Research and completion of training courses for working with human subjects, including research ethics, laboratory safety, blood-borne pathogens, and principles of health disparity. MHIRT cohort only. A-F only. (Summer only)

TRMD 431 Principles of Medical Parasitology (2)

Epidemiology, pathogenesis, immunobiology and diagnostic aspects of human parasitic infections; principles of host-pathogen interactions; public health aspects of parasitic infections. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: MICR 351 with a grade of B or higher or equivalent. (Spring only)

TAHR 415 Extension Education & Outreach (2)

Introduces an essential component of the Land Grant Mission. Students will explore the foundational components of extension education including agent expectations, program development and evaluation, audience engagement, building partnerships, funding structures. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Cross-listed as TPSS 415)

TAHR 251 Scientific Principles of Sustainability (3)

Introduction to the scientific principles of sustainability, including the ecology of managed and natural ecosystems, global change biology, ecological principles of natural resource management, renewable energy technologies, and the environmental impacts of humans.

TAHR 250 Introduction to Sustainability from Social Science Perspectives (3)

Introduction to key concepts and theories in social sciences in relation to sustainability issues. (Cross-listed as SOCS 250 and SUST 250)

TAHR 099 International Exchange Study/Research (V)

Study overseas in an approved international or similar exchange program. CR/NC only. Pre: consent of academic advisor.

TIM 700 Thesis Research (V)

Independent supervised research. Formal and oral written presentation of research findings. Repeatable up to six credits.

TIM 699 Directed Reading (V)

Independent study of approved, advanced reading with faculty supervision. Requires proposal prepared by student and approved by supervisor and graduate chair before registration. Repeatable one time.

TIM 695 Seminar: Travel Industry Management Policy (3)

Integration of learning through analysis of policy issues, trends, and problems in the travel industry. A-F only. Pre: three 600-level TIM courses completed or consent.

TIM 694 Professional Paper (3)

Independent project or paper under faculty supervision in lieu of Plan A, TIM 700 thesis. Requires proposal approved by supervisor and graduate chair prior to registration. A-F only. Pre: three 600-level TIM courses completed or consent.

TIM 645 Tourism Field Studies (3)

Integration of concepts and application of knowledge and skills from other courses to a selected field study project. Pre: any two 600-level TIM courses completed and a third concurrent; or consent.

TIM 640 Financial Management for the Travel Industry (3)

Applications of financial analysis to both the domestic and international travel industry. TIM majors only. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

TIM 607 Global Tourism Analysis (3)

International trade theory and regional analysis methodologies applied to tourism and the service industry, including travel balance account, inter-regional transactions flow, economic impacts, environmental economics, demand theory and forecasting. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

TIM 606 Transportation Economics and Management (3)

Advanced study analysis of economics and management of passenger transportation systems serving the travel industry. Emphasis on topics such as government policy, transport economics, marketing and management, and the relationships between transportation systems and tourism development. Pre: graduate standing or consent

TIM 605 Hospitality Management (3)

Advanced human relations and operating issues; use of accounting, behavioral, financial, marketing, and informational systems in managing hospitality organizations. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

TIM 604 Managerial Accounting for Travel Industry (3)

Advanced study of management accounting within travel industry: responsibility accounting, pricing decisions, concepts and application of central systems, financial planning, price level impacts, performance evaluation. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

TIM 603 Information Technology, E-Commerce, and Travel Industry (3)

Planning, implementation, management, evaluation, and impact of information and electronic communication technologies, including e-commerce applications in the travel industry. Analysis of new information technology use as an area of research and strategic application. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

TIM 602 Strategic Travel Marketing (3)

In-depth study of marketing principles and problems related to travel industry organizations. Emphasis on strategic marketing. Research applications, international and domestic marketing of travel industry services. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

TIM 601 Research Applications in Travel Industry Management (3)

Analysis of methodologies appropriate for research in travel industry management. Survey of the literature of applied techniques and approaches including exploratory approaches. Familiarization with research design and implementation of development of research proposals. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

TIM 469 (Alpha) Advanced Topics in Travel Industry Management (V)

(B) tourism planning; (C) advanced travel industry management; (D) advanced hospitality management; (E) advanced hotel management; (F) advanced restaurant management; (G) advanced tourism management; (H) advanced recreation management; (I) advanced leisure management; (J) advanced transportation management; (K) advanced travel industry management education; (M) advanced travel industry management technology; (N) advanced meetings, incentives, conventions, and exhibition management; (O) advanced food and beverage management; (P) leadership and advanced human resources; (Q) advanced assets management. Repeatable five times with consent for (B), (C), (D), (E), (F), (G), (H), (I), (J), (K), (M), (N); repeatable six times for (O), (P), and (Q). TIM majors only. A-F only for (O), (P), and (Q).

TIM 462 Environmental Management Systems (3)

Introduction to the process of developing Environmental Management Systems that address the principles outlined in ISO14001:2015. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as OCN 442 and SUST 442)

TIM 442 Advanced Topics in Transportation (3)

Advanced level of discussion in terms of transportation, including management, economics, strategy, regulation, operating performance, fleet management, and network management. Pre: 101. Recommended: 350 and/or 353.

TIM 431 Strategic Management for the Travel/ Hospitality Industry (3)

Strategic management in the travel/hospitality industry. Case study analysis, discussion and written reports, covering strategies, management problems and industry issues. Emphasis on writing instruction. A-F only. Pre: 301, 302, 303, 304, 305 and graduating senior.

TIM 425 Destination Development and Marketing (3)

Analysis of key factors in the marketing and management of tourism destinations, including destination branding, product development, integrated marketing, stakeholder relations, and the role of destination marketing/marketing organizations. Emphasis on written communication. Pre: 101.

TIM 420 Sustainable Tourism Policies and Practices (3)

Seminar examining the social, environmental, economic factors of sustainable tourism development. Emphasis on methods and processes and the role of stakeholders (government, industry, host community, tourists). Group projects. A-F only. Pre: 101 and departmental approval. (Cross-listed as SUST 421)

TIM 415 Nature-Based Tourism Management (3)

Principles of nature-based tourism, including a survey of impacts, objectives, planning, and management systems. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 101 or 324/ GEO 324. (Cross-listed as GEO 415 and SUST 415)

TIM 403 Revenue Management in Travel Industry (3)

TIM 402 Resort Mixed Use Development (3)

Critical and essential aspects of developing and managing resort mixed use facilities. Includes multidimensional and dynamic interrelationships of site development and facilities, business mix, management structures and systems, and industry practices. A-F only. Pre: 313 or 369; and 314. Recommended: 333 and 401. (Fall only)

TIM 401 Resort, Spa and Wellness Management (3)

Principles of resort and spa development. Essential aspects of understanding the leadership and interrelationships of managing/operating and marketing resorts, spas, and wellness. A-F only. Pre: 314. Recommended: 305.

TIM 400 (Alpha) Internship IV (2)

Requires a minimum of 150 hours of internship, a business presentation, and an analytical report synthesizing experience and related theories. A significant portion of class time is dedicated to writing instruction, which will enhance and improve students’ writing skills. (B) executive internship; (C) community service internship. Restricted to majors. CR/NC only. Pre: 200 and consent.

TIM 399 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Reading and research into problems in hotel, restaurant, transportation or tourism sectors of the travel industry. Pre: junior standing or above, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 and consent of dean’s office and instructor based upon student’s written proposal of content and objectives of course program. TIM majors only.

TIM 399 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Reading and research into problems in hotel, restaurant, transportation or tourism sectors of the travel industry. Pre: junior standing or above, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 and consent of dean’s office and instructor based upon student’s written proposal of content and objectives of course program. TIM majors only.

TIM 369 (Alpha) Current Topics in Travel Industry Management (V)

(B) resort development; (C) assets management; (D) transportation and public policy; (E) management by cultural values; (F) travel industry management; (G) hospitality management; (H) hotel management; (I) restaurant entrepreneurship; (J) tourism management; (K) recreation management; (M) leisure management; (N) transportation management; (O) travel industry management education; (P) travel industry management technology; (Q) meetings, incentives, conventions, and exhibition management. Repeatable five times with consent. TIM majors only for (B), (C), (D), (E), (F), (G), (H), (I), (J), (K), (M), (N).

TIM 368 TIM Study Abroad (V)

Study abroad instructional experience emphasizing international travel, tourism and hospitality-related topics at equivalent, accredited programs. Content varies depending on locus of instruction and instructor. Course qualifies as either a TIM or general elective with pre-approval or department. Repeatable unlimited times. TIM majors only. Pre: consent.

TIM 365 Economics in Travel Industry (3)

Microeconomic theory of consumer behavior and demand production cost analysis, market structure and pricing in travel companies. Economic impact of tourism. Students may not earn credit for 365 and BUS 313. TIM majors only. Pre: either ECON 120 or ECON 130.

TIM 354 Surface Transportation Management (3)

Management of surface transportation such as cars, buses, and intercity rail, etc. Includes marketing, ownership and financing, supply chain, operations, regulation and promotion, human resources. TIM majors only. Pre: 101.

TIM 353 Air Transportation Management (3)

Marketing, management and strategies used by airlines, airports, catering, and aircraft manufacturers. TIM majors only. Pre: 101.

TIM 351 Principles of Logistics (3)

Management of logistics systems: inventory control, warehousing, materials management, physical distribution, transportation. Emphasis on Hawai‘i’s location and unique problems. TIM majors only. Pre: 101.

TIM 350 Introduction to Tourism Transportation (3)

Introduction to managerial and operational issues related to all modes of transportation used by tourists into or within a tourist destination. Passenger behavior; transport infrastructure; transport networks; regulation; sustainable transport. TIM majors only. Pre: 101.

TIM 334 Hotel and Convention Sales (3)

Functions, methods, and problems of hotel, convention, and restaurant sales. Needs of different classifications of properties; market segmentation and the sale of services vs. products. TIM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 101. Recommended: 304.

TIM 333 Hotel/Resort Facilities and Design (3)

Comprehensive understanding of facilities management and design including maintenance systems, sustainable development options and design and environmental management. TIM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 313 and 314.

TIM 327 Travel Distribution Management (3)

History, development, operations, and management of travel distribution organizations including: travel agents, tour operators and wholesalers, specialty channelers, meeting planners, incentive houses, travel associations, and other destination management organizations. Evolution and economics of the distribution of travel products through destination databases and electronic commerce. TIM majors only. Pre: 302.

TIM 324 Geography of Global Tourism (3)

Tourist landscape in relation to resources, spatial patterns of supply and demand, impacts of tourism development, and models of tourist space. Flows between major world regions. TIM majors only. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as GEO 324)

TIM 321 Sociocultural Issues in Tourism (3)

Issues arising from the impacts of tourism on societies and cultures. Class discussions of the ethical dimensions of such impacts. Includes an emphasis on writing instruction. TIM majors only. Pre: 101.

TIM 320 Introduction to Tourism Economics (3)

Examines tourism from an economic perspective. Topics include: the determinants of consumer demand for leisure travel, structure of competition among suppliers of tourism services, benefits and costs of tourism development to the host community, government’s role in the taxation, subsidy, regulation and protection of the tourism industry, tourism’s impact on the environment, and sustainable tourism development. TIM majors only. Pre: ECON 120 or 130 or 131; or consent. (Cross-listed as ECON 320)

TIM 319 Quantity Foods and Institutional Purchasing (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Quantity food and beverage operations, menu development and costing, dietary menu claims, purchasing procedures, inventory control, procurement, transportation, legislation. Institutional foodservice sanitation, Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point and National Restaurant Association Certification. TIM majors only. Pre: FSHN 181 and FSHN 181L, 315 or consent.

TIM 316 Events Planning and Marketing (3)

Introduction to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis on designing, planning, marketing, management, staging events, legal compliances, risk management, financial control, and successful event evaluation. TIM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 313 and junior standing.

TIM 315 Quality Food Management (3)

Explore various aspects of the quality in foodservice operations and develop strategies to measure and improve the quality. A-F only. Pre: 101 and departmental approval.

TIM 314 Hotel Management (3)

Comprehensive understanding of hotel management and functional departments including front office, accounting, housekeeping, food and beverage, marketing, security and safety. Simulation of management trainee programs by hotel chains. Synthesis of concepts, tools and theories of decision-making relevant to hotel operations. TIM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 101, 302, and 303 (with a minimum grade of C- in 302 and 303).

TIM 313 Foodservice Management (3)

Critical and essential aspects of managing foodservice operations including principles of food safety and sanitation, procedural knowledge in front and back of the house and guest relations. TIM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 101 and 303.

TIM 311 Club Management (3)

Introduction to club and institutional management, including operations, services, and facilities. TIM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 101.

TIM 310 Institutional Purchasing (3)

Procurement responsibilities in hospitality management. Emphasis on institutions supplying hospitality operations and legislation which controls standards of industrial supplies and goods. TIM and FSHN majors only. Pre: 101.

TIM 306 Human Resource Management: Travel Industry (3)

Human resources as a strategic asset in the travel industry; contemporary theories, issues, and developments in the field; practical training in oral communication to enhance employee recruitment, retention, and productivity. TIM majors only. Pre: 101 and (COMG 151 or COMG 251).

TIM 305 Financial Management for the Travel Industry (3)

Cash flow determination and management strategies for financing hospitality ventures and expansion. Determining the financial viability of proposed and existing operations through traditional and state-of-the-art techniques. TIM majors only. Pre: 101, ACC 202, and NREM 203, MATH 203, MATH 215, MATH 241, or BUS 250.

TIM 304 Principles of Travel Industry Marketing (3)

Concepts, problems, processes of marketing within the travel industry; development of marketing strategies including product, place, promotion, and price for travel institutions. Students may not earn credit for 304 and BUS 312. TIM majors only. Pre: 101.

TIM 303 Management of Service Enterprises (3)

Principles and philosophies of management with special emphasis on those principles and theories that are most relevant to management in service-based industries. Students may not earn credit for 303 and BUS 315. TIM majors only. Pre: 101 or consent.

TIM 302 Information Systems Technology (3)

Computer applications in the travel industry; operation and evaluation of specific travel industry systems and applied business systems. TIM majors only. Pre: 101; and either ICS 101, or both LTEC 112 and LTEC 113

TIM 301 Legal Environment of the Travel Industry (3)

Origin, development, and principles of common, statutory, constitutional, international, and maritime law relating to hospitality industry. TIM majors only. Pre: 101. Recommended: BLAW 200.

TIM 300 Internship III (2)

A minimum of four hundred hours of travel industry experience. Position must be different from TIM 200 position and of a more responsible nature or in a different organization. Comprehensive report by student and performance evaluation from employer required. CR/NC only. Pre: TIM major and 200.

TIM 200 Internship II (2)

A minimum of four hundred hours of travel industry experience. Comprehensive report by student and performance evaluation from employer required. CR/NC only. Pre: TIM major, 100, and 101.

TIM 102 Food and World Cultures (3)

An integrated cross-cultural approach to the study of foods and cultures. Examine history, concepts, principles of cultures and cuisines, the background of food tradition including habitat, social status, religious beliefs, gender, and other environmental considerations. A-F only.

TIM 101 Introduction to Travel Industry Management (3)

Overview of travel industry and related major business components. Analysis of links between hotel, food, transportation, recreation, and other industries comprising tourism.

TIM 100 Internship I (2)

Introduction to travel industry. Discussion of job search strategies, TIM internship requirements, career and academic planning. CR/NC only.

TIM 099 International Exchange Programs (V)

UH Mânoa School of Travel Industry Management majors participating in approved international exchange programs. CR/NC only.

TI 499 Directed Reading/Studies (V)

Independent study of approved readings and research with faculty supervision. Repeatable two times, up to nine credits. A-F only.

TI 452 (Alpha) Sight Translation (3)

Focus on the ability to translate orally information from a written text. Emphasis on improving linguistic (discourse analysis) and communicative (public speaking) skills. (J) Japanese; (K) Korean; (M) Mandarin; (O) other; (S) Spanish. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: CITS screening exam.

TI 442 (Alpha) Simultaneous Interpretation (3)

Simultaneous interpretation of speeches. Focus on the study of formulaic and frozen language characteristically used in international meetings. (J) Japanese; (K) Korean; (M) Mandarin; (O) other; (S) Spanish. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: CITS screening exam.

TI 432 (Alpha) Consecutive Interpretation (3)

Extensive note-taking and note-reading in a bilingual context. Focuses on the translation of numbers, acronyms, initials, and economic and financial information. (J) Japanese; (K) Korean; (M) Mandarin; (O) other; (S) Spanish. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: CITS screening exam.

TI 425 Japanese to English Translation (3)

Training in techniques of translating Japanese into English. Pre: JPN 407D or JPN 407E, or consent. (Cross-listed as JPN 425)

TI 424 English to Japanese Translation (3)

Training in techniques of translating English in Japanese. Pre: JPN 407D or JPN 407E, or consent. (Cross-listed as JPN 424)

TI 422 Computer-Assisted Translation (3)

(1 Lec, 1 1.5-hr Lab) The use of computers as aids in the translation process. Basic desktop publishing and technical writing. Computer aids for terminology studies and glossary building. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 421, senior or graduate standing, and pass CITS screening exam. Co-requisite: 402, 412, 452.

TI 420 (Alpha) Chinese Translation (3)

Training in techniques; theory of translation. (B) Chinese– English; (C) English–Chinese. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as CHN 421(Alpha))

TI 414 (Alpha) Translation Skills (into Second Language) (3)

Translation into a Second Language. Processes, methodology, and techniques. Web-based. (J) Japanese; (K) Korean; (M) Mandarin; (O) other; (S) Spanish. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: a previous translation course, or consent.

TI 412 (Alpha) Technical Translation (3)

Translation of nonfiction texts into English. Emphasis on editing target version and producing camera-ready copy. (J) Japanese; (K) Korean; (M) Mandarin; (O) other; (S) Spanish. Repeatable one time. Pre: 411, senior or graduate standing, and pass CITS screening exam. Co-requisite: 414 and 452.

TI 409 Professional Orientation and Internship (3)

A three-part course consisting of business models for interpreters, a language-specific practicum lab, and an internship. Repeatable one time. Pre: 403 or 406. (Spring only)

TI 408 Medical Interpreting (3)

Healthcare interpreting requires students to understand basic biosystems, common illnesses and treatments, as well as interpreting skills. Students must have 402 or above equivalency of second language skills (or instructor approval). Repeatable one time. Pre: 406 or consent.

TI 407 Court Interpreting II (3)

Combined lecture/ discussion/practice. Continuation of 405 Court Interpretation, diving deeper into the practical side of oral interpreting for various proceedings, including arraignments, trials, witness testimonies, etc. Must be bilingual. Real courtroom observations required. Repeatable one time. Pre: 405 or consent.

TI 406 Community Interpreting (3)

Basic principles, ethics and skills involved in community interpreting in medical, legal, and social service settings; practical information about the community interpreter’s role and profession; practice of various community interpreting situations and techniques. Repeatable one time.

TI 405 Court Interpreting I (3)

Introduction to the legal system, as well as theoretical principles, ethics, practical techniques, and current issues surrounding the practice and profession of court and other legal interpreting. Repeatable one time.

TI 404 Spanish-English Translation (3)

Factors in the art of translation. Practice in translating material from Spanish to English and the reverse. Pre: SPAN 305 or consent. (Cross-listed as SPAN 405)

TI 403 Introduction to Interpretation (3)

Develop an awareness of the principles and the basic skills involved in the three modes of bilingual interpreting: simultaneous and consecutive interpreting and sight translation. Repeatable one time. Pre: at least 300-level proficiency in a second language.

TI 401 Principles of Translation (3)

Student awareness of the translation process and the criteria for evaluating translations. Includes readings and discussions of the translation process, terminology research as well as intensive practice in precise writing, paraphrasing, and summarizing. Pre: at least 300-level proficiency in a second language.

TONG 202 Intermediate Tongan (4)

Continuation of 201. Pre: 201 or consent.

TONG 201 Intermediate Tongan (4)

Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. History and culture. Meets four (4) hours weekly. Pre: 102 or consent.

TONG 102 Beginning Tongan (4)

Continuation of 101. Pre: 101 or consent.

TONG 101 Beginning Tongan (4)

Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Structural points introduced inductively. History and culture. Meets four (4) hours weekly.

THEA 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

THEA 779 Seminar in Theatre for Young Audiences (3)

Theories and methods applied in theatrical experiences with and for young audiences: creative movement/drama, puppetry, and theatre/ dance. Pre: one of 470, 474, 475, 476, 477, or DNCE 490.

THEA 763 (Alpha) Seminar in Asian Theatre (3)

(B) Southeast Asia and India; (C) China; (D) Japan. Repeatable two times. Pre: one of 464, 465, 466, or consent.

THEA 705 Seminar in Western Drama and Theatre (3)

Special topics. Repeatable when topics change. Pre: consent.

THEA 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

THEA 699 Directed Research (V)

Reading or research in theatre theory or history; reading and practice in particular areas of dramatic production. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

THEA 696 (Alpha) Professional Internship (V)

Internship program where students will work for or with a professional theatre company under supervision of a UH faculty member, plus possible supervisor(s) from the theatre company. Students must participate hands-on in production activities of that company and receive a satisfactory (or better) review from their supervisor(s); (B) entertainment design: costume, lighting, scenery, props, sound, or other related disciplines; (C) performance: acting, directing, dance, choreography, or other related disciplines. Repeatable eight times per alpha, up to nine credits per alpha. A-F only. Pre: 345 or 353 or 356 for (B); 621 or 682 or DNCE 371 for (C). (Cross-listed as DNCE 696 (Alpha))

THEA 695 Creative Projects (V)

MFA play or dance productions, design projects, original full-length plays. Repeatable unlimited times.

THEA 693 Internship: Youth Theatre/Dance (V)

Supervised leadership experiences in theatre/dance program with children. Students spend nine hours per week in supervised setting and three hours in weekly class meeting. Pre: one of 470, 476, or DNCE 490; or consent. (Cross-listed as DNCE 693)

THEA 692 Practicum in Teaching (V)

Supervised teaching experience at the introductory or undergraduate level. Students will teach an appropriate level course in their field of expertise under faculty supervision. Repeatable up to nine credits. THEA or DNCE majors only. (Cross-listed as DNCE 692)

THEA 691 Seminar in Teaching Dance/Theatre (3)

Pedagogy and classroom experience in teaching technique and theory. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as DNCE 691)

THEA 690 Graduate Theatre Workshop (V)

Practical and supervisory theatre work pertinent to professional degree objectives on productions being done in Kennedy Theatre or in other venues, by approval. Repeatable eight times, up to 9 credits. THEA majors only. Pre: consent.

THEA 685 Directing Western Styles (3)

Students direct scenes in classic or non-realistic western theatre styles or genres. Repeatable one time with consent. THEA majors only. A-F only. Pre: graduate student in theatre program, or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 683 Workshop in Directing Process (3)

Methods class in theatre production for the director. Covers organization and techniques such as rehearsal planning, scheduling, and execution. Repeatable one time.

THEA 682 Graduate Workshop in Directing (3)

Direction of scenes and major one-act plays. Pre-thesis production. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 600 or consent.

THEA 681 Advanced Topics in Theatre Directing (V)

Readings, discussion, research, and/or performance and scene work. Repeatable five times, up to nine credits. THEA majors only. Pre: consent.

THEA 680 Directing Asian Theatre (3)

Directing traditional Asian theatre pieces and Western plays performed with Asian techniques; development of new performance styles based on Asian examples; directing of scenes and one-act plays. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: graduate theatre major and one Asian theatre course, or consent.

THEA 678 (Alpha) Topics in Theatre for Young Audiences(3)

Creative movement/drama, puppetry, and theatre/dance; (B) production concepts. Repeatable when topics change. Pre: one of 470, 474, 475, 476, 477, DNCE 490; or consent.

THEA 670 Seminar in Advanced Creative Dramatics (3)

Advanced seminar in applied methods and theories of creative dramatics. Repeatable one time. THEA or DNCE majors only.

THEA 663 (Alpha) Topics in Asian Theatre (3)

Comparative and cross-cultural examination. (B) origins; (C) theories and systems; (D) modern Asian drama. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent.

THEA 660 Asian Theatre Field Research (3)

Goals and methods. Interview, questionnaire, observation, and performance study as research techniques. Practical application by designing a research project. Pre: 600.

THEA 658 Business for the Arts (3)

Seminar offering overview and foundation for launching or advancing enterprises in the arts. A focus on the processes and method for creating economically successful grants and project development applications. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as DNCE 658)

THEA 657 Seminar in Design (3)

Research, design, and discussion exploring collaborative design problems and solutions. Repeatable two times. A-F only. Pre: 445, 453, 456; or consent.

THEA 656 Costumes III: Advanced Costume Design (3)

Workshop dealing with special topics in costume design and related skills. Repeatable one time with consent. A-F only. Pre: 456 or consent.

THEA 654 Advanced Topics in Costume Construction (3)

Western and Asian theatre and dance costume production techniques. Topics may include corset building, draping, patterning, tailoring, dying, fabric fabrication, millinery, leatherwork, and crafts. Topics presented within the context of current entertainment industry practice. Repeatable three times for different topics. Pre: 354 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

THEA 653 Scenic III: Advanced Scenic Design (3)

Workshop dealing with special topics in scenic design, related skills, and portfolio preparation. Repeatable two times with consent. Pre: 453 or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 652 Scenic II: Intermediate Scene Design (3)

Workshop in advanced techniques and skills of scenic design; research, presentation, rendering, drafting, and model making. Pre: 353 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

THEA 650 Professional Advancement in Entertainment Design (1)

Directed study designed to help MFA candidates in Design acquire the tools helpful in obtaining future employment. Portfolios, resumes, and related application tools will be developed along with other necessary skills. Must be current MFA candidate in theatre. Repeatable six times. THEA majors only. Graduate students only.

THEA 645 Lighting III: Advanced Lighting Design (3)

Workshop dealing with special topics in theatrical lighting design and related skills. Repeatable two times. THEA or DNCE majors only. Pre: 445.

THEA 644 Lighting II: Intermediate Lighting Design (3)

Workshop in intermediate techniques and skills of lighting design; storytelling, analysis, research, envisioning, and communicating a design plan, execution of successful design projects. Use of communication tools such as mini-plots, light renderings, LightWright, and VectorWorks. Repeatable one time. Pre: 345 (with a minimum grade of B) or equivalent experience.

THEA 640 Problems in Design and Production (3)

Workshop dealing with special topics in lighting design, sound design, technical design, production stage management, and special effects. Repeatable three times with consent. Pre: 343 or 445 or consent.

THEA 634 Taiji Weapons for Actors (3)

Advanced level Taijiquan (T’ai Chi Ch’uan) weapons training. Repeatable two times. Pre: 334 or 434, or consent.

THEA 626 Advanced Topics in Theatre Acting (1)

Readings, discussion, research, and/or performance and scene work. Repeatable eight times. THEA majors only. Pre: consent.

THEA 625 Experimental Asian Acting (3)

Integration of movement, vocal technique, and concepts of traditional Asian genres into the actor’s repertory. Exploration of application to contemporary Asian and non-Asian texts. Workshop format. Repeatable one time. THEA and DNCE majors only. Pre: consent.

THEA 621 Great Roles in Acting (3)

Great roles from the Western theatre repertory; focus on the individual actor and performance styles. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

THEA 620 Advanced Voice for the Actor (3)

Training at advanced level in speaking and vocal skills and techniques in preparation for a solo performance. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 420 or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 619 Advanced Topics: Playwriting and Dramatic Theory (3)

Readings, research, writing, and seminar discussions. Pre: 418, 611, and consent.

THEA 618 Digital Multimedia Tools for Performance Research (3)

Dance, Theatre, Music Majors only. A-F only. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent.

THEA 617 Seminar in Performance Studies (3)

Special topics. Repeatable up to two times when topics change. Pre: 615 or consent. (Cross-listed as DNCE 617)

THEA 616 Script Analysis (3)

Study of dramatic texts in a seminar format; analysis of Western and Asian classical to post-modern plays. Pre: 312 or consent.

THEA 615 Performance Theory (3)

Introduction to key texts and concepts of performance studies. Pre: consent.

THEA 614 (Alpha) Topics in Dramaturgy (3)

(B) role of the dramaturg; covers history, theory, and practice; (C) dramaturgy workshop; accompanies specific Kennedy Theatre productions. Repeatable one time per alpha. Pre: consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 613 History of Western Theatre II (3)

Theatre as a cultural and social institution in the West, from the 18th century to the present. Pre: one of 311, 312, 411, 412, or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 612 History of Western Theatre I (3)

Theatre as a cultural and social institution in the West, from ancient Greece to Restoration England. Pre: one of 311, 312, 411, 412, or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 611 Seminar in Major Dramatic Theory (3)

Major theories of Western drama from Aristotle to Roland Barthes. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 412 or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 600 Seminar in Theatre Research (3)

Bibliography and research methods; preparation for thesis and dissertation writing. Required of many graduate theatre majors.

THEA 499 Directed Work (V)

Individual projects; tutorial. Repeatable two times. Pre: consent.

THEA 492 (Alpha) Topics in Drama and Theatre (3)

(B) theatre traditions; (D) contemporary theatre. Repeatable two times each for (B) and (D). Junior standing or consent.

THEA 490 Experimental Theatre Studio (3)

Working collectively, students research, write, design, develop, and perform a full-length production. Repeatable two times. Pre: 6 credits above the 200 level in acting, directing, playwriting, dancing; or consent.

THEA 480 Intermediate Directing (3)

Workshop; students direct one-act plays. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 380 and consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 478 Hula Ki‘i: Hawaiian Puppetry and Image Dancing (3)

History, techniques, construction, and performance of Hawaiian puppetry and traditional image dancing. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher.

THEA 477 Giant Puppetry (3)

History, construction, and performance techniques for large-scale and giant puppets. For teachers, recreation directors, and others working with students aged 10 to 18 and adults

THEA 476 Puppetry (3)

History and scope of puppetry. Construction and presentation of puppets for adult and child audiences. Repeatable one time.

THEA 475 Puppetry for Young Children (3)

Methods of constructing puppets and stages with and for children 3 to 8 years of age. Use of puppets in the creative arts. Fieldwork.

THEA 474 Theatre for Young Audiences (3)

Theories and principles of formal theatre for young audiences. Study of and practice in the selection, direction, and production of plays.

THEA 473 Storytelling (3)

Storytelling development through focused activities on personal artistic practice, story content, and public performative techniques. Repeatable one time.

THEA 470 Creative Drama (3)

Dramatic activities for young people. For teachers, group workers, recreation majors, and others dealing with children. Supervised field activities.

THEA 468 Drama and Theatre of Hawai‘i (3)

Survey of indigenous theatre forms of Hawai‘i, Native Hawaiian, and other ethnic playwrights, and contemporary multicultural landscape of drama and theatre in Hawai‘i. Sophomore standing or higher. (Alt. years: fall)

THEA 466 Drama and Theatre of Japan (3)

No, Kyogen, Bunraku, Kabuki, modern drama, and the manner of their production. Pre: junior standing.

THEA 465 Drama and Theatre of China (3)

Yuan, southern, spoken drama; Beijing opera and the manner of their production. Pre: consent.

THEA 464 Drama and Theatre of Southeast Asia and India (3)

Court, folk, popular traditions, and the manner of their production. Pre: consent.

THEA 462 Drama and Theatre of Oceania (3)

Survey of the contemporary drama and theatre of Oceania that combines island and Western traditions. Includes Papua New Guinea, Hawai‘i, Fiji, Samoa, Australia, New Zealand. Pre: 101 or ANTH 350, or consent. (Cross-listed as PACS 462)

THEA 456 Costumes II: Intermediate Costume Design (3)

Advanced costume design for theatre and dance. Introduction to collaborative process in costume. Intensive work on rendering skills, applied to various design problems. Cost analysis and organizational techniques. Pre: 356 or consent. (Cross-listed as DNCE 456)

THEA 448 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design for the Theatre (3)

Basic concepts and techniques of 2D computer-aided design. Lecture/ workshop covers language and commands common to most CAD packages with a focus on drafting specific to theatre. A laptop with Vectorworks installed is required. Pre: 343 or consent. (Once a year)

THEA 447 Stage Management (3)

Business, organization and management for theatre and dance productions. Pre: junior standing or consent.

THEA 446 Topics in Costume Construction (3)

Costume production techniques, both Western and Asian, for theatre and dance. Topic rotation includes: understructures and armatures, patterning, tailoring, dyeing, fabric modification, millenery and crafts, within the context of current industry practice. Repeatable two times. A-F only. Pre: 354, 356, or consent. (Cross-listed as DNCE 446)

THEA 439 Musical Theatre Dance Forms (3)

Theatrical dance forms used in 20th-century musical theatre. Pre: 100 level or above dance technique class, 421, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as DNCE 439)

THEA 438 Period Movement Styles, 1650–1800 (3)

Movement styles and social deportment of the Baroque and pre-Romantic periods in Europe and the American Colonies. Pre: one of 435, DNCE 435, one semester of a 100-level dance technique class, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as DNCE 438)

THEA 437 Period Movement Styles, 1450–1650 (3)

Movement styles and social deportment of European societies in the Renaissance and early Baroque periods. Pre: one of 435 or DNCE 435, or one semester of a 100-level dance technique class. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as DNCE 437)

THEA 436 Advanced Movement for Actors (3)

Detailed development of material presented in 435. Focus on Bartenieff fundamentals and movement analysis as it applies to the physical interpretation of theatrical roles. Pre: one of 435, DNCE 435, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as DNCE 436)

THEA 435 Movement for Actors (3)

Training actors to discover experientially the sources of movement; to teach skills for analyzing movement for its mechanical, anatomical, spatial, and dynamic content; and then to apply these skills in a role. Pre: 222 or consent. (Cross-listed as DNCE 435)

THEA 434 Taiji (T’ai Chi) for Actors II (3)

Intermediate-level Taijiquan (T’ai Chi Ch’uan) movement training. Repeatable two times. Pre: 334 or consent. (Cross-listed as DNCE 434)

THEA 433 Movement Workshop (V)

Special workshops in movement relating to specific departmental theatrical productions beyond the scope of movement taught in 437 and 438. Repeatable one time. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as DNCE 433)

THEA 432 Stage Combat (3)

Techniques for performing unarmed and armed stage combat. Repeatable one time. Pre: one of 221, 222, 321, 322; or consent.

THEA 429 Contemporary Performance Practices (3)

Focus on individual training in the skills and techniques of contemporary experimental theatre including acting, directing, and self-scripting. Repeatable two times. Pre: one of 222, 318, 380, or consent.

THEA 428 Japanese Acting Workshop (V)

Training in skills and techniques for selected traditional Japanese theatre forms. Emphasis on movement and vocal technique. Repeatable to six credits. Pre: 222 or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 427 Chinese Acting Workshop (V)

Training in skills and techniques for selected traditional Chinese theatre forms. Emphasis on movement and vocal technique. Repeatable to six credits. Pre: 222 or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 426 South/Southeast Asian Acting Workshop (3)

Training in skills and techniques for selected traditional south and southeast Asian theatre forms. Emphasis on movement and vocal techniques. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 222 or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 424 Hawaiian Acting Workshop (3)

Training in skills and techniques for selected traditional Hawaiian performance forms and Hawaiian medium theatre. Emphasis on movement and vocal technique. Repeatable one time. Pre: One of: 101, 221, 224, 468, HAW 202, HAW 321, HAW 384, HAW 486; or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 423 Acting Shakespeare (3)

Techniques for acting in Shakespearean and heightened language texts. Repeatable one time. Pre: 222, 322, or consent.

THEA 422 Period Styles in Acting (3)

Presentational acting in comedy and tragedy; emphasis on performance styles in Elizabethan, Restoration, and 18th-century drama. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 222 or 322 or consent.

THEA 421 Musical Theatre (3)

Training in skills required to perform in musicals. Students present scenes from musical comedies for criticism and review. Repeatable two times with consent. Pre: one of 321, 322, MUS 231B, or consent; and/or audition. (Cross-listed as MUS 421)

THEA 420 (Alpha) Intermediate Voice for the Actor (3)

Training in proper and dynamic use of the voice for the actor. (B) Western traditions; (C) Asian traditions. Repeatable two times. Pre: 220 or consent.

THEA 418 Advanced Playwriting (3)

Workshop in experimental writing in dramatic form; full-length plays. Repeatable one time. Pre: 318.

THEA 414 Women in Drama and Theatre(3)

The role of women and their presentation in theatre from ancient Greece to the present; focus on sociopolitical status of women. Pre: 311. (Cross-listed as WGSS 414)

THEA 413 (Alpha) Approaches to Dramatic Texts (3)

Intensive analysis and discussion of dramatic texts from a variety of authors. Understanding trends and variations in dramatic form and content. (B) contemporary British and American drama; (C) political drama in the West. Pre: one of 311, 312, 411, 412, or consent.

THEA 412 World Theatre IV: Modern (3)

Pluralism in modern theatre, 1900–present. Reactions to realism and current international theatre forms. Required of all majors. Pre: 411. (Alt. years)

THEA 411 World Theatre III: Elite and Popular (3)

Ethical issues in drama and production, interplay between elite and popular forms and the impact of colonialism, 1500-1900. Required of all majors. Pre: 311 (or concurrent). (Alt. years)

THEA 400 (Alpha) Advanced Theatre Practicum (1)

Advanced workshop experience in the practical application of theatre skills. (B) acting; (C) stagecraft; (D) costume; (E) theatre management; (F) directing dramaturgy stage management. Repeatable up to four credits per alpha. Pre: audition and performance of role in a Department of Theatre and Dance production for (B); 200C for (C); 200D for (D); 200E for (E); 200B or 200C or 200F, and consent for (F).

THEA 380 Beginning Directing (3)

Basic practical course in how to direct a play. Students will direct scenes. Emphasis on writing instruction. THEA and DNCE majors only. Pre: upper division theatre majors or consent.

THEA 357 Stage Makeup Workshop (3)

Western and traditional Asian makeup theory and application practice. Western corrective, period, and old age makeup. Asian may include Jingju, Kabuki, Wayang. Repeatable one time. Pre: 240 or consent.

THEA 356 Costumes I: Beginning Costume Design (3)

Basic principles and approaches to costume design for theatre and dance. Visual communication methods, creative process, historical research, and organizational practices. Repeatable one time. Pre: 240, DNCE 250, or consent. (Cross-listed as DNCE 356)

THEA 354 Introduction to Costume Construction (4)

Workshop on basic principles of costume construction for theatre and dance. Professional practices, materials, and methods. (Cross-listed as DNCE 354)

THEA 353 Scenic I: Beginning Scenic Design (3)

Workshop introducing the basic principles and approaches of scenic design for theatre and dance, with emphasis on the creative process. Pre: a course in THEA or DNCE, production experience, or consent. (Consent required for production experience option) (Cross-listed as DNCE 353)

THEA 345 Lighting I: Beginning Lighting Design (3)

Basic principles of lighting design and associated technologies. Includes functions and properties of light, lighting and control equipment, working procedures, and drafting and paperwork techniques. Pre: THEA/DNCE 240 or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as DNCE 345)

THEA 343 (Alpha) Topics in Theatre Production (3)

Workshop in principles, techniques, and application of contemporary theatre production practices. (B) entertainment electrics: lighting, sound, special effects, projections, and related areas; (C) technical production: technical direction, technical design, construction, rigging, and related areas; (D) scenic painting: techniques of scene painting for theatre through reading, drawing exercises, color theory, and practical projects; (E) props and crafts: techniques to create props for theatre. Repeatable one time for different alphas, each alpha can be taken one time. Pre: any course in THEA or DNCE, or production experience; or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 335 Taiji Round Form for Actors (3)

Introduction to basic Asian movement skills through learning the Wu-style taijiquan round form, a faster and more fluid version of the full 108 taiji sequence of forms. Open to non-majors. Repeatable two times. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

THEA 334 Taiji (T’ai Chi) for Actors I (3)

Basic Taijiquan (T’ai Chi Ch’uan) movement training. Repeatable two times. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as DNCE 334)

THEA 325 Introduction to Asian Acting Styles (3)

Principles of acting based on traditional Asian models. Voice, movement exercises. Pre: 221 or 222 or consent.

THEA 324 Advanced Film/TV Acting (3)

Advanced acting techniques for film and TV production. Taping/filming of scenes and full-length scripts. Repeatable one time. Pre: 323 and consent.

THEA 323 Film/TV Acting (3)

Acting techniques for film and TV production. Students appear in scenes from TV and film scripts. Repeatable one time. Pre: 101 or 221 or 222 or COM 201 or consent.

THEA 322 Acting II: Advanced Scene Study (3)

Further exploration of character development and dramatic action through textual analysis. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 221 or 222 or consent.

THEA 321 Auditioning (3)

Preparation of material from different audition situations, including monologues, cold readings, dance, singing, and TV/ film. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 221 or 222 or consent.

THEA 319 Screenplay Writing (3)

Characterization, structure, theme, image, and other components of writing for film. Pre: 201 and grade of B or better in composition, or consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 318 Playwriting (3)

One-act plays; practice in writing in dramatic form. Repeatable one time. Pre: grade of B or better in composition or consent.

THEA 312 World Theatre II: Myth to Drama (3)

Myth and ritual into drama, 1000 BCE–1700 CE. Development of secular drama from sacred and ritual beginnings. Required of all majors. Pre: 311 (Alt. years)

THEA 311 World Theatre I: Script Analysis (3)

Script analysis methods for world drama. Required of all majors. Pre: one of 101, 221, 222, 240; or consent.

THEA 259 Introduction to Voice Function and Singing Styles (3)

Students will study how the singing voice works in various styles, including classical, musical theater, jazz, choral, and pop/ rock. Students will learn historical contexts, aural characteristics, and musical vocabulary through lecture, discussion, and listening. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as MUS 259)

THEA 245 Principles of Design (3)

Introduction to general design principles as applied to theatre. Will introduce the language and tools of visual literacy and visual communications via individual projects and collaboration. Repeatable two times. (Cross-listed as DNCE 245)

THEA 241 Film/TV Production Process (3)

Entry-level course details three phases of the production process for film and video projects: pre-production, production, and post-production. A-F only. Pre: consent.

THEA 240L Theatre Production Lab (1)

Lab observations and projects illustrating basic principles of theatre production. A-F only. Co-requisite: 240.

THEA 240 Introduction to Stage Production (3)

Survey class introducing theater management, lighting, costuming, scenery, and other aspects of theatre that relate to producing stage performances. (Cross-listed as DNCE 240)

THEA 224 Pidgin/HCE Drama (3)

Introduction to Hawaiian Creole English (HCE) multicultural comedy and drama in Hawai‘i. Emphasis on acting exercises, local dialects, and the performance of Pidgin/HCE plays. Repeatable one time with consent. (Alt. years)

THEA 222 Acting I: Foundations and Techniques (3)

Fundamentals of contemporary acting styles, including self-awareness, character, and scene work. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 221 or consent or THEA major.

THEA 221 Introduction to Performance (3)

Concentration on voice, relaxation, body awareness, and freedom from self-consciousness through theatre games, improvisations, monologues, and exercises. Emphasis also on written work through self-awareness journals and performance evaluations. Repeatable one time with consent.

THEA 220 Beginning Voice and Movement (3)

Introduction to vocal and movement techniques to increase self-awareness and potential for self-expression. Repeatable one time.

THEA 214 Development of the Sound Film (3)

Growth and changes in aesthetics of the sound film from 1929 to present; films by Renoir, Welles, Eisenstein, etc. Pre: 201. (Alt. years)

THEA 205 Introduction to Long-Form Improvisation (1)

Introduction to long-form improvisation as developed by companies such as Second City and iO Chicago. Focus will be on games, situations, creating characters, and forming narratives from those elements. Repeatable two times.

THEA 201 Introduction to the Art of the Film (3)

Introduction to the aesthetics of silent and sound movies. Technical subjects analyzed only as they relate to theme and style.

THEA 200 (Alpha) Beginning Theatre Practicum (1)

Beginning workshop experience in the practical application of theatre skills. (B) acting; (C) stagecraft; (D) costume; (E) theatre management; (F) directing dramaturgy stage management. Repeatable up to four credits in each alpha. Pre: (B) audition and performance of role in a Department of Theatre and Dance production; (F) consent.

THEA 152 Live on Stage (3)

Will view 10 locally-produced theatre and dance productions. Readings, class discussion, and live demonstration will assist students to understand each performance. Performances may include theatre, dance, musical theatre, opera, and performance art. Repeatable one time. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as DNCE 152)

THEA 101 Introduction to World Drama and Theatre (3)

(2 Lec, 1 1-hr Lab) Performance traditions of Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and the Pacific from the 5th century B.C. to the present. Analysis of political, religious, and technological conditions of theatre. Includes practical theatre workshop. Emphasis on writing instruction. A-F only.

THAI 462 (Alpha) Readings in Thai Contemporary Prose Literature: the Novel (3)

Selected readings in Thai novels from early 1930s to present. Oral and written reviews. (B) 1930–1969; (C) 1970–present. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 402, 461(B) or 461(C), or consent.

THAI 461 (Alpha) Readings in Thai Contemporary Prose Literature: the Short Story (3)

Selected readings in Thai short stories from early 1930s to present. Oral and written reviews (B) 1930-1969; (C) 1970-present. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 402 or consent.

THAI 452 Structure of Thai (3)

Continuation of 451. Pre: 451 or consent.

THAI 451 Structure of Thai (3)

Introduction to information structure of Thai as a basis for developing reading skills. Analysis of rhetorical, sentence, and word structure from different types of written texts. Pre: 402 or consent.

THAI 415 Thai Language in the Media (3)

Development of reading and aural comprehension of authentic Thai language used in print and broadcast media through reading Thai newspapers, viewing and listening to Thai television and radio programs. Oral and written reports. Repeatable one time. Pre: 402, 404 (or equivalent), or consent.

THAI 404 Accelerated Fourth-Level Thai (6)

Continuation of 303. Meets six hours a week. Advanced conversation and reading of specialized, scholarly texts. Pre: 303.

THAI 402 Fourth-Level Thai II (3)

Continuation of 401. Pre: 401.

THAI 401 Fourth-Level Thai I (3)

Continuation of 302/303. Advanced conversation and reading of specialized, scholarly texts. Pre: 302 or 303 or equivalent.

THAI 303 Accelerated Third-Level Thai (6)

Continuation of 202. Meets six hours a week. Advanced conversation and reading; emphasis on modern written texts. Lab work. Pre: 202 or equivalent.

THAI 302 Third-Level Thai II (3)

Continuation of 301. Pre: 301 or equivalent.

THAI 301 Third-Level Thai I (3)

Continuation of 202. Advanced conversation and reading, emphasis on modern written texts. Regular on-line lab work. Pre: 202 or equivalent or consent.

THAI 212 Intensive Intermediate Thai (10)

THAI 202 Second-Level Thai II (4)

Continuation of 201. Pre: 201 or consent.

THAI 201 Second-Level Thai I (4)

Continuation of 104 and 106, or 102. Integrated development of skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Thai script. Meets 5 hours/week, regular online lab work and review of on-line audio visual materials. Pre: 104 and 106, or 102.

THAI 112 Intensive Elementary Thai (10)

THAI 107 Reading and Writing Thai Script (3)

Focus on Thai script reading and writing skills. For students with some aural and spoken skills in Standard Thai equivalent to those completing THAI 102 or higher, but cannot read or write in Thai script. Lab work. Pre: consent.

THAI 106 Beginning Reading and Writing Thai II (2)

Continuation of 105. Development of literacy skills in Thai for those who cannot read or write in the language. Focus on Thai script reading and writing. Not open to students who have taken 102. Pre: 105 or 101.

THAI 105 Beginning Reading and Writing Thai I (2)

Development of literacy skills in Thai for those who cannot read or write in the language. Focus on Thai script reading and writing. Not open to students who have taken 101. Co-requisite: 103, or consent.

THAI 104 Beginning Conversational Thai II (2)

Continuation of 103. Development of basic skills (listening, speaking, and grammar) of spoken Thai. Regular online lab work and review of audiovisual materials. Not open to students who have taken 102. Pre: 103 and 105, or 101. Co-requisite: 106.

THAI 103 Beginning Conversational Thai I (2)

Development of basic skills (listening, speaking, and grammar) of spoken Thai. Regular online lab work and review of audiovisual materials. Not open to students who have taken 101. Co-requisite: 105.

THAI 102 First-Level Thai II (4)

Continuation of 101. Pre: 101, or 103 and 105, or consent.

THAI 101 First-Level Thai I (4)

Listening, speaking, reading, writing. Structural points introduced inductively. Meets one hour daily, Monday–Friday; four out of five hours devoted to directed drill and practice; regular on-line lab work and review of audiovisual materials.

TAHT 459 Fourth-Level Tahitian Abroad (3)

Continuation of 458. A-F only. Pre: 401 or 458, and consent.

TAHT 458 Fourth-Level Tahitian Abroad (3)

Full-time formal instruction at the University of French Polynesia in Tahiti. Fourth-year level in Tahitian language and culture. A-F only. Pre: 302 and consent.

TAHT 402 Fourth-Level Tahitian (3)

Continuation of 401. Pre: 401 or consent.

TAHT 401 Fourth-Level Tahitian (3)

Continuation of 302. Advanced conversation, reading, and writing with focus on modern formal and colloquial Tahitian styles. The language in the realms of storytelling, radio, folklore, traditional and modern writing. Survey of modern and classical language. Pre: 302 or consent.

TAHT 359 Third-Level Tahitian Abroad (3)

Continuation of 358. A-F only. Pre: 301 or 358; and consent.

TAHT 358 Third-Level Tahitian Abroad (3)

Full-time formal instruction at the University of French Polynesia in Tahiti. Third-year level in Tahitian language and culture. A-F only. Pre: 204 and consent.

TAHT 302 Third-Level Tahitian (3)

Continuation of 301. Pre: 301 or consent.

TAHT 301 Third-Level Tahitian (3)

Continuation of 202. Conversation, advanced reading, composition. Pre: 204 or consent.

TAHT 202 Second Year Tahitian II (3)

Continuation of 201. Pre: 201 or consent.

TAHT 201 Second Year Tahitian I (3)

Intermediate core skills of listening, speaking and knowledge of grammar for spoken Tahitian in a condensed format. Meets three 50-minute sessions weekly. Pre: 102.

TAHT 102 First Year Tahitian II (3)

Continuation of 101. Pre: 101 or consent.

TAHT 101 First Year Tahitian I (3)

Basic core skills of listening, speaking and grammar of spoken Tahitian in a condensed format. Meets three 50-minute sessions weekly.

SUST 763 Research Seminar: Agricultural Geography (3)

(Cross-listed as GEO 763)

SUST 696 Sustainability & Resilience Seminar (1)

Weekly seminar covering research, processes, and initiatives related to sustainability and resilience in practice. The intent is to foster intellectual engagement and to help and encourage students to spawn their own original research ideas. Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only.

SUST 677 Marine Renewable Energy (3)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems: applicability, thermodynamics, design challenges; wave energy converters: floating devices, oscillating water column, optimal hydrodynamic performance; current, tidal, and offshore wind power. Pre: ORE 607; basic knowledge of thermodynamics desirable. (Cross-listed as ORE 677)

SUST 670 Sociology of Sustainability (3)

Analyses of sustainability, environmental, and technoscience issues from sociological perspectives. Graduate students only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SOC 670)

SUST 661 Hawaiian Vascular Plants (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Identification, systematics, evolution, and biogeography of native plants. Field trips. Pre: 461 or consent. (Cross-listed as BOT 661)

SUST 658 Advanced Environmental Benefit Cost Analysis (3)

Advanced environmental benefit-cost analysis will require that proficiency be demonstrated on fundamentals and address topics related to sustainability, including income equality, non-market goods, risk, cost of public funds, and the social discount rate. (Cross-listed as NREM 658)

SUST 652 Kanawai Lawai‘a: Hawa‘i’s Ocean and Fisheries Laws (3)

Seminar on pre-contact, customary laws on fishing and ocean stewardship, their codification in written laws during the Hawaiian Kingdom period, and changes and impacts through U.S. annexation and statehood, including current models of ocean governance. (Alt. years: Fall) (Cross-listed as HWST 652)

SUST 647 Urban and Regional Planning for Sustainability (3)

Focus on ideology, conceptual models, accounting frameworks, appropriate technologies, and indicators of planning for sustainability. Central and local policies, plans, and best practices in various countries and settings will be covered. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Cross-listed as PLAN 647)

SUST 641 (Alpha) Seminar (3)

Study in trends, research, and problems of implementation in teaching field. (P) place-based education. Each alpha repeatable two times. COE-related majors only. Pre: graduate and/or undergraduate courses in education and/ or social sciences or consent. (Cross-listed as EDCS 640P)

SUST 640 Land Systems Science (3)

Through discussion of primary land systems science literature and use of environmental modeling software, this interdisciplinary course explores how drivers, states, and trends in human appropriation of land affect socio-ecological system function. Pre: NREM 477 or NREM 677 or GEO 470 or GEO 476 or ERTH 460 or ERTH 461. (Alt. years: Fall) (Cross-listed as NREM 640)

SUST 638 Environmental Resource Economics (3)

Principles of policy design and evaluation for environmental resources management, forestry and watershed conservation, and sustainable economic development. Pre: ECON 604 or 606; or consent. (Cross-listed as ECON 638)

SUST 637 Resource Economics (3)

Analysis of problems of development and management of natural resources with emphasis on resources in agriculture and role in economic development. Pre: ECON 608 and 629. (Cross-listed as ECON 637 and NREM 637)

SUST 636 Renewable Energy Economics and Policy (3)

Analysis of economic and policy aspects of renewable energy use, and interactions of markets for renewable energy and other energy options. Evaluations of policies to develop renewable energy options. Pre: college calculus and principles of microeconomics; or consent. (Cross-listed as ECON 636)

SUST 632 Planning in Hawai‘i and Pacific Islands (3)

Urban and regional planning in island settings. Experiences in Hawai‘i, Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. Pre: graduate standing. (Cross-listed as PLAN 632)

SUST 628 Urban Environmental Problems (3)

Seminar that examines environmental problems associated with urbanization. Reviews strategic approaches and collaboration among key actors to address such problems. (Cross-listed as PLAN 628)

SUST 625 Climate Change, Energy and Food Security in the Asia/Pacific Region (3)

Analysis of planning responses to human-induced climate change and related environmental problems. Part of the Asia/Pacific Initiative taught in collaboration with universities throughout the region via videoconferencing. (Cross-listed as PLAN 625)

SUST 620 Environmental Planning and Policy (3)

Overview of urbanization and environmental change. An examination of environmental laws, policies, planning and urban design strategies designed to minimize and mitigate urban impacts. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Cross-listed as PLAN 620)

SUST 613 Advanced Methods in Wildlife Management & Conservation (4)

Introduces advanced techniques for wildlife management and conservation. In addition to hands-on training, students will learn underlying biological and ecological principles, as well as quantitative skills, with an emphasis on sustainable management. A-F only. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as NREM 610)

SUST 612 Predicting and Controlling Degradation in Human-Dominated Terrestrial Ecosystems (3)

Historic, present, and projected trends in understanding and managing human-dominated ecosystems; predicting, measuring and mitigating degradation especially in terrestrial ecosystems with a focus on small volcanic islands in tropical settings. A-F only. Pre: NREM 301/SUST 311 and NREM 304 (or equivalent) and NREM 600. Recommended NREM 461, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as NREM 612)

SUST 611 Resource and Environmental Policy Analysis(3)

Exploration of institutional and policy dimensions of natural resource development, management, allocation, markets and pricing, focusing on their environmental impacts. Emphasis on policy analysis using case studies and empirical findings. Original paper required. A-F only. Pre: grade of Cor above in ECON 130 or NREM/SUST 220, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as NREM 611)

SUST 610 Seminar on Water in History (3)

Explores how various forms of salt, fresh, and brackish water have played transformative roles in the evolution of human communities throughout history. (Cross-listed as HIST 608)

SUST 496 Sustainability & Resilience Seminar (1)

Weekly seminar covering research, processes, and initiatives related to sustainability and resilience in practice. The intent is to foster intellectual engagement and to help and encourage students to spawn their own original research ideas. Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only.

SUST 494 Environmental Problem Solving (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Senior-level capstone for NREM and related majors. Ecosystem management within problemsolving context. Applications of research and analytical methods, management tools to case studies. Focus on student teamwork and oral communications. NREM majors only. A-F only. Pre: Senior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as NREM 494)

SUST 481 American Environmental History (3)

Survey history of the complex relations between American societies and diverse U.S. ecosystems, from European contact and colonization to the present. (Cross-listed as AMST 425 and HIST 480)

SUST 461 Global Ethnic Conflict (3)

Ethnic conflicts cause most wars on our globe today. Examines causes of ethnic conflict, including climate change. Will evaluate approaches to building peaceful relations between groups and developing sustainable relationships with the environment. Junior standing or higher. Pre: one DS or DH course or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 460)

SUST 460 Hui Konohiki Practicum (3)

A “hands-on” internship in an environmental or resource-management organization in Hawai‘i. The experience will be broadened and supplemented by classroom lectures, discussion and analysis from traditional Hawaiian, scientific and economic perspectives. A-F only. Pre: 217/HWST 207 or 317/HWST 307 or SUST/HWST 356. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as HWST 460)

SUST 458 Project Evaluation and Resource Management (3)

Principles of project evaluation and policy analysis. Shadow pricing, economic cost of taxes and tariffs; public policy for exhaustible, renewable, and environmental resources. Pre: 301. (Cross-listed as ECON 458)

SUST 457 ‘Aina Mauliola: Hawaiian Ecosystems (3)

Comprehensive analysis of traditional Hawaiian and modern resource management practices. Rigorous overview of the dominant physical and biological processes from the uplands to the oceans in Hawai‘i. Pre: 217/HWST 207 or 317/HWST 307 or SUST/
HWST 356. (Cross-listed as BOT 457 and HWST 457)

SUST 456 Natural Resource Issues and Ethics (4)

Overview of the history of land, resources and power in Hawai‘i; players and processes influencing land and natural resources policies today explored from Native Hawaiian and other viewpoints. Extensive use of case studies. Pre: 217/HWST 207 or 317/HWST 307 or SUST/HWST 356. (Cross-listed as HWST 458)

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