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College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources

ANSC 200 Humans, Animals, and Agriculture (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to animal agriculture, animal science, and the use of animals by humans. Ethics and importance of human use of animals in agriculture are emphasized.

ANSC 201 Principles and Practices of Animal Science (3)

Biology, behavior, and management of  animals of economic and social importance. Topics include physiology, genetics, nutrition, reproduction, behavior, care, and management to achieve productivity, performance, and welfare. (lecture, discussion, and field trips)

ANSC 244 Comparative Nutrition (3)

Digestive systems and nutrient functions, interrelationships and metabolism are compared among animal species, including humans. An intermediate, general nutrition course for Food Science and Human Nutrition and Animal Science majors. Pre: 200 (or concurrent), CHEM 161/L or higher. (Cross-listed as FSHN 244)

ANSC 301 Anatomy of Domestic Animals (3)

Micro and gross anatomical arrangements of tissues and organ systems of domestic animals. Pre: 200 (or concurrent). Co-requisite: 301L.

ANSC 301L Domestic Animal Anatomy Laboratory (1)

Laboratory to accompany 301. Dissection and identification of anatomical arrangements of tissues and organ systems of domestic animals. A-F only. Pre: 200 (or concurrent). Corequisite: 301. (Fall only)

ANSC 321 Applied Animal Nutrition (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Application of the principles of nutrition to feeding of farm animals; composition and nutritional value of feed stuffs; nutritional requirements of beef cattle, dairy cattle, horses, poultry, and swine. Pre: 201 (or concurrent), and 244 or FSHN 244.

ANSC 350 Humans, Food, and Animals: Ethics, Issues, and Controversies (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Ethical issues and other controversies related to human and animal needs; their impact on resource sustainability and quality of life are explored from scientific perspectives. A-F only. Pre: 200 or 201 or FSHN 181 or FSHN 185. (Cross-listed as FSHN 350)

ANSC 353 Horses and Horsemanship (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Origin of species, breeds, nutrition, care, management. Lab on management practices with work on light horses. Pre: 200, or 201 (or concurrent).

ANSC 387 Laboratory Skills in Animal Science (2)

Provides students with basic and essential laboratory skills required in various fields of animal science such as nutrition, genetics, reproductive physiology, meat science, clinical pathology, parasitology, and animal handling. ANSC majors only. A-F only. Pre: 200 or 201, and BIOL 171 and 171L and CHEM 161. (Fall only)

ANSC 430 Poultry Production (3)

Students will learn about poultry health and hygiene, husbandry, production, biosecurity, hands-on skills, and recent advances in poultry farming systems for meat and egg production. ANSC majors only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 301 or 445.

ANSC 431 Beef Production (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of economic beef production, including beef breeds, selection, breeding, management systems, feeding, and marketing under tropical conditions. Pre: 321 and 445.

ANSC 432 Swine Production (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of efficient pork production, including comparative breed evaluation, breeding, feeding, management, marketing, and business aspects. Problems and practices associated with tropical environment emphasized. Pre: 321 and 445.

ANSC 433 Tropical Dairying (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles involved in economical milk production in the tropics, including management, recordkeeping, breeds, breeding, selection, culling, feeding, housing, milking, quality control, and raising young animals. Pre: 321 and 445.

ANSC 445 Genetics and Animal Breeding (3)

Review and application of genetic principles to livestock, poultry, companion, aquatic, and laboratory research animals. Current practices and future developments. Pre: BIOL 171/L or ZOOL 101/L, and MATH 140 or higher. Recommended:biochemistry and genetics or equivalent.

ANSC 446 Genes and Animal Biology (3)

An understanding of animal biology at the level of genes and their regulations; emphasis on gene structure, recombinant DNA, transgenic animals and functional genomics being used for agricultural, nutritional and biomedical sciences. Open to nonmajors. A-F only. Pre: 301, BIOL 171 or ZOOL 101; or consent

ANSC 450 Aquaculture Production (3)

Theory and practice of aquaculture: reproduction, yield trials, management, economics and business case studies of fish, crustaceans, and molluscs. Field classes held at commercial farm and hatchery. Pre: 321 and 445: or BIOL 172/L and CHEM 162/L or higher. (Crosslisted as OCN 450)

ANSC 451 Physiology of Domestic Animals (3)

Functions and relationships of organs and organ systems of domestic animals excluding reproduction and lactation. Problem-based learning and case studies are emphasized. Pre: 301 or consent.

ANSC 453 Animal Diseases and Their Control (3)

Disease problems of livestock, poultry, and companion animals; their economic significance, causes, public health implications, and control. Pre: 200 (or concurrent), and BIOL 171/L or ZOOL 101/L.

ANSC 454 Meat Science and Muscle Biology (3)

Development, growth, function, carcass evaluation of muscle tissue. Pre: 301 (or concurrent).

ANSC 454L Meat Science and Muscle Biology Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Livestock and poultry slaughter, carcass evaluation, meat chemistry, muscle physiology and biochemistry, meat microbiology, and meat processing. Pre: 454 (or concurrent).

ANSC 455 Companion Animals and Society (3)

Explore human and companion animal relationships in biological, social, cultural, economic, legal, health, and welfare contexts to prepare students for careers in the various animal-related fields in Hawai‘i, the Pacific rim, and worldwide. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171, or consent.

ANSC 460 Biology and Culture of Shrimp and Prawns (2)

Aspects of the biology and culture of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and marine shrimp Penaeus (sp) species. Scientific research results and case studies presented and analyzed. Pre: 450 or consent.

ANSC 462 Reproduction and Artificial Insemination (3)

Introductory exploration of anatomy, development, and physiology of reproduction of domestic animals and artificial insemination. Repeatable one time. Pre: 301.

ANSC 462L Reproduction and Artificial Insemination Lab (1)

Reproductive anatomy and physiology of domestic animals, estorus synchronization, breeding soundness, and artificial insemination laboratory, field trips. One week offisland field trip. Repeatable one time. ANSC majors or consent. Pre: 301 and 462.

ANSC 465L Aquaculture Production Laboratory (4)

Intensive, hands-on course involving the culture of larvae and juveniles of marine shrimp, freshwater prawns, molluscs, fish, and their food. Must have strong interest in hands-on rearing and flexible time for continuous live animal care. Lab fee required.

ANSC 472 Comparative Endocrinology (3)

Structure and function of endocrine systems across vertebrate groups, surveying how hormones mediate adaptive responses to dynamic environments and coordinate key aspects of growth, development, metabolism, osmoregulation, and stress. Pre: 301.

ANSC 490 Aquaculture Business Planning and Entrepreneurship (2)

Practical aspects of planning and developing an aquaculture business from conceptualization to a final business plan. Topics include species/technology, project planning, business structuring, permitting, contracts, production plans, financial planning and analysis, market/competition analysis, capital acquisition, intellectual property and
legal issues. Pre: 450 or OCN 450. Must have strong interest in hands-on rearing aquaculture animals and flexible time for live animal care.

ANSC 491 Topics in Animal Sciences (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics, problems. Offered by visiting faculty and/or for extension programs. Repeatable five times, up to 18 credits. Pre: junior or senior standing.

ANSC 492 Field Experience (4)

Integration and application of academic knowledge and critical skills emphasizing professional development. Placement with an approved cooperating supervisor/employer. Writing a learning plan and field report. A-F only. Pre: senior standing in ANSC. (Cross-listed as FSHN 492)

ANSC 499 Directed Study or Research (V)

Limited to exceptional undergraduate students, generally with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 or a minimum GPA of 3.0 in major. Exceptions may be granted for students with high achievement in last three semesters. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: junior or senior standing.

ANSC 601 The Science of Food Systems (2)

(1 50-min Lec, 1 2-hr Discussion) Discussion of food systems as they apply to animal science, food science, and human nutrition. Repeatable one time. Pre:graduate standing or consent. (Cross-listed as FSHN 601)

ANSC 603 Experimental Design (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Design of experiments and variance analyses in biological and agricultural research. Pre: graduate standing or consent. Recommended: ZOOL 632. (Cross-listed as TPSS 603)

ANSC 641 Seminar in Animal Sciences (1)

Topics of current interest and current research related to nutrition, genetics, and physiology. Repeatable three times. Pre: consent.

ANSC 642 Advanced Animal Nutrition (3)

An advanced course in the nutrition of mono-gastric, ruminant, avian, and aquatic species. Topics include digestive system structures, utilization of nutrients, energy metabolism, and experimental techniques used in the study of animal nutrition. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

ANSC 643 Physiology of Reproduction (3)

Comparative differentiation, development, growth, and function of the reproductive systems of mammals and birds; external factors that influence response; artificial insemination. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

ANSC 644 Growth Biology of Meat Animals (2)

Growth and development of meat-producing animals; skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and bone; protein turnover, lipid metabolism, and bioenergetics; regulation of animal growth. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

ANSC 650 DNA and Genetic Analysis (2)

Combined lecture-lab for students interested in genetic analysis of humans, animals, and other species. Molecular techniques, such as PCR, DNA marker identifications, transgenics, expression analysis and functional genomics, are included. Open to nonmajors. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Crosslisted as FSHN 650 and MBBE 650)

ANSC 652 Information Research Skills (1)

Examines the use of libraries and information technology for scholarly investigation in support of scientific research; provides experience utilizing and critically evaluating a variety of print and electronic sources in basic and applied sciences. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as FSHN 652, NREM 652, and TPSS 652)

ANSC 657 Grant Writing for Graduate Students (1)

Combined lecture/discussion on grants and grant writing. Designed to introduce graduate students to grants and grant proposal writing through lectures, class discussion, writing assignments, and peer review. Open to CTAHR graduate students only; others with consent. (Cross-listed as FSHN 657 and TPSS 657)

ANSC 687 Advanced Laboratory Techniques (3)

(1 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Advanced laboratory techniques used in food science and human nutrition research. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent and MBBE 402/402L, and FSHN 477; or BIOC 441/441L. (Cross-listed as FSHN 687 and MBBE 687)

ANSC 695 Plan B Master’s Project (V)

Plan B students work with their advisor to select, revise, and defend before a three-person faculty committee a report of work the student has produced in the project. Repeatable unlimited times, credit earned up to 9 credits. ANSC majors only. Graduate students only.

ANSC 699 Directed Research (V)

Pre: consent. Repeatable unlimited times.

ANSC 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

AREC 610 Biosystems Modeling (3)

Introduction to system thinking, procedures for developing system models, characteristics of important agricultural system modes, computer approach to evaluation and optimization of system models. Pre: one of MATH 215, MATH 241, MATH 251A; or consent. (Crosslisted as BE 638)

AREC 626 Econometrics I (3)

Review of probability, estimation, small sample and asymptotic properties. Bivariate and multiple regression and matrix algebra formulation. Regression diagnostics. Introduction to heteroskedastidity, autocorrelation, simultaneity, dichotomous variables, advanced topics. Pre: NREM 310 or ECON 321, and MATH 241; or consent.

AREC 634 Econometrics II (3)

Specification, statistical estimation, inference, and forecasting of economic models. Includes advanced topics for single-equation models, pooled models, qualitative dependent variables, simultaneous systems, distributed lags, and time series. Pre: 626 and ECON 628, or consent. (Cross-listed as ECON 629)

BE 110 Introduction to Sustainable Engineering (3)

Sustainability and its social and technical significance; global population growth; resource management and quantification; designs for sustainable society; challenges interfacing technology and culture/religion; green and ecological engineering; life cycle analyses; engineering ethics; selected case studies. A-F only. (Fall only)

BE 120 Introduction to Quantitative Biology (3)

Quantitative approach to applied topics in biology including synthesis and metabolism, kinetics, physiological systems, cellular processes and signaling, informatics, and emerging technologies for health, biological production/processing, and discovery. Pre: MATH 241 (or concurrent) and CHEM 162 (or concurrent), or consent. (Once a year)

BE 150 Introduction to Biological Engineering (2)

Discussion and experimental investigation of physical and chemical principles underlying representative biological processes and systems. Bioproduction, energy conversion processes, physiological systems, biological treatment, biosensors, biomechanics, and related natural and engineered systems. A-F only. Pre: MATH 140 or consent. (Once a year)

BE 191 Introduction to Applications in Biological Engineering (V)

Discussion and investigation of special topics, problems and applications of biological engineering. Pre: consent.

BE 260 Mass and Energy Balances (3)

Introduction of the principles of mass and energy conservation; development of systematic approaches to apply these principles in calculations for design and analysis of biochemical, chemical, and physical processes. Pre: BIOL 171, CHEM 162 or 171 or 181A, PHYS 170, and MATH 242 or 252A; or consent.

BE 350 Dynamic Systems Modeling (3)

Introduction to analytical and numerical solutions for systems of differential equations. Modeling and computer simulation of representative dynamic systems encountered in biological engineering. A-F only. Pre: 260, EE 110 or 160, MATH 243 or 253A, CEE 270; or consent. Co-requisite: BE 350L.

BE 350L Dynamic Systems Modeling Laboratory (1)

Industry field trips and lab experiences to illustrate behavior of representative dynamic systems in biological engineering. Data acquisition and model validation. A-F only. Co-requisite: 350.

BE 373 Transport Phenomena (3)

Fundamental principles and applications relating to mass, momentum, and energy transfers in biosystems and other systems for engineers and scientists. Pre: 260, CEE 270, MATH 243 or 253A, ME 311 (or concurrent).

BE 405 Engineering Economics (3)

Economic analysis in engineering and management decision-making, interest, depreciation, income tax, cost classification, break-even analysis, economic comparisons of alternatives, benefit-cost analysis. BENG, CE, CEM, CNST, EE, and ME majors only. A-F only. Pre: ECON 120 or 130, and senior standing. (Cross-listed as CEE 405)

BE 410 Biomass Conversion to Biofuels and Bioenergy (3)

Overview of biofuel/bioenergy production; fundamental concepts in biofuel/ bioenergy production; renewable feedstocks; thermochemical and biochemical conversions of biomass to biofuel/bioenergy; biodiesel production; environmental impacts, economics and life-cycle analysis; value-added processing of biofuel residues; selected case studies. A-F only. Pre: 373 or consent. (Once a year)

BE 411 Food Engineering (3)

Principles and applications of thermodynamics, electricity, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, psychrometry, and material and energy balances of food processing and preservation. Pre: (BIOL 171, CHEM 162 or CHEM 171 or CHEM 181A, MATH 243 or MATH 253A, PHYS 151 or PHYS 170) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as FSHN 411 and MBBE 411)

BE 420 Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems (3)

Design course focused on fundamentals of electronic interfacing, control and automation, including biological processes. Topics include sensor physics, basic instrumentation, digital communication, and programming of microcontrollers and other portable computer systems. Pre: (EE 160, EE 211, and BE 350 or MATH 302 or MATH 307 or EE 326) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Cross-listed as EE 422 and MBBE 422)

BE 421 Bioprocess Control (3)

Process control in both time and Laplace domains with an introduction to the frequency domain; selection and design of appropriate control systems for bioprocesses with consideration of the impact on the total system; identification of safety concerns in designing control systems and process equipment. Pre: 260, MATH 243; or consent.

BE 431 Environmental Biotechnology (3)

Environmental impact and control; the microorganism and its nutrition and growth conditions; microbial growth and substrate removal kinetics; bioreactors; biological treatment systems; biodegredation of xenobiotic organic chemicals; case studies. A-F only. Pre: 373 or consent. (Spring only)

BE 437 Biosystems Unit Operations (3)

Introduction to unit operations in biological, environmental, food, and manufacturing processes. Integration of biology and chemistry into engineering using basic concepts in mass and energy conservation and transport in reacting and non-reacting systems. A-F only. Pre: 373; and either CEE 320 or ME 322; or consent.

BE 440 Bioremediation: Principles and Practices (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Soil environment, fate and transport of contaminants; microbial ecology, metabolism, and energy production; biodegradation of selected compounds. In situ treatment, solid-phase bioremediation, slurry-phase bioremediation, and vapor-phase biological treatment. Open to nonmajors. Repeatable one time. Pre: 260, CHEM 161, PHYS 170; or consent.

BE 460 Bioreactor Design and Analysis (3)

Application of mass/energy balances and reaction kinetics for the design and analysis of bioreactors for microbial, plant, and animal cell cultures. Pre: 373 or CEE 320 or ME 322; or consent. (Cross-listed as MBBE 460)

BE 470 Bioprocess Design and Analysis (3)

Combined lecture/computer lab on theory and practice of bioprocess design and analysis, involving biological basics and engineering principles of bioprocessing, computer-aided unit operations, process integration, and economic evaluation. A-F only. Pre: 373, or 437 (or concurrent) or 460 (or concurrent); or consent. (Alt. years)

BE 481 Senior Engineering Design I (3)

(1 1-hr Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) First of a two-semester sequence that
provides a major design experience for senior students in biosystems engineering. Design process; project management; design methods; modeling and simulation; design optimization; engineering economics; engineering statistics, initiation of an open-ended design project. A-F only. Pre: 350/350L, 373, CEE 320 (or concurrent) or ME 322 (or concurrent), ME 311, EE 211; or consent.

BE 482 Senior Engineering Design II (3)

(1 1-hr Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Continuation of 481. Properties of biological materials; risk and reliability; design ethics; guest lectures on engineering design by practicing engineers; extension and completion of the design project with submission of a final design report. A-F only. Pre: 481 or consent.

BE 491 Biological Engineering Topics (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics and problems. Offered by visiting faculty and/or for extension programs. Repeatable nine times.

BE 492 Internship (4)

Integration and application of academic knowledge and critical skills emphasizing professional development. Placement with an approved cooperating supervisor/employer. A-F only. Pre: consent.

BE 499 Directed Research (V)

Research in the area of biosystems engineering. Pre: consent.

BE 606 Instrumentation and Measurement (3)

Measurement concepts and operating principles applied to the selection and use of instruments important to scientists and engineers dealing with biological systems, including automatic data acquisition and processing. Pre: CHEM 151, MATH 241, and ME 311; or consent.

BE 610 Biofuel and Bioenergy (3)

Overview of biofuel/bioenergy production, biorefinery concept; renewable feedstocks; thermochemical and biochemical conversions of biomass to biofuel; biodiesel production; algal-biofuel; environmental impacts, life-cycle analysis; value-added processing of biofuel residues; selected case studies; term paper and presentation. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Once a year)

BE 622 Experimental Methods in Cause-Effect Modeling (3)

Factorial designs and fractional factorial designs for screening variable and response optimization. Response surface methodology. Experimental designs appropriate to building and testing multi-variable behavior relationships. Sequential experimental designs.

BE 625 Biological Instrumentation (3)

System integration for computer-based control, automation, and study of biological systems. Topics include physical, chemical, and biological sensors, actuators, digital interfacing/communication, image analysis, and structured code for microcontrollers and other portable computers. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as MBBE 625)

BE 634 Biological Treatment (3)

Fundamentals of applied microbiology and biochemical reactor engineering, quantitative description of microbial growth, operational theory and design basis of aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic treatment processes. Applications for water, wastewater, air, solid wastes, and soil. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Alt. years: spring) (Cross-listed as CEE 634)

BE 638 Biosystems Modeling (3)

Introduction to system thinking, procedures for developing system models, characteristics of important agricultural system models, computer approach to evaluation and optimization of system models. Pre: one of MATH 215, MATH 241, MATH 251A; or consent. (Crosslisted as AREC 610)

BE 664 Hydrologic Processes in Soils (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Hydrologic properties in soils and the processes involved in water infiltration drainage and solute transport. Emphasis on key parameters required for modeling. Recommended: CEE 424 or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as CEE 625 and NREM 660)

BE 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

BE 750 Seminar (1)

Use of computer and video technology in technical presentation, review of current biosystems engineering research. Pre: consent.

FDM 101 Introduction to the Fashion Industry (3)

Introduction to the fields of apparel design and merchandising including theories of fashion change, apparel industry operations, current industry issues, literature of the field, professional competencies, careers in apparel and related businesses. A-F only.

FDM 200 Culture, Gender, and Appearance (3)

Social construction of gender within culture and its visual expression through appearance. Analysis of role, identity, conformity, and deviance in human appearance. Repeatable one time. Open to nonmajors. (Cross-listed as WGSS 200)

FDM 205 Basic Apparel Construction (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles, concepts, and procedures for quality construction and custom fitting of clothing.

FDM 210 Western World Fashion History (3)

Historic study of dress as related to customs and cultures in the Western world, in sociohistorical and contemporary contexts. Emphasis on 19th and 20th centuries. Pre: 101.

FDM 215 Block Pattern Designing (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of pattern making for women’s apparel through manipulation of pattern blocks. Pre: 205.

FDM 216 Fashion Illustration (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles and techniques of sketching the fashion figure including garment details and fabric drape. Development of a personal style of illustration. Introduction to use of computers for illustration. Pre: 101.

FDM 221 Textiles I (3)

Introduction to fibers, fabric structure, and finishes related to selection and care. Interrelationship between textile characteristics, properties, and end uses. Open to non-majors. A-F only.

FDM 269 Costumes/Cultures of East Asia (3)

Development of traditional dress as visual manifestation of culture. Ethnic and national dress of China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Okinawa, Tibet, and Vietnam.

FDM 301 Fashion Forecasting/Marketing (3)

Principles and practices in fashion trend forecasting and their role in apparel company marketing strategies. Analysis of aesthetics as it related to apparel and marketing. Adapting fashion trend forecasts to apparel lines. FDM majors only. Pre: 101, 210, and 221.

FDM 315 Draping (3)

Principles of pattern making through draping muslin models on standard garment forms. Pre: 205 and 215.

FDM 316 Advanced Specialty Design (3)

Advanced study in the specialty market design, pattern making, and construction for fashion design majors. Different specialty designs, such as swimwear, menswear, or others, will be offered each semester. Repeatable five times. Pre: 215, 221, and 301. Recommended: 315, 330.

FDM 321 Textiles Quality Assurance (3)

Chemical nature and structure of fibers and fabrics, their properties and finishes. FDM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 221 or consent. Co-requisite: 321L. (Spring only)

FDM 321L Textiles Quality Assurance Laboratory (1)

Examination of textile properties through standardized textiles testing laboratory equipment. FDM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 221 or consent. Co-requisite: 321. (Spring only)

FDM 330 Advanced Apparel Construction (3)

Principles of advanced techniques for garment construction with emphasis on new, difficult-to-handle fabrics. Repeatable one time. Pre: 205 and 215.

FDM 338 2D/3D Computer Aided Design (3)

Exploration of CAD applications from the design to the pattern-making process. Use of Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop for fashion illustration. Use of OptiTex PDS pattern design software featuring 2D and 3D CAD. Repeatable one time.

FDM 339 3D Retail Store Design (3)

Visual merchandising concepts and planning; use of a virtual 3D store modeling software package. Visual Retailing/ Mockshop, to design store interiors, fixtures, lighting, signage, window displays, and planograms. A-F only. (Spring only)

FDM 340 Computerized Pattern Grading (3)

Gerber Technology (GT) AccuMark System Management. The system is designed to use CAD for specific apparel industry applications in grading patterns into different sizes and making production markers. Pre: 338. Computer skills are helpful.

FDM 350 Embellishments (3)

Emphasis on design principles as applied to stitchery using a variety of techniques and raw materials. Processes and problems experienced and critiqued in a group environment. Repeatable two times. Pre: 205.

FDM 360 Writing for the Fashion Industry (3)

Analysis and creation of different types of writing in the fashion industry, with emphasis on creating a professional writing style. A-F only. Pre: 101, 200 or 210, and 221.

FDM 371 Retail Buying and Merchandising (3)

Theories and procedures in selecting, buying and selling apparel and textiles. Types of merchandising organizations, analysis of consumer demand, brick-and-click opportunities and challenges, development of an image, operation location, store and floor layout. FDM majors only. Pre: 101 and 221.

FDM 375 Merchandise Planning and Control (3)

Theories, problems, and procedures of financial and assortment planning and control of merchandise inventories. FDM majors and merchandising minors only. Pre: 371.

FDM 411 Product Lifecycle Management (3)

Application of principles of apparel production management, including methods engineering (detail construction for ordering), story boards and color tables, production measurements, costing, and PLM computer applications. A-F only. Pre: 338 (Once a year)

FDM 418 Costumes of South and Southeast Asia (3)

Development of traditional dress as visual manifestation of culture. Ethnic and national dress of Afghanistan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand and Saudi Arabia. Pre: 200, 221, two FG courses; or consent.

FDM 419 Apparel Design Studio I (3)

Development of independent expression through creative designing for a ready-to-wear collection. Problem solving in the design process; includes sketching, draping, blocking, muslin proofs, complete garments, and portfolio. Studio courses must be taken in sequence. Repeatable one time. Pre: 210, 221, 316, 330. Enrollment in 419 or 420 is required to show designs in annual fashion show, but doesn’t guarantee acceptance. (Fall only)

FDM 420 Apparel Design Studio II (3)

Development of niche market. Problem solving in the design process. Includes sketching, draping, blocking, muslin proofs, complete garments, and portfolio. Repeatable one time. Pre: 210, 221, 316, and 330. Enrollment in 419 or 420 is required to show designs in annual fashion show, but doesn’t guarantee acceptance. (Spring only)

FDM 430 Fashion Show Production (4)

Application of principles and procedures related to the promotion of fashion apparel. Preparation and presentation of fashion information through shows, displays, media, and written communications. Repeatable one time. Pre: 101. (Spring only)

FDM 437 Small Business Start-up (3)

Application of principles, procedures and techniques of organizing a small retail business in a brick-and-click world. Students develop, write, and evaluate business plans creatively using low and high tech resources and oral communication skills. Junior standing or higher. FDM majors only; open to non-majors with instructor’s consent. Pre: one FS or FQ course, or consent.

FDM 460 Costume Museum Management (3)

Investigation of skills and techniques needed for handling textile and apparel artifacts in museums and other collections. Active involvement in documenting, researching, interpreting, and exhibiting costumes and textiles. Involves written work and oral presentations. Repeatable one time. FDM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 210, 269, or 418.

FDM 471 International Apparel Trade Issues (3)

Theories, concepts, problems of international trade of textile and apparel products. Issues of importing and exporting apparel products globally. Social, economic, and ethical factors affecting textile and apparel trade.

FDM 491 Topics in Fashion (V)

Study and discussion of special topics, problems. Offered by staff and visiting faculty. Repeatable five times.

FDM 492 Internship (4)

Examination of issues and opportunities associated with careers in fashion and related businesses and industries. Topics include interpersonal skills development, job search and interview strategies, and ethical issues in the workplace. FDM majors only. A-F only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: consent.

FDM 495 Capstone Portfolio (3)

Integration and application of academic knowledge and critical skills emphasizing professional development. Placement with an approved cooperating supervisor/employer. Pre: 492 and senior standing.

FDM 496 Field Study in the Fashion Industry (V)

Study tours to various centers of the world to examine historical and modern apparel and textiles. Merchandising and design methods and operations examined. Repeatable up to 12 credits. Pre: consent.

FDM 499 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Repeatable up to 15 credits. Pre: consent.

FSHN 112 Food Service Safety and Sanitation (2)

Principles and procedures of sanitation and safety in the food service industry, including the study of foodborne illnesses, biological, chemical, physical hazards and cross-contamination as they may occur during the flow of food.

FSHN 141 Culture and Cuisine: The Global Diversity of Food (3)

A timeline of the world history of food and how it relates to culture, diversity, ethnicity, and religion. International food demonstrations and tastings included.

FSHN 181 Introduction to Food Preparation (3)

Lectures, discussions, and demonstrations on how food components contribute to the functional, sensory, and safety characteristics of foods, and what changes occur in foods due to preparation, processing, and storage. Co-requisite: 181L.

FSHN 181L Food Preparation Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Experiments in foods emphasizing ingredient function and standard preparation methods for food groups. Co-requisite: 181.

FSHN 185 The Science of Human Nutrition (3)

Integration of natural science concepts basic to the study of human nutrition. Emphasis on nutrient requirements of healthy individuals, food sources, functions of nutrients.

FSHN 244 Comparative Nutrition (3)

Digestive systems and nutrient functions, interrelationships and metabolism are compared among animal species, including humans. An intermediate, general nutrition course for Food Science and Human Nutrition and Animal Science majors. Pre: ANSC 200 (or concurrent), CHEM 161/L or higher. (Cross-listed as ANSC 244)

FSHN 311 Food Service Systems Management (3)

Critical and essential aspects of management and effective leadership practices to direct and delivery quality foodservices. Focus on the role and competencies of the Registered Dietitian (RD) working in these environments. Pre: 181 and 181L (or concurrent), or
consent. FSHN 31

FSHN 312 Food Service Production and Operations (3)

Principles and procedures of menu planning, quantity food production, production scheduling, recipe adaptation, equipment operation, and formula costing. Principles of procurement including purchasing, selection, storage of equipment and quantity foods. Pre: 181 and 181L (with a minimum grade of C), or consent.

FSHN 322 Marketing Nutrition and Food (2)

(1 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Fundamental marketing principles applied to nutrition and food. Will include concepts such as the psychology of food purchasing decisions and consumer behavior. Field trips and group projects included. Open to non-majors. Pre: 181/181L, 185, 312; or consent.

FSHN 350 Humans, Food, and Animals: Ethics, Issues, and Controversies (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Ethical issues and other controversies related to human and animal needs; their impact on resource sustainability and quality of life are explored from scientific perspectives. A-F only. Pre: 181 or 185 or ANSC 200 or ANSC 201. (Cross-listed as ANSC 350)

FSHN 360 Applied Professional Skills in Nutrition (1)

Will apply skills in technology, research, and career development to nutrition. Students will identify evidence-based nutrition information and demonstrate their academic skill sets for future professional success through technology. Pre: 185 (with a minimum grade of B). (Summer only)

FSHN 370 Lifespan Nutrition (3)

Physiological changes and nutritional requirements during human life stages: prepregnancy, pregnancy, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood. Includes an emphasis on writing instruction. Pre: B or better in 185; C or better in CHEM 161/161L; C or better in PHYL 142/142L (or concurrent)

FSHN 381 Experimental Foods (3)

Experimental approach to study food preparation problems. Applying basic food science research design to conduct experiments, interpret data and write reports. Subject matter used to practice critical thinking and problem solving skills. A-F only. Pre: 181/181L, CHEM 161/161L. Co-requisite: 381L.

FSHN 381L Experimental Foods Laboratory (1)

Experimental approach to study food preparation, food formulation, and sensory evaluation with laboratory exercises in a certified kitchen environment. Applying basic food science research design to conduct experiments, interpret data and write reports. A-F only. Pre: 181/181L, CHEM 161/161L. Co-requisite: 381.

FSHN 389 Nutritional Assessment (3)

Addresses concepts and uses of nutrition assessment tools at individual and community levels. Students will be introduced to national surveys and new, more sophisticated body composition measurements. Includes an emphasis on writing instruction. A-F only. Pre: 185 and 370 (or concurrent).

FSHN 403 Microbiology of Foods (3)

Microorganisms encountered in foods; types of food spoilage; microbial hazards in food; methods of food preservation. Pre: MICR 130 and MICR 140L, or MICR 351 and MICR 351L; or consent.

FSHN 411 Food Engineering (3)

Principles and applications of thermodynamics, electricity, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, psychrometry, and material and energy balances of food processing and preservation. Pre: (BIOL 171, CHEM 162 or CHEM 171 or CHEM 181A, MATH 243 or MATH 253A, PHYS 151 or PHYS 170) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as BE 411 and MBBE 411)

FSHN 420 Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems (3)

Design course focused on fundamentals of electronic interfacing, control and automation, including biological processes. Topics include sensor physics, basic instrumentation, digital communication, and programming of microcontrollers and other portable computer systems. Pre: EE 160, EE 211, and BE 350 or MATH 302 or MATH 307 or EE 326; or consent.

FSHN 430 Food Chemistry (3)

Chemical properties of food constituents studied in relationship to their effects on processing, nutrition, and spoilage. Pre: CHEM 161 and 161L or consent.

FSHN 430L Food Chemistry Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Application of different chemical methods in the study of food constituents—proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, pigments, enzymes, etc. Pre: 430 (or concurrent).

FSHN 440 Food Safety (3)

Discussion of potential microbiological, parasitic, chemical, and natural food hazards; food laws and standards; and related aspects of consumer protection. Pre: 181, BIOL 171, and CHEM 272; or consent.

FSHN 445 Food Quality Control (3)

Fundamental principles of quality control in the food industry: measurement of quality parameters, utilization and integration of the individual test procedures into grades and standards of quality, sampling, and reporting results.

FSHN 451 Community Nutrition and Nutrition Education (4)

(4 Lec) Concepts and methods of nutrition program planning and nutrition education; analysis of nutritional problems of local, national, and international communities; strategies used to educate groups or individuals. A-F only. Pre: 370 and either HDFS 380 or NREM 310; or consent.

FSHN 454 Foundation of Childhood Obesity Prevention in the Pacific (3)

Provide students with a basic overview of the causes and effects of childhood obesity, evidence-based approaches, community-based research, and policies to prevent childhood obesity as it relates to the Pacific region. Pre: 185 (with a minimum grade of B). (Summer only)

FSHN 455 Childhood Anthropometric and Dietary Assessment Field Techniques (1)

Teaches techniques for measuring anthropometry and collecting dietary intake in children. Online course imitates hands-on training through partnering with local organizations and the use of technology. Repeatable one time. Pre: 185 (with a minimum grade of B). (Summer only)

FSHN 456 Child Health and Nutrition Monotiring (1)

Covers topics related to health and nutritional status monitoring and surveillance, including epidemiology, biostatistics, health and nutrition surveillance systems, and the uses of technology for conducting these activities. Repeatable one time. Pre: 185 (with a minimum grade of B). (Summer only)

FSHN 457 Culture and Child Health in the Pacific (3)

In-depth study of Pacific culture, land, people, and history and its relationship to child health. Explores cultural competency, cultural safety, and multidisciplinary approaches to promote a healthy Pacific. Includes an emphasis on instruction in writing. Pre: 185 (with a minimum grade of B). (Summer only)

FSHN 460 Food Processing Operations (3)

Principles and applications of food dehydration, thermal processing, low temperature preservation, chemical and biochemical preservation, irradiation, packaging, manufacturing, plant sanitation, water and waste management. Pre: 403 and 430, or consent.

FSHN 467 Medical Nutrition Therapy I (V)

Development of dietary, anthropometric and clinical lab assessment skills measuring nutritional status. Understanding pathophysiology of disease processes, medical terminology and nutritional intervention, utilizing case studies. Dietetics majors only. Pre: 389 and 486 or consent.

FSHN 468 Medical Nutrition Therapy II (3)

Understanding of the pathophysiology of disease processes and nutritional intervention, using medical terminology and case studies. Dietetics majors only. Pre: 467 or consent

FSHN 469 Nutrition Counseling Skills (2)

Theory and practice in nutritional counseling. Combined lecture and discussion on nutrition/dietary counseling. Knowledge and theories. Application through lab experiences including role playing, case presentations, and performing actual counseling sessions. A-F only. Pre: 467 (or concurrent) or consent.

FSHN 475 Applied Human Nutrition (3)

Application of basic nutrition principles; includes sources and functions of essential nutrients and food patterns compatible with nutrient needs, health, disease prevention, and sustainability. Intended for undergraduate and graduate students. Pre: CHEM 161 (or higher) or BIOC 241 (or higher); PHYL 141, BIOL 171; or consent.

FSHN 476 Cultural Aspects of Food Habits (3)

Study of eating from behavioral perspectives. Implications for health practitioners and health education. Pre: two classes from ANTH 151 or higher or SOC 100 or higher or PSY 100 or higher.

FSHN 477 Food Analysis (2)

Principles of sample preparation and chemical and physical analysis of food components using current methodology. Pre: 430; and CHEM 162 or higher; and BIOL 402 or MBBE 402 or PEPS 402.

FSHN 477L Food Analysis Lab (2)

(2 3-hr Lab) Application of different chemical and physical methods for the identification and quantitation of food components. Co-requisite: 477.

FSHN 480 Nutrition in Exercise and Sport (3)

Effects of physiologic demands of exercise on nutrition. Emphasis on physiologic and biochemical basis for nutrition recommendations to enhance exercise participation and optimize athletic performance. Pre: 185, and PHYL 103 or 141 or 301. (Cross-listed as KRS 480)

FSHN 485 Nutritional Biochemistry I (3)

Metabolism and biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins, including chemical structure, digestion, absorption, transport, cellular/molecular functions in human nutrition; integration of metabolic pathways; energy metabolism and balance, including relevance to chronic disease. Pre: 185; PHYL 142/142L or PHYL 302/302L; BIOC 341 or higher (or concurrent) or MBBE 402 (or concurrent); or consent.

FSHN 486 Nutritional Biochemistry II (3)

Metabolism and biochemistry of vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber, including chemical structure, digestion, absorption, transport, and cellular/ molecular functions in human nutrition; relevance to establishing nutrient requirements and to mechanisms of chronic disease. Pre: 485 or consent.

FSHN 488 Obesity, Science, and Issues (2)

In-depth study of obesity, including research, etiology, treatment, and prevention. Pre: 480 and 486.

FSHN 491 Topics in Food Science and Human Nutrition (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics, problems, or laboratory experiments. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: instructor approval.

FSHN 492 Field Experience (4)

Integration and application of academic knowledge and critical skills emphasizing professional development. Placement with an approved cooperating supervisor/employer. Writing a learning plan and field report. A-F only. Pre: senior standing in FSHN. (Cross-listed as ANSC 492)

FSHN 494 Food Science Capstone (3)

Field practicum designed to integrate knowledge from previous FSHN courses to develop novel and innovative food products. Students deal with shelflife, marketing, packaging, labeling, sensory evaluation, and quality assurance. Repeatable one time. FSHN majors only. A-F only. Pre: 381 and 460, or consent.

FSHN 499 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

FSHN 601 The Science of Food Systems (2)

(1 50-min Lec, 1 2-hr discussion) Discussion of food systems as they apply to animal science, food science, and human nutrition. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 601)

FSHN 607 Advanced Food Science I (3)

Advanced topics in chemical and physical characteristics of foods as well as their role in human nutrition. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: graduate student status with undergraduate courses in organic chemistry, microbiology, additional biological science, physics, and biochemistry. Basic knowledge of food science is expected; or consent. (Cross-listed as MBBE 607)

FSHN 608 Advanced Food Science II (3)

Advances in sensory quality and evaluation, deterioration of foods and food safety, as well as food processing technology. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: graduate student status with undergraduate courses in organic chemistry, microbiology, additional biological sciences, physics, and biochemistry. Basic knowledge of food science is expected; or consent.

FSHN 609 Advanced Food Safety (3)

Real and perceived food hazards, their ethical issues and implications, advanced emerging topics in food safety, and controls, including laws and regulations of food safety issues and public perception of food safety will be discussed. A-F only. Pre: graduate student status with undergraduate courses in biochemistry, microbiology, food processing, physics and organic chemistry. Basic food science knowledge is required; or consent.

FSHN 633 International Nutrition (3)

Analysis of major nutrition problems in developing countries. Comparative review of the design, implementation, and evaluation of programs to intervene in the development of malnutrition. Pre: 185 or consent.

FSHN 650 DNA and Genetic Analysis (2)

Combined lecture-lab for students interested in genetic analysis of humans, animals, and other species. Molecular techniques, such as PCR, DNA marker identifications, transgenics, expression analysis and functional genomics, are included. Open to nonmajors. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 650 and MBBE 650)

FSHN 652 Information Research Skills (1)

Examines the use of libraries and information technology for scholarly investigation in support of scientific research; provides experience utilizing and critically evaluating a variety of print and electronic sources in basic and applied sciences. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 652, NREM 652, and TPSS 652)

FSHN 657 Grant Writing for Graduate Students (1)

Combined lecture/discussion on grants and grant writing. Designed to introduce graduate students to grants and grant proposal writing through lectures, class discussion, writing assignments, and peer review. Open to CTAHR graduate students only; others with consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 657 and TPSS 657)

FSHN 667 Dietetics Supervised Practice (5)

ISPP activities and assignments completed at designed facilities in community, clinical, food service, and other settings that stress planning, delivery, and evaluation of dietetics services to individuals and populations. Repeatable two times. MS Nutritional Sciences students only. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: admission to the Individualized Supervised Practice Pathway program and consent.

FSHN 668 Advanced Topics in Dietetics (1)

Advanced topics in professional dietetics practice. Students will further their knowledge and skills in professional practice areas of dietetics; including clinical, community, and food systems management. Repeatable one time. MS Nutritional Sciences students only.

FSHN 681 Seminar in Food and Nutritional Sciences (1)

Student presentation of literature reviews and research. Repeatable five times. Pre: consent.

FSHN 682 Topics in Nutritional Sciences (V)

Advanced topics in nutritional sciences, from basic to applied research, including current issues in nutrition and critical analysis of current research literature. Repeatable three times, up to 12 credits. Pre: consent.

FSHN 683 Global Nutrition (2)

Examination of global food and nutrition problems, programs, issues, policies, and strategies for improvement. A-F only. Pre: statistics and consent. (Alt. years: fall) (Cross-listed as PH 683)

FSHN 684 Supplemental and Nutritional Approaches in Disease Prevention and Treatment (3)

Examines a variety of issues associated with nutritional and supplemental approaches to reduce disease incidence, morbidity, and mortality in relation to public health prevention strategies. PH majors only. (Cross-listed as PH 684)

FSHN 685 Nutrition and Disease: Cellular and Molecular Aspects (3)

In-depth lecture, discussion, and student presentations on selected topics relating nutrition to the etiology and prevention of chronic diseases at the cellular and molecular level. Repeatable one time. Pre: 485 and 486; statistics; or consent.

FSHN 686 Advanced Child and Adolescent Nutrition (3)

Addresses nutrition, growth, and development in children and adolescents and nutrition-related issues, such as childhood obesity and chronic disease risk factors, with a focus on current research in the Pacific region. Pre: 370 or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as PH 686)

FSHN 687 Advanced Lab Techniques (3)

(1 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Advanced laboratory techniques used in food science and human nutrition research. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent and MBBE 402/402L, and FSHN 477; or BIOC 441/441L. (Cross-listed as ANSC 687 and MBBE 687)

FSHN 688 Indigenous Peoples’ Food Systems, Environment and Health (3)

Explores Indigenous Peoples’ food systems as local food resources Indigenous People acquire through specific cultural knowledge of traditional territories. Global forces transforming these food systems and their impact on population health and nutrition are explored. Graduate students only. (Fall only)(Cross-listed as PH 688)

FSHN 689 Nutritional Epidemiology (3)

Dietary, biochemical, anthropometric and clinical methods used for evaluating nutrition and diet in the etiology and epidemiology of disease. Pre: 685 and PH 663, or consent. (Cross-listed as PH 689)

FSHN 695 Plan B Master’s Project (3)

Independent study for students working on a Plan B Master’s project. A grade of Satisfactory (S) is assigned when the project is satisfactorily completed. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing in nutritional sciences.

FSHN 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

FSHN 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

FSHN 701 Topics in Food Science (1)

Advanced topics in food science and technology, from basic to applied research, including current issues in food science and technology and critical analysis of current research literature. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

FSHN 749 Epidemiology of Diabetes and Obesity (2)

Provides an overview of the epidemiology and prevention of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and associated complications. Discusses methodological issues associated with evaluating these in epidemiologic studies. A-F only. Pre: 663 (with a minimum grade of B-) or consent. (Cross-listed as PH 749)

FSHN 784 Dietary Fiber, Bioactive Food Components and Health (3)

Lecture/discussion of current research on gut physiology, gut microbes, dietary fiber, bioactive food components, and their impact on health, including colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, heart disease, diabetes, and immune function. Pre: 485 and 486 (or equivalent), statistics, physiology; or consent.

FSHN 785 Diet and Cancer Seminar (1)

Presentation-discussion of selected research topics in the field of diet-cancer relationships including: nutritional epidemiology of cancer, diet and supplement intervention trials, and cellular/molecular effects of diet on cancer pathophysiology. Repeatable one time. Pre: 685 and 689, or consent.

FSHN 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Research for doctoral dissertation in nutrition. Repeatable unlimited times. Graduate standing only. Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory only. Pre: candidacy for PhD in Nutrition.

HDFS 230 Human Development (3)

Concepts, issues, theories of human growth and development from conception to death; systems approaches to inquiry into factors affecting growth and development.

HDFS 331 Infancy and Early Childhood (3)

Growth and development from prenatal period to age 5. Historical and current issues and research based on ecological, cross-cultural perspective. Focus on optimal development. Pre: 230 or consent.

HDFS 332 Childhood (3)

Intensive investigation into developmental aspects of 6–12 year old children. Historical and current issues, research, and examination of the role of schools and other community resources. Focus on optimal development. Pre: 230 or consent.

HDFS 333 Adolescence and Early Adulthood (3)

Problems, concepts, and research related to development from puberty through early adulthood. Examination of biological, cognitive, social, and cultural factors affecting the individual. Pre: 230 or consent.

HDFS 334 Middle Age and Aging (3)

Change and continuity in midlife and late life from theoretical and applied perspectives. Written assignments communicate information about physical and psychological age-related events, as well as social attitudes, values, to scholarly and community audiences. Pre: 230. (Cross-listed as COA 334)

HDFS 340 Intimacy, Marriages and Families (3)

Study of intimate relationships, marriages and families, their dynamics, strengths, growth and development, challenges, choices and opportunities, in the context of social change and cultural diversity. Pre: 230 or PSY 100 or SOC 100; or consent

HDFS 341 Parenting (3)

Parenting theories, methods, skills, issues, and resources; parent-child relations in various cultural contexts. Pre: 340 or consent.

HDFS 350 Leadership and Group Process (3)

Exploration of leadership research and theories and their application to leadership development; designed to enhance personal and interactive leadership. Pre: any FG course.

HDFS 352 Community Needs and Resources (3)

Theory and practice in determining community needs and resources; community resources development based on needs identification. Pre: any FG course.

HDFS 360 Family Resource Management (3)

Concepts, principles, and practices in managing family and household resources. Pre: 230 or consent.

HDFS 361 Family Financial Planning (3)

Analytical approach to family financial planning from the perspective of changing family demands over the life cycle. Pre: 360 or an ECON course, or consent.

HDFS 363 Consumer Economics (3)

Consumer rights, responsibilities, and resources; consumer decision-making; factors affecting consumer functioning within economy. Pre: 360 or an ECON course, or consent.

HDFS 365 Soft Skills for Success in the Workplace (3)

Employers regard soft skills as key criteria when hiring and retaining employees. Students learn critical skills essential to work place success. This class prepares students to be work ready.

HDFS 380 Research Methodology (3)

Fundamentals of scientific methodology and techniques in design and data collection; introduction to statistics for decision-making and program evaluations in agriculture and human resources. FDM, HDFS, or TPSS majors only. Pre: 230 or FDM 200 or TPSS 200/SUST 211, or consent. Co-requisite: 380L.

HDFS 380L Research Methodology Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Test design, computer use, data analysis. FDM, HDFS, or TPSS majors only. Co-requisite: 380.

HDFS 425 Partnerships with Families and Professionals (4)

Lecture, discussion and hands-on course, prepares students for direct, educational work with parents and children and for continued graduate work in child and family studies, counseling, psychology, social work and/or family life education. A-F only. Pre: 341 or consent.

HDFS 435 Mindfulness and Skillful Living (3)

Lecture, discussion, experiential activities of principles and practice of an evidence-based contemplative science discipline, including applications to daily life and with youth and families. Pre: completed DS course.

HDFS 442 Marriage Development (3)

Marital interaction and development; divorce and remarriage; resources and techniques for marital adjustment, enrichment, and growth. Pre: 340.

HDFS 444 Contemporary Family Issues (3)

Investigation of current issues with impact upon family quality of life, with emphasis on the interdependent nature of families and their environments. A-F only. Pre: 340 or consent.

HDFS 445 Family Life Education Methodology (4)

Lecture, discussion and hands-on course, with service learning on Family Life Education Methodology. Repeatable one time. Pre: 341 or 442, or consent.

HDFS 452 Community Program Development (3)

Concepts and theories of community program development; principles, practices, and procedures in administration and supervision of volunteer services surveyed and analyzed. Pre: 352.

HDFS 454 Family Public Policy (3)

Cross-national survey of family public policy; analysis, revision, and development of family public policy; impacts of policy on consumers and families. Pre: 352.

HDFS 455 Consumer Communications (3)

Development, production, analysis, and evaluation of consumer materials for print media. Use of desktop publishing computer programs. Pre: 360 or an ECON course, or consent.

HDFS 468 Family Economics (3)

Study of personal family resources and its interaction with the economy. Focuses on contemporary economic problems that affect the welfare of families. Pre: 360 or an ECON course, or consent.

HDFS 491 Topics in Family Resources (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics, problems. Offered by visiting faculty and/or for extension programs. Repeatable.

HDFS 492 Internship (4)

Integration and application of academic knowledge and critical skills in supervised work at an approved internship site and through analytical writing assignments and class discussions. Repeatable one time. HDFS majors only. A-F only. Pre: 230, 340, 360, 380, and 380L.

HDFS 495 Capstone Portfolio (3)

Preparation of a senior portfolio to be used as assessment of competence relative to national FCS standards. Includes extensive instruction on writing. HDFS majors only. Pre: 230, 340, 360, 380, and 380L.

HDFS 499 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Independent reading and research on a topic, done under supervision of a faculty member; outcomes contracted in writing with faculty member at beginning of semester. Repeatable two times or up to nine credits. Pre: consent.

MBBE 304 Biotechnology: Science and Ethical Issues (3)

Introduction to the concepts, goals, ethical issues and consequences of biotechnology using real-life case studies of GMOs, cloning, DNA fingerprinting, gene therapy and genetical engineering. Pre: BIOL 171 or consent. (Cross-listed as BIOL 304)

MBBE 375 Essential Biochemistry (3)

Introduction to basic concepts of cellular biochemistry and metabolic pathways as applied to nutritional, medicinal and environmental biochemistry. A-F only. Pre: CHEM 152 or CHEM 272, or consent.

MBBE 401 Molecular Biotechnology (3)

General principles, applications, and recent advances of the rapidly growing science of biotechnology. Topics include impact of biotechnology on medicine, animal sciences, environment, agriculture, forensics, and economic and socio-ethical issues. Pre: C (not C-) or better in BIOL 275 or consent. (Cross-listed as BIOL 401)

MBBE 401L Molecular Biotechnology Lab-Gene Editing by CRISPR/Cas9 (2)

(1-hr Lec, 3-hr Lab) Laboratory to accompany 401. Students learn advanced gene editing techniques, including CRISPR/Cas9 to engineer prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Repeatable one time. Pre: 304, or 375, or BIOL 275L, or BIOL 375L; or consent. Co-requisite: 401. (Cross-listed as BIOL 401L)

MBBE 402 Principles of Biochemistry (4)

Molecular basis of living processes in bacteria, plants and animals; emphasis on metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Pre: C (not C-) or better in BIOL 275/275L, CHEM 272 and CHEM 273; or consent. (Cross-listed as BIOL 402)

MBBE 402L Principles of Biochemistry Lab (2)

(1 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principle techniques of biochemical laboratory. A-F only. Pre: 402 (or concurrent), BIOL 402 (or concurrent).

MBBE 405 Marine Functional Ecology and Biotechnology (3)

Marine functional genomics, biodiversity of marine natural habitats, marine microbial communities and their ecological functions, interactions of marine microbes and their host, climate change and marine biodiversity, marine biotechnology. A-F only. Pre: OCN 201 or MICR 130, or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as OCN 403)

MBBE 408 Molecular Cellular Biology II (3)

Cell structure and function. Structure, chemistry, and functions of organelles and macromolecules. Pre: C (not C-) or better in BIOL 407; or consent. (Cross-listed as BIOL 408 and MCB 408)

MBBE 411 Food Engineering (3)

Principles and applications of thermodynamics, electricity, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, psychrometry, and material and energy balances of food processing and preservation. Pre: (BIOL 171, CHEM 162 or CHEM 171 or CHEM 181A, MATH 243 or MATH 253A, PHYS 151 or PHYS 170) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as BE 411 and FSHN 411)

MBBE 412 Environmental Biochemistry (3)

Biochemical and chemical principles of occurrence, distribution, biotic and abiotic conversion, fate, and impact of synthetic and natural molecules in the environment. Important pollutants will be used as case studies to illustrate the principles. A-F only. Pre: CHEM 152 or CHEM 272, and CHEM 162 or CHEM 171; or consent.

MBBE 422 Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems (3)

Design course focused on fundamentals of electronic interfacing, control and automation, including biological processes. Topics include sensor physics, basic instrumentation, digital communication, and programming of microcontrollers and other portable computer systems. Pre: (160, 211, and BE 350 or MATH 302 or MATH 307 or EE 326)
with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Cross-listed as BE 420 and EE 422)

MBBE 451 Synthetic Biology (3)

Introduction to principles, tools, and applications of synthetic biology; molecular techniques and design/analysis of synthetic gene circuits, synthetic-biology parts/devices, CRISPRbased systems, engineered microbial cell factories, for industrial, agricultural, medical applications. A-F only. Pre: PHYS 152 (or PHYS 272), BIOL 275/275L; or consent. (Alt. years: fall)

MBBE 460 Bioreactor Design and Analysis (3)

Application of mass/energy balances and reaction kinetics for the design and analysis of bioreactors for microbial, plant, and animal cell cultures. Pre: ME 322 (with a minimum grade of C-) or BE 373 or CEE 320; or consent. (Cross-listed as BE 460) DP

MBBE 461 Biotechnology for Teachers (3)

Principles, methods, classical examples, recent development, benefits and concerns of modern biotechnology. Pre: BIOL 304 or equivalent.

MBBE 483 Introduction to Bioinformatics Topics for Biologists (3)

Focuses on the use of computational tools and approaches to analyze the enormous amount of biological data (DNA, RNA, protein) available today. A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171 (or equivalent), or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as BIOL 483)

MBBE 491 Special Topics in MBBE (V)

Study and discussion of special topics and problems in molecular biosciences and bioengineering. Pre: consent.

MBBE 499 Directed Research (V)

Supervised individual instruction in laboratory research problems in biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, genomics, and genetics. Repeatable 3 times or up to 16 credits. Limited to qualified undergraduate students. A-F only.

MBBE 601 Molecular Cell Biology (3)

Provide fundamental concepts and dynamic characteristics of the molecules of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell, their biosynthesis and regulation, and the mechanisms that regulate cellular activities. A-F only. Pre: basic course in cell and molecular biology, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as MICR 601)

MBBE 602 Molecular Biology and Genetics (3)

Graduate-level basic course on molecular biology and genetics. Prepares students to understand advanced concepts in related subjects such as biochemistry, cell biology, cancer biology, immunology, plant genetics, and genomics. Pre: 402/BIOL 402 (with a minimum grade of B or higher), or with consent from instructor. (Alt. years: fall) (Cross-listed as MICR 602)

MBBE 607 Advanced Food Science I (3)

Advanced topics in chemical and physical characteristics of foods as well as their role in human nutrition. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: graduate student status with undergraduate courses in organic chemistry, microbiology, additional biological science, physics, and biochemistry. Basic knowledge of food science is expected; or consent. (Cross-listed as FSHN 607)

MBBE 610 Molecular Biosciences Seminar (1)

Study and discussion of significant topics and problems in plant physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. Repeatable three times. A-F only

MBBE 611 Professional Development (1)

Lecture/discussion targets students exiting from graduate degree programs and provides preparation as a career professional; topics include establishing a professional identity; CV and cover letters, job-seeking due diligence, and negotiation skills. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as PEPS 611 and TPSS 611)

MBBE 620 Plant Biochemistry (3)

Comprehensive study of chemical constituents and biochemical processes unique to the plant kingdom with emphasis on selected aspects of current interest. A-F only. Pre: 402 or consent.

MBBE 621 Metabolic Engineering (4)

Principles and methodologies of metabolic engineering. Concepts of metabolic networks. Establishment of metabolic flux analysis and metabolic control analysis. Systems biology framework for integration of mathematical modeling and global measurements at metabolite, protein and transcription levels. Pre: BIOL 275, MATH 311, and MICR 351; or consent.

MBBE 625 Biological Instrumentation (3)

System integration for computer-based control, automation, and study of biological systems. Topics include physical, chemical, and biological sensors, actuators, digital interfacing/communication, image analysis, and structured code for microcontrollers and other portable computers. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as BE 625)

MBBE 627 Molecular Diagnostics: Principles and Practices (3)

Molecular diagnostics principles, comparative genomics, genome annotation and
bio-informatics, phylogenetics, gene target selection, advanced primer, and probe design. Repeatable one time. Graduate students only or consent. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as PEPS 627)

MBBE 650 DNA and Genetic Analysis (2)

Combined lecture-lab for students interested in genetic analysis of humans, animals, and other species. Molecular techniques, such as PCR, DNA marker identifications, transgenics, expression analysis and functional genomics, are included. Open to non-majors. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 650 and FSHN 650)

MBBE 651 Signal Transduction and Regulation of Gene Transcription (3)

Lecture/discussion on molecular mechanisms involved in the transmission of regulatory signals from the cell surface to the nucleus. A-F only. Pre: undergraduate level biochemistry, molecular biology, biology, nutrition; or override/ consent by professor. (Fall only)

MBBE 652 Molecular Plant–Fungal Interactions (3)

Focuses on the actions of plant pathogenic fungi/ oomycetes and their host responses at the molecular and cellular level. Current genetic and genomic approaches to study plant-fungal interactions will be discussed. Graduate standing only. Pre: consent. (Every 2 years) (Cross-listed as PEPS 652)

MBBE 666 Fermentation Biochemistry – Theory, Practice, Competency, and Application (3)

Lecture/lab addresses fundamentals in fermentation biochemistry; theoretical and practical level. Explores the concepts of a start-up capital venture business as a project, moving a fermented product to production and into the marketplace. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: 375 or MBBE/BIOL 402 (or equivalent). (Fall only)

MBBE 680 Methods in Plant Molecular Biology (3)

(1 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Advanced methodology and research strategies. Hands-on laboratory training in basic and current molecular procedures for plant research. Pre: one of BIOC 481 or BIOL 407.

MBBE 683 Advanced Bioinformatics Topics for Biologists (4)

Teaches problem-solving with bioinformatic tools. Real-world problems will be provided and worked out, students encouraged to provide their own research problem where they require assistance. Graduate student must work on genomics research project requiring bioinformatic analysis, working knowledge of UNIX OS, Perl, Java or C. A-F only. Pre: ICS 471 and ICS 491 and ICS 691 (or equivalent), or consent. (Alt. years)

MBBE 687 Advanced Lab Techniques (1)

(1 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Advanced laboratory techniques used in food science and human nutrition research. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent and 402/402L, and FSHN 477; or BIOC 441/441L. (Cross-listed as ANSC 687 and FSHN 687)

MBBE 691 Advanced Special Topics in MBBE (V)

Study and discussion of advanced special topics and problems in molecular biosciences and bioengineering. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

MBBE 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable up to 64 credits.

MBBE 700 Thesis Research (V)

CR/NC only.

MBBE 800 Dissertation Research (V)

CR/NC only.

NREM 105 Environmental Service Learning I (3)

Experiential service learning course for students participating in the Hawai‘i Youth Conservation Corps summer program as team members and leaders. Repeatable one time. Hawai‘i Youth Conservation Corps summer program students only. A-F only. (Summer only)

NREM 192 Introduction to Natural Resources and Environmental Management (1)

Introduction to NREM student learning outcomes and scholarly breadth within the department, exposure to on-campus resources, networking with current and former NREM students and external stakeholders, career skills development. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Fall only)

NREM 200 Environmental Service Learning II (3)

Experiential service learning course for students participating in the Hawai‘i Youth Conservation Corps summer program as Hana Hou members. Hawai‘i Youth Conservation Corps summer program students only. A-F only. (Summer only)

NREM 203 Applied Calculus for Management, Life Sciences, and Human Resources (3)

(2 Lec, 1 1-hr Lab) Applications of calculus (limits, continuity, derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, partials, integrals) to problems in business management, social sciences, and life sciences. Applies symbolic techniques and quantitative methods in problem solving, utilizes concept of proof as a chain of inferences, and promotes development of reasoning skills and mathematical logic in bridging theory and practice. A-F only.

NREM 210 Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

Analysis of our environment with emphasis on understanding relationships and interactions of physical, biological, technological, and political components using scientific methods of inquiry. Food supply and safety, water quality, pollution control, biodiversity, environmental policy. Open to nonmajors. (Cross-listed as PEPS 210 and SUST 210)

NREM 220 Agricultural and Resource Economics (3)

Introduction to basic economics concepts, including demand, supply, exchange, market price and market failure. Economic evaluation and policy for the uses of various natural resource endowments, especially in production agriculture, is included. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 220)

NREM 251 Scientific Principles of Sustainability (3)

Introduction to the scientific principles of sustainability, including the ecology of managed and natural ecosystems, global change biology, ecological principles of natural resource management, renewable energy technologies, and the environmental impacts of humans. (Cross-listed as SUST 251 and TPSS 251)

NREM 292 Internship Preparation (1)

Exploration of internship and career opportunities for NREM majors. Development of career-building skills, including resume, interview, and professional networking. NREM majors only. A-F only. (Fall only)

NREM 301 Natural Resources Management (3)

Biological and physical science aspects of natural resource management at local, national, and global scales. Topics covered include resource management of soil, water, forests, wetlands, coasts and wildlife. A-F only. Pre: NREM/TPSS 251 or 210; CHEM 151 or higher; and BIOL 172; or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as SUST 311)

NREM 301L Natural Resources Management Lab (1)

(1 4-hr Lab) Laboratory and field methods covering biological and physical principles and concepts in natural resource management. Emphasis on basic field measurement techniques, computer skills commonly used in managing natural resources and writing scientific lab reports. A-F only. Co-requisite: 301. (Spring only)

NREM 302 Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (3)

Introduction to natural resource and environmental public policy at U.S. federal, Hawai‘i
state, local, and international levels. Policy principles, legal structure, governmental agencies, statutes and programs, analytical techniques, program assessments, and contemporary ethical issues. A-F only. Pre: NREM/ PEPS/SUST 210 or NREM/SOCS/TPSS 251 or (BIOL 101 or higher) or GEO 101 or (ERTH 101 or higher);
and 220/SUST 220 or one ECON course or two DS courses. (Cross-listed as SUST 312)

NREM 304 Fundamentals of Soil Science (3)

Origin, development, properties, management of tropical soils; classification of Hawaiian soils. A-F only. Minimum prerequisite grade of C or consent. Pre: CHEM 161 and 161L, or consent. Co-requisite: 304L. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as TPSS 304)

NREM 304L Fundamentals of Soil Science Laboratory (1)

Field and analytical methods for exploring the origin, development, properties, and management of soils, with an emphasis on tropical and Hawaiian soils. A-F only. Pre: CHEM 161 and CHEM 161L. Co-requisite: 304. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as TPSS 304L)

NREM 306 Environmental Ethics (3)

Application of traditional moral theories to environmental issues. Development and evaluation of specific environmental ethical theories. Application of ethical theories to environmental decision-making. A-F only. Pre: 210 or GEO 101 or PHIL 101 or PHIL 103. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as SUST 316)

NREM 310 Statistics in Agriculture and Human Resources (3)

Theory, applications, and presentation of statistical reasoning. Descriptive, probability, and inferential reasoning for one-variable analysis with extensions to multiple variable cases. A-F only.

NREM 311 Current Topics in Plant Science (1)

An undergraduate seminar that provides the presentation and discussion of topics of current relevance to students preparing for careers in applied plant sciences. Oral focus designation. A-F only. Pre: 210 or TPSS 200/SUST 211, or consent. (Cross-listed as TPSS 311)

NREM 341 Managerial Accounting (3)

Principles and methods of agricultural accounting. Preparing and interpreting financial statements. Sources and costs of credit, capital budgeting, tax management, estate planning. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 220/SUST 220 or ECON 130 or consent. (Cross-listed as TPSS 341)

NREM 351 Enterprise Management (3)

Introduction of practical concepts and methods used in business management. Introduce broad range of business strategies. Understand the critical role each strategy plays. Facilitate student’s practice of analytical and critical thinking through case studies. (Cross-listed as TPSS 351)

NREM 358 Basic Environmental Benefit Cost Analysis (3)

Fundamentals of benefit-cost analysis with extensions to environmental impacts and projects; case studies. Pre: 220/SUST 220 or ECON 130 or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 358)

NREM 380 Tropical Forestry/Agroforestry (3)

Biophysical and socioeconomic description and analysis of major tropical forestry and agroforestry management systems, including Hawai‘i and the Pacific Basin. The role of traditional land use, pressures from regional and global development, and efforts to create sustainable, diverse systems for rural communities will be discussed. Pre: CHEM 151 or higher and BIOL 171 or higher. (Alt. years: spring)

NREM 399 Directed Study (V)

Limited to exceptional undergraduate students qualified to carry on advanced study. Pre: consent.

NREM 410 Methods in Wildlife Management & Conservation (4)

Introduces fundamental techniques for wildlife management and conservation. In addition to hands-on training, students will learn underlying biological and ecological principles, as well as quantitative skills, with an emphasis on sustainable management. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as SUST 411)

NREM 420 Community and Natural Resource Management (3)

Theory and tools for working with groups and communities in the management of natural resources is presented using a participatory format. Topics include sustainable development, extension programming, participatory learning and communication, evaluation, and conflict management. Pre: two social science courses or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SUST 420)

NREM 429 Spreadsheet Modeling for Business and Economic Analysis (3)

Introduction to quantitative decision-making methods for effective agribusiness management in resource allocation, scheduling, logistics, risk analysis, inventory, and forecasting. Emphasis on problem identification, model formulation and solution, and interpretation and presentation of results. Pre: NREM/SUST 220 or ECON 130, and 310 or ECON 321; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ECON 429)

NREM 450 Wildlife Ecology and Management (3)

Lecture-based overview of the history, ecology, and management of wildlife species from around the world and Hawai‘i. Pre: BIOL 172 or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SUST 451)

NREM 458 Natural Resource Issues and Ethics (3)

Overview of the history of land, resources and power in Hawai‘i; players and processes influencing land and natural resources policies today explored from Native Hawaiian and other viewpoints. Extensive use of case studies. Pre: HWST 207/SUST 217 or HWST 307/ SUST 317 or HWST/SUST 356 (Cross-listed as HWST 458 and SUST 456)

NREM 460 Sustainable Nutrient Management in Agroecosystems (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Biological, chemical, and physical processes governing the cycling of nutrients in agroecosystems, crop and livestock production, and the effects on surrounding unmanaged ecosystems. Pre: 304 and CHEM 161, or consent. (Cross-listed as TPSS 450)

NREM 461 Soil and Water Conservation (3)

Past and present issues in soil and water conservation will be examined. Principles of erosion, conservation tillage, irrigation, and drainage will be discussed. Land-based threats to coastal zones and watershed management will also be covered. Pre: 301/SUST 311 or 304.

NREM 463 Irrigation and Water Management (3)

Basic soil-water-plant relationships, irrigation water requirements, irrigation efficiencies, different methods of irrigation, planning, design and management of an irrigation system, fertigation and impact of irrigation on soil and water quality. Pre: 203 (or equivalent) and NREM/TPSS 304 (or equivalent), or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as TPSS 463)

NREM 467 Natural Resources Conservation Planning (3)

Combined lecture and hands-on field course on theory and practice of natural resource conservation planning. Includes individual and group projects. Pre: undergraduate junior or senior or graduate standing. Recommended: at least one upper division course in soils, natural resources, planning, physical geography, or related area; or consent. (Alt. years)

NREM 475 Plant Nutrient Diagnosis in the Tropics (3)

Designed for students to identify essential nutrients required by plants; diagnose nutrient disorders in plants; and propose environmentally sound solutions to correct disorders. Pre: 304/TPSS 304 (or concurrent) and BIOL 172. (Cross-listed as TPSS 475)

NREM 477 Geographic Information Systems for Resource Managers (4)

Combined lecture-lab on the basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, remote sensing, and global positioning system. Practical skills to be developed by solving real natural resources and environmental problems. Pre: either 203 (or concurrent) or 310 (or concurrent) and 301 (or concurrent); or consent. (Once a year)

NREM 480 Applied Forest Ecology (3)

Application of ecological theory to sustainable management of forest resources in Hawaii and beyond, including silviculture (production of timber and nontimber forest products), restoration (restoring damaged or degraded forests), and conservation (conserving existing forest resources). A-F only. Pre: 301/SUST 311 and 380 or consent. (Alt. years)

NREM 490 Ho‘okâhua: ‘Âina Based Leadership Education (ABLE) (3)

Ho‘okâhua: is an ‘âina based leadership course encompassing Hawaiian culture,
Environmental Science, Law & Policy, Planning and Community Development to equip students to care for, guard, and govern natural resources they care about.

NREM 491 Topics in Natural Resources and Environmental Management (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics and problems. Offered by visiting faculty and/or for extension programs. Repeatable five times up to four credits. A-F only. Pre: consent.

NREM 492 Internship Experience (3)

Internship work experience for NREM majors. Completion of writing assignments with a minimum of 4,000 words. A-F only. Pre: 192 or consent.

NREM 494 Environmental Problem Solving (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Senior-level capstone for NREM. Ecosystem management within problem-solving context. Applications of research and analytical methods, management tools to case studies. Focus on student teamwork and oral communications. NREM majors only. A-F only. Pre: Senior standing or consent. (Crosslisted as SUST 494)

NREM 499 Directed Study (V)

Repeatable up to four credits. Pre: senior standing and consent.

NREM 600 Foundations of Natural Resource and Environmental Management and Policy(4)

Critical evaluation of environmental and social components of NREM and policy. Students develop research skills and integrative knowledge important for all resource managers in, e.g., ecology, applied economics, hydrology, policy/management, soils, and human dimensions. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

NREM 601 Social-Ecological Systems Analysis of Natural Resource and Environmental Management (4)

Case study approach to building the structural and behavioral framework for complex, dynamic systems underlying sustainable NREM and policy, emphasizing the transdisciplinary interactions of the ecological and economic components. Pre: 600 (with a minimum grade of B-), and ECON 130 or NREM/SUST 220, and BIOL 171, or consent. (Spring only)

NREM 610 Advanced Methods in Wildlife Management & Conservation (4)

Introduces advanced techniques for wildlife management and conservation. In addition to hands-on training, students will learn underlying biological and ecological principles, as well as quantitative skills, with an emphasis on sustainable management. A-F only. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as SUST 613)

NREM 611 Resource and Environmental Policy Analysis (3)

Exploration of institutional and policy dimensions of natural resource development, management, allocation, markets and pricing, focusing on their environmental impacts. Emphasis on policy analysis using case studies and empirical findings. Original paper required. A-F only. Pre: grade of Cor above in ECON 130 or NREM/SUST 220, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SUST 611)

NREM 612 Predicting and Controlling Degradation in Human-Dominated Terrestrial Ecosystems (3)

Historic, present, and projected trends in understanding and managing human-dominated ecosystems; predicting, measuring and mitigating degradation especially in terrestrial ecosystems with a focus on small volcanic islands in tropical settings. A-F only. Pre: 301/SUST 311 and 304 (or equivalent) and 600. Recommended 461, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SUST 612)

NREM 620 Kaiaulu: Care and Collaborative Management of Natural Resources (3)

Engagement with theory and practice of collaboration to care for natural resources. Topics include community based management, common property, Hawaiian knowledge, co-management, and access through readings, discussion, and projects with Hawai‘i communities. (Spring only)

NREM 625 ‘Imi ‘Ike: Social Science Field Methods for Environmental Research (4)

Students learn and apply social science research methods tailored to natural resource management and environmental issues to a class project with Hawai‘i community. Emphasis on
qualitative and participatory approaches. (Alt. years)

NREM 627 Applied Microeconomic Analysis (3)

Economic applications to the agricultural and nonagricultural industries are emphasized. Econometric techniques are used to estimate demand, supply, production and cost functions which are analyzed in terms of economic theory and market information. A-F only. Pre: AREC 626 and ECON 627, or consent.

NREM 631 Sustainable Agriculture Seminar (3)

Critical evaluation of existing and alternative cropping systems from a long-term perspective. Value conflicts and resolution. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: graduate standing or advanced undergraduate standing, and consent.

NREM 637 Resource Economics (3)

Analysis of problems of development and management of natural resources with emphasis on resources in agriculture and role in economic development. Pre: ECON 608 and ECON 629. (Cross-listed as ECON 637 and SUST 637)

NREM 640 Land Systems Science (3)

Through discussion of primary land systems science literature and use of environmental modeling software, this interdisciplinary course explores how drivers, states, and trends in human appropriation of land affect socioecological system function. Pre: 477 or 677 or GEO 470 or GEO 476 or ERTH 460 or ERTH 461. (Alt. years: Fall) (Cross-listed as SUST 640)

NREM 652 Information Research Skills (1)

Examines the use of libraries and information technology for scholarly investigation in support of scientific research; provides experience utilizing and critically evaluating a variety of print and electronic sources in basic and applied sciences. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 652, FSHN 652, and TPSS 652)

NREM 658 Advanced Environmental Benefit Cost Analysis (3)

Advanced environmental benefit-cost analysis will require that proficiency be demonstrated on fundamentals and address topics related to sustainability, including income equality, non-market goods, risk, cost of public funds, and the social discount rate. (Cross-listed as SUST 658)

NREM 660 Hydrologic Processes in Soils (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Hydrologic properties in soils and the processes involved in water infiltration drainage and solute transport. Emphasis on key parameters required for modeling. Recommended: CEE 424 or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as BE 664 and CEE 625)

NREM 662 Watershed Hydrology (3)

Theory and application of basic hydrologic processes and management occurring on small islands watersheds. Pre: 203 (or equivalent) and PHYS 151 (or equivalent) and 477 or GEO 388 (or equivalent); or consent. (Once a year)

NREM 664 Small Watershed Modeling (3)

Introduction to process-based modeling of watershed with emphasis on model applications. Deals with the characterization and simulation of small watershed hydrolic and pollutant transport processes. Pre: CEE 424 (or concurrent) or ERTH/SUST 425 (or concurrent) or BS degree from NREM, or consent. (Spring only)

NREM 665 Coastal Resources Management (3)

Study of coastal systems, estuaries, and coral reefs. Emphasis on interdisciplinary science and integration of coastal ecology, geoscience, and social science. Coastal and marine wildlife-human interactions, environmental pertubations, and management strategies will be discussed. Pre: advanced undergraduate course work in marine biology, oceanography, geoscience, and sustainability recommended. (Spring only)

NREM 670 Interdisciplinary Methods for Agrarian Systems (3)

Interdisciplinary methodologies for conducting research and impact analyses on agrarian systems, sustainable development, and resource management. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as TPSS 670) (Alt. years: fall)

NREM 671 International Agricultural Systems (2)

Analysis of trends and strategies in international agricultural research and development. International agricultural research centers (IARC), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), university networks and consortia, and private voluntary organizations (PVOs). Pre: graduate standing or advanced undergraduate standing, and consent.

NREM 677 Remote Sensing of the Environment (3)

Fundamentals, techniques, and applications of remote sensing for natural resource assessments and environmental monitoring. Lab consisting of field radiometric exercises, computer modeling of energymatter interaction, processing, and analysis of remotely sensed imagery. Pre: one physics course (e.g. PHYS 151), one calculus course (e.g. 203), and one statistics course (e.g. 310), or consent. Recommended: either GEO 470 or ERTH 460 or one introductory remote sensing course. (Alt. years)

NREM 680 Ecosystem Ecology (4)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of ecosystem ecology with emphasis on tropical forests, human impacts, and global environmental change. Factors controlling ecosystem structure, productivity, nutrient cycling, plant-soil-atmosphere interactions, and energy balance. Field and laboratory methods in ecosystem science. Pre: advanced undergraduate coursework in ecology and soil science; graduate standing; and consent. (Alt. years: spring)

NREM 682 Restoration Ecology (3)

Graduate seminar on foundations of restoration ecology, application of ecological theory to restoration practice. Emphasis on restoration of structure and function in degraded terrestrial ecosystems using case studies from Hawai‘i and around the world. Pre: advanced undergraduate ecology course and graduate standing, or consent. Completion of 680 recommended, but not required. (Alt. years)

NREM 685 Landscape Ecology (3)

Focuses on the history, theories, and contemporary views of landscapes; including scale, land cover, land use, landscape metrics, disturbance regimes, land management, landscape change, the relationship of landscapes to species, and modeling. Pre: graduate students, or consent. (Alt. years)

NREM 690 Conservation Biology (3)

Theories and concepts of ecology, evolution and genetics for conservation of biological diversity. Topics will include restoration ecology, management planning, laws and policies, biological invasions. Pre: BIOL 375 and either ZOOL 480 or BOT 462; and either ZOOL 410, 439, 620, 623, BOT 453, 454, 456, or 492. (Cross-listed as BOT 690 and ZOOL 690)

NREM 691 Advanced Topics in Natural Resources and Environmental Management (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics and problems at an advanced level. Offered by visiting or existing faculty as a special course. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

NREM 695 Capstone Preparation in NREM (2)

Preparation for NREM Master’s Plan B capstone experience. NREM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 600 and 601 (or concurrent) (with a minimum grade of B-), and one graduate methods course (or concurrent).

NREM 696 Capstone Experience in NREM (2)

Capstone experience in NREM. NREM majors only. Pre: 695 and 601, or consent.

NREM 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.. Pre: graduate standing.

NREM 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

NREM 701 Research Seminar (1)

Presentation and discussion of student research proposals, theses and dissertations, and research presentations by NREM faculty, students, and invited speakers. A-F only. Pre: consent.

NREM 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PEPS 210 Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

Analysis of our environment with emphasis on understanding relationships and interactions of physical, biological, technological, and political components using scientific methods of inquiry. Food supply and safety, water quality, pollution control, biodiversity, environmental policy. Open to nonmajors. (Cross-listed as NREM 210 and SUST 210)

PEPS 250 The World of Insects (3)

Biology/ecology of insects with emphasis on relationships to plants, animals, and especially people in Hawai‘i and the tropics. Open to nonmajors. A-F only.

PEPS 310 Environment and Agriculture (3)

Overview of environmental issues and impacts associated with agriculture, specifically pest management issues, and options for environmentally responsible management and amelioration of these impacts. (Cross-listed as SUST 320)

PEPS 340 Ecology of Infectious Diseases and Symbioses (3)

Introduction to the ecology of infectious diseases of animals, plants, and humans. Factors affecting disease transmission and virulence. Effects of human activities and environmental change on disease transmission. Emphasis on issues pertinent to Hawai‘i. A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171 and BIOL 172; or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as OCN 340)

PEPS 350 Invasive Pest Species (3)

Ecological, economic and sociological impacts of invasive pest species on tropical ecosystems; characteristics of invasive species and nature of vulnerable habitats; management of invasive species or eradication options; impacts on evolution, biological diversity and ecological stability. Open to nonmajors. (Alt. years: spring)

PEPS 363 General Entomology (3)

Biology, diversity, and ecology of insects with emphasis on Hawaiian fauna. Classification to order level. A-F only. Pre: BOT 101 or ZOOL 101 or BIOL 171; or consent.

PEPS 363L General Entomology Laboratory (1)

Laboratory in the biology and classification to family level of Hawai‘i’s insects and arthropods. A-F only. Pre: 363 (or concurrent) or consent.

PEPS 371 Genetics: Theory to Application (3)

Fundamentals of genetic theory using traditional breeding and biotechnological procedures in insect and plant pathogen management for sustainable agricultural production. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 371 and TPSS 371)

PEPS 405 Plant Pathogens and Diseases (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Classification, morphology, ecology, and biology of bacteria, fungi, nematodes, and viruses that attack economic crops. Etiology and control of plant diseases. Pre: 210/SUST 210 or BOT 101 or MICR 130, or consent. (Fall only)

PEPS 410 Sustainable Soil and Plant Health Management (2)

Provides knowledge and understanding of soils, agroecology, and sustainable approaches for plant health management, and prepares students for applied research in various tropical cropping systems. A-F only. (Alt. years: spring) (Cross-listed as TPSS 410 and SUST 410)

PEPS 418 Turfgrass Pest Management (3)

Provides students with knowledge and real world experience on common turfgrass pests and management strategies in Hawai‘i, with emphasis on integrated pest management. Common cool-season turfgrass and pest management are also discussed. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as TPSS 418)

PEPS 421 Foundations of Pest Management (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles and concepts of insect pest management using biological, ecological, cultural, behavioral, legislative, microbial and chemical methods. A-F only. Pre: one of the following: 250 or 363, BIOL 171, BIOL 172, or BOT 101; or consent. (Spring only)

PEPS 422 Biocontrol of Invasive Species (3)

Biological control of invasive insects and weeds using natural enemies; biological control as a cornerstone of sustainable pest management; contributions of biocontrol to economic, environmental, and societal sustainability; reduced dependence on pesticides; increased sustainability of pest management. Pre: 363 or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 422)

PEPS 430 Plant Disease Management (3)

Diagnosis, epidemiology, and integrated management of important plant diseases and pathogens for key plants and cultivated crops in various agroecosystems in Hawai‘i, the Pacific, and the global tropics. Pre: 405. (Spring only)

PEPS 451 Environmental Law (3)

Exploration of federal laws, regulations, and precedents that govern our interaction with the environment. Analysis of laws regulating air, water, toxins, pests, endangered species, and environmental justice. Pre: junior or senior standing.

PEPS 463 Medical and Urban Entomology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Biology, ecology, health and economic impacts, and control of urban insect pests and medically important arthropods that act as vectors of diseases. Pre: 363 or BIOL 265, or consent. (Cross-listed as TRMD 463)

PEPS 481 Weed Science (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Weed classification, identification, adaptations for weediness; principles of weed control; properties, uses, and action of herbicides. Lab: pesticide application equipment and techniques, no-till farming, greenhouse and field experiments. A-F only. Pre: CHEM 152 and TPSS 200/SUST 211, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as TPSS 481)

PEPS 486 Insect-Plant Interactions (3)

Study of the coevolutionary relationships between insects and plants, with emphasis on the behavior, physiology, and symbiotic relationships of insects. Discussed in the context of sustainable agriculture, anthropogenic change, and climate change. A-C only. Pre: 363 or consent.

PEPS 491 Topics in Plant & Environmental Protection (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics and problems. May be offered by visiting faculty, extension faculty or research faculty. Repeatable two times.

PEPS 495 PEPS Capstone (4)

Integration and application of academic knowledge and critical skills emphasizing professional development, Directed Research, field studies, employment with cooperating businesses, government or schools are all options. A-F only. Pre: consent.

PEPS 499 Directed Research (V)

Conduct original research in environmental protection sciences. Limited to qualified undergraduate students. Repeatable two times. CR/NC only.

PEPS 601 Agrosecurity and Food Safety (2)

Concepts of agrosecurity and food safety (including plant and animal biosecurity), global impacts of introduced pests and diseases, and current mechanisms for interception of pests and mitigation of disease. A-F only. (Fall only)

PEPS 605 Biology of Plant Pathogens: Fungi and Nematodes (4)

(2 Lec, 2 3-hr. Lab) Principles and concepts in pathogen biology, epidemiology and management of plant diseases caused by fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Laboratory techniques for isolation and identification of pathogens and disease diagnosis. A-F only. (Fall only)

PEPS 606 Biology of Plant Pathogens: Bacteria and Viruses (4)

(2 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Principles and concepts in pathogen biology, epidemiology, and management of plant diseases caused by bacteria and viruses. Laboratory techniques for isolation and identification of pathogens and disease diagnosis. A-F only. Pre: 605 (with a minimum grade of B). (Spring only)

PEPS 611 Professional Development (1)

Lecture/discussion targets students exiting from graduate degree programs and provides preparation as a career professional; topics include establishing a professional identity; CV and cover letters, job-seeking due diligence, and negotiation skills. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as MBBE 611 and TPSS 611)

PEPS 615 Diagnosis and Management of Tropical Plant Diseases (3)

Iterative and interactive course integrating plant pathogen and pest biology with diagnostic and management approaches. Will use biological information about pathogens, anthropods, and abiotic stresses to diagnose diseases, disorders, or other injuries of plants. A-F only. Pre: (605 and 606) with a minimum grade of B, or consent. Co-requisite: 615L. (Summer only)

PEPS 615L Diagnosis and Management of Tropical Plant Diseases Laboratory (2)

Diagnosis and management of plant pathogen and pest problems in laboratory and field. Taught concurrently with 615. A-F only. Pre: (605 and 606) with a minimum grade of B, or equivalent. Co-requisite: 615. (Summer only)

PEPS 627 Molecular Diagnostics: Principles and Practices (3)

Molecular diagnostics principles, comparative genomics, genome annotation and bio-informatics, phylogenetics, gene target selection, advanced primer, and probe design. Repeatable one time. Graduate students only or consent. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as MBBE 627)

PEPS 641 Insect Physiology (2)

(2 Lec) Study of the principal physiological and biochemical functions in insects, with emphasis on hormonal interactions. Pre: 402 or consent.

PEPS 652 Molecular Plant–Fungal Interactions (3)

Focuses on the actions of plant pathogenic fungi/ oomycetes and their host responses at the molecular and cellular level. Current genetic and genomic approaches to study plant-fungal interactions will be discussed. Graduate standing only. Pre: consent. (Every 2 years) (Cross-listed as MBBE 652)

PEPS 660 Seminar in Plant Pathology (1)

Seminar on research and topics in plant pathology. Repeatable unlimited times. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

PEPS 662 Systematics and Phylogenetics (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Classification and study of diversity among insects and other life forms. Use of morphological and molecular characters to reconstruct evolutionary histories. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

PEPS 671 Insect Ecology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Insects as living units in an environment of physical and biotic factors. Pre: consent of instructor.

PEPS 675 Biological Control of Pests (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Fundamental concepts. Critical study of major biological control projects. Pre: 421 or consent. Recommended: 662; and ZOOL 631 or 632.

PEPS 676 Biological Control of Weeds (3)

Examine approaches to weed biological control of invasive plants in various environments with different agents (insects, pathogens, and vertebrates), integration with other management tactics, sociopolitical aspects, and history of the practice. Graduate students only. Pre: 421 or 422 or consent. (Alt. years)

PEPS 686 Invertebrate Microbiology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) In-depth study of the molecular and cellular interactions between microbes and animals. Topics will cover types of symbioses, gut microbiome, parasites, and agricultural pathogens, and disease and human health disease.

PEPS 690 Seminar in Entomology (1)

Seminars on research and topics in entomology. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

PEPS 691 Special Topics (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics and problems in plant and environmental protection sciences at an advanced level. Offered by visiting or existing faculty as a special course. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

PEPS 695 Plan B Master’s Project (3)

Independent study for students working on a Plan B master’s project. A grade of Satisfactory (S) is assigned when the project is satisfactorily completed. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing in entomology or tropical plant pathology.

PEPS 699 Directed Research (V)

Directed research, critical reviews in environmental protection sciences, entomology, or plant pathology. Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only.

PEPS 700 Thesis Research (V)

Research for master’s thesis. Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only.

PEPS 716 Advanced Plant Nematology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Advanced study of nematode taxonomy, genetics, behavior, host interactions, and sustainable management in an integrated lecture-laboratory. Pre: 605 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

PEPS 730 Advanced Plant Virology (2)

Characterization, genome organization, gene expression, and molecular mechanisms of plant viruses. Pre: 606 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

PEPS 746 Advanced Plant-Bacteria Interactions (3)

Molecular biology, genomics, molecular genetics, and infection mechanisms of bacterial plant pathogens and symbionts. Pre: 606 (with a minimum grade of B or better) or consent. (Cross-listed as MICR 746)

PEPS 799 Proposal/Defense Seminar (1)

Thesis/ dissertation proposal and defense seminars. Repeatable one time. CR/NC only. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

PEPS 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Research for doctoral dissertation. Repeatable unlimited times. CR/ NC only.

TAHR 099 International Exchange Study/Research (V)

Study overseas in an approved international or similar exchange program. CR/NC only. Pre: consent of academic advisor.

TAHR 250 Introduction to Sustainability from Social Science Perspectives (3)

Introduction to key concepts and theories in social sciences in relation to sustainability issues. (Cross-listed as SOCS 250 and SUST 250)

TAHR 251 Scientific Principles of Sustainability (3)

Introduction to the scientific principles of sustainability, including the ecology of managed and natural ecosystems, global change biology, ecological principles of natural resource management, renewable energy technologies, and the environmental impacts of humans.

TAHR 415 Extension Education & Outreach (2)

Introduces an essential component of the Land Grant Mission. Students will explore the foundational components of extension education including agent expectations, program development and evaluation, audience engagement, building partnerships, funding structures. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Cross-listed as TPSS 415)

TPSS 120 (Alpha) Plants for People (1)

The origins: social, cultural, and ceremonial traditions; culture; food and nutritional properties. Processing of a variety of tropical horticultural plants are presented, with tasting sessions and optional field trips. Topics will rotate among (B) beverage crops (e.g., coffee, tea, chocolate, kava, fruit juices); (C) herbs, spices, and flavoring (selection of examples to be determined); (D) tropical fruits (assortment offered depends on availability during semester); (E) ornamental plants (flowers, houseplants, popular landscape plans, bonsai, ethnic ornamentals). Does not count towards TPSS major. Pre: consent.

TPSS 156 Sustainable Food and Energy (Field Course) (V)

Examines the nexus of food, energy, and water in Hawai‘i for sustainable development. Repeatable two times, up to nine credits. (Cross-listed as SUST 156)

TPSS 156L Natural History Field Trips on Hawai‘i Island (1)

Field trips for Natural history and Conservation of the Hawaiian Islands. A-F only. Co-requisite: 156. (Summer only)

TPSS 200 Agriculture, Environment, and Society (3)

Relationship of plants, soils, and the environment, and how they relate to cultural practices and society in agroecosystems with an emphasis on Hawai‘i as a model system. (Cross-listed as SUST 211)

TPSS 210 Aquaponics (3)

Basic online course integrates aquaculture (raising fish and prawns) with hydroponics plant cultivation in water. Includes the basic design and construction of an aquaponics feed system. Repeatable one time. (Summer only)

TPSS 220 Organic Food Crop Production (2)

Combined lecture/lab on the theory and practice of certified organic food production. Field visits to organic farms/markets included. Open to nonmajors. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SUST 221)

TPSS 251 Scientific Principles of Sustainability (3)

Introduction to the scientific principles of sustainability, including the ecology of managed and natural ecosystems, global change biology, ecological principles of natural resource management, renewable energy technologies, and the environmental impacts of humans. (Cross-listed as NREM 251 and SUST 251)

TPSS 300 Tropical Production Systems (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Comparisons and contrasts of crop management systems, techniques, and technologies in protected and open field production of tropical crops. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or consent.

TPSS 304 Fundamentals of Soil Science (3)

Origin, development, properties, management of tropical soils; classification of Hawaiian soils. A-F only. Minimum prerequisite grade of C or consent. Pre: CHEM 161 and 161L, or consent. Co-requisite: 304L. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as NREM 304)

TPSS 304L Fundamentals of Soil Science Laboratory (1)

Field and analytical methods for exploring the origin, development, properties, and management of soils, with an emphasis on tropical and Hawaiian soils. A-F only. Pre: CHEM 161 and CHEM 161L. Co-requisite: 304. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as NREM 304L)

TPSS 311 Current Topics in Plant Science (1)

Undergraduate seminar that provides the presentation and discussion of topics of current relevance to students preparing for careers in applied plant sciences. Oral focus designation. A-F only. Pre: 200/ SUST 211 or NREM 210, or consent. (Cross-listed as NREM 311)

TPSS 322 Farm & Food Marketing (3)

Problems, agencies, functions, costs, prices, regulations affecting marketing: proposed improvements. Pre: ECON 130, NREM/SUST 220; or consent. (Alt. years)

TPSS 336 Renewable Energy and Society (3)

Combined lecture/discussion regarding the ability of renewable energy technologies to meet local, national, and global energy demands and their potential impacts on the environment and society. Pre: consent.

TPSS 341 Managerial Accounting (3)

Principles and methods of agricultural accounting. Preparing and interpreting financial statements. Sources and costs of credit, capital budgeting, tax management, estate planning. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: ECON 130 or NREM/SUST 220, or consent. (Cross-listed as NREM 341)

TPSS 350 Tropical Landscape Practices (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Concepts and techniques of landscape installation and management in the tropics. Pre: 200/ SUST 211 and 369; or consent.

TPSS 351 Enterprise Management (3)

Introduction of practical concepts and methods used in business management. Introduce broad range of business strategies. Understand the critical role each strategy plays. Facilitate student’s practice of analytical and critical thinking through case studies. (Cross-listed as NREM 351)

TPSS 352 Landscape Architecture History (3)

Survey of the history of landscape architecture from Mesopotamia to present. Review of the physical, cultural, social, economic, and political factors, as well as the environmental concerns, horticultural techniques, and technological innovations of historic landscapes. A-F only. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as ARCH 352)

TPSS 353 Landscape Graphics Studio (4)

Basic skills of landscape graphic communication through a creative process model. Learning free hand and technical drafting techniques to creative effective landscape graphics. Pre: consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as ARCH 353)

TPSS 354 Tropical Landscape Planting Design Studio (4)

Students will develop basic skills of residential landscape graphic and design processes in order to clearly articulate the ability to think, analyze, and extend a physical solution in the proper scale. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as ARCH 354)

TPSS 364 Horticulture: Theory and Practice (3)

Techniques of culture and management of horticulture crops. Pre: consent.

TPSS 369 Ornamental Plant Materials (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Identification, origin, use, and cultural requirement of trees, shrubs, vines, and groundcovers used in Hawaiian landscapes. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or consent.

TPSS 371 Genetics: Theory to Application (3)

Fundamentals of genetic theory using traditional breeding and biotechnological procedures in insect and plant pathogen management for sustainable agricultural production. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Cross-listed as PEPS 371 and SUST 371)

TPSS 401 Vegetable Crop Production (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Crop biology, requirements, and production techniques for commercial vegetable production in Hawai‘i will be stressed. Pre: 300 or consent.

TPSS 402 Flower and Foliage Crop Production (4)

Biology and production of cut flowers, blooming potted plants, foliage plants under field and protected cultivation in Hawai‘i and globally. Pre: 300 or consent.

TPSS 403 Tropical Fruit Production (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Botanical aspects and horticultural management practices of selected tropical and subtropical fruit crops, with emphasis on small scale commercial production in Hawai‘i. Pre: 300 or consent.

TPSS 405 Turfgrass Management (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Adaptability and selection, establishment, and cultural practices of grasses for various types of turf. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or consent.

TPSS 409 Cultural Biogeography (3)

Co-evolution of human societies and plants over the last 10,000 years. Foraging, farming and urban societies economies; spread and modification of selected plants; issues of preservation of genetic resources and traditional plant knowledge. The form and function of gardens. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent.

TPSS 410 Sustainable Soil and Plant Health Management (2)

Provides knowledge and understanding of soils, agroecology, and sustainable approaches for plant health management, and prepares students for applied research in various tropical cropping systems. A-F only. (Alt. years: spring) (Cross-listed as PEPS 410 and SUST 410)

TPSS 415 Extension Education & Outreach (2)

Introduces an essential component of the Land Grant Mission. Students will explore the foundational components of extension education including agent expectations, program development and evaluation, audience engagement, building partnerships, funding structures. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Cross-listed as TAHR 415)

TPSS 416 Introduction to Social, Ethical and Political Issues Associated with Biotechnology (3)

Introduces concepts of biotechnology, fundamental issues associated with use of this technology, with special emphasis on agricultural biotechnology. A-F only. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or BIOL 171 or NREM 210, or consent. (Alt. years)

TPSS 418 Turfgrass Pest Management (3)

Provides students with knowledge and real world experience on common turfgrass pests and management strategies in Hawai‘i, with emphasis on integrated pest management. Common cool-season turfgrass and pest management are also discussed. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as PEPS 418)

TPSS 420 Plant Propagation (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Theoretical and applied aspects of seed and vegetative propagation technology involving fruits, flowers, vegetables, and landscape plants. Pre: 200/SUST 211 or consent.

TPSS 421 Tropical Seed Science (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of seed science, seed physiology, seed production, and genetic modification. Hawai‘i’s seed industry and biotechnology. A-F only. Pre: 364 (recommended) and 420 (recommended), or consent.

TPSS 429 Spreadsheet Modeling for Business and Economic Analysis (3)

Introduction to quantitative decision-making methods for effective agribusiness management in resource allocation, scheduling, logistics, risk analysis, inventory, and forecasting. Emphasis on problem identification, model formulation and solution, and interpretation and presentation of results. Pre: ECON 130 or NREM/ SUST 220, and ECON 321 or NREM 310; or consent. (Once a year)

TPSS 430 Nursery Management (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Management practices in production and operations of commercial nurseries in Hawai‘i. Pre: 200/SUST 211 and 364; or consent.

TPSS 431 Indigenous Crops/Food Systems (1)

Schemes for managing sequences and combinations of crops and crop production activities. Ecosystem and social determinants. Multiple cropping. Analysis of alternative cropping systems. Repeatable unlimited times, but credit earned one time only. Junior standing or higher.

TPSS 432 The Biology of Fungi (2)

Will introduce the diversity, ecology, evolution, and biology of the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on our current understanding of fungal evolution and diversity and how fungi interact with environments and hosts. Pre: BOT 201, BIOL 172; or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BIOL 430 and BOT 430)

TPSS 432L The Biology of Fungi Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to the morphology and life cycles of
organisms in the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on learning how to identify a diversity of fungi based on macro- and microscopic features. Field trips to collect specimens. Pre: BOT 430 (or concurrent) or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BIOL 430L and BOT 430L)

TPSS 435 Environmental Soil Chemistry (3)

Study of soil chemical processes such as weathering, adsorption, precipitation, and ion exchange; causes of soil acidity, alkalinity, and salinity; reactions between soils and fertilizers, pesticides, or heavy metals. Management strategies to minimize environmental contamination by nitrate, phosphate, and trace elements such as As, Pb, and Se. A-F only. Pre: 304 or consent. (Fall only)

TPSS 440 Tissue Culture/Transformation (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Application of plant tissue culture for plant scientists; study of the growth and development of plant tissues in culture as influenced by chemical and environmental factors, and the regeneration of plants following plant transformation by biolistics and other molecular approaches. Pre: 420 or consent. Recommended: BOT 410.

TPSS 450 Sustainable Nutrient Management in Agroecosystems (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Biological, chemical, and physical processes governing the cycling of nutrients in agroecosystems, crop and livestock production, and the effects on surrounding unmanaged ecosystems. Pre: 304 and CHEM 161, or consent. (Cross-listed as NREM 460)

TPSS 453 Plant Breeding and Genetics (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Unique aspects of plant genetics and applications to crop improvement, with emphasis on breeding plants in Hawai‘i. Pre: BIOL 375 (or concurrent) or consent.

TPSS 460 Soil Plant Environment (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Bio-physical processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum that influence crop growth and development. Methods to estimate the impact of soil and climate on crop performance. Use of crop models to simulate effects of planting date, plant spacing and density, fertilizer rate, rainfall or irrigation, and daily weather on crop yield and farm income. Pre: 304 and either PHYS 151 or PHYS 170, or consent.

TPSS 463 Irrigation and Water Management (3)

Basic soil-water-plant relationships, irrigation water requirements, irrigation efficiencies, different methods of irrigation, planning, design and management of an irrigation system, fertigation and impact of irrigation on soil and water quality. Pre: NREM 203 (or equivalent) and NREM/TPSS 304 (or equivalent), or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as NREM 463)

TPSS 470 Plant Physiology (3)

Integration of form and function from cellular to whole plant levels in processes from seed germination, through photosynthesis, growth, and morphogenesis, to flowering and senescence. A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171 or consent.

TPSS 470L Principles of Plant Physiology Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Principles of experimentation in plant physiology, includes individual investigations. A-F only. Pre: consent.

TPSS 473 Post-Harvest Physiology (3)

Comparative physiological and biochemical processes during growth, maturation, ripening, and senescence in fruits, vegetables, and flowers related to changes in quality and storage life. Tropical commodities emphasized. A-F only. Pre: 200/SUST 211, BIOL 171, or BOT 201; CHEM 152; or consent.

TPSS 475 Plant Nutrient Diagnosis in the Tropics (3)

Designed for students to identify essential nutrients required by plants; diagnose nutrient disorders in plants; and propose environmentally sound solutions to correct disorders. Pre: 304/NREM 304 (or concurrent) and BIOL 172. (Cross-listed as NREM 475)

TPSS 480 Life in the Soil Environment (3)

An interdisciplinary study of the diverse life in the soil beneath our feet that includes bacteria, fungi, protists, nematodes, arthropods, invertebrate, viruses, and the essential functional roles these organisms contribute to sustainability of the planet. Repeatable one time. Pre: TPSS/PEPS/SUST 371 or BIOL 375, or MICR 351, or consent. (Cross-listed as BIOL 480)

TPSS 480L Life in the Soil Environment Lab (1)

Laboratory to accompany 480. Technical examination of bacteria, fungi, protists, nematodes, arthropods, and other invertebrate, and the essential functional roles these organisms contribute to sustainability of the planet. Repeatable one time. Pre: BIOL 171L and 172L, or MICR 351L, or consent. Co-requisite: 480. (Crosslisted as BIOL 480L)

TPSS 481 Weed Science (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Weed classification, identification, adaptations for weediness; principles of weed control; properties, uses, and action of herbicides. Lab: pesticide application equipment and techniques, no-till farming, greenhouse and field experiments. A-F only. Pre: 200/ SUST 211 and CHEM 152, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as PEPS 481)

TPSS 491 Experimental Topics (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics, problems. Offered by visiting faculty and/or for extension programs. Repeatable. Pre: consent.

TPSS 492 Internship (1)

Integration and application of academic knowledge and critical skills emphasizing professional development. Placement with an approved cooperating supervisor/employer. Pre: consent.

TPSS 499 Directed Studies (V)

Supervised individual instruction in field laboratory and library. Repeatable up to six credits. CR/NC only. Pre: 364 or consent.

TPSS 601 Crop Modeling (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of modeling crop growth and development, model types, techniques, simulation. Modeling influence of climate/environment on phenology, growth, development of horticultural crops. Pre: BOT 470 and NREM 310, or consent.

TPSS 603 Experimental Design (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Design of experiments and variance analyses in biological and agricultural research. Pre: graduate standing or consent. Recommended: ZOOL 632. (Cross-listed as ANSC 603)

TPSS 604 Advanced Soil Microbiology (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Study of biochemical and biogeochemical transformations mediated by soil microorganisms, emphasis on processes important to plant growth productivity and environmental quality. Pre: 304 and MICR 351, or consent.

TPSS 610 Nutrition of Tropical Crops (3)

(1 2-hr Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Mineral nutrition of plants in relation to plant metabolism, mechanisms of ion uptake, long-distance transport of solutes, and interactions at the root-soil interface. Special emphasis on problems associated with tropical crops. Pre: 450 and 470, or consent. (Alt. years)

TPSS 611 Professional Development (1)

Lecture/discussion targets students exiting from graduate degree programs and provides preparation as a career professional; topics include establishing a professional identity; CV and cover letters, job-seeking due diligence, and negotiation skills. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as MBBE 611 and PEPS 611)

TPSS 614 Molecular Genetics of Crops (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Applications of molecular genetics to crop improvement. Pre: 453 and MBBE 402; or consent.

TPSS 615 Quantitative Genomics and Evolution (3)

Overview and lab-based course exploring theory and methods to understand genome evolution and adaptation; focus will be on a range of organisms. Pre: 453 and 603, or consent.

TPSS 634 Landscape Plants: Identification and Use (3)

Introduction to the identification, recognition, and use of plants in landscape design and built environment applications. Students will be introduced to a variety of landscape plants commonly used in Hawai‘i and the tropics. TPSS majors only. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ARCH 634)

TPSS 640 Advanced Soil Chemistry (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Physio-chemical processes in soils and soil solutions, with emphasis on ionic equilibria, mineral stability, organic complexation, and surface sorption of major plant nutrients and heavy metals. A-F only. Pre: 435 and CHEM 351, or consent.

TPSS 650 Soil Plant Nutrient Relations (4)

(2 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Soil-plant interactions, emphasis on characteristics of tropical soils and plants influencing nutrient uptake by plants. Diagnostic methods to identify nutrient deficiencies and element toxicity. Pre: 450 or consent.

TPSS 652 Information Research Skills (1)

Examines the use of libraries and information technology for scholarly investigation in support of scientific research; provides experience utilizing and critically evaluating a variety of print and electronic sources in basic and applied sciences. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 652, FSHN 652, and NREM 652)

TPSS 654 Communications in the Sciences (1)

(3-hr Lec/Lab combination) Laboratory-type course for improving communication abilities in the sciences and engineering. Presentations to lay audiences are emphasized. Hands-on experience in techniques and methods is provided.

TPSS 656 Environmental and Cultural Landscape Studio (4)

Exploring, understanding, and implementing Hawaiian and Western cultural and environmental landscape design principles. A concentrated look at how to think about creating and respecting a sense of place through landscape design. TPSS and LAND majors only. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ARCH 656)

TPSS 657 Grant Writing for Graduate Students (1)

Combined lecture/discussion on grants and grant writing. Designed to introduce graduate students to grants and grant proposal writing through lectures, class discussion, writing assignments, and peer review. Open to CTAHR graduate students only; others with consent. (Cross-listed as ANSC 657 and FSHN 657)

TPSS 658 Environmental Landscape Technologies and Systems (3)

Understanding the science and art of green landscape technologies, with a comprehensive understanding of LID (low impact design) principles and practices; to increase knowledge to help produce more viable and enduring built landscapes. TPSS majors only. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ARCH 658)

TPSS 664 Orchidology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Classification, culture, cytogenetics, breeding of orchids. Pre: consent. Recommended: 200/SUST 211 and 402.

TPSS 667 Graduate Seminar (1)

Presentation of research reports; reviews of current literature in plant and soil sciences. Repeatable four times. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

TPSS 670 Interdisciplinary Methods for Agrarian Systems (3)

Interdisciplinary methodologies for conducting research and impact analyses on agrarian systems, sustainable development, and resource management. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as NREM 670) (Alt. years: fall)

TPSS 674 Plant Growth and Development (3)

Contemporary literature is used as the basis for understanding the physiology for whole plant growth and development. Aspects covered include vegetative and reproductive development, seed dormancy, senescence, abscission, and relevant biochemical and molecular processes. Pre: 470 and MBBE 402, or consent.

TPSS 680 Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resource Data (3)

The application of geostatistics to estimate spatial dependence to improve soil and regional sampling; provide insight into underlying soil, geographic, and geologic process, and to provide quantitative scaling up of point measurements to fields, regions, and watersheds. State-space modeling also will be included. A-F only. Pre: GEO 388 or ZOOL 631; or consent. (Cross-listed as GEO 680)

TPSS 695 Plan B Master’s Project (3)

Independent study for students working on a Plan B master’s project. A grade of Satisfactory (S) is assigned when the project is satisfactorily completed. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing in TPSS program.

TPSS 699 Directed Research (V)

In-depth study of specialized problems. Repeatable unlimited times. CR/ NC only. Pre: consent.

TPSS 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

TPSS 711 Special Topics (V)

Specialized topics from various areas of plant and soil research such as experimental techniques, growth regulation, morphogenesis, genetics and breeding, culture and nutrition of tropical crops. A-F only. Pre: consent.

TPSS 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.