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ASTR 110 Survey of Astronomy (3)

Introduction to the astronomical universe: sky and celestial objects, planetary motion, planets and the Solar System, Sun and stars, the Milky Way and galaxies, cosmology and the universe.

ASTR 110A Survey of Astronomy (3)

Introduction to the astronomical universe: sky and celestial objects, planetary motion, planets and the Solar System, Sun and stars, the Milky Way and galaxies, cosmology and the universe.

ASTR 130 Introduction to Archaeoastronomy (3)

Astronomy and celestial lore in ancient cultures: Neolithic Europe, Mayan, Mesoamerican, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, American Indian, Chinese, and Polynesian. Concepts of the cosmos, calendars, eclipse predictions, motion of celestial bodies, and navigation.
Construction of simple observing tools.

ASTR 150 Voyage through the Solar System (3)

An illustrated voyage through the Solar System based on recent scientific results. The class highlights the origin, evolution, and current knowledge of the eight planets, their moons, asteroids, comets, and one star, the Sun. Field trip. (Cross-listed as ERTH 105)

ASTR 210 Foundations of Astronomy (3)

A rigorous overview of modern astronomy: solar system, stellar, galactic and extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. For science and engineering students. Pre: 110; PHYS 151 or PHYS 170.

ASTR 241 Foundations of Astrophysics I: The Solar System (3)

Solar system astrophysics. Dynamics of planets, satellite systems, asteroids and comets;
planetary atmospheres and internal structure; thermal balance; the Sun as a star. Introduces numerical computing. A-F only. Pre: PHYS 170, MATH 242 or 252A, and PHYS 272 (or concurrent). (Fall only)

ASTR 242 Foundations of Astrophysics II: Galaxies and Stars (3)

Stellar and galactic astrophysics. Stellar magnitudes, colors, distances, and spectra. Galactic structure and evolution, active nuclei, large-scale structure, Big-Bang cosmology. Stellar interiors, nuclear “burning,” main-sequence and evolved stars. Introduces computer programming. A-F only. Pre: 241, PHYS 274 (or concurrent), and MATH 243 (or concurrent) or 253A (or concurrent). (Spring only)

ASTR 280 Evolution of the Universe (3)

The Big Bang, origin of the elements, formation and evolution of galaxies and stars. Pre: 110 or 210 or 241 or 242, or consent

ASTR 281 Astrobiology (3)

Are we alone in the universe? Modern astronomical, biological, and geological perspectives on this fundamental question. Searches for life on Mars, oceans on Europa, planets orbiting other stars. Space exploration and colonies, interstellar spaceflight and communication. Pre: 110 or 210, or consent. (Spring only)

ASTR 300 Observational Astronomy (3)

Principles and techniques of optical and near-infrared astronomical observation. Astronomical coordinate systems. Telescopes, cameras, spectrographs, and detectors. Astrometry, photometry, and spectroscopy of astronomical objects. A-F only. Pre: 210 or 242; PHYS 152 or 274; MATH 216, 242, or 252A. (Fall only)

ASTR 320 Astronomical Spectroscopy (3)

Introduction to astronomical spectroscopy. Stellar atmospheres, line formation, elements of radiative transfer. Phases of interstellar medium. Emission line diagnostics. Doppler shift and kinematics. A-F only. Pre: 210 or 242; PHYS 152 or 274; MATH 216 or 242 or 252A. (Spring only)

ASTR 423 Stellar Astrophysics (3)

Advanced survey of stellar astrophysics, including application of astrometry, photometry, and spectrometry to determine fundamental stellar properties; stellar structure and evolution of single and binary stars; astrophysical distance determination methods; stellar nucleosynthesis. Pre: 242 and 300, and PHYS 480.

ASTR 426 Galaxies & Cosmology (3)

Survey of extragalactic astronomy and cosmology, including: galaxy morphology and kinematics; luminosity functions; dark matter; properties of galaxy groups/ clusters; gravitational lensing; redshifts; cosmological models; the Big Bang; thermal history of the Universe; structure formation. A-F only. Pre: 300 (or concurrent); PHYS 152 or PHYS 274; MATH 216 or MATH 242 or MATH 252A. (Alt. years)

ASTR 430 The Solar System (3)

Observations and physical nature of planets and moons, asteroids, comets, and other small bodies; formation of the Solar System; discovery of other planetary systems; solar activity. Pre: 300; and PHYS 152 or 274; and MATH 216, 242, or 252A. (Alt. years)

ASTR 470 General Relativity & Cosmology (3)

Introduction to general relativity & cosmology. Spacetime metrics, geodesics, Einstein field equations, black holes. Geometry of the universe, redshift, cosmological distances. Cosmological models, dark matters, dark energy. Big Bang nucleosynthesis, recombination, cosmic microwave background, inflation. Pre: PHYS 274; MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). Recommended: 242. (Alt. years: fall) (Cross-listed as PHYS 470)

ATMO 101 Introduction to Weather and Climate (3)

Introductory physical science course for all undergraduates in any major. A non-mathematical introduction to basic atmospheric variables, Earth’s past climates, global warming, air pollution, El Nino, hurricanes, tornadoes, and forecasting weather in Hawai‘i.

ATMO 200 Atmospheric Processes and Phenomena (3)

Atmospheric variables, gas laws, radiation processes, thermodynamics, conservation laws, dynamic approximations, clouds and precipitation, convection, atmospheric circulations, mid-latitude and tropical weather systems, forecasting, climate. Pre: PHYS 170 (or concurrent).

ATMO 302 Atmospheric Physics (3)

Energy and thermodynamics, statics and stability, physical processes of cloud formation, radiation and Earthatmosphere heat balance, kinetic theory, optical effects. Pre: 200, MATH 242, and PHYS 272; or consent.

ATMO 303 Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics (3)

Scalar and vector development of basic laws of hydrodynamics, equations of motion, kinematics, divergence and vorticity, viscosity and turbulence, introduction to numerical weather prediction, general circulation. Pre: 302 and MATH 244.

ATMO 305 Meteorological Instruments and Observations (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Each week targets a different meteorological instrument and culminates in a lab exercise and report. The focus is on accurate measurement and scientific-style writing. A-F only. Pre: 302 and PHYS 272/272L

ATMO 310 Global Environmental Change (3)

Global environmental change problems such as carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect, acid rain, chlorofluorocarbons and the ozone layer, global deforestation and the effect on climate, etc. Pre: 200, OCN 201, ERTH 101, ERTH 103, or ERTH 170; or consent. (Cross-listed as GES 310 and OCN 310)

ATMO 402 Applied Atmospheric Dynamics (3)

Advanced concepts in dynamics: vorticity, cyclogenesis, jet streams, fronts, mesoscale circulations. Pre: 303.

ATMO 405 Synoptic Satellite Meteorology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Satellite applications to synoptic meteorology and forecasting, including orbital elements, ephemerides, viewing geometry, radiation, satellite sensors, and interpreting satellite data. Pre: 302.

ATMO 406 Tropical Meteorology (3)

History; tropical clouds and hydrometeors; typhoons; monsoons; local and diurnal effects. Pre: 303.

BE 260 Mass and Energy Balances (3)

Introduction of the principles of mass and energy conservation; development of systematic approaches to apply these principles in calculations for design and analysis of biochemical, chemical, and physical processes. Pre: BIOL 171, CHEM 162 or 171 or 181A, PHYS 170, and MATH 242 or 252A; or consent.

BE 350 Dynamic Systems Modeling (3)

Introduction to analytical and numerical solutions for systems of differential equations. Modeling and computer simulation of representative dynamic systems encountered in biological engineering. A-F only. Pre: 260, EE 110 or 160, MATH 243 or 253A, CEE 270; or consent. Co-requisite: BE 350L.

BE 373 Transport Phenomena (3)

Fundamental principles and applications relating to mass, momentum, and energy transfers in biosystems and other systems for engineers and scientists. Pre: 260, CEE 270, MATH 243 or 253A, ME 311 (or concurrent).

BE 411 Food Engineering (3)

Principles and applications of thermodynamics, electricity, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, psychrometry, and material and energy balances of food processing and preservation. Pre: (BIOL 171, CHEM 162 or CHEM 171 or CHEM 181A, MATH 243 or MATH 253A, PHYS 151 or PHYS 170) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as FSHN 411 and MBBE 411)

BE 420 Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems (3)

Design course focused on fundamentals of electronic interfacing, control and automation, including biological processes. Topics include sensor physics, basic instrumentation, digital communication, and programming of microcontrollers and other portable computer systems. Pre: (EE 160, EE 211, and BE 350 or MATH 302 or MATH 307 or EE 326) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Cross-listed as EE 422 and MBBE 422)

BE 421 Bioprocess Control (3)

Process control in both time and Laplace domains with an introduction to the frequency domain; selection and design of appropriate control systems for bioprocesses with consideration of the impact on the total system; identification of safety concerns in designing control systems and process equipment. Pre: 260, MATH 243; or consent.

BE 431 Environmental Biotechnology (3)

Environmental impact and control; the microorganism and its nutrition and growth conditions; microbial growth and substrate removal kinetics; bioreactors; biological treatment systems; biodegredation of xenobiotic organic chemicals; case studies. A-F only. Pre: 373 or consent. (Spring only)

BE 437 Biosystems Unit Operations (3)

Introduction to unit operations in biological, environmental, food, and manufacturing processes. Integration of biology and chemistry into engineering using basic concepts in mass and energy conservation and transport in reacting and non-reacting systems. A-F only. Pre: 373; and either CEE 320 or ME 322; or consent.

BE 440 Bioremediation: Principles and Practices (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Soil environment, fate and transport of contaminants; microbial ecology, metabolism, and energy production; biodegradation of selected compounds. In situ treatment, solid-phase bioremediation, slurry-phase bioremediation, and vapor-phase biological treatment. Open to nonmajors. Repeatable one time. Pre: 260, CHEM 161, PHYS 170; or consent.

BE 460 Bioreactor Design and Analysis (3)

Application of mass/energy balances and reaction kinetics for the design and analysis of bioreactors for microbial, plant, and animal cell cultures. Pre: 373 or CEE 320 or ME 322; or consent. (Cross-listed as MBBE 460)

BE 470 Bioprocess Design and Analysis (3)

Combined lecture/computer lab on theory and practice of bioprocess design and analysis, involving biological basics and engineering principles of bioprocessing, computer-aided unit operations, process integration, and economic evaluation. A-F only. Pre: 373, or 437 (or concurrent) or 460 (or concurrent); or consent. (Alt. years)

BIOC 141 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (3)

Biological chemistry stressing integration of concepts of general, inorganic, and biochemistry and application to life chemistry. Pre: beginning algebra and high school science.

BIOC 341 Elements of Biochemistry (3)

Biochemical principles and concepts as applied to living systems, including sufficient organic chemistry to understand these principles. Pre: 241 or consent.

CEE 270 Applied Mechanics I (3)

Forces, resultants, and equilibrium; analysis of trusses, frames, and machines; centroids, moments of inertia; friction. A-F only. Pre: grade of C or better in all of the following: PHYS 170; MATH 242; and either MATH 243 (or concurrent) or MATH 252A (or concurrent).

CEE 271 Applied Mechanics II (3)

Dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; force, acceleration, impulse-momentum, work-energy. CE, CNST, ENGS, ME majors only. A-F only. Pre: C or better in 270; MATH
244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). (Cross-listed as ME 271)

CEE 320 Fluid Mechanics Fundamentals (4)

(3 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Compressible and incompressible fluid properties; fluid statics; kinematics, energy and momentum considerations in steady flows; application of steady flow concepts to various fluid processes; with an emphasis on instruction in writing lab reports. A-F only. Pre: 271.

CEE 330 Environmental Engineering (4)

(3 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Parameters and indices of environmental quality; materials balances; chemical kinetics; ideal reactor models; water and air pollution control; solid and hazardous waste management; emphasis on instruction in writing lab reports. A-F only. Pre: 271.

CEE 355 Geotechnical Engineering I (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to geotechnical engineering: soil characterization, index properties, seepage and flow in soil, stresses in soils, compressibility, consolidation, shear strength. Substantial emphasis on writing lab reports. A-F only. Pre: 320, 370.

CEE 370 Mechanics of Solids (3)

Introduction to analysis and design of deformable bodies subject to loading. Stress, strain, constitutive relation, axially loading, torsion, statically indeterminate systems, Mohr’s circle, failure criteria, buckling, defection due to axial, shear, torsional, and flexural loading. Pre: C or better in all of the following: 270; and MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). (Crosslisted as ME 371)

CEE 375 Construction Materials (3)

(2 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Introduction to the crystalline and molecular structure of materials. Properties of metals, concrete, concrete admixtures, asphalt, wood, and other materials commonly used in construction. A-F only. Pre: 305 (or concurrent); and 370 with a minimum grade of C or better.

CEE 381 Structural Analysis (3)

Analysis of statically determinate plane and space trusses and frames; deflections; introduction to matrix methods; computer applications. A-F only. Pre: 370 with a minimum grade of C or better.

CEE 421 Engineering Hydraulics (3)

Hydraulics of closed conduits and open channels with emphasis on engineering applications. Topics also include pump hydraulics, bridge hydraulics, urban drainage engineering, and flood plain management. A-F only. Pre: 320.

CEE 422 Environmental Fluid Mechanics (3)

Introduction to basic concepts of pollutant transport phenomenon through theoretical modeling, lab and field experiments and observations. Specific topics include mass balance, jets and plumes, mixing and transport in rivers, reservoirs, groundwater and estuaries; non point course pollution. A-F only. Pre: 320, and MATH 244 or MATH 253A (or equivalent). (Alt. years)

CEE 424 Applied Hydrology (3)

Surface water hydrology topics include hydrologic cycle, hydrographs, regression methods, urban rain-runoff process, flood frequency analysis, flood routing and hydrology for detention basin design. Groundwater hydrology topics include seawater intrusion, theory of groundwater flow and solutions to steady and unsteady aquifer flows. A-F only. Pre: 305 and 320.

CEE 431 Water and Wastewater Engineering (3)

Hydrologic fundamentals of water demand and supply; water and wastewater distribution; collection systems; quality characterization; analytical methods for water quality management. Pre: 330.

CEE 455 Geotechnical Engineering II (3)

Continuation of 355 field exploration, lateral earth pressures, bearing capacity theory, slope stability, use of geosynthetics. A-F only. Pre: 355.

CEE 485 Reinforced Concrete Design (4)

(3 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Behavior and design of reinforced concrete beams, one-way slabs and columns. Laboratory section includes design and hands-on manufacturing and testing of reinforced concrete members. A-F only. Pre: 375 and 381.

CHEM 100 Chemistry and Society (3)

Introduction to chemistry for non-science majors. Discussion of basic chemistry concepts and their application to everyday life. No credit for science and engineering majors. A-F only. Students who successfully completed 110/SUST 120 with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 100 without instructor override. Students who successfully complete 100 with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 110/SUST 120 without instructor override.

CHEM 110 Chemistry in a Sustainable World (3)

Introduction to chemistry for non-science majors. Discussion of the role of natural and manmade chemicals in everyday life, with an emphasis on sustainable and environmentally-sensitive use of chemicals to improve our world. A-F only. Students who successfully completed 100 with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 110/SUST 120 without instructor override. Students who successfully complete 110/SUST 120 with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 100 without instructor override. (Cross-listed as SUST 120)

CHEM 151 Elementary Survey of Chemistry (3)

Nonrigorous but adequate background in fundamentals. Preparation for technical training in life sciences.

CHEM 152 Survey of Organic and Bioorganic Chemistry (3)

Structure, nomenclature, properties, reactions of organic compounds emphasizing those of practical importance in related fields. Pre: 151, 162, or 171.

CHEM 161 General Chemistry I (3)

Basic principles of chemistry, including stoichiometry. Introduction to solution phase chemistry. Gas phase chemistry. Thermodynamics, including enthalpies of formation and reaction. Atomic structure, periodic trends, chemical bonding, molecular structure. Students who successfully completed 171 or 181A with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 161 without instructor override. Students who successfully complete 161 with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 171 or 181A without instructor override. Pre: C (not C-) in 131 or C (not C-) in 151 or successful completion of placement exam, or consent.

CHEM 162 General Chemistry II (3)

Continuation of 161. Liquids and solids. Solutions and colligative properties. Continuation of thermodynamics, including entropy and free energy. Principles and applications of chemical equilibrium, including acidbase chemistry (titrations, buffers). Kinetics. Redox reactions and electrochemistry. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 161.

CHEM 171 Principles of Chemistry (4)

Principles, theories, elementary analytical methods of chemistry. Intended for physical science majors and engineers. Pre: Satisfactory Placement Exam score, and MATH 241 or MATH 242 or MATH 243 or MATH 251A or MATH 252A or MATH 253A. Co-requisite: 171L. Students who successfully completed 161 or 181A with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 171 without instructor override. Students who successfully complete 171 with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 161 or 181A without instructor override. (Fall only)

CHEM 181A Honors General Chemistry (4)

Rigorous, in-depth introduction to chemical principles with emphasis on experimental and applied aspects of modern chemistry. Students who successfully completed 161 or 171 with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 181A without instructor override. Students who successfully complete 181A with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 161 or 171 without instructor override. Pre: satisfactory placement exam score and MATH 215 (or concurrent) or MATH 241 (or concurrent) or MATH 251A (or concurrent) with a minimum grade of C. (Fall only)

CHEM 272 Organic Chemistry I (3)

Molecular structure, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, mechanisms, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 162 or 171 or 181A.

CHEM 273 Organic Chemistry II (3)

Continuation of 272. Molecular structure, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, mechanisms, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 272.

CHEM 274 Principles of Analytical Chemistry (3)

Selected methods and principles, e.g., phase equilibria, ionic equilibria, electrode equilibria, separations, spectroscopy, automation, and process control. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 162 or 171 or 181A, MATH 215 or MATH 241 or MATH 251A.

CHEM 351 Physical Chemistry I (3)

Principles and theories; physico-chemical procedures. Pre: 274, 274L, PHYS 272, PHYS 272L, and MATH 243 or MATH 253A.

CHEM 352 Physical Chemistry II (3)

Continuation of 351. Pre: 351.

CHEM 425 Synthesis and Analysis of Inorganic Compounds (3)

Lecture on advanced methods of preparation and characterization of inorganic compounds and materials. A-F only. Pre: 351 (or concurrent) or 461 (or concurrent). (Fall only)

CHEM 427 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)

Classification, description, fundamental theory. Pre: 425.

CHEM 445 Synthesis and Analysis of Organic Compounds (3)

Introduction to multi-step synthesis and instruments/analytical techniques used to characterize organic compounds. Retrosynthesis and diastereoselective reactions; spectroscopy (optical methods, NMR), mass spectrometry. Chromatography (GC, HPLC) and coupled techniques (GCMS, LCMS). CHEM or BIOC majors only. A-F only. Pre: 273 with a grade of C (not C-) or better, or departmental approval. (Spring only)

CHEM 461 Physical Biochemistry (3)

Biochemical thermodynamics, chemical and enzyme kinetics, biomolecular structure, and biomolecular spectroscopy. A-F only. Pre: 162, PHYS 272, and MATH 242 or 252A with a grade of C or better for prerequisites.

EE 101 Electrical Engineering Skills (3)

Electrical engineering subjects in a skill acquisition context at the freshman level. Learning, creative problem solving, brainstorming, technical information assimilation, and presentation skills development. Repeatable two times. A-F only.

EE 211 Basic Circuit Analysis I (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Linear passive circuits, time domain analysis, transient and steady-state responses, phasors, impedance and admittance; power and energy, frequency responses, resonance. BENG, CE, CENG, EE, ME, PREN, and ENGS majors only. A-F only. Pre: MATH 243 (or concurrent) or MATH 253 (or concurrent), and PHYS 272 (or concurrent); or consent.

EE 213 Basic Circuit Analysis II (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Laplace transforms and their application to circuits, Fourier transforms and their applications to circuits, frequency selective circuits, introduction to and design of active filters, convolution, and state space analysis of circuits. A-F only. Pre: 211, and MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent); or consent

EE 323 Microelectronic Circuits I (3)

Semiconductor structures, operating principles and characteristics of diodes and amplifying devices. Their application as circuit elements in building basic digital, analog, and integrated circuit subsystems. Pre: 213.

EE 324 Physical Electronics (3)

Review of quantum mechanics fundamentals, H-atom, and chemical bonding. Introduction to band structure models and materials. Semiconductor doping, charge carrier statistics and charge transport, including ambipolar transport. Metal-semiconductor and PN junctions. Pre: MATH 243 or MATH 253A, and PHYS 274; or consent.

EE 326 Microelectronic Circuits II (3)

Principles and design of linear electronic circuits including differential, operational, feedback, and tuned amplifiers; integrated circuits, current mirrors, signal generators, filters, and stability. Pre: 323.

EE 327 Theory and Design of IC Devices (3)

Band structure models and carrier transport physics review. Theory and design of semiconductor IC devices: Schottky diodes, bipolar devices (PN junction diodes, BJTs), FETs (MOSFETs, JFETs, and MESFETs). Pre: 324 and either MATH 243 or MATH 253A; or consent.

EE 328 Microcircuit Fabrication (3)

Technology principles, materials, and methods for the design and fabrication of semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, and microelectromechanical systems. Pre: 327 or consent. Co-requisite: 328L.

EE 351 Linear Feedback-Control Systems (3)

Analysis/design of feedback systems. Compensator design via root locus and Bode analysis. Routh/ Nyquist stability. State space representation and introduction to MIMO formulation. Controllability/ observability. Application to physical dynamic systems such as industrial robots. Pre: 315 or ME 375 or consent.

EE 422 Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems (3)

Design course focused on fundamentals of electronic interfacing, control and automation, including biological processes. Topics include sensor physics, basic instrumentation, digital communication, and programming of microcontrollers and other portable computer systems. Pre: (160, 211, and BE 350 or MATH 302 or MATH 307 or EE 326) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Cross-listed as BE 420 and MBBE 422)

EE 425 Electronic Instrumentation II (3)

Instrumentation systems and circuits for measurement, control, signal processing, transmission, and detection. Noise and interference, ADC/DAC, modulation demodulation, high-frequency and high-speed techniques, IC applications. Pre: 422 and 422L, or consent.

EE 426 Advanced Si IC and Solid State Devices (3)

State of the art Si-based devices including advanced bipolar and MOS devices, heterojunction devices, new device trends. Topics from the most current literature included. Pre: 327 and either MATH 243 or MATH 253A, or consent.

EE 427 Computer-Aided Circuit Design (3)

Application of the computer to the analysis, design, simulation, and construction of analog and digital circuits. Pre: 326 and 326L, or consent.

EE 438 Renewable Energy (3)

Fundamentals of power, electric power grid and conventional electricity generation. Wind and solar power systems. Photovoltaic materials and systems. Distributed generation and energy storage. ENG majors only. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 213 or consent. (Spring only)

EE 455 Design of Intelligent Robots (3)

Study of the design principles of computer-controlled, intelligent robots such as roving vehicles, hand-eye systems. Pre: 351 and 367.

EE 470 Physical Optics (3)

Fundamentals of classical physical optics emphasizing linear systems theory, including optical fields in matter, polarization phenomena, temporal coherence, interference and diffraction (Fourier optics). Specialized applications include Gaussian beams, laser resonators, pulse propagation, and nonlinear optics. Pre: 372 (or concurrent with a minimum grade of C-) or PHYS 450 (or concurrent with a minimum grade of C), or consent. (Cross-listed as PHYS 460) DP

EE 473 Microwave Engineering (3)

Passive and active microwave devices and circuits for RF and wireless applications. Scattering parameters, signal-flow graphs, and computer-aided design. Pre: 371.

EE 475 Optical Communications (3)

Principles and applications of optical fibers and waveguides. Fundamentals of optical communication systems (optical links, high-speed systems, wavelengthdivision-multiplexing networks, and network elements) and optical components (guided-wave circuits, lasers, detectors, and optical amplifiers). System and network integration issues. A-F only. Pre: 372 or consent.

EE 477 Fundamentals of Radar, Sonar, and Navigation Systems (3)

Discussion of basic radar detection and position- and velocity-measurement principles. Applications to various types of radar and sonar systems. Modern navigation aids. Pre: 371 (or equivalent), and familiarity with waveguides or waveguide theory.

ERTH 101 Dynamic Earth (3)

The natural physical environment; the landscape; rocks and minerals, rivers and oceans; volcanism, earthquakes, and other processes inside the Earth; effects of human use of the Earth and its resources. Field trip. (Cross-listed as SUST 101) DP

ERTH 101A Dynamic Earth (3)

The natural physical environment; the landscape; rocks and minerals, rivers and oceans; volcanism, earthquakes, and other processes inside the Earth; effects of human use of the Earth and its resources. Field trip.

ERTH 103 Geology of the Hawaiian Islands (3)

Hawaiian geology and geologic processes: origin of Hawaiian islands, volcanism, rocks and minerals, landforms, stream and coastal processes, landslides, earthquakes and tsunamis, groundwater, geologic and environmental hazards. Field trip.

ERTH 105 Voyage through the Solar System (3)

An illustrated voyage through the Solar System based on recent scientific results. The class highlights the origin, evolution, and current knowledge of the eight planets, their moons, asteroids, comets, and one star, the Sun. Field trip. (Cross-listed as ASTR 150)

ERTH 106 Humans and the Environment (3)

Prepares students to make decisions such as where to build/buy a house, sustainable use of natural resources, and what environmental actions relevant to society and Earth’s ecosystem are appropriate on a local and global scale. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 116)

ERTH 107 Solar System Studio (4)

Explore the wonders of the Solar System through hands-on experience of science. Will study satellite images, evaluate planetary surface observations, analyze data of objects in our Solar System, conduct experiments, and communicate their findings. Repeatable one time. A-F only.

ERTH 111 Introduction to Volcanoes (3)

Examines the origin and classification of volcanoes, volcanic eruptions, and volcanic deposits. Includes the history of volcanic studies, myths, and legends. Emphasis on volcanic eruptions, eruptive products, volcanic hazards, and risk management. (Spring only)

ERTH 130 Geological Hazards (3)

Introductory course covering the causes of, and effects from, earthquakes, tsunami, volcanic eruptions, landslides, rockfalls, and other natural geologic phenomena. Open to non-majors. Field trips. (Alt. years)

ERTH 170 Physical Geology (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Structure, composition and evolution of Earth; processes responsible for formation, deformation and transformation of rocks; plate tectonics. Emphasis on quantitative methods, problem solving and critical thinking to geology. Laboratory and field trips required.

ERTH 200 Geological Inquiry (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Origin and age of the solar system and earth: interior of the earth; plate tectonics and records of biological evolution and past environments. Pre: 170, or 101 and 101L, or 103 and 101L; or consent. 101L may be taken concurrently. ERTH and GEOL majors only. Consent required for all non-majors.

ERTH 300 Volcanology (3)

Volcanic eruptions and their consequences. Includes models for volcanic eruptions including explosive eruptions and lava flows, monitoring of active volcanoes, evaluation and impacts of volcanic hazards, and mitigation of volcanic risk. Field trips. Normally fall. ERTH and GEOL majors or consent. Pre: 200 or consent.

ERTH 301 Mineralogy (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Crystallography, crystal chemistry, phase equilibria, and crystal structures. Also covers mineral optics and identification and includes an introduction to modern methods of mineralogy and crystallography. Pre: 200 and (CHEM 162/162L or CHEM 171/171L). or consent.

ERTH 302 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Survey of composition, classification, and occurrence of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Hand-specimen identification and optical petrography of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Development of critical thinking and writing skills. Pre: 301 or consent.

ERTH 303 Structural Geology (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to (a) the geometry, kinematics, and mechanics of crustal deformation, and (b) continuum mechanics in geology. Develops skills in three-dimensional thinking through geologic maps, cross sections, various projections, experiments, and vector analyses. Pre: 200, 250, MATH 241 or MATH 251A, and PHYS 151 or PHYS 170; or consent.

ERTH 304 Physics of Earth and Planets (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Essentials of geophysics: formation of Solar System and Earth, gravity, seismology, heat flow, geomagnetism, isostasy, plate tectonics. Course work involves application of basic physics to understanding Earth structure. Labs include field surveys and computer analyses. Pre: 250, 303, MATH 241, MATH 242, and PHYS 272; or consent.

ERTH 305 Geological Field Methods (3)

Methods used in geological investigations in the field. Eight hours on Saturday in the field. Pre: 302, 303, and 309; or consent.

ERTH 306 Work of Water (3)

Physical properties of water, geological aspects of surface water and ground water occurrence, surface water and groundwater resources, use, and problems. Pre: 200 or consent. (Alt. years: fall)

ERTH 309 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of sedimentology, sedimentary petrology, geochemistry and stratigraphy. Description and discussion of modern and past processes and environments that form sedimentary rocks, properties of sedimentary rocks and interpretation of these properties and stratigraphic relationships in terms of Earth history. Repeatable one time. Pre: 200 or consent. (Spring only)

ERTH 325 Geochemistry (3)

Theory and applications of chemical principles and chemical analysis to Earth, ocean and environmental sciences; chemistry of hydrosphere-geosphere-biosphere system, origin/differentiation of Earth/Solar system, volcanic processes, natural radioactivity, organic/inorganic chemistry. Pre: 200, 250, MATH 241 or MATH 251A, CHEM 162 (or concurrent); or consent. (Fall only)

ERTH 333 Earth Materials and Structures (4)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Lecture and lab that covers formation, occurrence, and identification of common minerals, rocks, and geologic structures. Lab work will include study of hands-samples, thin-sections, and field experiences. A-F only. Pre: 200. (Fall only)

ERTH 401 Introduction to mineral Physics (3)

Scientific study of the materials that make up the Earth. Properties of minerals on micro- and macro-scales; their properties and behavior. Pre: 302 and PHYS 272, or consent. (Alt. years)

ERTH 402 Hawaiian Geology (3)

Consists of lectures, discussions, and field trips about the geology of the Hawaiian islands. Focus on geological processes and the geologic history of all islands will be covered. Pre: 302 and 303; or consent.

ERTH 407 Energy and Mineral Resources (3)

Lecture and discussion on the origin, distribution and exploitation of fossil fuels, renewable energy resources and ore deposits. Coverage and detail will depend partly on student interest and background. Pre: consent.

ERTH 420 Beaches, Reefs, and Climate Change (3)

Global and local aspects of climate change and paleoclimate; beach and reef processes and response to climate change; management of coastal environments; field study local sites. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST
427)

ERTH 423 Marine Geology (3)

Sediments, structure, geophysics, geochemistry, history of ocean basins and margins. Pre: 200 and 302 or consent. (Cross-listed as OCN 423)

ERTH 425 Environmental Geochemistry (3)

Theory and applications of contaminant/pollutant distribution in the hydrosphere-geosphere-biosphere-atmosphere system, remediation methods, prevention, industrial/agricultural best practices. Topics include aqueous geochemistry, organic, inorganic, gas phase, and ecosystem impacts of environmental contaminants. Pre: CHEM 161 and CHEM 162, or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as SUST 425)

ERTH 444 Plate Tectonics (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Quantitative geometrical analysis techniques of plate tectonics theory; instantaneous and finite rotation poles; triple-junction analysis; plate boundary stresses. Pre: 200 or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as OCN 444)

ERTH 450 Geophysical Methods (4)

Combined lecture/lab covering basic geophysical theories, exploration, and interpretation. Seismic reflection and refraction, gravity, and electromagnetics. Constraints on models of Earth’s internal structure and composition. Pre: 250, 303, MATH 241, MATH 242, and PHYS 272; or consent.

ERTH 451 Earthquakes and Crustal Deformation (3)

Earthquakes and crustal deformation through modern seismological and geodetic observations; elastic properties of rocks, seismic waves, causes, detection, and location of earthquakes; crustal motions of the earthquake cycle; tsunami generation, liquefaction, and planetary observations. Pre: MATH 241 and PHYS 170, or consent. (Alt. years)

ERTH 455 Hydrogeology (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Occurrence, characteristics, movement, quality, development, and contamination of water in the Earth’s crust.

ERTH 460 Geological Remote Sensing (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Combined lecture-lab on the concepts behind, geologic uses for, and techniques of satellite and airborne remote sensing. Lab work will consist of computer image processing. Field trips. Open to non-majors. Pre: 200 or consent. (Spring only)

ERTH 466 Planetary Geology (3)

Comparative geology of the terrestrial planets (moon, Mars, Mercury, Venus, and Earth); impact cratering, volcanism, tectonism, geomorphology, weathering; manned and unmanned space exploration. Pre: any 100-level ERTH course.

FDM 221 Textiles I (3)

Introduction to fibers, fabric structure, and finishes related to selection and care. Interrelationship between textile characteristics, properties, and end uses. Open to non-majors. A-F only.

FDM 321 Textiles Quality Assurance (3)

Chemical nature and structure of fibers and fabrics, their properties and finishes. FDM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 221 or consent. Co-requisite: 321L. (Spring only)

FSHN 411 Food Engineering (3)

Principles and applications of thermodynamics, electricity, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, psychrometry, and material and energy balances of food processing and preservation. Pre: (BIOL 171, CHEM 162 or CHEM 171 or CHEM 181A, MATH 243 or MATH 253A, PHYS 151 or PHYS 170) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as BE 411 and MBBE 411)

FSHN 420 Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems (3)

Design course focused on fundamentals of electronic interfacing, control and automation, including biological processes. Topics include sensor physics, basic instrumentation, digital communication, and programming of microcontrollers and other portable computer systems. Pre: EE 160, EE 211, and BE 350 or MATH 302 or MATH 307 or EE 326; or consent.

FSHN 430 Food Chemistry (3)

Chemical properties of food constituents studied in relationship to their effects on processing, nutrition, and spoilage. Pre: CHEM 161 and 161L or consent.

GEO 101 The Natural Environment (3)

Introduction to physical geography including weather, climate,
vegetation, soils, geology, and landforms. Environmental issues and natural hazards. (Cross-listed as SUST 102) DP

GEO 300 Introduction to Climatology (3)

Elements and controls of climate. World patterns of insolation, temperature, evaporation, precipitation, atmospheric circulation. Climatic classifications. Pre: 101 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200, or consent.

GEO 303 General Geomorphology (3)

Introduction to geomorphological concepts, process mechanics, and relationships between forms and processes. Emphasis on various subdisciplines of geomorphology: coastal hillslopes, fluvial, aeolean, and glacial. Pre: 101 and 101L, or ERTH 101 and ERTH 101L.

GEO 400 Vegetation and the Climate System (3)

Role of vegetation in the climate system; links to hydrology and biogeochemical cycling; vegetation and climate history; evolution of terrestrial ecosystems; effects of global warming. Pre: 101 or 300 or 401 or 402 or 405 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200 or ATMO 302 or ATMO 303 or ATMO 310, or consent.

GEO 401 Climate Change (3)

Approaches to the study of past and future climate change. Pre: 101 or 300 or 401 or 402 or 405 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200 or ATMO 302 or ATMO 303 or ATMO 310, or consent.

GEO 402 Agricultural Climatology (3)

Analyzing climatic data; relation to photosynthesis, phenological development, and crop yields. Crop-weather models as guides to improved land-use planning and agronomic practices. Pre: 101 or 300 or 400 or 401 or 405 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200 or ATMO 302 or ATMO 303 or ATMO 310, or consent.

GEO 403 Fluvial Geomorphology (3)

Introduction to the single most important geomorphic agent shaping the terrestrial environment. Focus on fluvial process, fluvial dynamics, fluvial landforms, and sediment transport. Pre: 101/101L or 303 or ERTH 101/101L.

GEO 405 Water in the Environment (3)

Water fluxes in the environment. Occurrence and movement of water; methods of quantification. Water balance of soil-plant system: precipitation, interception, infiltration, runoff, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. Pre: 101 or 300 or 400 or 401 or 402 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200 or ATMO 302 or ATMO 303 or ATMO 310, or consent.

GEO 411 Past Global Change and the Human Era (3)

Study of past environments to understand present and future global change. Focus on terrestrial Quaternary environments and global processes. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 413)

GES 310 Global Change and Earth System Science (3)

Covers the Earth system, including mass and energy transfers, biogeochemical cycles, natural and anthropogenic changes on regional and global scale. GES majors only. Pre: OCN 201, ATMO 200, ERTH 101, ERTH 103, or ERTH 170; or consent.

GES 320 Aquatic Pollution (3)

Pollution of freshwater and marine systems by human activities. Causes, consequences, and correctives. GES majors only. Pre: 201, CHEM 161, BIOL 171. (Cross-listed as OCN 320)

GES 401 Biogeochemical Systems (3)

Relationship of biogeochemical cycles in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere to global chemical cycles and planetary climatic conditions. GES degree foundation and
capstone course. GES majors only. A-F only. Pre: 311, 319L, OCN 201, BIOL 172/172L, CHEM 162/162L, ERTH 101/101L, MATH 241, MATH 243 and 252A, MATH 373 (or ECON 321), ATMO 200, PHYS 170/170L, and PHYS 272/272L; or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as OCN 401)

GES 463 Data Analysis in Earth Science (3)

Combined lecture, discussion, and laboratory on global Earth system databases and satellite instrumentation, including computer laboratory. GES majors only. A-F only. Pre: MATH 242; or consent. (Cross-listed as OCN 463)

HON 291 (Alpha) Sophomore Seminar (3)

Special inquiry-based study of multi-disciplinary topics in particular historical, cultural, geographical, environmental, or other contexts. Emphasis on primary sources and/or fieldwork and extensive instruction in writing. (B) biological science; (H) humanities; (P) physical science; (R) arts; (S) social science; (T) literature. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 101 or departmental approval. DB for (B); DH for (H); DP for (P); DA for (R); DS for (S); DL for (T)

MBBE 411 Food Engineering (3)

Principles and applications of thermodynamics, electricity, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, psychrometry, and material and energy balances of food processing and preservation. Pre: (BIOL 171, CHEM 162 or CHEM 171 or CHEM 181A, MATH 243 or MATH 253A, PHYS 151 or PHYS 170) with a minimum grade of C; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as BE 411 and FSHN 411)

MBBE 460 Bioreactor Design and Analysis (3)

Application of mass/energy balances and reaction kinetics for the design and analysis of bioreactors for microbial, plant, and animal cell cultures. Pre: ME 322 (with a minimum grade of C-) or BE 373 or CEE 320; or consent. (Cross-listed as BE 460) DP

ME 271 Applied Mechanics II (3)

Dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; force, acceleration, impulse-momentum, work-energy. CE, CNST, ENGS, ME majors only. A-F only. Pre: C or better in CEE 270;
MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). (Cross-listed as CEE 271) D

ME 311 Thermodynamics (4)

(3 Lec, 1 Discussion) Basic laws, closed and open systems. Work, heat, concept of entropy. Properties of pure simple substances. Ideal gases. Introduction to power and refrigeration cycles. Pre: grade of C or better in all of CHEM 162 (or CHEM 171 or CHEM 181A), PHYS 170 and MATH 244 (or MATH 253A).

ME 322 Mechanics of Fluids and Lab (4)

(3 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Incompressible and compressible ideal fluids, effects of viscosity. Similitude, boundary layer flow. Measurement techniques in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. Hands-on experience with instrumentation. Open-ended design of thermofluid systems. Emphasis on writing instruction. Pre: grade of C or better in all of 311 and CEE 271 (or ME 271).

ME 331 Materials Science and Engineering (3)

Electronic, atomic, and crystalline structure of materials and their effect on the mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties of engineering metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Pre: grade of C or better in all of CHEM 162 (or CHEM 171 or CHEM 181A), MATH 242 (or MATH 252A), and PHYS 170.

ME 371 Mechanics of Solids (3)

Introduction to analysis and design of deformable bodies subject to loading. Stress, strain, consitutive relation, axially loading, torsion, statically indeterminate systems, Mohr’s circle, failure criteria, buckling, defection due to axial, shear, torsional, and flexural loading. Pre: C or better in all of the following: CEE 270; and MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). (Crosslisted as CEE 370)

ME 372 Component Design (3)

Design, analysis, and selection of machine components: shafts, screws, fasteners, welds, rolling contact bearings, journal bearings, gears, clutches, brakes, belts, and roller chains. Pre: 213, and either 371 or CEE 370.

ME 374 Kinematics/Dynamics Machinery (3)

Velocity and acceleration analysis of planar mechanisms; kinematic synthesis of linkages, cams, and gears; static and dynamic force analysis of mechanisms; balancing of machinery. Pre: CEE 271 or ME 271 (C or better), MATH 244 (or MATH 253A) and either MATH 302 or MATH 307

ME 375 Dynamics of Machines and Systems and Lab (4)

(3 Lec, 1 2-hr. Lab) Lumped-parameter modeling of dynamic systems. Methods of analysis, including transform techniques. Time and frequency response. Feedback control. Engineering instrumentation. Data acquisition. Dynamic measurements. Design and testing. Pre: grade of C or better in all of CEE 271 (or ME 271) and MATH 302 (or MATH 307).

ME 402 Dynamics Systems Laboratory (2)

(1 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Analysis, design, fabrication, testing and characterization of engineering instrumentation. Computer-based data acquisition methods. Techniques and procedures associated with carrying out dynamic measurements within the constraints of cost, time and accuracy. Pre: one of 360, MATH 407, or PHYS 305 (or concurrent for any); and 375 (or concurrent).

ME 411 Applied Thermodynamics (3)

Gas mixtures, generalized thermodynamic relationships, combustion and thermochemistry, chemical equilibrium, power and refrigeration cycles. Pre: grade of C or better in 311.

ME 417 Applied Thermal Engineering (3)

Principles, design and analysis of practical thermal systems. Engineering applications. Valve, compressor, condenser and evaporator technologies. System integration and control. Thermal loads and thermal comfort. Pre: 422 (or concurrent). (Fall only)

ME 418 Power and Propulsion (3)

Principles, performance, and design of gas turbine power plants and propulsion systems. Pre: 422 (or concurrent).

ME 422 Heat Transfer and Lab (4)

(3 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Steady and unsteady conduction; steady convection and radiation; heat exchangers. Emphasis on writing instruction. Pre: 322.

ME 423 Mass Transfer (3)

Elementary mass diffusion; diffusion in a stationary medium; diffusion in a moving medium; low and high mass transfer theories; simultaneous heat and mass transfer; condensation, evaporation, and boiling; transpiration cooling; species boundary layers; engineering and design of heat and mass exchangers; current refrigerants and environmental regulations. A-F only. Pre: 422 or consent.

ME 424 Introduction to Gas Dynamics (3)

One-dimensional compressible flow involving change of area, friction, heat transfer. Normal and oblique shocks. Prandtl-Meyer flow. Application to nozzles, diffusers, airfoils. Pre: 322.

ME 433 Failures in Materials (3)

Analysis of component failures due to imperfections, fatigue, brittle fracture, wear, corrosion, bending, impact, and overload. Fracture mechanics. Case studies. Pre: 331 or consent.

ME 434 Materials Selection for Design (3)

Methodology for the selection of materials for mechanical applications to prevent mechanical failure and environmental degradation. Design considerations associated with the use of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Pre: 341 and 371 (or CEE 370).

ME 436 Corrosion Engineering (3)

Basics of corrosion processes and emphasis on corrosion control. Thermodynamics and kinetics of corrosion, metal alloys and their behavior, corrosion control techniques (cathodic protection, anodic protection, coatings, and inhibitors). Pre: 341.

ME 446 Advanced Materials Manufacturing (3)

(2 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Introduction to anisotropic materials, advanced manufacturing techniques for composite and intelligent materials, joining of composites, thin film processing and stereolithography, computer aided manufacturing and rapid prototyping, manufacturing process optimization, open-ended manufacturing projects. A-F only. Pre: 341, 342, and senior standing; or consent.

ME 447 Introduction to Nanotechnology (3)

(3 Lec) Tools and techniques of micro- and nanotechnology in design, modeling, simulations, analysis, fabrication, testing and characterization; nano-materials, nano-structures, nano-composites, nano-coating, nano-optics, nano-electronics and nano-biotechnology. A-F only. Pre: senior standing or consent.

ME 451 Feedback-Control Systems (3)

Analysis/ design of feedback systems. Compensator design via root locus and Bode analysis. Routh/Nyquist stability. State space representation and introduction to MIMO formulation. Controllability/observability. Application to physical dynamic systems such as industrial robots. Pre: 375 or EE 315 or consent.

ME 452 Robotics (3)

Principles and design methods for autonomous systems. Pre: senior standing.

ME 453 Energy Conversion Systems (3)

Energy conversion and its impact on the environment. Conventional, hydroelectric, nuclear fission and fusion, solar, wind, ocean, geothermal, and biomass power; energy storage, transmission and conservation. Pre: 322, 411, and 422 (or concurrent); or consent.

ME 455 Nuclear Power Engineering (3)

Nuclear reactor principles. Reactor heat transfer, heat generation and removal. Design and analysis of reactor power systems and plants. Pre: 411 (or consent) and 422.

ME 473 Mechanical Vibrations (3)

Response of machines and systems to transient and periodic excitation. Vibration isolation and transmissibility. Modal analysis of multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Applications to design. Pre: 371, 375; or consent.

ME 474 Fundamentals of Acoustics (3)

Plane and spherical acoustic waves. Transmission, reflection, radiation, and absorption. Near and far fields, radiation patterns. Applications to noise control. Instruments. Pre: 375, EE 211; or consent.

NREM 304 Fundamentals of Soil Science (3)

Origin, development, properties, management of tropical soils; classification of Hawaiian soils. A-F only. Minimum prerequisite grade of C or consent. Pre: CHEM 161 and 161L, or consent. Co-requisite: 304L. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as TPSS 304)

NREM 461 Soil and Water Conservation (3)

Past and present issues in soil and water conservation will be examined. Principles of erosion, conservation tillage, irrigation, and drainage will be discussed. Land-based threats to coastal zones and watershed management will also be covered. Pre: 301/SUST 311 or 304.

NREM 467 Natural Resources Conservation Planning (3)

Combined lecture and hands-on field course on theory and practice of natural resource conservation planning. Includes individual and group projects. Pre: undergraduate junior or senior or graduate standing. Recommended: at least one upper division course in soils, natural resources, planning, physical geography, or related area; or consent. (Alt. years)

OCN 120 Global Environmental Challenges (3)

Scientific approach to evaluating human-caused environmental challenges and their potential solutions. Open to non-majors. (Spring only)

OCN 201 Science of the Sea (3)

Structure, formation, and features of ocean basins; seawater properties and distributions; currents; waves; tides; characteristics of marine organisms; marine ecological principles; man and the sea. Field trip required.

OCN 310 Global Environmental Change (3)

Delve into global environmental change issues such as geometric population growth, food production, plastic waste, and global warming that are of growing interest and importance to our society. Designed for non-GES majors. Pre: 201, ATMO 200, or similar environmental/natural sciences course. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as ATMO 310)

OCN 320 Aquatic Pollution (3)

Pollution of freshwater and marine systems by human activities. Causes, consequences, and correctives. Pre: 201, CHEM 161, BIOL 171. (Cross-listed as GES 320)

OCN 330 Mineral and Energy Resources of the Sea (3)

Hard mineral and petroleum origins, exploration, and exploitation. Renewable and non-renewable resources distribution. Political and scientific constraints. Pre: 201, ORE 202; or consent. (Cross-listed as ORE 330)

OCN 401 Biogeochemical Systems (3)

Relationship of biogeochemical cycles in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere to global chemical cycles and planetary climatic conditions. GES degree foundation and
capstone course. GES majors only. A-F only. Pre: 201, GES 310/310L, BIOL 172/172L, CHEM 162/162L, ERTH 101/101L, MATH 241, MATH 243 & 252A, MATH 373 (or ECON 321), ATMO 200, PHYS 170/170L, and PHYS 272/272L; or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as GES 401)

OCN 423 Marine Geology (3)

Sediments, structure, geophysics, geochemistry, history of ocean basins and margins. Pre: ERTH 200 and ERTH 302, or consent. (Cross-listed as ERTH 423)

OCN 444 Plate Tectonics (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Quantitative geometrical analysis techniques of plate tectonics theory; instantaneous and finite rotation poles; triple-junction analysis; plate boundary stresses. Pre: ERTH 200 or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as ERTH 444)

OCN 463 Data Analysis in Earth Science (3)

Combined lecture, discussion, and laboratory on global Earth system databases and satellite instrumentation, including computer laboratory. GES majors only. A-F only. Pre: MATH 242; or consent. (Cross-listed as GES 463)

OEST 101 Natural Hazards (3)

Science of natural hazards: impact on human civilization of events in the lithosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere (e.g., earthquakes, hurricanes, red tides, and floods), and impact of humans on their exposure to and mitigation of the hazards.

ORE 202 Ocean Technology—Man in the Sea (3)

Survey of human activities in the ocean, from the most traditional to the most innovative technical and engineering accomplishments.

ORE 203 Surf Science and Culture (3)

Introduction to wave science covering generation, propagation, transformation, and coastal processes related to surfing and the human interaction with the ocean using Western science and cultural perspectives. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only.

ORE 330 Mineral and Energy Resources (3)

Hard mineral and petroleum origins, exploration and exploitation. Renewable and non-renewable resources distribution. Political and scientific constraints. A-F only. Pre: 202 or OCN 201, or consent. (Cross-listed as OCN 330)

ORE 411 Buoyancy and Stability (3)

Ship nomenclature and geometry, hydrostatic principles of surface ships and underwater vehicles in free-floating, partially waterborne, and damaged conditions. Subdivision of ships. Launching. Pre: CEE 270 or equivalent.

PHYS 100 Survey of Physics (3)

Mechanics, electricity and magnetism, waves, optics, atomic and nuclear physics. Only algebra and geometry used. For non-science majors.

PHYS 109 Physics in the Arts (3)

Introduction to physics of sound and light, with applications to music and visual arts: sound perception, harmony, musical scales, instruments; lenses, cameras, color perception and mixing. Uses algebra and geometry. Intended primarily for non-science majors.

PHYS 121 How Things Work: Physics for Everyday Life (3)

Introduction to physics and science in everyday life. It considers objects from our daily environment, and focuses on the principles such as motion, forces, heat, electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. A-F only.

PHYS 151 College Physics I (3)

Non-calculus physics. Mechanics, wave motion, heat. Pre: MATH 140, or 215 or higher; or qualifying score on math assessment exam.

PHYS 152 College Physics II (3)

Electricity, magnetism, optics, modern physics. Pre: 151 or 170.

PHYS 170 General Physics I (4)

Calculus-based mechanics of particles and rigid bodies: kinematics, force, energy, momentum, rotation, gravitation, fluids, oscillations and waves. Intended for physical science and engineering majors. Pre: MATH 242 (or concurrent) or MATH 252A (or concurrent). MATH 216 may be substituted with consent.

PHYS 170A Honors General Physics I (4)

Special format for topics: mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, wave motion, thermodynamics and kinetic theory. Pre: MATH 242 (or concurrent) or MATH 252A (or concurrent). MATH 216 may be substituted with consent. Co-requisite: 170L

PHYS 272 General Physics II (3)

Electricity and magnetism and geometric optics. Pre: 151 or 170 and MATH 242 or MATH 252A, MATH 216 may be substituted with consent.

PHYS 274 General Physics III (3)

Relativity, introduction to quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and physical optics. Pre: 152 or 272 and MATH 243 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent); or consent.

PHYS 305 Computational Physics (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr. Lab) Analysis of physical systems and problem solving using computers and numerical methods. Pre: 152 or 272 or 272A, and MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent); or consent.

PHYS 310 Theoretical Mechanics I (3)

Particle dynamics, rigid-body dynamics, planetary motion. Pre: 170 or 170A; 272 or 272A; MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). Recommended: MATH 302 (or concurrent). (Fall only)

PHYS 311 Theoretical Mechanics II (3)

Rigid-body mechanics continued, fluid dynamics, wave motion, theory of relativity. Pre: 310.

PHYS 350 Electricity and Magnetism (3)

Electrostatic and magnetostatic fields in vacuum and in matter; induction; Maxwell’s equations; AC circuits. Pre: 272 or 272A; and MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). (Fall only)

PHYS 400 Applications of Mathematics in Physical Sciences (3)

Mathematical methods, techniques; applications to problems in physical sciences. Pre: MATH 244 or MATH 253A, and MATH 307 or 311; or consent. Recommended: upper division mathematics course.

PHYS 430 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3)

Laws of thermodynamics, heat transfer, kinetic theory, statistical mechanics. Pre: 274 and MATH 244 or MATH 253A.

PHYS 440 Solid-State Physics I (3)

Crystal structure: lattice vibrations; phonon effects; electronic processes in solids (metals, semiconductors, and superconductors). Pre: 274 and 350 (or concurrent).

PHYS 441 Solid-State Physics II (3)

Energy-band calculations, optical processes, Josephson effect, theories of dielectrics and magnetism, physics of color centers, order-disorder transformation. Pre: 440.

PHYS 450 Electromagnetic Waves (3)

Field equations, plane, spherical and guided waves. Pre: 350.

PHYS 460 Physical Optics (3)

Fundamentals of classical physical optics emphasizing linear systems theory, including optical fields in matter, polarization phenomena, temporal coherence, interference and
diffraction (Fourier optics). Specialized applications include Gaussian beams, laser resonators, pulse propagation, and nonlinear optics. Pre: 450 (or concurrent with a minimum grade of C) or EE 372 (or concurrent with a minimum grade of C-), or consent. (Cross-listed as EE 470) DP

PHYS 470 General Relativity & Cosmology (3)

Introduction to general relativity & cosmology. Spacetime metrics, geodesics, Einstein field equations, black holes. Geometry of the universe, redshift, cosmological distances. Cosmological models, dark matters, dark energy. Big Bang nucleosynthesis, recombination, cosmic microwave background, inflation. Pre: 274; MATH 244 (or concurrent) or MATH 253A (or concurrent). Recommended: ASTR 242. (Alt. years: fall) (Cross-listed as ASTR 470)

PHYS 475 Electronics for Physicists (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Investigation of Kirchoff’s Laws, electromagnetic circuit theory. Fourier analysis and stability theory with circuits. Applications to physical measurements are stressed. A-F only. Pre: junior standing, and 152L or 272L.

PHYS 480 Quantum Mechanics I (3)

Wave mechanics, Schroedinger equation, angular momenta, potential problems. Pre: 274, 310, 350, 400 (or concurrent); either MATH 244 or 253A; and either MATH 311 or 307; or consent.

PHYS 481 Quantum Mechanics II (3)

Continuation of 480; atomic physics, scattering, perturbation theory. Pre: 480.

PHYS 490 Modern Physics (3)

Introduction to nuclear and elementary-particle physics. Pre: 480 (or concurrent).

SUST 116 Humans and the Environment (3)

Prepares students to make decisions such as where to build/buy a house, sustainable use of natural resources, and what environmental actions relevant to society and Earth’s ecosystem are appropriate on a local and global scale. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ERTH 106)

SUST 120 Chemistry in a Sustainable World (3)

Introduction to chemistry for non-science majors. Discussion of the role of natural and man-made chemicals in everyday life, with an emphasis on sustainable and environmentally-sensitive use of chemicals to improve our world. A-F only. Students who successfully completed CHEM 100 with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 120/CHEM 110 without instructor override. Students who successfully complete 120/CHEM 110 with a grade of C or better will not be allowed to enroll in 100 without instructor override. (Cross-listed as CHEM 110)

SUST 413 Past Global Change and the Human Era (3)

Study of past environments to understand present and future global change. Focus on terrestrial Quaternary environments and global processes. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as GEO 411)

SUST 425 Environmental Geochemistry (3)

Theory and applications of contaminant/pollutant distribution in the hydrosphere-geosphere-biosphere-atmosphere system, remediation methods, prevention, industrial/agricultural best practices. Topics include aqueous geochemistry, organic, inorganic, gas phase, and ecosystem impacts of environmental contaminants. Pre: CHEM 161 and CHEM 162, or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as ERTH 425)

SUST 427 Beaches, Reefs, and Climate Change (3)

Global and local aspects of climate change and paleoclimate; beach and reef processes and response to climate change; management of coastal environments; field study local sites. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as ERTH 420)

TPSS 304 Fundamentals of Soil Science (3)

Origin, development, properties, management of tropical soils; classification of Hawaiian soils. A-F only. Minimum prerequisite grade of C or consent. Pre: CHEM 161 and 161L, or consent. Co-requisite: 304L. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as NREM 304)