Archived Postings

The deadlines have passed for the following listings, or they are notices of new issues of life writing journals. We provide this information here for points of reference for scholars interested in trends in the field.

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The Textual Self: Aesthetics and Politics of Contemporary Self-Narration

*21st-22nd November, 2024* deadline for submissions:  July 1, 2024 English Department / LMU Munich contact email:  textualselfconference@gmail.com *Keynotes*
    • Kirsty Bell (Author of The Undercurrents, Berlin)
    • Claire Squires (Stirling)
    • Corinna Norrick-Rühl (Münster)
    • Alexandra Effe (Oslo)
    • Julia  Lajta-Novak (Vienna)
    • Sabine Erbrich (Editor, Suhrkamp Verlag, Berlin)
Over ten years have passed since Oasis front man Noel Gallagher wrote fiction off as a “waste of time” and his then provocative opinion seems only to have grown in popularity. As the display tables of any major British bookstore will confirm, the book market has since been flooded by texts dealing, to borrow Gallagher’s words again, with “things that have actually happened” – in most cases to their author (see Bury 2013). Already in 2001, in their manual on Reading Autobiography, Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson offered an open-ended list of circa sixty genres within the permeable boundaries of life writing alone. The list has only grown, culminating recently in the Nobel Prize being awarded, two years in a row, to writers of autofiction, widely regarded as “the hottest literary trend of the last decade” (Folarin 2020). Many see these modes as responding to a dissatisfaction with the conventions of novel writing, newly perceived – as per Rachel Cusk’s much-cited dismissal – as “fake and embarrassing”, or radically mismatched with the complexity and crises of the contemporary world (see Kellaway 2014). While much life writing presupposes the authenticity and sincerity of the text, along the lines of Philippe Lejeune’s “autobiographical pact” (1975), autofiction is based on a freer understanding of the truthfulness of the narrated events. The autofictional author replaces honesty with sincerity: they may well lie, “but in an attempt to reflect the world with justice” (Ferreira-Meyers in Dix 2018). Leaving the reader unsure of the confines between truth and fiction, thus stoking their curiosity, autofiction eschews at once prurient promises of authenticity and the phoniness of novel-writing decried by Cusk and Shields alike. Taking literally that venerable mantra of creative writing workshops, ‘write what you know’, writers of life writing and autofiction produce – in their mode-specific ways – allegedly ‘immediate’ (see Kornbluh 2023) records of personal experience. The concurrent de-aestheticisation of literature – whose value is increasingly located more in the what of the story than the how of its telling – can be framed as a form of artistic renewal and expression of a cultural ideal of sincerity (see Voelz 2016), particularly in response to the ‘post-truth’ political climate. Autofictional representations of the world are frequently centred around the Romantic image of the singular (traumatised/suffering) author as a creative subject; yet in contrast to the Romantic notion of the solitary genius, these subjects are now intended as ‘relatable’ to ordinary readers (see Reckwitz 2012; Mead 2014). Stylistic simplicity and essayistic forms of writing are hallmarks of a new cultural ideal of witnessing, of telling stories that are anchored in authentic experience. In these new forms and formats of writing, authors regain primary importance as a key link between their stories and their lives, as well as the lives of their readers. As witnesses to their own experiences (e.g., of social marginalisation), authors can testify to the singularity or universality of these experiences, just as they can – quite literally – embody particular identities. At the same time, the burden of representation, proportionate to the degree of intersectional marginalisation of the speaking voice, is not negotiated in a vacuum. On the contrary, works included in the commodification processes of cultural industry production reckon with, and often thematise, the imperative to speak from the core of one’s lived experience. This serves to at once legitimise the author’s right to speak – about certain experiences and themes – and to maximise the commercial appeal (the ‘marketability’) of the works themselves (see Brouillette 2020). Complicity with, and/or critique of, these broader cultural industry dynamics and their calls for authentic material are another crucial aspect of contemporary life writing, particularly in Anglophone contexts (see Nicol 2018). Despite these works’ refusal of fiction-making, their narrative artistry is based on strategies of authentication, which in turn draw on established patterns and tropes of literary fiction, on creative forms of citation and world-representation developed in the history of the novel (hence: auto-fiction). In the book market, autofiction and its aesthetics of relatability are one example of the persistence of “subject-centric authorship models” (Maitra 2020, 116). However, these dominant practices of personal, or personalised, literary authorship are being challenged by the digital revolution, making technological innovation powered by vast resources, including the spread of generative AI, an important context to reckon with. This conference explores trends in contemporary Anglophone life writing and autofiction against the background of the social, institutional, and political conditions of making selves and others. With a focus on the aesthetics and politics of textual self-formation, as well as their interaction, we invite papers addressing a range of topics including but not limited to:
    • new forms and formats of (literary) subjectivity and self-formation
    • connections between publishing and writing, access to writing/publishing
    • autotheory and the essay
    • long-form novel vs. shorter vignettes
    • life writing/autofiction across media (graphic novels, film, drama, TV series, etc.)
    • new realism(s)
    • genre and privilege: the ‘right to fiction’, and racialised, gendered, classed biases in critical reception
    • life writing as feminist/intersectional adaption/adoption
    • life writing and cultural industries
    • style and politics
    • postcolonial/global-majority autofiction and life writing
*Please send 300 words abstract and 150 words bio by 1st July 2024, to textualselfconference@gmail.com* Notification of selection will be no later than 1st August. *Conference Organization* Prof. Dr. Ingo Berensmeyer (LMU Munich) Dr. Lianna Mark (LMU Munich) Sonja Trurnit (LMU Munich) Works Cited Brouillette, Sarah. 2020. “Sally Rooney’s Couple Form.” Post 45. Bury, Liz. 2013. “Noel Gallagher Says Reading Fiction ‘A Waste of Fucking Time'”. The Guardian, 18 Oct. 18. Dix, Hywel, Hg.2018. Autofiction in English. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan. Kellaway, Kate. 2014. “Rachel Cusk: ‘Aftermath was Creative Death. I Was Heading into Total Silence.” The Guardian, Aug. 24. Kornbluh, Anna. 2023. Immediacy or, The Style of Too Late Capitalism. London: Verso. Lejeune, Philippe. 1975. Le pacte autobiographique. Paris: Seuil. —. 2009. On Diary. Hg. Jeremy D. Popkin, Julie Rak. Übers. Katherine Durnin. Manoa: University of Hawai’i Press. Maitra, Julian. 2020. “Shakespeare’s Verified Facebook Page: How Authorship Patterns Survive and Thrive in the Digital Sphere”. Kodex. Jahrbuch der Internationalen Buchwissenschaftlichen Gesellschaft. Vol. 10. Im digitalen Jenseits der Literatur. Towards the Digital Beyond of Literature.Ed. Vincent Kaufmann. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz. 111–128. Mead, Rebecca. 2014. “The Scourge of Relatability”. The New Yorker, August 1. https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/scourge-relatability. Nicol, Bran. 2018. “Eye to I: American Autofiction and Its Contexts from Jerzy Kosinski to Dave Eggers.” In H. Dix, ed., Autofiction in English. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 255–274. Reckwitz, Andreas. 2012. Die Erfindung der Kreativität. Zum Prozess gesellschaftlicher Ästhetisierung. Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp. Voelz, Johannes. 2016. “The New Sincerity as Literary Hospitality”. Security and Hospitality in Literature and Culture: Modern and Contemporary Perspectives. Ed. Jeffrey Clapp and Emily Ridge. New York: Routledge. 209–226. * Call for Papers: Fashion, Style & Popular Culture Special Issue: ‘Queer Celebrities: Fashion, Style and Influence in Popular Culture’ Deadline for Submissions: July 1, 2025 View the full call here>> https://www.intellectbooks.com/fashion-style-popular-culture#call-for-papers Fashion, Style & Popular Culture invites scholars, critics and artists to submit papers for a Special Issue exploring the intersection of queerness, celebrity culture, fashion and style. How are queer celebrities influencing, shaping and transforming popular culture through their fashion and stylistic choices? We are interested in contributions that critically engage with the roles of queer celebrities in fashion as agents of change, as symbols of resistance, and as architects of a more inclusive and diverse cultural landscape. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: Iconography and Symbolism: Symbols, motifs in queer celebrities’ fashion choices. Fashion and Activism: Queer celebrities using fashion for activism, advocacy, social change. Queer Aesthetics and Design: Queer aesthetics in celebrity fashion designers and stylists. Media Representation: Queer celebrity portrayals in film, tv, music videos, digital media. Queer Influencers: Tension between self-commodification and contributing to queer culture. Fan Culture and Imitation: Queer celebrity fashion in imitation, cosplay, fan communities. Queer Celebrity Fashion Brand Collaborations: Impact on brand and consumer behaviour. Body Politics and Gender Fluidity: How queer celebrities challenge conventional body. norms and gender binaries through fashion, including impact on societal norms. Queer Celebrities and the Fashion Industry: Impact on fashion industry’s sizing, fit, gender neutrality. Identity: Queer celebrity fashion and identity formation, self-expression. Intersectionality and Global Perspectives: Global influence of queer celebrities on fashion and diverse expressions of queerness in different cultural contexts. Queer or Queer baiting? Exploitation of the queer market through queer fashion and style. Each topic invites contributors to delve into the multifaceted relationship between queer celebrities and the world of fashion. We encourage submissions that offer unique, including non-western, perspectives, interdisciplinary approaches and innovative methodologies. The deadline for manuscripts of 5000–7000 words (using Intellect House Style) is 1 July 2025. Please visit the journal website for Notes for Contributors: https://www.intellectbooks.com/fashion-style-popular-culture#call-for-papers Please submit full manuscripts for double blind peer-review to Dirk Reynders at dirk_reynders@hotmail.com. Questions regarding journal standards and submissions should be sent to Hilde Van den Buck at hdv26@drexel.edu. General questions regarding the journal can be sent to Joseph H. Hancock, II at joseph.hancockii@gmail.com. *

Travel and Tourism (Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Assn)

Conference will be held November 7-9, 2024, in Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA Deadline for Submissions June 30, 2024 Travel and Tourism Studies as a discipline continues to gain popularity in academia, in part because of its inter-disciplinary nature. The Travel and Tourism area seeks papers that discuss and explore any aspect of travel and/or tourism. Topics for this area include, but are not limited to, the following:- – travel and gender/race/class – travel and religion – travel and war – personal travel narratives – heritage tourism – material culture and tourism – virtual travel and tourism: How has COVID affected travel around the globe? Please feel free to consider a wide range of materials, texts and experiences. Applicants are encouraged to consider multi-media (or other alternative format) presentations if those formats would better suit their topics, and may also propose 3- or 4-person panels and roundtables. Submit a brief (300 words) abstract at mapaca.net by JUNE 30, 2024. Students (both undergraduate and graduate) and independent scholars are encouraged to apply. Please feel free to send questions to Chair Jennifer Erica Sweda traveltourismmapaca@ymail.com https://mapaca.net/help/conference/submitting-abstracts-conference For general information: mapaca.net * Autobiography within the Paratext: Fiction and Nonfiction Challenged by Autobiographical Paratexts 7 & 8 November 2024 (University of Pau) Organizers : Pr. Sophie Vallas (Aix-Marseille Université, LERMA), Pr. Arnaud Schmitt (University of Pau, ALTER) Deadline for Submissions: June 30, 2024 Definition First defined by Gérard Genette in Seuils (1987), and divided by him into epitext and peritext, the paratext designates an eminently liminal space: it is perhaps in the peritext, “around the text, in the space of the same volume, like the title or preface, and sometimes inserted in the interstices of the text, like the chapter headings or certain notes” (Genette, 11, our translation) that the paratext is the most fixed, but it can nevertheless evolve, for example, in the case of a reprint or a generic switch ; in the epitext, that unstable, public zone outside the author’s purview, where the expression is often beyond authorial control, the paratext is deployed in “all messages that are, at least initially, outside the book: generally on a media support (interviews, talks…), or under the cover of private communication (correspondence, diaries…)” (10-11). According to Genette, therefore, the paratext is a “fringe” (“une frange”, 8) which, in the words of Philippe Gasparini, “frequently exerts a prior influence on the reader’s horizon of expectation, or a posteriori influence on their understanding of the work” (Est-il je?, 62). Playing with the paratext Numerous authors have taken advantage of this singular space to guide the reading of their texts, or simply for the pleasure of playing in the margins or with their readers. For Philip Roth, paratextual games were confined to the peritextual space: in the epitextual space, the author adopted a much wiser, official posture, granting interviews only to serious newspapers, and renouncing his extratextual persona, which he reserved for his writings. In his strange autofiction entitled Operation Shylock (1993), Roth indeed included a notorious palinody: while the book features the subtitle “A Confession” on its cover, a term the preface goes on to justify, Roth then retracts this in the final note to the reader, stating bluntly “This book is a work of fiction.” Bret Easton Ellis is another case in point: ahead of the release of Lunar Park (2005), he went so far as to set up a website to corroborate the existence of his ultimately fictional characters and events. In the paperback edition of his autobiographical text, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius (2000), Dave Eggers inserted peritextual fantasies which were not present in the first hardback edition. The paperback features numerous changes and, above all, a much more substantial body of paratext: the reader need only turn the book over to discover an extension of the text, a new section soberly entitled “Mistakes We Knew We Were Making – Notes, Corrections, Clarifications, Apologies, Addenda,” in which Eggers quotes readers’ comments on several occasions, thus integrating into the work material that is usually excluded from it. A Publishing Adventure If autofiction is, according to Philippe Gasparini, a “linguistic adventure,” the paratext clearly is a publishing adventure involving the multiple possibilities of actual publication. The primary function of the paratext is to specify the genre of the text, an essential operation in the case of autobiographical or semi-autobiographical texts. Dorrit Cohn points out two different ways of distinguishing a memoir from a novel: “One is to give explicit notice, paratextually (by way of title, subtitle, or prefatory statement) or textually. The other is to provide the narrator’s name: its distinction from the author’s name conveys fictional intentionality, its identity with the author’s name autobiographical intentionality” (The Distinction of Fiction, 59). But the paratext also represents for the author an opportunity to introduce autobiographical elements in a text, or more precisely around a text in which there are none, for example by mentioning, in a preface or during an interview, the context of the work’s creation. A TV interview will be considered as a “performance,” requiring the author to embody their work, which will make body language an integral part of the paratext. We should bear in mind that for Genette, the paratext is both a “zone of transition” and of “transaction” (8). Despite the fact that Genette was reluctant to explore this “zone of transition,” eminently more phenomenological than narratological, narrative elements of the author’s life are to be found in this paratextual space as Georg Stanitzek (2005) or Dorothee Birke et Birte Christ (2013) have demonstrated. The Flesh-and-blood Author In “The Other Kind of Film Frames: A Research Report on Paratexts in Film” (2015), Cornelia Klecker describes the paratext as a “place to influence reception” (402). But how fascinating it is to watch authors on TV, on the Internet or their Instagram accounts trying to exert this influence through word and manner and, more often than not failing, or at least struggling, to do so. Autobiography is there, in the paratext, with or without the author’s knowledge, between the lines of a literally ill-intentioned preface, or between the words of an awkward audio-visual performance. The autobiography is the paratextual clumsiness. On the subject of authors promoting their books on TV, one is reminded of Philippe Lejeune’s famous analysis of the French literary show “Apostrophes” in Moi aussi (1986): “It is on TV that this impression is the strongest, we think we are watching the author behaving naturally and tend to forget that speaking on TV or on the radio implies a form of role-playing dictated by circumstance […]. Any author invited to ‘Apostrophes’ must simultaneously present their book (summarizing content, stating intentions) and physically represent it. This inevitably wrenches a novelist in two opposite directions” (91-93). It is in the representation, designated by Alain Brunn as “the authorial ethos,” that autobiography intrudes. Thus, autobiography is everywhere, and, more particularly, everywhere in the paratext. In this symposium, our aim is to study its multiple manifestations: “In our current culture autobiography appears all about us. It surfaces in books (whether formally autobiographies or not), on television talk shows, in interviews and therapeutic sessions, and in our daily conversation. In these and myriad other instances persons seize the chance to tell their personal histories and hence to present themselves as they would like to be or to be seen” (Rockwell Gray, “Autobiography Now,” 31). Proposals can focus indiscriminately on works of fiction or non-fiction as long as the paratext involved is autobiographical. * CFP Life Writing (6/30/2024; 11/15-17/2024) South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference, Jacksonville, Florida USA Studies of life writing attend to how we read and engage self-representationality, the capaciousness of lives and literatures turned textual, while demanding that readers attend to histories, languages, and experiences that are unfamiliar or different from their own. This panel welcomes presentations on any aspect of life writing; projects related to the conference theme, “Seen/Unseen,” are especially welcome. The production of identities and subjectivities across histories, from genres like narratives of enslavement and captivity, auto/biographies, cookbooks, and commonplace books, to contemporary iterations in memoir, social media, and documentaries, challenge expectations for how lives can be documented and shared. In the SAMLA Newsletter, SAMLA 96 President Lisa Nalbone asks: “How often do we ‘witness,’ ‘observe,’ ‘contextualize,’ ‘seek to,’ name that which ‘illuminates’ or ‘illustrates,’ discuss what’s in our ‘view’: in essence, claiming that space or confronting that periphery?” The focus of this panel–life writing–centers Nalbone’s questions as writers of self-representational texts routinely confront and work to narrativize or textualize that which is often invisibilized and rendered peripheral. As we read and analyze life writing, we bear witness to the witness; we examine how life writers understand and represent selfhood; we consider the types of boundaries or barriers these life writers encounter–including those that are cultural, temporal, linguistic, spatial, geographic, political, and sexual; and we negotiate the ethics of life writing, in particular, as we address inherent implications of reading stories of others’ lives. Because self-representational texts arguably move beyond the representation of an autonomous autobiographical self to the relational subject as they consider historical events and people that construct and contextualize identity, a panel focused on life writing studies pays particular attention to how authors (re)present themselves, their worlds, and their lives, in ways seen and unseen. By June 30, please submit an abstract of 250 words, along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements, to Nicole Stamant, Agnes Scott College, at nstamant@agnesscott.edu. https://samla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/19139 * Call for Papers Hybridity and Women’s Writing in Eighteenth-century Britain Guest Editors: Francesca Blanch-Serrat and Paula Yurss Lasanta (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona) deadline for submissions: June 30, 2024 In the last four decades, hybridity has become an umbrella term encompassing a variety of disciplines, including biology, linguistics, postcolonial studies, media studies, and cultural studies. Particularly within literary studies, genre hybridity refers to the blending of themes, forms, and other elements from different genres—a practice with a long and fruitful history as old as literature itself. As a hybrid field itself, literature cannot be extricated from “extraneous elements”1 such as the sociopolitical context, class, age, or gender. According to Behling’s formulation2, the hybrid genre exists as a site for identity negotiation and resistance. In this sense, the hybrid genre allows for the assertion, reconsideration, and articulation of women’s identities. In women’s writing, it becomes a strategy and a vehicle for intellectual contemplation and expression. Indebted to the hybridity of genre in the early modern period, the eighteenth century saw a blossoming of hybrid texts fostered by new forms of circulation and the growing literary market. Authors “experimented with hybrid combinations to a degree previously unrecognized”3, and women writers in particular, often excluded from intellectual debates because of their gender, not only experimented with blending different genres but also challenged conventional notions of authorship and literary authority to navigate the constraints imposed on them. Examples of hybridity can be found in the blending of biography and fiction in Romantic novels by Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Hays, Mary Robinson, and Mary Shelley4, as well as in genres such as the travelogue, the sentimental periodical, the agricultural tour, the cookery book, or the memoir, and other examples of life writing. By examining eighteenth-century women’s writing through the lens of hybridity, Hybridity and Women’s Writing in Eighteenth-Century Britain seeks to illuminate new pathways for understanding and appreciating the complexities of women’s literary production during this era. Located in the intersections of gender, genre, and hybridity, the editors of this volume seek contributions that explore the various ways in which women writers asserted, reconsidered, and articulated their literary identities within the socio-cultural milieu of the eighteenth century through hybrid texts. Special attention will be given to lesser-known case studies and we extend our invitation to submissions that engage with a wide range of hybrid genres, including but not limited to the novel, autobiography, periodical essay, travelogue and poetic forms. We welcome interdisciplinary approaches that enrich our understanding of literary studies, such as history, philosophy and other relevant disciplines. Topics of interest may include, but are not limited to: ➢ Life writing across genres. ➢ Hybrid identities: queer identities, ethnicity, interfaith relations, women and the empire, etc. ➢ Hybrid genres: the agricultural tour, the travelogue, etc. ➢ Women’s literary authority and the hybrid form. ➢ Genre hybridity in women’s scientific writing: botany, astronomy… ➢ Memory and narrative truth (Intersection between fact and fiction). ➢ Genre and political discourse (The political function of literary genres). ➢ Cultural purity and hybridity in historical contexts. Proposals for articles (in the form of an abstract of about 250 words) must be submitted before 30 June 2024. The selected proposals will be announced by late July. Please submit your proposals to: Francesca.Blanch@uab.cat and Paula.Yurss@uab.cat. Completed articles with a maximum length of 8,000 words, including footnotes, must be submitted by November 31, 2024. Articles will include a short biography, an abstract (80-130 words) and 5–10 keywords. Contributors should follow the Brepol Guidelines for Authors. Papers will be published in Hybridity and Women’s Writing i Eighteenth-century Britain (Autumn 2025), as part of the book series Early Modern Women Writers in Europe: Texts, Debates, and Genealogies of Knowledge, published by Brepols Publishers. Please note that the essay submission date and publication schedule are tentative and subject to change, depending on the peer reviewing progress. 4 Cook, Daniel, and Amy Culley. Women’s Life Writing, 1700-1850: Gender, Genre and Authorship. Palgrave Macmillan, 2016: 5. 3 Ingrassia, Catherine. “Introduction.” The Cambridge Companion to Women’s Writing in Britain, 1660–1789. Ed. Catherine Ingrassia. Cambridge University Press, 2015: 12. 2 Behling, Laura L. “‘Generic’ Multiculturalism: Hybrid Texts, Cultural Contexts.” College English, vol. 65, no. 4, 2003: 415. 1 Saïd, Edward. “Figures, Configurations, Transfigurations.” From Commonwealth to Post-C * * Whether you have been involved in oral history for a month, a year, a decade or more, the Oral History Society in partnership with National Life Stories at the British Library extends a warm invitation to join us for a day of reflection, listening, conversation and networking being held on Saturday 6 July 2024 from 09.30-18.00 in the Knowledge Centre, British Library, London NW1 2DB This exciting new approach is taking the OHS back to its roots and trialling different ways of bringing people together to participate and collaborate with other oral historians.  The programme and abstracts are here for your information and really hope you can join us.  Attendees at the Festival will have a rare chance to spend a day exploring a diverse range of ideas and experiences within oral history and memory work. Everyone will have the opportunity to reflect on their own practice in discussion with others, to network and – hopefully – to gain new perspectives and insights into oral history that they can apply to their work. Festival Fees (including lunch and refreshments):
    • £75 Standard
    • £50 Oral History Society and British Library Members
    • £50 Concessions
To book your place please visit https://www.ohs.org.uk/events/oral-history-festival/.  Advance booking is recommended to secure your place and booking by Friday 28th June is appreciated, although bookings will remain open until Friday 5th July. I hope you are able to join us next weekend and we encourage you to circulate the details to your networks, colleagues and friends. If you have any queries please don’t hesitate to get in touch and do keep an eye out for other Oral History Festival events running online throughout 2024. Visit https://www.ohs.org.uk/upcoming-events/ for more information. Best wishes Polly On behalf of the festival organising group
Polly Owen
Events & Finance Manager, Oral History Society
polly.owen@ohs.org.uk * CALL FOR PAPERS Proposed Title of the book:  Nonfiction in Indian Languages deadline for submissions:  June 18, 2024 Concept Note Nonfiction, a genre of writing that comprises of a very wide variety of writings, has not received in India the kind of critical attention it deserves. Nonfiction writing includes narrative nonfiction, biography/autobiography, travel writing, self-help writing, writing on photography, gardening, health and fitness, music and much more. In case of India, all these sub-genres have seen extensive output not just in English but also in all the regional languages of the country. Secondly, it is not a product only of recent times, but has been trickling from pre-Independence era to the present. As such, the non-fiction produced in India is quite comprehensive both in the terms of quality and quantity. In spite of this variety and quantum of nonfictional works produced in India, there are very few critical studies discussing this particular genre. There are a few books which review a particular sub-genre, for example, autobiography, in a particular language like Bengali or Oriya. However, a comprehensive collection of scholarly articles that presents the state of the art of non-fiction across the sub-genres and regional languages is still awaited. The proposed edited volume will explore the rich and relatively ignored tradition of Indian Nonfiction.  It aims to rope in scholars from different regional languages who would write a state-of-the-art review of non-fiction or a sub-genre of it in one particular Indian language. The editors believe that this kind of work where information of different writers and their writing from different literatures of India available at one place will be of great help to researchers not just from India but also from outside  and will turn out to be an important reference book. We wish to invite scholarly papers from scholars interested in Nonfictional writing from the following sub-genres (but not limited to) written in English and all regional Indian languages:
    1. Essays
    1. Life-narratives, Self-narratives, Memoirs, Biographies and Autobiographies
    1. Food and Culinary studies, Cookbooks
    1. Children’s Nonfiction
    1. Narrative Nonfiction
    1. Historical Nonfiction
    1. Philosophy, Religion and Spirituality
    1. Self-Help and Parenting Guides
    1. Science Fiction
    1. Business and Economics
    1. Education- Early Childhood, Young Adult and Tertiary
    1. Fine-Arts: Music, Painting, Architecture, Crafts, Photography Sculpture
    1. Ecology and Environment Studies, Gardening and Nature Care studies.
    1. Healthcare and Fitness
There are a multitude of genres in the nonfiction category. Many of them overlap, and some of them cover very niche subject matters. We hope that the assemblage of different papers will add something important to the discourses and contemporaneity of Indian Nonfiction. The collection of papers may give rise to some new and neglected themes, unheard voices, and perspectives. Submissions could address the suggested areas but may not necessarily be limited to these. You are welcome to address some related relevant area too. Submission Guidelines It is proposed to publish the edited volume in association with Manipal Universal Press (MUP), Karnataka. Paper submissions should be about 5,000 to 7,000 words in length and prepared in accordance with the  recent MLA style manual.  Submissions should be in Times New Roman, 12-point font, with 1-inch margins, and single-spaced. The last date to submit the completed papers and a short biography (200 words) is 18 June 2024.  Double-blind review process will be employed for the selection of the papers. Contributors will be notified of acceptance status via email after the completion of the review process. The copy editors may suggest certain revisions. In the Subject line, please indicate “Proposal for …..(Type of Nonfiction) …………(the particular language in which the selected Non-fiction is written) Contact email: dr.langare@gmail.com, triptikarekatti@gmail.com Editors: Dr. Tripti Karekatti and Dr. Chandrakant Langare Department of English, Shivaji University, Kolhapur. Maharashtra. 416004. * 9th International Symposium of the Finnish Oral History Network FOHN Memory in Movement: Pace, Connection & Introspection 28th–29th November 2024, University of Jyväskylä, Finland (CFP DL 1.6.2024) Deadline for Submissions: June 1, 2024 The ninth international symposium of the Finnish Oral History Network (FOHN) critically explores the concept of ‘movement’ in relation to oral history and memory studies. ‘Movement’ is defined broadly and inclusively: it can refer to social movements, physical movement, or movement across concrete or conceptual borders. It can be interpreted as the movements that have shaped oral history as a discipline, from its inception to today. Moreover, the memories oral historians study are constantly in motion, with the present framing people’s recollection and understanding of the past. In this conference ‘movement’ is therefore paired with the notion of ‘pace’, accentuating the importance of temporality for the study of oral history. We invite researchers and practitioners to approach their work from an introspective angle, examining how subjective experiences and social factors impact the speed at which oral history is conducted. We wish to invite contributions involving methodological, analytical, and ethical questions, as well as case studies. Proposals may be submitted for individual papers or panels and can address, but are not limited to, the following themes and topics: • Social movements and oral history. Does conceptualising researchers as activists challenge established oral history practices? • The ways in which emotions can move the interviewer and/or responder. What ethical considerations must we account for, when incorporating the study of emotions into oral history and memory studies? How does speed and timing influence how emotions are recorded, analysed, or internalized in our research processes? • Physical movement, the body and oral history interviewing. For example, how might moving through memorable spaces evoke visceral reminiscences? • Digital humanities and changes to how we collect, process, and analyse memories. Technology and how it shapes oral history into a reproducible, codable, and ‘fast’ process. How much time do we need to meaningfully connect with our research subjects? • The pace at which change within oral history has occurred. What connects/distinguishes oral historians working across the decades? Has oral history ‘matured’ into a stable and agreed upon methodology? The conference offers researchers an interdisciplinary setting in which to connect and present cutting-edge ideas. The conference language will be English. Important Dates Proposals for symposium: deadline 1.6.2024 Acceptance of abstract: notice will be sent by 24.6.2024 Speaker registration: no later than 6.9.2024 Audience registration: no later than 22.11.2024 Conference Fees Standard fee: 40 euro Fee for FOHN-members: 20 euro Concession fee (students, unwaged participants): free https://www.jyu.fi/en/events/fohn-2024-memory-in-movement-pace-connection-introspection * CLERICAL LIVES IN BRITAIN, C. 1600–1800 The University of Manchester, 17 September 2024 Deadline for Submissions: June 1, 2024 ** Keynote speakers: Professor Jacqueline Eales (Canterbury Christ Church University) and Professor Jon Stobart (Manchester Metropolitan University) The Anglican clergy had a ubiquitous presence in early modern Britain and played a significant role in shaping its religious, cultural, social, and political landscape. We now know a considerable amount about the social background, education, recruitment, training, professionalisation, and responsibilities of the post-Reformation clergy. In recent years, the social lives of the early modern Protestant clergy have come into sharper focus with historians seeking to better understand this demographically diverse social cohort beyond the focus of ecclesiastical history. This conference, held at the University of Manchester on 17 September 2024, joins this renewed historiographical focus on the clergy’s social lives and aims to broaden our purview of clerical experiences in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Whereas a wealth of research has examined the clergy and its changing social functions and roles during the tumult of the English Reformation, this conference seeks to investigate clerical experience and behaviours in the later part of the early modern period. This conference therefore asks the following questions: how can we define the clergyman in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Britain? While scholars have explored their public lives as political agents and figureheads of the English Church in great detail, what can we discover about their private lives away from the pulpits and the press? And how were these myriad lives represented in manuscript, print, and visual culture? We are particularly keen to receive proposals which focus on a greater range of historical actors in discussions of the clergy. We would also be interested in proposals from scholars who approach the clergy from a range of methodological and disciplinary approaches. We invite papers on topics including, but not limited to, the following:
    • Clerical autobiography and life-writing
    • Biographies of clergymen
    • Clerical wives, families, and dynasties
    • Clergymen’s domestic lives
    • Clergymen’s social lives
    • Clergymen’s political lives
    • Clergymen’s emotional lives
    • Clergymen’s material lives
    • Clergymen’s gendered lives
    • Clergymen’s recreational lives
    • Clergymen’s scientific lives
    • Clergymen’s cultural and artistic lives
    • Clergymen’s musical lives
    • Clergymen’s literary lives
    • Clergymen’s mobile lives
    • Clergymen’s precarious lives
    • Marginalised voices, e.g. curates and unbeneficed priests
    • Comparative lives, e.g. clergymen in Europe and America
    • Clergymen’s misdemeanours, e.g. intoxication
    • Digital histories of the clergy, e.g. the Clergy of the Church of England database
We welcome contributions from independent scholars, ECRs, and PhD students. Please send a 250-word abstract for papers of no more than 20 minutes and a short biography (max. 100 words) to Hannah Yip and Ben Jackson via clericallives@gmail.com no later than 1 June 2024. Alternatively, we would also welcome proposals for ‘lightning talks’ (10 minutes) to be incorporated into roundtable discussions. Please indicate your preferred format within your proposal. NB. This conference will be held in person. Please get in touch if you need any particular arrangements to be made, or support provided, if you are interested in attending. Contact Information Dr Hannah Yip Dr Benjamin Jackson Contact Email clericallives@gmail.com * *

Writing the Self in Pain: Historical Perspectives

24–25 October 2024, University of Helsinki https://blogs.helsinki.fi/experiencingagony/writing-the-self-in-pain/ We are delighted to invite papers for our international conference Writing the Self in Pain: Historical Perspectives, to be held at the University of Helsinki on 24–25 October 2024. The deadline for proposals is 31 May 2024. Check out for the criteria for proposals below.

About the conference

Pain as an affective, simultaneously sensory and emotional experience has made a prominent entrance into historical inquiries during the past two decades. Inquiries into what caused pain, how it was managed and endured, and how pain was constructed through the interaction of language, culture, society, body, and mind, have broadened our view of the experiential and mental landscapes of the past. This international conference explores the manifold ways in which pain was described and made sense of by the sufferers of the past. Its focus will thus not be the medical experts or authorities, but the ‘self’ who suffered and described their pain as a sensory, emotional, and embodied experience. We hope to shed light on the individual who tried to make sense of their own pain in different contexts and with the help of varying cultural resources, while remaining conscious of the construction of identities that went hand in hand in describing their own individual experiences of pain.

The goals of the conference

The goal of the conference is to access embodied experiences of pain through an analysis of descriptions of and allusions to pain in a great variety of self-writing (including but not limited to, for example, letters, diaries, autobiographies, spiritual writings, and travel journals and colonial texts). We encourage researchers in historical and related fields to inquire how sufferers conceptualised and understood their pain. How did the intersectional categories and identities they inhabited influence the cultural resources available to them to make sense of their pain? Did the form and function of their writings shape the representation of their experience in crucial ways? How may we widen the lens of context and the genre expectations of our source material so as to catch in our net historical experiences of pain that have not been in focus before? What changes and/or continuities were there in embodied experiences of pain from the classical to the medieval period, or from the early modern to the modern period? The conference is organised by the Research Council of Finland-funded research project, Experiencing Agony: Pain and Embodiment in the British Atlantic World, 1600–1900. The project analyses descriptions of emotional and sensory pain, tracing historical breaks and continuities in how pain was experienced and expressed in the British Atlantic world and how social, cultural, and temporal change affected its embodiment on both an individual and social level. The conference organisers are planning to edit and publish a collection of articles/a theme issue on an international journal based on selected papers from the conference.

Keynote speakers

The confirmed keynote speakers for the conference are Joanna BourkeKatie Barclay, and Jan van Dijkhuizen, all internationally renowned experts on the cultural and social histories of experiences of pain. Joanna Bourke is Professor Emerita of History at Birkbeck, University of London, and a Fellow of the British Academy. She is the prize-winning author of fifteen books, as well as over 120 articles in academic journals. In 2014, she was the author of The Story of Pain: From Prayer to Painkillers. In 2022, she published Disgrace: Global Reflections on Sexual Violence. Among others, she is the author of Dismembering the Male: Men’s Bodies, Britain, and the Great WarAn Intimate History of Killing (which won the Wolfson Prize and the Fraenkel Prize) and Fear: A Cultural HistoryWhat it Means To Be Human. She is currently writing a book entitled Evil Women. Her books have been translated into Chinese, Russian, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Turkish, and Greek. Katie Barclay is Future Fellow and Professor at the University of Macquarie, Sydney. She writes widely on the history of emotions, gender, and family life. Her publications include, among others, Caritas: Neighbourly Love and the Early Modern Self (2021) and Men on Trial: Performing Emotion, Embodiment and Identity, 1800-1845 (2019). She is currently working on a short monograph on the production of the self in the contemporary university. Jan van Dijkhuizen is Reader in English Literature at Leiden University. His research focuses on early modern literature, with a special interest in the interactions between literature and religion, the cultural history of the body and the senses, manuscript culture, and the afterlives of early modern literary works. He is the author of Devil Theatre: Demonic Possession and Exorcism in English Renaissance Drama, 1558–1642 (2007), Pain and Compassion in Early Modern English Literature and Culture (2012), and A Literary History of Reconciliation: Power, Remorse and the Limits of Forgiveness (2018). He currently leads a research project on the ‘Poetics of Olfaction in Early Modernity’ (poem), funded by the Dutch Research Council.

Submitting a proposal

Individual paper proposals should consist of an abstract (c. 300) words), a brief biography (up to 200 words) and full contact information. Papers should be 20 minutes in duration. We also invite proposals for full panels of 3-4 papers, with same details and a brief outline of the scope of the panel (150-250 words). We especially welcome ideas and explorations of sources that have thus far not been extensively examined from this perspective. Presentations may address any time period or geographical location. Suggested topics for papers include, but are not limited to:
    • Methods and concepts of examining pain
    • Ontologies and epistemologies of pain
    • Colonial and cross-cultural negotiations of pain
    • Pain and the history of emotions and experiences
    • Senses, emotions, and the body
    • Vocabularies, metaphors and narrativity of pain
    • Practices and performativity of suffering
    • Religious suffering and supernatural pain
    • Alleviating and medicating pain
    • Changes and continuities in the embodied experiences of pain
    • Pain experiences and (intersecting) categories of gender, race, class, age, ability
    • Sympathy, empathy and pain
    • Reading pain from marginalised communities
    • Temporality and memory in writing about pain
    • Individuals and pain communities
    • Interdisciplinary approaches to reading pain
The deadline for proposals is 31 May 2024. Proposals, as well as any inquiries and questions, should be sent to the project email: (experiencing.agony@helsinki.fi) *

National Portrait Gallery Director’s Essay Prize

Deadline for nominations: May 24, 2024  USA Founded in 2019, the Director’s Essay Prize celebrates leading research in the field of United States portraiture and visual biography. The award includes a cash prize of $3,000 for the author of a published essay that explores and enriches the interdisciplinary nature of American art, biography, history, and cultural identity. The recipient will present on their essay topic at the National Portrait Gallery during an award ceremony in fall 2024. The Director’s Essay Prize complements the Portrait Gallery’s Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition, a triennial juried contemporary art exhibition established in 2006, and is specifically dedicated to supporting the next wave of written scholarship on portraiture. To qualify, scholarly essays of minimum 4,000 words must have been published in print or online within the past three years (details below). Scholars may self-nominate or nominate the work of their peers. Through its competitive nomination and selection process, the Director’s Essay Prize recognizes outstanding scholars whose work explores the interdisciplinary nature of American portraiture. Eligibility
    • Jurors will consider single-author scholarly essays that have either appeared in an academic journal or in a university press and/or museum publication between January 2022 and March 2024.
    • The author must hold a Ph.D. or other terminal degree (such as an MFA) or be enrolled in such a program at the time of submission.
    • The essay must explore U.S. portraiture through an interdisciplinary lens.
    • The author must be available to present a 35-minute lecture on their essay topic at the National Portrait Gallery’s award ceremony, which will take place in the fall of 2024.
    • The essay must be in written in English or translated to English before submission for review.
    • Nominations must be received by May 24, 2024, at 5 p.m. ET.
Please note that no work written by an employee of the Smithsonian Institution or produced by a Smithsonian museum’s publications office is eligible.  To Nominate an Essay Please send a brief letter that explains the work’s significance to the field of portraiture and a copy of the nominated essay. More than one person may nominate the same essay. Send letters of nomination and a copy of the essay to NPGPortal@si.edu with the subject line “Director’s Essay Prize Nomination.” Please send your nomination in PDF format. Contact Please reach out to depabloc@s*i.edu with questions *

Call for Papers: Journal of Greek Media and Culture

Edited by Dr Olga Kourelou and Dr Lydia Papadimitriou Special Issue: ‘Greek Stardom and Celebrity: Histories and Methods’ Deadline for Abstracts: May 15, 2024 View the full call here>> https://www.intellectbooks.com/journal-of-greek-media-culture#call-for-papers Since the publication of Richard Dyer’s Stars (1979), which initiated the beginning of a scholarly enquiry into film stardom, star studies have been constantly evolving and expanding. While most early work on stardom focused on issues of representation and the ideological significance of film stars, or their role in the industrialisation of Hollywood cinema, the field has expanded across film, TV and media studies; adopting new areas of investigation and methodological approaches, including work on the nature of fame and celebrity (Holmes and Redmond 2007; Holmes and Negra 2011), empirical audience research (Herzog and Gaines 1991; Stacey 1994), acting and performance (Naremore 1988; Hollinger 2006; Baron 2018), as well as national and transnational stars and stardoms (Vincendeau 2000; Landy 2010; Meeuf and Raphael 2013; Yu and Austin 2017; Lawrence 2020). Meanwhile, Greek film studies have been experiencing an exponential growth in both the Greek- and English-language academe. However, while popular Greek cinema has been reclaimed as a serious object of academic study for some time now, the phenomenon of stardom in Greece has not enjoyed a similar academic reappraisal, despite its acknowledged centrality in Greek cinema and beyond. It is primarily in connection with Old Greek Cinema (Kourelou 2020; Karalis 2015; Potamitis 2013; Kartalou 2011; Kyriacos 2009), genre (Papadimitriou 2009, 2004; Eleftheriotis 1995) and, to a lesser extent, acting (Lykourgioti 2017; Dimitriadis 2008; Kourelou 2008) that Greek film criticism has recognised the role of stardom. Beyond these contexts, there has been a considerable lack of critical engagement with the diachronic manifestation and development not only of stardom but also of celebrity. This issue aims to lay the groundwork for a wide-ranging debate on the subject that will improve our understanding of stardom in Greece. The issue, however, does not seek to simply celebrate individual stars, unearth their biographies or elaborate on the types they embody. Rather, our concern is with exploring theoretical issues individual or groups of stars raise, the kinds of identities and meanings they personify, as well as the ways in which they negotiate the values and contradictions of their era. At the same time, we are not only interested in revealing the textual significance of stars in specific historical contexts, but also their political economy and discursive construction. Some of the lines of enquiry we would particularly like to pursue revolve around the following questions: how has stardom evolved historically in Greece? Does cinema still provide the ultimate confirmation of stardom, as Christine Gledhill (1991) claimed in relation to Hollywood stars more than three decades ago? How have media technologies (from TV and VHS to social media) impacted not only the way stars emerge, but also the way their fame has been conceptualised and their fans engage with them? How can we understand Greek stardom in nationally and culturally specific terms as well as through the way it intersects with other – dominant or peripheral – transnational contexts? What ideas about personhood do stars articulate, how do these change over time and how do they help audiences make sense of themselves and the (Greek) world? In order to reveal the multitude of stardoms in Greek film, TV and media, we invite (but do not limit) proposals on the following topics:
    • Histories of stardom and celebrity
    • Stars and genre
    • Stars and film style
    • Stars, gender and sexuality
    • Stars, ethnicity and race
    • Stars and the nation
    • Star labour
    • Ageing
    • Acting and performance
    • The relationship between studios and stars, auteurs and stars
    • The interconnectivity between theatrical, film and/or TV stardom
    • Non-film stardom
    • Cult stardom
    • Reception and spectatorship: stardom and film criticism, the role of the audience (and different types of audiences) and how they make use of star images
Please send a title, 300 word abstract and a short biography to Dr Olga Kourelou (kourelou.o@unic.ac.cy) and Dr Lydia Papadimitriou (L.Papadimitriou@ljmu.ac.uk) by 15 May 2024. The final articles should be around 6000-8000 words, and submitted to the editors by 1 November 2024. * CFP–Witnessing the War in Ukraine: Testimony in the Pursuit of Justice Summer Institute

August 27-30, 2024

Wroclaw, Poland

Deadline for Submissions: May 15, 2024

As an urgent response to the Russian military aggression against sovereign Ukraine, several partner institutions launched the Summer Institute Witnessing the War in Ukraine in July 2022 and then hosted the Second Institute in June 2023. Over the two years, the circumstances of the war led to the rapid growth of grassroot activism and formation of new research communities both in Ukraine and beyond. As academic researchers, we consider it as our professional and ethical obligation to continue the initiative we introduced two years ago to further disseminate our academic expertise in oral history, ethnography, memory studies, interview research and research of witness literature, as well as to share this knowledge with a broad and evolving community of practitioners working in various local settings. The third Summer Institute in 2024 will focus on testimony research in the pursuit of justice, with an ambition to chart novel disciplinary approaches for oral history, memory studies and anthropology, while affording victims of the war a space of trust, empowerment and dignity. We invite the prospective WWSI 2024 participants to bring to the limelight, contextualize and interrogate injustice as it has been witnessed, observed and experienced, from a variety of conceptual and disciplinary perspectives, across diverse ethnic, religious, and cultural groups of Ukraine. Testimonies provided by eyewitnesses play a pivotal role in uncovering crimes, establishing culpability of war criminals, and securing redress for victims. The first-hand testimonies serve not only as crucial components in legal proceedings but also as a solid basis for upholding human rights and international law during armed conflicts. Moreover, such juridical work with witnesses lays the groundwork for restoring trust in the legal system and fostering peace in post-conflict societies. The concept of genocide is of special interest within the framework of WWSI 2024. Since 2014 the rhetoric of genocide has been tested to provide a juridical qualification of the crimes of the Russian Federation committed in Ukraine. We will discuss existing scholarly approaches and gauge the possibility of qualifying assaults against one’s life, one’s group identity, one’s cultural heritage and one’s natural habitat as crimes of genocide in a comparative perspective. Another focus of WWSI 2024 is proposed to be on experiences of occupation and pursuit of justice in the formerly occupied territories. Among the confirmed invited speakers are: Oksana Dovgopolova, Odessa I.I. Mechnikov National University Gabriele Rosenthal, University of Göttingen Kristina Hook, Kennesaw State University’s School of Conflict Management, Peacebuilding, and Development Dirk Moses,  City College of New York Hasan Hasanović, Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial Centre Claudia Seymour, Geneva Graduate Institute Yevheniia Podobna, Journalist & documentarian Nataliya Zubar, Maidan Monitoring Information Centre Józef Markiewicz, POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews What to expect Over the course of four days, the institute will offer a series of presentations, workshops, and mentorship opportunities examining current trends in scholarly and creative reflections on witnessing the war in Ukraine. Invited speakers and faculty will lead such discussions and invited participants will be offered opportunities to discuss their work with other members of the Institute. Testimonials to the work of the previous Summer Institute can be found here. The Summer Institute will be held in person in Wrocław, Poland. The working language of the Institute is English. The registration fee for the Summer Institute is 200 EURO. In support of accepted participants residing in Ukraine, the travel grant (covering travel, accommodation and registration fee) will be announced.

To participate in the Institute, apply here.

Your application should include a personal statement in English explaining how this Summer Institute will benefit your scholarly and/or creative work and ongoing or planned projects, a brief bio, and contact information. Important Deadlines and Dates: Application Deadline — 15 May, 2024 Notifications of Acceptance — 1 June, 2024 Summer Institute — 27-30 August, 2024 Organizers Lund University, Sweden Huculak Chair in Ukrainian Culture and Ethnography, University of Alberta, Canada Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, Canada Ukrainian Oral History Association, Ukraine Polish Oral History Association, Poland Dobra Wola Foundation, Poland Centrum Historii Zajezdnia Ukrainian-German Historical Commission Organizing Committee
    • Natalia Khanenko-Friesen — Oral historian and cultural anthropologist, Director of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies and Huculak Chair in Ukrainian Culture and Ethnography, both at University of Alberta; Co-Head of Ukrainian Oral History Association.
    • Eleonora Narvselius — Anthropologist from Lund University, currently leading the research project Ukrainians in Poland: Making Home in Times of Peace and War, in collaboration with Wrocław University.
    • Gelinada Grinchenko — Oral historian, Philipp Schwartz Fellow at the University of Wuppertal (Germany); Co-Head of Ukrainian Oral History Association.
    • Alina Doboszewska — Researcher at the Institute of Sociology of Jagiellonian University, NGO activist, founder and president of the Dobra Wola Foundation in Krakow.
https://networks.h-net.org/group/announcements/20030136/cfp-witnessing-war-ukraine-testimony-pursuit-justice-summer-institute *

CFP: Articles About Mental Illnesses in Reality Television for Book Project

deadline for submissions:  May 15, 2024 The pandemic brought a lot of changes to the structure of American society. COVID-19 was a disabling pandemic, leaving many people with severe health issues that they didn’t have pre-pandemic and which now affect their daily life. And when it comes to mental illness, the pandemic threw some of us into the realization that loneliness, depression, anxiety, etc. are more prevalent than we thought. This issue was so prominent in the minds of health officials, that the Surgeon General released a report on this new loneliness epidemic. Reality television has not typically been a place for nuanced discussions about anything, but the representation we’ve seen has improved a lot in the past decade, from a “finalist” talking about his depression on The Bachelorette to differently abled contestants on a variety of shows. And, it’s worth noting, that with the popularity and large audience of the genre, sometimes these shows can be the first time someone sees themselves represented or learns about a different type of person. I am seeking abstracts for potential articles for a book project that will be themed around representations of mental illnesses/disorders/disabilities in reality television. Some potential topics are listed below to help spur ideas! Please submit a 300 word abstract and 100 word bio by May 15, 2024 to acabral@sfsu.edu. Once abstracts have been received, a full proposal will be submitted to the interested publisher (McFarland & Company) by June 15, 2024 and if accepted, essays/papers will be due by the end of August 2024. Possible areas for discussion include:
    • How men with disabilities are depicted versus women with disabilities
    • Desirability politics in relation to dating shows and the typical uplifting of one specific body type (white, straight, skinny, able bodied).
    • Less sanitized depictions of mental illness, such a portrayals of what could probably be labeled Obsessive Compulsive Disorder on shows like My Strange Addiction
    • Shows that focus on a specific disorder, like The OCD project
    • How reality television portrayals of mental illness fit into the larger conversation about mental health, especially post-COVID and acknowledging the push by many for society to be more accepting
    • How representation of mental illnesses on reality television shows and how that may affect public perception
    • Mental illness “influencers” and/or how reality television contestants have used a newfound platform to discuss their mental health
    • How appearing on reality television can cause or worsen mental illness, such as on camera emotional breakdowns on Love Is Blind
    • How certain shows, especially marriage oriented ones like The Bachelor, force contestants to reveal their trauma (notably a contestant on Tayshia’s season of The Bachelorette told her about his suicide attempt)
Special issue editor: Angelica Cabral, Women and Gender Studies MA student at San Francisco State University. Editor Bio: Angelica Cabral is in her first year of the Women and Gender Studies Master’s program at San Francisco State University, with a focus on studying internet culture and social media as they intersect with gender and sexuality. Alongside being a student, she is the Development and Communications Manager for a youth focused nonprofit. In February she presented at the 2024 Southwest Popular/American Culture Association. Her paper was titled “Hot Girls Have IBS: An analysis of the use of meme culture to cope with an illness primarily affecting women.” Her writing has appeared in Mother Jones, Slate, The Objective, and more. * Call for Papers Women’s Autobiographical Filmmaking  Special issue of Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media, Summer 2026 Deadline for Abstracts: May 15, 2024 Guest editors: Dr Felicia Chan (University of Manchester) and Dr Monika Kukolova (University of Salford) Autobiographical filmmaking refers to films created by filmmakers that tell stories about their lives, experiences and memories. These may be truthful or partially fictionalised, remembered clearly or misremembered, or a combination of these, usually in ways that also explore how film as a medium itself can do this — a form of practice-as-research, if you like. We are interested in exploring with potential contributors whether there might be a gendered nature to this mode of filmmaking / life-remembering / self-narrating? Do filmmakers who identify as women tell different stories about themselves and their lives from those who identify as men, or do they do so in a different way? How do women filmmakers navigate their simultaneous objecthood and subjecthood in the eye of the camera (Everett, 2007)? Much of the canon in film studies is constituted by works of male auteurs, all in one form or another said to be exploring their lives, their pasts and their selves on screen: think of figures like Federico Fellini, Woody Allen, François Truffaut, Shane Meadows, the list goes on. This structural domination is being continually challenged (Gledhill and Knight, 2015) and moves to rehistoricise women’s filmmaking have seen increased attention on figures from Agnès Varda through to Greta Gerwig though much more remains to be done on women filmmakers in the global majority. There has been a longer history of scholarship on women’s literary life-writing (Smith and Watson, 1998; Neuman, 2016; Brodzki and Schenck, 2019) but less so on women’s life-writing on/through film as a mode of self-narration. How have women filmmakers had to navigate the industrial structures of filmmaking with all its gatekeeping mechanisms, including access to capital? To what extent are these gatekeeping mechanisms disproportionately discriminatory towards women? We are inviting proposals to explore any area of the subject, although we are especially keen to receive proposals from scholars studying the ways women in the global majority use cinema to write themselves and their memories into post/colonial histories. We would also like to invite proposals on alternative publication formats such as the video essay, and shorter provocations, interviews or reports. Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
    • Filmmaker case studies
    • Close readings of individual films
    • Industry analysis
    • Autobiographical film as method
    • Challenges to theoretical orthodoxies, e.g. auteur theory, canon-making, etc.
    • Decolonial approaches to gender studies and women’s filmmaking
Full-length articles: 5,500-7,000 words, including notes but excluding references Video essay: Approx. 3-15 mins, plus accompanying text 500-1000 words Short reports, provocations, reviews, interviews, reflections: 1,500-2,500 words Full-length articles and video essays will be subject to full peer review. Guidelines here: https://www.alphavillejournal.com/Guidelines.html Publication Timeline 15 May 2024, abstract due 31 May 2024, notification of editors’ decision 15 January 2025, full video essay / manuscript due Publication: Summer 2026 If you are interested in contributing to this issue, please send a 300-word abstract along with a brief biography, in the same file, to Dr Monika Kukolova (M.Kukolova@salford.ac.uk) Feel free to contact us with any questions. Alphaville is a diamond open-access journal, and it requests no fee from authors or readers. Visit us at https://www.alphavillejournal.com Contact Information Dr Felicia Chan, University of Manchester, UK: Felicia.Chan@manchester.ac.uk Dr Monika Kukolova, University of Salford, UK: M.Kukolova@salford.ac.uk Contact Email Felicia.Chan@manchester.ac.uk URL https://www.alphavillejournal.com * Call-for-Papers Cultural Depictions of the Stepmother: Literature, Stage, and Screen. An Edited Collection Deadline for Abstract Submissions–30 April, 2024 This call is for abstracts for a scholarly, international edited collection entitled, Cultural Depictions of the Stepmother: Literature, Stage, and Screen. Currently I am seeking a number of academics and professionals in the field who might like to send me an abstract for consideration for inclusion in the book. Deadline for abstract submissions:  30 April, 2024 The aim of this scholarly edited collection is to reveal how, in any society, the personal expectations and actual experiences of the stepmother may differ from the societal and cultural expectations and realities of the role. The further aim is to show how the stepmother is perceived in the popular views of a particular society, as demonstrated in the literature, stage, screen, and pop culture narratives, of that society. To whatever degree, every culture in the world is different to all others. Yet, in any culture, religious and cultural beliefs are inseparable, intrinsic one to the other, and are important to the traditions, customs, practices and laws of any particular culture or society. One figure that remains consistent in almost every culture, and that attracts the attention, is the stepmother. Regardless of whether a culture is mainly monogamous or polygamous, the stepmother is one of the female figures that are central to the family, the community and hence the society and the culture. Various sources define the stepmother as: a woman who is married to one’s father after the divorce or separation of one’s parents or the death of one’s natural mother; a non-biological female parent who is married to a child’s biological male parent. An added complexity exists: statistics indicate that globally, there has been an increase of children born outside of marriage and who are raised by their cohabiting or non-cohabiting parents. Thus, a stepmother can be a woman who either marries or is the female partner of a man who has biological children resulting from a former marriage, or a previous union with some other woman.  A woman may also become a stepmother by default as in the case of, say, raising the children of a deceased (or otherwise absent) relative, or an orphan or an abandoned child as if her own offspring. Thus, given that cultural and religious, and social traditions, and laws vary widely across the globe, a woman may become the stepmother either by fact or by custom, or by religious or civil law, or by de facto relationship, or by guardianship. In most though not necessarily all cultures, and according to the religious and cultural beliefs and laws of a culture, as well as the civil laws of that country, a man who has been but is no longer married may remarry; and in some other cultures also, a man who is currently married may marry or take a second wife who may be expected to act as stepmother to his biological children by another previous marriage or union that has ended, or by agreement between the child’s/children’s biological parents. It is generally understood that whether she is welcomed by her new family or not, a man’s first wife or female partner brings with her some baggage into the life of the man she either weds or cohabits or has a relationship with, and hence into the family into which she marries or enters in some way.  Perhaps this may be more so in the case of the stepmother—a second (or further) wife or female partner of a man who already has a biological child/or children from a former relationship. Sometimes, too, a woman who becomes a stepmother will bring her own biological offspring into the union. It is well documented that parenting can be a difficult task at times. For a stepmother, the challenges, problems, and the difficulties in raising some other woman’s biological children may differ to those experienced by the biological mother. Questions arise: within any culture, what are the implications for a woman who weds or become the female partner of a widower or a divorced or separated man who is actively involved with, or is responsible for, his biological child/children from a previous union? Likewise, what are the implications for a stepmother in a) a polygamous arrangement, and b) for a stepmother in a monogamous relationship? Some suggestions for potential contributors to consider, and that could be addressed, may include but not limited to, are:
    • What are the cultural and social duties and expectations of the stepmother; and what are her personal realities and expectations, as depicted in the popular culture of a particular culture/society? Is it possible to detect differences or sameness between the fictionalized portrayals and the realities and social dictates of that culture?
    • How do class, ethnicity, culture, race, gender, and possibly history, shape depictions of the stepmother, as indicated in the popular screen, stage, and literary productions of any one particular culture?
    • What is the range of ways in which the stepmother is represented in the popular/social culture of the various societies?
    • Are there any powerful cultural or socially historical antecedents for the representations of the stepmother in popular/social culture, as screen, stage, and literary productions?
    • What are the creators’ and/or the producers’ intentions behind their portrayals of the stepmother; what are their messages for their audiences?
    • How would we establish the underlying cultural, historical, or production motivations for particular depictions of the stepmother?
How often, if at all, are these representations told from the point-of-view of the stepmother herself? Alternatively, how often, if at all, are these representations told from the point-of-view of the stepchild/stepchildren, or the husband or partner of that woman herself?
    • Is there a difference between the ways in which the stepmother is depicted in film for small and large screen, and between those mediums to the depictions in drama, and to literature? Or in these depictions, is there a reasonably broad consensus between these genres?
This collection of scholarly essays will make an intervention in the field: it will be the first of its kind to make a comprehensive study of what being a stepmother means to and for the woman, to the family, the community, the culture, and the society to which she belongs. This to investigate whether or not there are characteristic features of the stepmother between cultures that may have either some similarity, or that are totally dissimilar; explore the popular beliefs and popular culture in relation to stepmother-hood in any one or more society/ies; document and record how various eastern and western societies perceive and represent the socially and culturally important figure of the stepmother in screen, stage, and literary works, including folk tales and pop culture narratives; indicate if there is agreement or difference between the various cultures on how the figure of the stepmother is depicted in popular culture to the viewing/reading audiences; establish a new and dynamic area of theoretical research crossing family studies, women’s studies, cultural studies, social history, gender studies, social studies, and the humanities in general; point the way to possible future cross-disciplinary work through examining various peoples and societies by way of cultural depictions of the stepmother; and permit scholarly consideration of the extent to which the creators and producers of narratives about the stepmother place this figure on the perimeter of society or at its center. Submission instructions: At this initial stage, in lieu of “chapters,” this proposed work, Cultural Depictions of the Stepmother, calls for extended abstracts for consideration for inclusion in the book.
    1. The extended abstracts must be more than 1,500 words and less than 2,000 words.
Full-length chapters of not less than, say, 7,000 words, and no more than 8,500 words each (including notes but excluding references lists, title of work, and key words), will be solicited from these abstracts.
    1. Please keep in mind that your essay-chapter will be written from your extended abstract. Your abstract will carry the same title as your essay-chapter.
    1. To be considered, an abstract must be written in English, and submitted as a Word document.
    1. When writing your abstract use Times New Roman point 12, and 1.15 spacing.
    1. At the beginning of your extended abstract, immediately after the title of your work and your name, add 5 to 8 keywords that best relate to your work.
    1. Use the Chicago Manual of Style 16th Edition.
    1. Since this work is intended for Lexington Books, USA, please use American (US) spelling not English (UK) spelling, and not Australian English spelling;
    1. Use the Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary;
    1. For this project it is most important to use an impersonal academic voice when writing your abstract, and possibly your chapter later. That is, do not use the teacherly voice (“as we will see…”; “here we see…”; “as it will become clear”; …); and do not use 1st person or the personal voice (I; We will find; We find; You; Us; …)
    1. Use endnotes not footnotes, use counting numbers not Roman numerals, and keep the endnotes to a bare minimum, working the information into the text where possible;
    1. Do cite all your work in your extended abstract as you would in a full chapter:
a) In the body of the abstract, add parenthetical in-text citations (family name of author and year, and page number/s) (e.g. Smith 2019, 230); b) And fully reference all in-text citations in detail and in alphabetical order, in the References list at the end of your abstract;
    1. Please send your completed abstract as a Word document attached to an email, by the date given in this call for papers;
    1. To this same email please also attach, as separate Word documents, the following:
    • Your covering letter, giving your academic title/s, affiliation, your position, and your home and telephone numbers, your home address, and your email contact details;
    • A short bio of no more than 250 words;
    • Your C.V., including a full list of your publications and giving the publishing details and dates, and including those in press.
Editor: Dr Jo Parnell, PhD| Researcher, and Honorary Lecturer, School of Humanities and Social Science, College of Human and Social Futures, University of Newcastle, Australia. Papers should be forwarded to: Jo.Parnell@newcastle.edu.au  or annette.parnell@newcastle.edu.au or joandbobparnell@bigpond.com  * Call for Presentations Auto / Bio / Fictional Graphic Narratives: A Online Symposium Thursday 27 June 2024 Deadline for Submissions: April 19, 2024 Life-writing in its many forms, including autofiction and biofiction, has grown exponentially in recent decades. Comics and graphic narratives have similarly become widespread and respected literary genres that feature many biographical, autobiographical, autofictional or biofictional texts. Completing the 2023-24 Auto / Bio / Fiction series at the Goldsmiths’ Centre for Comparative Literature, this online symposium will reflect on the combination of these two forms in order to explore how auto / bio / fictional graphic narratives and comics mobilise – and may put in tension – the visual and the verbal, the individual and the collective, the historical and the fictional, the documentary and the imagined, as well as popular culture and ‘serious’ literary fiction in constructing historical lives with varying degrees of fictionality and purposes. We invite proposals for varied forms of contributions, which can include:
    • –  20-minute formal papers
    • –  10-minute flash contributions
    • –  digital posters (i.e., as in a conference poster session: the poster can be shown
through screen share, with a 5-6 minute explanation)
    • –  roundtable proposals (3-4 contributions in which each speaker presents their
position in no more than 5 minutes, followed by a discussion / conversation)
    • –  led practical exercises or workshops
    • –  presentation of work in progress by practitioners
    • –  other formats not listed above
Topics may address (but are not limited to):
    • –  the representation and development of auto/biographical and auto/biofictional
identity
    • –  the representation of self and other
    • –  constructions and explorations of gender, sexual orientation, religion, race,
ethnicity…
    • –  experiences of displacement, migration, illness, war
    • –  the relationships or tensions between the factual and the fictional, the documentary
and the imagined, the visual and the verbal in the representation of the life
    • –  the literariness of graphic life narratives
    • –  wordless narratives (e.g. George A. Walker’s The Life and Times of Conrad Black: AWordless Biography)
    • –  chronotopes of life-writing; the temporal and spatial dimensions of life narratives
    • –  the relationship between author/narrator/illustrator and the character whose life is re-told –  how forms of reading experience, in hard copy or digital formats, affect the sense of the life conveyed in the narrative
    • –  tone in graphic life narratives: the dramatic, traumatic, melodramatic; the comedic, the ironic, the satirical…
    • –  effects and function of humour, pathos, surprise…
    • –  translations of graphic life narratives
    • –  adaptation of traditional written biographies into graphic narratives
    • –  historical and geographical developments of the genre
Comparisons across languages, cultures and traditions are most welcome. Proposals are welcome from academics and practitioners at any stage of their career. Please send your proposals by 19 April 2024 to: CCL@gold.ac.uk (please include the words “Auto-Bio-Fictional Graphic Narratives” in the subject line). Proposals should include: 1) a summary of up to 250 words of the proposed contribution, and 3-5 keywords; 2) the type of contribution proposed (formal paper, digital poster, etc.: see the list above); 3) a short biography of up to 150 words. For more information visit: https://sites.gold.ac.uk/comparative-literature/auto-bio- fictional-graphic-narratives-a-symposium/. * PhD Studentship in UK – Oral History and Provenance (4/8/2024) British Library and University College London Colleagues from the Oral History Team at the British Library write: We are excited to announce the details of a collaborative AHRC-funded PhD entitled ‘Exploring the Importance of Provenance in Oral History Collections’. The project will be jointly supervised by the British Library Oral History team and the Department of Information Studies at UCL. Applications are now open and close on the 8th April 2024. Please share with your networks! More information below, full details including application instructions is available on the UCL website. Please read the application information carefully – do not use the ‘apply now’ button on the listing. https://www.ucl.ac.uk/work-at-ucl/search-ucl-jobs/details?nPostingId=9173&nPostingTargetId=21440&id=Q1KFK026203F3VBQBLO8M8M07&LG=UK&languageSelect=UK&mask=ext University College London (UCL) and the British Library are pleased to announce the availability of a fully funded Collaborative Doctoral Studentship from 1 October 2024 under the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Scheme. This research will examine the importance of documenting provenance for archived oral history collections by exploring the value of records of provenance to archivists and oral history researchers, and how making such records available to researchers could enhance understanding of oral history interviews and the historiography of the discipline. This project will be jointly supervised by Dr Andrew Flinn (Reader in Archive Studies and Oral History) and Dr Hannah Smyth (Lecturer in Archives and Records Management) in the Department of Information Studies at UCL (UCL:DIS) and by Dr Madeline White (Curator Oral History) and Mary Stewart (Lead Curator Oral History) at the British Library. The student will spend time with both UCL and the British Library and will become part of the wider cohort of AHRC CDP funded PhD students across the UK. UCL and the British Library are keen to encourage applications from a wide range of students and particularly welcome those currently underrepresented in doctoral student cohorts. * Call for Papers Stardom & Fandom Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) 2024 SWPACA Summer Salon June 20-22, 2024 Virtual Conference Submissions open on March 25, 2024 Proposal submission deadline: April 15, 2024 Proposals for papers are now being accepted for the SWPACA Summer Salon. SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas in a variety of categories encompassing the following: Film, Television, Music, & Visual Media; Historic & Contemporary Cultures; Identities & Cultures; Language & Literature; Science Fiction & Fantasy; and Pedagogy & Popular Culture. For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit https://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/ The Area Chair for Stardom and Fandom invites paper or panel proposals on any aspect of stardom or fandom. The list of ideas below is limited, so if you have an idea that is not listed, please suggest the new topic. We are an interdisciplinary area and encourage submissions from multiple perspectives and disciplines. Topics might include:
    • Studies of individual celebrities and their fans
    • Studies focused on specific fandoms
    • The reciprocal relationship between stars and fans
    • Impact of celebrity and fame on identity construction, reconstruction and sense of self
    • Reality television, TikTok, YouTube and the changing definition of ‘stardom’
    • The impact of social media on celebrity/fan interaction
    • Celebrity/fame addiction as cultural change
    • The intersection of stars and fans in virtual and physical spaces
    • Celebrity and the construction of persona
    • Pedagogical approaches to teaching stardom and fandom
    • Anti-fans and ‘haters’
    • Fan shame, wank, purity culture and fandom policing
    • Gendered constructions of stars and fans
    • Shipping, anti-shipping and representation
    • Historical studies of fandom and fan/celebrity interaction
All proposals must be submitted through the conference’s database at https://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at https://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/ Registration information for the conference will be available at https://southwestpca.org/conference/conference-registration-information/ Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. Only one proposal per person, please; no roundtables. If you have any questions about the Stardom and Fandom area, please contact its Area Chair, Dr. Lynn Zubernis, Professor, West Chester University, lzubernis@wcupa.edu. If you have general questions about the conference, please contact us at support@southwestpca.org, and a member of the executive team will get back to you. We look forward to receiving your submissions! * Call for Papers for a Special Issue (2025) Letters in/as Pedagogy Journal of Epistolary Studies Deadline for Submissions: April 15, 2024 Letters and letter writing have captivated scholars across diverse fields, including life writing, cultural studies, history, and literary studies. In the digital age, there is a renewed interest in studying letters within the ever-evolving landscape of digital communication technologies and platforms. Digital tools have revolutionized the examination of historical letters, enabling the archiving, analysis, and presentation of these artefacts. Interpersonal communication has undergone a transformation with the prevalence of email and social media. Additionally, the emergence of large language models like ChatGPT has added new dimensions to the discourse on interpersonal communication, as the chatbots promise seamless and rapid generation of personalized letters. The transformative impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has underscored the relevance of letters and letter writing in education. As teachers and students abruptly transitioned to online learning during the pandemic, some educators explored the potential of letters as a means to establish meaningful connections during a period of social distancing and isolation. Already before the pandemic letters were employed as interventions in individual classes. For instance, teachers asked students to write letters to future students of the same course, encouraging the students to share their experiences and advice (inspired by James M. Lang Small Teaching). Letters have also served as the foundation for entire courses, as exemplified by Toni Bower’s “Epistolary Fiction before 1800” course, where students were introduced to contemporary epistolary novels that use multimodality or digital communication technologies to better appreciate the form’s “long and vibrant history.” Moreover, letters have been used to communicate educational theory, as seen in Paulo Freire’s Teachers as Cultural Workers: Letters to Those who Dare Teach (2005). Letter writing can offer a unique possibility to create and explore relationships in writing where shared knowing is made possible despite geographical, temporal, cultural and other distances between the addresser and the addressee.  As the editors of We Saved the Best for You: Letters of Hope, Imagination and Wisdom for 21st Century Educators (2013) note, epistolary genre has the potential to “illuminate experiential connections and continuity across space and time” (xiv). This call for papers invites scholars to contribute their insights, research findings, and perspectives on the multifaceted relationship between letters, real-life and fictional, and pedagogy. Letters, with their malleable form, can serve a multitude of purposes. We invite contributions that explore the diverse ways in which letters may be used in and as pedagogical practices: the cultural and societal significance of letters as means of imparting knowledge and values; historical and contemporary examples of letters used for didactic purposes; and the evolution of letter writing manuals and their future in the digital age. We encourage discussions on how letters can be used to create a supportive and empathetic learning environment, connect students across geographical, temporal, and cultural boundaries, and how educators use letter writing as reflective practice. To explores these questions, we invite contributions on a range of topics, including but not limited to:
    • Didactic purpose/ potential of letters
    • Letter writing manuals: past, present, and future
    • Letter writing as pedagogy of care
    • Public pedagogy through letters
    • Letters and global education
    • Autoethnographic letter writing
    • Letters in language learning
    • Electronic correspondence
    • Multimodal epistolarity
Sindija Franzetti has proposed this special issue on “Letters in/as Pedagogy” and will serve as guest editor. If you are interested in having a peer-reviewed article published in this special issue of the Journal of Epistolary Studies, please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words, the article title, 3-5 key words, a short biographical note, and your email address to lettersinpedagogy@gmail.com no later than April 15, 2024. You will be notified by May 1, 2024, whether your proposed paper has been accepted. The final date for full article submission is pending. The aim is to publish the issue in 2025. *

CFP Translation, Transposition, and Travel in the Global Nineteenth Century

16-19 January 2025 Society for Global Nineteenth-Century Studies World Congress Global Studies Center, Gulf University for Science and Technology, Kuwait deadline for submissions: March 25, 2024 Keynote speakers: Regenia Gagnier, University of Exeter Marwan Kraidy, Northwestern University QatarArthur Asseraf, University of Cambridge Sarga Moussa, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle The period between 1750 and 1914 was marked by change, motion, and mobility. Advances in transport and the expansion of imperial powers brought together an array of peoples and facilitated contact between different cultures. These cultural encounters spurred the discovery of new information and of efforts to transmit, mask, or contain it. Translation played a seminal role in informing the public about the changing world and its interconnections. Imaginative writings and scientific concepts were subject to transposition and adaptation across languages and cultures. Indeed, global modernizing processes were due, to some extent, to travel, translation, and transposition. For its second world congress to be held in Kuwait from 16 to 19 January 2025, the Society for Global Nineteenth-Century Studies is pleased to invite proposals on the theme of “Translation, Transposition, and Travel in the Global Nineteenth Century.” We welcome proposals for papers and panels that explore transits between places, languages, cultures, and ideas. Topics may include (but are not limited to): ·       Travel and adventure ·       Initiatic journeys ·       Travel narratives and nautical fiction ·       Pilgrimage ·       Slave trade and the forced movement of peoples ·       Circulations, transfers, and migrations ·       Nomadism ·       Problems in translation (e.g., political humour, the absurd, nonsense, etc.) ·       Exile and displacement ·       Explorers and expeditions ·       Science fiction ·       Intermedial translation ·       Steamers and trains ·       Colonization ·       Translation and life writing ·       Transfer of knowledge ·       Cultural transposition ·       Adaptation across cultures ·       Transmediality and transnationalism ·       Transfer and transmission ·       Texts and their contexts ·       Transposition in music ·       Transposition and translation ·       Travel maps and cartographies of navigation ·       Books as travelling objects ·       Photography, painting, and travel ·       Tourism and visual culture ·       Nomadic narratives ·       Translation and the discovery of new cultures ·       The re/discovery of ancient civilizations/Egyptomania ·       Translation and the discovery of European modernity In addition to paper and panel proposals related to the conference theme, we also welcome proposals for prearranged special panels on topics in global nineteenth-century studies more broadly: Methodology OR Pedagogy Roundtables: Sessions focused on methodological approaches to studying and practical strategies for teaching the nineteenth century in a global context. Big Ideas: Sessions focused on a single thought-provoking topic related to the global nineteenth century. The format may vary from standard panels (three presenters and a moderator) to lightning roundtables (five to eight presenters delivering short, provocative position papers) to others that may be proposed. Proposals (extended deadline of 25 March) Individual paper proposals should consist of an abstract (200-250 words), brief biography (80- 100 words), and full contact information in a single pdf document or Word file. Panel proposals should include abstracts for 3-4 papers, a brief rationale that connects the papers (100-200 words), and biographies of each participant (80-100 words) in a single pdf or Word file. All proposals should include 3 to 5 keywords.  Successful panel proposals will include participants from more than one institution, and, ideally, represent a mix of disciplines/fields and career stages. Panel proposals should also indicate the category for evaluation: general conference program or special session; Methodology or Pedagogy Roundtable; or Big Ideas. Although the working language of the conference is English, a limited number of slots will be available for presentations in Arabic. Location and requirements The congress will be held at the Global Studies Center, Gulf University for Science and Technology, in Kuwait. Modern, prosperous, and safe, Kuwait boasts a unique cultural mix, a longstanding tradition of the theatrical arts, diverse cuisine, and some of the best beaches in the region. Presenters, panel chairs, and workshop participants must be current members of the Society for Global Nineteenth-Century Studies at the time of the World Congress. For more information on membership, visit www.global19c.com. Proposals and questions should be directed to the Program Committee: societygncs@gmail.com. Please visit the 2025 Congress website for the most up-to-date information: https://www.sgncscongress.com. *

Un-Bioed: Radically Reimagining Black Women’s Lives (3/28-29/2024)

University of Kentucky USA This 2-day conference is an opportunity to celebrate and expand the community of Black women’s life writers. Black women’s life writing has been among the fastest-growing literary subgenres in the past several years. Long before this explosion of memoirs and biographies on and by Black women, scholars such as Nell Painter, Farah Jasmine Griffin, and Barbara Ransby led the way in the 1990s and early 2000s, writing path-breaking biographies and establishing the methodologies that other scholars would build upon. And while Black women’s biography has remained a vital form of writing and research for academics at various career stages, only a few have managed to secure contracts with commercial publishers and garner wider audience reach. Join us on Thursday, March 28, 2024, from 4 – 6 pm at the William T. Young Library Auditorium for an inspiring keynote from Salamishah Tillet (Baruch College), followed by a reception at the Alumni Gallery. The next day Friday, March 29, 2024, join us at the Alumni Gallery from 9 am – 3 pm for a day of panels and workshops dedicated to community, craft, and marketing. The schedule of events with speakers can be found here. Register here for free! Please share widely—we look forward to seeing you in March! https://www.eventbrite.com/e/un-bioed-radically-reimagining-black-womens-lives-tickets-761393888617?utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&utm-medium=discovery&utm-term=listing&utm-source=cp&aff=ebdsshcopyurl Shanna G. Benjamin, Ph.D. Professor of African American Studies, Wake Forest she/her My book, Half in Shadow, is available for purchase! Read my interview with the AAIHS to learn more about the book and why I wrote it. Visit my Linktree for videos of past events and notice of upcoming talks. Here’s how you pronounce my name. *

2024 Conference: Call for Papers

Defining the Letter– The Epistolary Research Network (TERN) will hold its fifth conference 4-5 October 2024. Deadline for Abstracts: March 29
    1. On February 28, 1943, someone found scraps of paper in their garden, thrown from the window of a train going to Auschwitz-Birkenau. This person delivered these scribbled messages from resistance fighter Simone Alizon to her father. [Arch. Nat. 72A fonds Alizon.]
    1. James Lee Byars wrote more than 100 letters, using a variety of materials, forms, and ideas, to artist Joseph Beuys over a period of 16 years. Received but never replied to, they explore the day-to-day of his artistic practice.
Whether composed under difficult circumstances or elaborated as part of a creative experiment, these examples share one feature. They raise the question: What is or should be considered a letter? Must it be written on socially recognized media, be it papyrus sheets, potsherds, or vellum, to qualify? Must it have a date, greetings, closing, and include epistolary conventions, like asking after someone’s health? Must it have a specific addressee, or be delivered via a postal institution? TERN2024 will serve as a forum to discuss and elaborate a definition of ‘letter.’ Is one definition even possible for this form of communication that has been adapted in many ways by many people over millennia and across the globe? We are interested in bringing together examples that challenge in some way current thinking or current definitions of ‘letter.’ Topics might include:
    • epistolary communications on atypical materials (pages torn from books, fabric, handmade ink)
    • written under duress or difficult situations (war, exile, prison, refugee camps, censorship, travel)
    • examine conventions specific to one group of people (secret societies, coded letters, academic or philosophical letters)
    • letters written by those unfamiliar with letter conventions and formats (children, those with limited literacy, or those writing letters for the first time)
    • hybrid forms (poem letters, essay letters, petitions, literary letters, etc.)
​ Proposals (maximum 250 words) and a brief biography (CV) should be sent to ternetwork@hotmail.com. The deadline is 29 March 2023. The conference will be virtual and the language will be English. As always, we will try to accommodate all times zones. Publication of selected papers will be arranged following the conference. *
Deadline for Submissions, March 31, 2024
CFP: Oral History and Disability The Oral History Review is happy to announce a call for papers for a special issue dedicated to Oral History and Disability. It is currently slated for the Spring 2025 issue of the OHR. Oral historians often write and talk about inclusion, even radical inclusion. What does this mean in practice? What contributions have oral historians made – or can they make – to Disability Studies? What are the cultural representations of disability and how can oral historians add to a view of disability beyond the traditional, mostly medical, and socially constructed ones? What do the practices of oral historians with disabilities look or sound like? What can oral historians learn about communication from people with disabilities? And how do such themes as embodiment, trauma, and identity, topics oral historians often discuss, apply to disability? For this issue, we especially want to encourage multimedia submissions and to push thinking around new technologies for both interviewing and oral history project outcomes. This might include, for example, for the blind and seeing impaired, not only audio but perhaps screen reader (or text-toaudio) software. For people who are deaf or hearing impaired, the use of signed interviews with video online (ASL), closed captioning, and downloadable transcripts. Or for people with neurocognitive differences, intellectual disabilities, and other conditions, anything from assistive devices to language cues within an interview to the use of photos to aid in story capture. This special issue thus asks oral historians to explore:
    • Multimedia projects and the use of audio/video/photography
    • New technologies for both interviewing and oral history project outcomes
    • Access and accessibility
    • Visibility and its meanings
    • Stories before and after the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act
    • The second wave of the disability rights movement, also called Disability Justice (DJ)
    • The role of oral history in Disability Studies and history
    • How disability is framed today and at different times and places
    • Disability and advocacy, family, and religious belief
    • Stories from the field of narrative medicine, which seeks to bridge clinical practice and patients’ emotional health and well being
    • What oral historians can learn about communication from people with disabilities, and/or from artists with disabilities who address the labor of care in their work
    • How oral history can be used to investigate the structural ableism that people with disabilities confront daily (spatial equity)
    • Disability and poverty, gender, or race
    • COVID-19 stories
    • And other themes that oral historians often address – embodiment, trauma, community, labor, inclusion/exclusion, identity – as applied to disability
It is estimated that one in four people in the U.S. alone live with a disability. If you have questions, book and media review ideas, or would like to discuss your proposal in advance, please contact the OHR editor, Holly Werner-Thomas, at holly@hollythomasoralhistory.com by December 31, 2023. To submit your articles, use the OHR submission portal, https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ohr. The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2024. Contact Email holly@hollythomasoralhistory.com URLhttps://oralhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/OHR-Spring-2025-Call-for-Papers.pdf *

The Expatriate Archive Centre (EAC) invites master’s students around the world to participate in the EAC Master’s Thesis Award and submit theses that contribute to the scholarship of expatriation studies.

Prize: €500 and promotion of the executive summary of the winning thesis by the EAC and partner organisations. Application deadline: 31 March 2024. Master thesis requirements: •             The thesis should relate to the EAC’s mission and objectives; •             The thesis is written in English; •             The thesis is from the 2019–20, 2020–21, 2021–22, or 2022–23 academic year; •             The thesis has been awarded a mark of 8/10 or more (or equivalent, e.g., 16/20 or more, or an ‘A’).

In 2019, we created this award to celebrate and reward talents who produce outstanding master’s theses that help to further understand the impact of expatriation on people’s lives. Five jurors evaluate the submissions. They use the following criteria: originality and innovation (20%); technical quality (30%); composition (10%); potential for contributing to the stimulation of scholarly (e.g. theoretical, methodological, etc.) perspectives regarding the award theme (20%); potential for contributing to the stimulation of practical engagement by policy, industry and/or civil society actors with the award theme (20%). More information about how to apply can be found here.

Partner organisations: Families in Global Transition, The International Metropolis Project, International Centre for Archival Research, TheHagueOnLine, ACCESS Netherlands and DutchNews.nl.

For more information about the EAC and this initiative, please visit our website or email welcome@xpatarchive.com.

Have a nice day, Kristine Director Expatriate Archive Centre Paramaribostraat 20 2585 GN  The Hague (the Netherlands) T. +31 (0)70 427 2014 F. +31 (0)70 427 2016 director@xpatarchive.com www.xpatarchive.com Follow us on: Facebook  Twitter  Instagram *

Close Encounters in War and Personal Narratives: Experience, Memory, and Storytelling Special issue of CEIWJ [Close Encounters in War Journal]

Deadline for Submissions: March 31, 2024

War has been the object of narration and storytelling since ancient times. Epics, myths, and legends transmitted the memory of heroes’ deeds, thus shaping and consolidating the cultural identities of local communities and ethnic enclaves and later nation-states and empires. Mythical storytelling evolved into historical narration as wars began to be recorded and accounted for systematically by early historians like Herodotus, Thucydides, or in Rome’s Annales. The public narration of war was an effective instrument of political and ideological cohesion as it displayed power and fuelled patriotic sentiments. However, the narration of war remained confined to the domain of public discourse despite armies consisting of individuals who contributed to the war directly and with personal sacrifice. The first personal account of war in the Western cultural tradition is Odysseus’s tale of the fall of Troy, which he shares with the Phaeaces. Thucydides referred to singular episodes involving specific individuals in his narration of the Peloponnesian Wars, though his discourse excludes any form of direct and personal narration. The first case of an extensive autobiographical war narrative is Julius Caesar’s De bello gallico. Despite being narrated in the third person, this work provides an individual-centred perspective about the military campaigns led by Caesar between 58 and 50 BC, culminating with the conquest of Gallia and Britannia. For the first time, the historian, the storyteller, and the protagonist of the tale coexist in the figure of the anonymous narrator/chronicler who accounts for Caesar’s deeds in the third person.

Personal narratives about war have seldom reached the public before the nineteenth century. This caused scholars to believe that anonymous soldiers, who constituted the core of all armies in any historical period, never wrote about their experiences. Writing, on the other hand, was a skill far from being achieved by everyone in the pre-modern era. Only a few combatants could account for their war experiences in writing, for example, through letters, diaries and memoirs, a small number of which has reached the public as books. Furthermore, while personal accounts of war mostly remained confined to military, political, and intelligence communication – and are therefore stored in archives and mostly accessible as historical sources – the first testimonies of war that became works of public interest did not appear in the form of autobiographies or memoirs. An author like Tobias Smollett transfigured his war experiences as a navy surgeon in his novel The Adventures of Roderick Random (1748). Something similar did Herman Melville in White Jacket (1850), an autobiographical work inspired by the author’s experience as a sailor on the frigate USS United States. In general, it can be stated that the Napoleonic wars (1800-1815) triggered an incredible proliferation of autobiographical personal accounts since the 1820s.[1] This is not surprising, if one thinks that modern autobiography – as a genre and as a philosophical form of reflection on the “self” – begins in the seventeenth century with Rousseau’s Confessions (1782),[2] whose “revolution” transformed the subject into a “unique and unrepeatable psychical interiority, which was accessible only through introspective writing.”[3]

If the nineteenth century was characterised by an increasing interest in war personal narratives, the phenomenon assumed a mass scale with the outbreak of the Great War, mainly for two reasons: the enormous mass of soldiers involved in the conflict on a global scale for over four years; and the diffusion of literacy among the mass of enlisted soldiers. Scholars claim that between 1914 and 1918, over 65 billion letters circulated between the frontlines and Italy, France, Germany, and Great Britain.[4] If personal narratives from the nineteenth-century wars amount to hundreds, above all distributed in Western countries, autobiographical accounts of the Great War amount to many thousands, spread all over the world. New groups of authors appear in this recent tradition, such as prisoners of war (POWs), women, and members of colonial troops. One striking phenomenon that characterised the response of some combatants to the Great War was the blooming of poetry in all countries, with remarkable achievements in the UK with the so-called “war poets” Wilfred Owen, Rupert Brooke, and Siegfried Sassoon, in Austria with Georg Trakl, and in Italy with the Futurists, Gabriele D’annunzio, and Giuseppe Ungaretti, only to mention a few examples. Moreover, the technological nature of the war caused all armies to create specialised corps such as pilots, tankers, submarine crews, drivers, and chemical companies, whose members published several personal narratives that enlightened the aspects of the “new” warfare. During and after the Second World War, further groups of witnesses appeared, such as the victims of political and racial persecution and deportation and the members of armed resistance (partisans) against the Nazi and the Fascist authorities in several European countries.

As wars became more and more global, during the twentieth century, so did the more and more established genre of war narratives, which eventually became a consistent section of contemporary literature (despite the debate that saw literary scholars question the literariness of personal narratives), or at least of the international book market. One can recall several personal narratives that have become classics of twentieth-century literature like Henri Barbusse’s Le feu (1916), Ernst Jünger’s In Stahlgewittern (1920), Thomas Edward Lawrence’s Seven Pillars of Wisdom (1926), Anne Frank’s Diary (1947), Primo Levi’s Se questo è un uomo (1958), Elie Wiesel’s La Nuit (1958), Elechi Amadi’s Sunset in Biafra (1973), Eugene Sledge’s, With the Old Breed (1981), Eric Lomax’ The Railway Man (1995), Isaac Fadoyebo’s A Stroke of Unbelievable Luck (1999), Keiko Tamura’s Michi’s Memoirs (2001), and many more worldwide.

As a genre, personal narratives have evolved over two centuries, passing from being almost exclusively memoirs written by high-ranking officers (mostly noble) to consisting of a much more multifaceted variety of expressive forms including letters, diaries, autobiographical sketches, poems, published or unpublished memoirs, oral histories and autobiographical fiction. After a long-lasting prejudice that banned personal narratives from the history of war and conflict, which was relegated to the disciplinary field of Military History, since the 1960s historians have begun to look at these narrations as valid and valuable sources of historical knowledge, thus giving impulse, after the so-called “cultural” and “narrative” turns after the 1970s, to the birth of sub-disciplines such as Micro-History, History of Mentality, Cultural History, Oral History and more recently the History of the Emotions. Working with personal narratives is a challenging scholarly enterprise due to the flickering and multifaceted nature of this kind of written expression, which is transversal to literary genres while including forms, styles, and registers typical of the spoken language. Personal narratives can hardly provide an overall comprehension and depiction of war, as they can inform about events that occurred on a smaller scale and the perception that human beings have of the war as a direct experience. Therefore, working with personal narratives often requires intellectual flexibility and the ability to blend different disciplinary approaches by borrowing diverse methodological, critical and analytical tools.

Issue n. 7 of the CEIWJ aims to investigate the theme of the close encounters in war in connection with the universe of personal narratives to study how people have accounted for their personal experience of war in ancient, pre-modern, modern and contemporary periods. To do so, we invite the submission of articles focused on the investigation of testimonies from a broad spectrum of theoretical and critical perspectives in the fields of Aesthetics, Anthropology, Classics, Comparative Literature, Cultural History, Ethics, Epistemology, Ethnology, Gender Studies, History of Art, History of Ideas, Linguistics, Memory Studies, Modern Languages, Oral History, Philosophy of Language, Psychology, Religion, Social Sciences, and Trauma Studies.

We invite, per the scientific purpose of the journal, contributions that focus on human dimensions and perspectives on this topic. We, therefore, seek articles that analyse the close encounters in war in diaries, letters, autobiographies, memoirs, autobiographical fiction, oral histories and other egodocuments such as juridical testimonies and memoirs, bulletins and reports (military, medical, technical, and so on), photographic albums, drawings and paintings. The following aspects (among others) may be considered:

  • Representation and perception of the “self” in the context of war;
  • Language, public and private (e.g. the use of dialect or foreign languages; encrypted writing; metaphors, symbols and allegories; alternative forms of communication);
  • Propaganda and ideology (e.g. political perspectives; racism; nationalism; religious fanaticism);
  • Ethical and moral aspects (e.g. personal development; self-understanding; the relation with the others; justification of violence; acceptance of suffering and death);
  • Censorship and self-censorship in personal narratives;
  • Literary aspects of personal narratives (e.g. use of literary models and styles; editorial re-elaboration of personal narratives for publication; the relationship between fiction and autobiographical writing; personal narrative and the literary canon);
  • Personal narratives as historical sources (e.g. methodological and deontological  issues; epistemological value of personal narratives; rhetoric and logic);
  • Anti-war attitudes (e.g. pacifism; criticism of violence; desertion and conscience objection; sabotage);
  • Feelings and emotions in personal narratives;
  • Personal narratives and trauma;
  • Identity and diversity (e.g. gender; ethnicity; cultural heritage);
  • Personal narratives in pop culture (e.g. film; TV; journalism; cultural heritage);
  • Personal narratives and the culture of memory (local and collective) (e.g. archives and repositories; Public History; sites of memory; public use of personal narratives through the Internet);

 CEIWJ encourages inter/multidisciplinary approaches and dialogue among different scientific fields to promote discussion and scholarly research. The blending of different approaches will be warmly welcomed. Contributions from established scholars, early-career researchers, doctoral students, witnesses of war (e.g. veterans, journalists, reporters, etc.) and practitioners who have dealt with or used personal narratives in the course of their activities will be considered. Case studies may include different historical periods and geographic areas.

The editors of the Close Encounters in War Journal invite the submission of abstracts of 250 words in English by 31 March 2024 to ceiwj@nutorevelli.org. The authors invited to submit their works will be required to send articles of 8,000-10,000 words (endnotes included, bibliographical references not included in word count), in English by 14 June 2024. All articles will undergo a process of double-blind peer review. We will notify the results of the review in September 2024. Final versions of revised articles will be submitted in November 2024. Please see the submission guidelines at: https://closeencountersinwar.org/instruction-for-authors-submissions/.

 [1]     See, for example, http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/browse?type=lcsubc&key=Napoleonic%20Wars%2C%201800%2D1815%20%2D%2D%20Personal%20narratives%2C%20French (Napoleonic wars 1800-1815), http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book//browse?type=lcsubc&key=Crimean%20War%2C%201853%2D1856%20%2D%2D%20Personal%20narratives (Crimean war 1853-1856), and https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/166546.First_hand_accounts_of_the_Napoleonic_Wars. See also the repository of personal narratives from the American Civil War of the University of Maryland at https://lib.guides.umd.edu/c.php?g=326774&p=2197450 (all websites last accessed on 11th January 2024).[2]     James Goodwin, in “Narcissus and Autobiography”, Genre, 12, 1 (1979): 69-92; Andrea Battistini, Lo specchio di Dedalo. Autobiografia e biografia, Bologna, il Mulino, 103-104.[3]     Gianluca Cinelli, Ermeneutica e scrittura autobiografica. Primo Levi, Nuto Revelli, Rosetta Loy, Mario Rigoni Stern, Milan, Unicopli, 2008, 12.[4]     Carlo Stiaccini, War Letters (Italy), in International Encyclopedia of the First World War (8 January 2017): 2. https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/war_letters_italy.

Contact Information

Gianluca Cinelli giancin77@yahoo.it

Patrizia Piredda patrizia.piredda@oxfordalumni.org

Simona Tobia s.tobia@univ-pau.fr

Fabio Caffarena fabio.caffarena@unige.it

Contact Email

ceiwj@nutorevelli.org

URL

https://closeencountersinwar.org/2024/01/17/call-for-articles-for-issue-n-7-202…

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Talking Back Interdisciplinary Conference

June 25, 2024 Nottingham, UK Deadline for Submissions: April 1, 2024
‘Moving from silence into speech is for the oppressed, the colonized, the exploited, and those who stand and struggle side by side, a gesture of defiance that heals, that makes new life, and new growth possible. It is that act of speech, of “talking back” that is no mere gesture of empty words, that is the expression of moving from object to subject, that is the liberated voice.’ bell hooks, “Talking Back.” Discourse (1986), p. 128. 
Talking Back interdisciplinary conference is an in-person conference that will be held in Nottingham, United Kingdom. It will bring together researchers, writers, poets, and activists in order to contribute to cross-cultural dialogue, collaborative thinking, and ongoing discussions on resistance and representation. Reflecting on speech as a radical force against the systemic silencing of marginalised voices (hooks, 1989), we would like to invite proposals from writers, academics, creatives, and activists alike who are interested in exploring critical and creative approaches to decolonial activism, reclamations of culture and identity, and the transformative power of voice. We invite contributions that explore marginalised voices, representations of dissent against western hegemony and rigid binaries, and resistance to silencing and structural oppression. We welcome critical and creative approaches to proposals from participants of all genders, racial groups, and faith groups. The conference is free to attend and will take place at Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, England on Tuesday 25th June 2024. The conference will be followed by an open-mic poetry and networking event, centred on the theme of ‘talking back.’ Proposals Suggestions include and are not limited to:
    1. Solidarity in dialogue: The power of collaboration in amplifying silenced voices.
    1. Testimonial narratives of marginalisation and dissent – how can speech become an act and practice of resistance?
    1. Resisting marginalisation and challenging labels.
    1. ‘Talking back’ as a form of activism – in what ways does the idea of ‘talking back’ contribute to decolonial modes of thinking and understanding.
    1. Exposing injustice: Challenging on-going realities of colonialism
Submission Guidelines Please submit a 250-word abstract/proposal for a 20-minute paper or presentation along with a 100-word biographical statement to: talkingbackconference@gmail.com. Please title your email with the type of submission you are applying for:
    • 20-minute paper: Talking Back Conference 2024
    • 20-minute presentation: Talking Back Conference 2024
Funding The conference is free to attend. We are also able to offer 4 travel bursaries of up to £50 to support self-funded and disadvantaged students with travel costs. If you wish to apply for one of these bursaries, please express your interest at the bottom of your abstract, along with a brief summary explaining why you require the support. Key Dates
    • Deadline for all submissions: 1st April 2024
    • Conference date: 25th June 2024
Queries Email us at talkingbackconference@gmail.com if you have any questions. We look forward to receiving your submissions. This conference is made possible by generous funding and support provided by New Art Exchange, Bonington Gallery, and the NTU Postcolonial Research Group. Contact Email talkingbackconference@gmail.com URL https://talkingbackconference2024.wordpress.com * Call for Papers Voices of Resistance in and against Dutch Empire, 1600-2020s Thursday 12 and Friday 13 September 2024, at Utrecht University, The Netherlands, Deadline proposals: 1 April 2024. Throughout the long history of Dutch empire starting in the early seventeenth century and extending into the postcolonial present, various people both in imperial dependencies across the globe and the metropole have resisted the logics and realities of oppression and exploitation. While colonisers’ perspectives have received plentiful attention, this conference puts the often marginalized voices of resistance in and against Dutch empire front and centre. Drawing on recent trends in the intellectual history of anticolonialism, the conference will chart and discuss the intellectual interventions of actors who agitated against the Dutch empire and its legacies. We invite contributions on the ideas, practices and networks of anticolonial actors who navigated the Dutch empire from the seventeenth century up to today, including freedom fighters and poets, religious leaders and (formerly) enslaved rebels, artists and activists, musicians, political thinkers and intellectuals, journalists and writers. We thus interpret voices of resistance broadly, ranging from political protest to works of fiction and from artistic and literary forms of expression to philosophical tractates as well as pamphlets and other forms of ephemeral writing. We aim to take a long-term perspective from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century and combine East and West that have often been treated as separate sections of the historiography of Dutch empire. Anticolonial stories have long served as chronicles about heroic resistance such as that of the nineteenth-century Javanese Prince Diponegoro or have confirmed teleological narratives ‘from empire to nation state’. We aim to contextualize such narratives by looking into related memory practices in anticolonial and postcolonial settings and by examining the transnational and transimperial entanglements of anticolonial networks. Besides contributions focusing on better-known anticolonial agitators and their networks, we are also interested in bringing together more subtle stories of, for example, legal resistance and more local accounts of religious defiance or economic subversion. Furthermore, we are interested in exploring not only what voices of resistance were fighting against but also in analysing the constructive agendas they put forth. From histories of political thought to meaningful practices of artistic, religious, and literary resistance, the conference will examine how anticolonial actors in transimperial contexts criticized and shaped the (end of the) Dutch empire. The conference, which will be held on Thursday 12 and Friday 13 September 2024, at Utrecht University, The Netherlands, is a critical follow-up to the international conference “Visions of Empire in Dutch History”, organized in 2016 at Leiden University, and the resulting edited volume The Dutch Empire Between Ideas and Practice [Cambridge Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies] (Palgrave, 2019). Call for papers We invite proposals for papers on the following range of topics: – languages, ideologies and conceptual histories of resistance – ideas articulated in the context of political protests, (labour) strikes, violent rebellions – anticolonial or decolonial scholarship, including history writing, social sciences, humanities – artistic and literary expressions of resistance, including fiction, poetry, songs, visual arts – memory and memorialization of acts of resistance – demands for symbolic and financial forms of reparations and/or restitution We furthermore encourage: – long-term and diachronic perspectives (1600-2020) – comparative and/or interconnected perspectives from East and West, including the Indian Ocean region, the Indonesian archipelago, Cape Good Hope/South Africa, the Dutch Atlantic and Dutch North America, the Caribbean, Surinam, Dutch Guyana and Brazil – transimperial perspectives of voices that operated within the Dutch empire but agitated against other empires or imperialism more broadly, and of those actors who operated in other imperial spheres, but whose efforts were aimed against the Dutch empire – paper proposals by junior researchers (at RMA or PhD level) as well as more senior scholars, from different backgrounds (also outside academia) Individual paper proposals should consist of an abstract (200-250 words), a brief biography (50-100 words), and contact information. Proposals should be directed to the organizational committee: dr. René Koekkoek, dr. Anne-Isabelle Richard, and dr. Arthur Weststeijn at a.v.weststeijn@uu.nl. https://networks.h-net.org/group/announcements/20021539/voices-resistance-and-against-dutch-empire-1600-2020s Deadline proposals: 1 April 2024. Notification of selected proposals will be given by 1 May 2024. *

The 2024 Project Narrative Summer Institute: Rhetorical and Intersectional Narratologies in Dialogue

Co-Directors: Jim Phelan and Robyn Warhol Dates: June 17-28, 2024 (on Zoom) https://projectnarrative.osu.edu/2024-project-narrative-summer-institute-rhetorical-and-intersectional-narratologies-dialogue-online PNSI is a two-week workshop that offers faculty and advanced graduate students in any discipline the opportunity for an intensive study of core concepts and issues in narrative theory. The focus for summer 2024 will be Rhetorical and Intersectional Narratologies, and the co-directors will ground their approach in the principle of dialogue.  More specifically, we will explore the grounding principles of each approach by reading foundational and cutting-edge texts from each, and we will attend to the convergences and divergences between them.  Just as important, we will add a range of primary texts to the dialogue, including Jane Austen’s Emma, Edith Wharton’s “Roman Fever,” Toni Morrison’s “Recitatif,” and Jesmyn Ward’s “On Witness and Respair.”  Sample questions:  How do rhetorical narratology’s roots in the Poetics of Aristotle and of the neo-Aristotelian Chicago Critics and intersectional narratology’s roots in structuralism and feminist theory influence the current theory and practice of each approach? How do the narrative texts prompt re-examination, revision, and/or extensions of the theories? More generally, what can rhetorical and intersectional narratologies do for each other?  We’ll take up these (and other) questions as we work through the syllabus, and in relation to the specific interests and projects of the participants.  At the end of the Institute, each participant will present and receive feedback on their individual project. Syllabus Before the Institute begins, everyone should (re)read Jane Austen’s Emma Part I: Rhetorical Narratology Monday, June 17 Poetics:  Theoretical Texts: Aristotle, Poetics; R.S. Crane, “The Concept of Plot and the Plot of Tom Jones”; Ralph W. Rader; “The Dramatic Monologue and Related Lyric Forms”; James Phelan, “The Chicago School: From Neo-Aristotelian Poetics to the Rhetorical Theory of Narrative” Narrative Texts (in addition to Emma): T.C. Boyle, “Chicxulub”; Robert Browning, “My Last Duchess”; Alfred, Lord Tennyson “Tithonus” Tuesday, June 18: The Rhetorical and Ethical Turn Wayne C. Booth, The Rhetoric of Fiction:  Excerpt about Unreliable Narration and “Control of Distance in Emma”; Booth, The Company We Keep, discussion of Emma; Peter J. Rabinowitz, “Truth in Fiction: A Re-Examination of Audiences”; Introduction to Before Reading; Nielsen, Phelan, and Walsh, “Ten Theses about Fictionality.” Narrative Texts: Emma; Edgar Allan Poe, “The Cask of Amontillado”; Toni Cade Bambara, “The Lesson”; Roddy Doyle, “Worms” Wednesday, June 19: Rhetorical Poetics Theoretical Texts: Phelan, Intro to Reading People, Reading Plots; Chapter One of Somebody Telling Somebody Else; Excerpts from Debating Rhetorical Narratology: definitions of mimetic, thematic, and synthetic; discussion of Emma; Phelan and Sarah Copland, “The Ideal Narratee and the Rhetorical Model of Audiences” Narrative Texts (in addition to Emma): Wharton, “Roman Fever”; Cisneros, “Barbie-Q”; John Donne, “The Flea,” Jamaica Kincaid, “Girl” Thursday, June 20: Applied Rhetorical Narratology: Rhetorical Narrative Medicine; Black Women’s Stories of Everyday Racism Phelan, Excerpts from Narrative Medicine, Chapter 1; “Narrative as Rhetoric and the Art of Medicine”; Chapter 11, Narrative Medicine Workshops: Understanding, Overstanding, Springboarding; Phelan, “Rhetorical Listening: Character, Progression and Fictionality in African American Women’s Stories of Everyday Racism” Narrative Texts: Jesmyn Ward, “On Witness and Respair: A Personal Tragedy Followed by Pandemic”; Joyce Carol Oates, “Hospice/Honeymoon”; Stories by Mary Bullock and Scotia Brown from Black Women’s Stories of Everyday Racism Part Two:  Intersectional Narratologies Friday, June 21: NARRATIVE DISRUPTED First, read: Toni Morrison, “Recitatif.” Plot, Genre, Ethnicity: Paula Gunn Allen, “Kochinnenako in Academe“(1986) Sexualities: Valerie Rohy, “Queer Narrative Theory” (2018) Race & Disability, Robyn Warhol & Amy Shuman, “The Unspeakable, the Unnarratable and the Repudiation of Epiphany in ‘Recitatif’” (2018); Monday, June 24: NARRATIVITY/TELLABILITY Ruth Page, “The Narrative Dimensions of Social Media Storytelling: Options for Linearity and Tellership” (2015) Susan Lanser & Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan, “Narratology at the Checkpoint” (2019) David Herman, “Zoonarratology” (2012) Julio Cortázar, “Axolotl” Tuesday, June 25:  EMPATHY/SUBJECTIVITY First, read: Judith Butler, “Giving an Account of Oneself” (2009)—available on Project Muse Katherine Young, “Narratives of Indeterminacy: Breaking the Medical Body into its Discourses: Breaking the Discursive Body out of Postmodernism” (1999) Amy Shuman, “Entitlement and Empathy in Personal Narrative” (2006) Warhol, “She Was Not Heard: Personal Narratives that Tackle Structural Racism.” Additional narratives from Black Women’s Stories of Everyday Racism Wednesday, June 26: ALTERNATE PARADIGMS Susan Lanser, “Toward (a Queerer and) More (Feminist) Narratology” (2015) Claudia Breger, “Affects in Configuration: A New Approach to Narrative Worldmaking” (2017) Karin Kukkonen, “A moving target – cognitive narratology and feminism” (2018) Thursday, June 27 and Friday, June 28: Participant Presentations To Apply: Applicants should send a current CV, a short description of the proposed project (no longer than a single-spaced page), and one letter of recommendation to Project Narrative by April 1, 2024. Applications will be reviewed promptly after the deadline. If, in order to meet funding deadlines, applicants need an earlier decision, the co-directors will consider special requests for early action. Applications can be emailed to projectnarrative@osu.edu or sent by post to the following address: 421 Denney Hall Attn: James Phelan, Project Narrative 164 Annie and John Glenn Avenue Columbus, OH 43210 Please email projectnarrative@osu.edu with any questions about applying.

Fees Tuition for the 2024 Project Narrative Summer Institute is $1900. The co-directors will gladly write in support of participants’ applications for funding from home institutions.

— Jim Phelan, Distinguished University Professor and Editor, Narrative Director, Project Narrative Department of English Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210-1370 614-292-6669 FAX 614-292-7816 phelan.1@osu.edu *

Slavery, Authorship and Literary Culture

Call for papers

April 1, 2024 Edited Collection This volume, the last in a three-volume series devoted to the comparative literary history of modern slavery, explores slavery, past and present, from the perspective of authorship, textuality and literary cultures. The editors invite abstracts for essays on all aspects of this question. Slavery is often portrayed as shrouded in silence due to the simple fact that the number of texts and accounts written by enslaved people is very limited, especially when compared to the vast amount of documentation produced by the colonial powers. As recent scholarship has shown, however, enslaved people were not silent — silence is rather an effect created by the privileging of some forms of writing and as a result certain voices and viewpoints over others. This volume aims to investigate writing about slavery in all its forms, from the written traces left by enslaved people to the archives of slaveholders and from the discourses of abolition to postcolonial narrative. While we acknowledge the problem of invisibility as a fundamental condition for the study of slavery, we also wish to highlight the ways in which discourses about slavery have found their way into print and other media as well as the ways in which these texts have circulated and been read. The volume will consider how enslaved people expressed themselves in writing, considering, among other genres, letters, legal and financial documents, as well as published texts of all kinds. We encourage contributions that explore how the formerly enslaved took up authorship as free colored people or, after emancipation, in newspapers, journals or in other contexts and venues. We will consider the literary cultures that took shape in colonies and countries in which texts on slavery were produced and disseminated. Finally, we wish to explore postcolonial writing about slavery as well as accounts of slavery in today’s world. An important question for the volume will be how and to what extent authorship corresponds to agency and political subjectivity. For vol. 3 we invite articles that address any of the many the ways in which literature relating to slavery has been written, disseminated, read and discussed. This includes, for example, the existence of libraries and literary and scientific circles in colonial settings, the ways in which colonial literature was read and discussed in Europe, international debates about abolition, the uses of literature in colonial schools and missions, and more broadly the use of text as documentation. Articles might also consider processes of translation between languages and cultures, e.g. from an African to a plantation context, when texts pass from one colonial system to another, or when accounts circulate between European audiences and readers in other parts of the world. We also invite articles that address the afterlives of colonial slavery in contemporary literatures worldwide and the recreation of lost authorship as authors engage with the memory of slavery and attempt to recover lost voices. The volume will have a broad historical and geographical scope. We encourage submissions on modern slavery from the 16th century to the present. While the focus will be on the Atlantic world, we are also interested in the related systems of African, Mediterranean and Indian Ocean slavery. Comparative angles are especially welcome. Areas of particular interest include but are not limited to:
    • Questions of agency and political subjectivity in relation to authorship. How do we situate slave narratives and their impact both at the time of their publication and since? Where do we locate the voices of enslaved and formerly enslaved in different genres and forms of textual expression?
    • Literary cultures in the colonial world, e.g. the existence of libraries, bookstores, printing presses, scientific societies and the relationship between literature and literary institutions and the practices of slavery in the colonies and Europe.
    • The relationship between literary, performative, and visual forms of expression relating to slavery in the colonies and in Europe.
    • Gender in colonial literary culture, in relation to questions of subjectivity, and in later historical and literary reflections on the gender structures of slavery and post-slavery societies.
    • The relationship between slavery and colonialism and the development of African print culture and the traces and translation of oral slavery stories in printed texts.
    • The role of abolitionist movements in the disseminations of early texts on slavery and the establishment of African-American and African-European literary traditions.
    • The relationship between economy, capitalism and literature in the colonial Atlantic and its importance for the circulation, translation and commerce of texts across the Atlantic and between colonial spheres.
    • How to recognize processes of silencing. Which strategies of reading traces and absences must be employed in order to highlight and perhaps counteract silencing?
    • Post- and decolonial responses to slavery in 20th-century art, film and literature especially in relationship to questions of voice and agency.
Please send a 300 words abstract to the volume editors Mads Anders Baggesgaard (madsbaggesgaard@cc.au.dk) and Helen Atawube Yitah (hyitah@ug.edu.gh) no later than April 1, 2024. If selected for further process, the final deadline for the article will be October 1, 2024. After that deadline there will be a peer review process. The volume will be published in the fall of 2025. This volume is the third and last in Comparative Literary Histories of Slavery, main eds. Mads Anders Baggesgaard, Madeleine Dobie and Karen-Margrethe Simonsen in the series of literary histories made by CHLEL (Coordinating Committee for Literatures in European Languages) under the ICLA (International Comparative Literature Association) Publishing House: John Benjamins Publishing. Please read the description of the book here: https://cc.au.dk/en/slaverystudies/projects/comparative-literary-history-of-modern-slavery. Kind regards from the editors Mads Anders Baggesgaard (Comparative Literature, Aarhus University) Helen Atawube Yitah (Department of English, University of Ghana) Contact Email madsbaggesgaard@cc.au.dk URLhttps://cc.au.dk/en/slaverystudies/show/artikel/call-for-papers-slavery-authorship-and-literary-culture * Podcast Launch–“Biographers in Conversation” (4/3/2024) Today I launched “Biographers in Conversation” a free weekly podcast of interviews with biographers from around the world about the choices they make while researching, writing and publishing life stories. It launches on 3 April 2024, however, here’s a sneak peek of the biographers I’ll chat with over the next few months. Please share the sneak peek far and wide within your networks to get the word out https://www.biographersinconversation.com/sneak-peek/ Warmest wishes Gabriella Gabriella Marie Kelly-Davies Doctoral candidate: Breaking through the pain barrier. The extraordinary life of Dr Michael J. Cousins  School of Literature, Arts and Media University of Sydney gkel6637@uni.sydney.edu.au 0408 256 381 * The Indigenous Nineteenth Century  4-5 June 2024, University of Kent Deadline for Submissions: March 15, 2024 Keynote: Professor Chris Andersen (Métis, University of Alberta), Professor David Stirrup (University of York) and Métis community members: ‘”On the trail of Alexander Isbister: 19th Century Métis Nationhood in Motion” The Victorian Diversities Research Network, in collaboration with the Centre for Indigenous and Settler Colonial Studies (CISCS) are pleased to announce a two-day AHRC-funded symposium: ‘The Indigenous Nineteenth Century.’ With the aim of producing new, interdisciplinary scholarship, anti-colonial research methodologies and critical interventions that re-indigenise the nineteenth-century archive and scholarly approaches to it, this two-day, hybrid symposium is accompanied by two publication opportunities: a special issue of the journal Transmotion and an edited collection to be published by Palgrave. The work of indigenising the nineteenth-century colonial archive is well under way, and this symposium aims to bring together scholars, writers, artists, curators and educators in literary studies, Indigenous studies, museum studies, library studies, and historical research areas to discuss the pleasures and problematics of (re)indigenising the colonial archive. The historical archives of imperial and colonial settlement are founded on what Mohawk scholar Audra Simpson has theorised as a foundational mis-recognition, a philosophical refusal to see Indigenous peoples’ cultures and lifeways outside of pre-conceived Eurocentric frameworks. The violence these archives do to First Nations people is ongoing. Literature and the creative arts can offer a space to interrogate the racialised-archive and its role in forming national, colonial and imperial identities. However, as Narungga woman, poet and scholar Natalie Harkin has highlighted, the wounds created by the epistemic violence of the archive still bleed. It is this problematic that this symposium proposes to investigate. The organisers therefore welcome 20 minute research papers, position papers and creative/critical interventions on the following themes: 1) Alternative archives: nineteenth-century Indigenous cultural production including treaties, petitions, letters, life writing, travel writing, novels and poetry, song culture, storytelling, material culture. 2)Colonisation and knowledge production: colonial archives and the challenges of recovering Indigenous voices from within them. Decolonial approaches to colonial archives, methodologies for addressing gaps and absences in the archive, settler-Indigenous collaborations, Indigenous language loss and revitalisation. 3)Creative-critical forms of historical writing that unsettle linear narratives and disrupt hegemonic perspectives. These can include life writing; historical novels; ‘critical fabulation’ (Hartman) and speculative history; histories of Indigenous political formations and resistance movements. 4)Contemporary literary and artistic responses by Indigenous cultural producers that seek to remix, rewrite and reconstitute colonial history and artifacts. 5)Indigenising cultural institutions: curatorial practices, representation and decolonial museology. Abstracts of 300 words and bios of 150 words for 20 minute papers or panels of 3-4 speakers should be submitted to L.E.Atkin@kent.ac.uk . Creative and critical interventions that are outside the scope of the traditional research paper are very welcome. These might include ‘in conversation’ sessions, readings, performances and other types of practice-based intervention. If you can only attend online, please say so in your submission. Online sessions will be held on June 5thAll submissions should be made by 15 March 2024. Participants will be notified by the organisers of their acceptance and the outcome of any bursary applications by 28 March 2024. In order to facilitate scholarly collaboration and cross-disciplinary conversation, we would like to invite as many people as possible to join us in Kent. To this end, we can offer six travel grants to ECR, precarious and Indigenous scholars travelling from within the UK and outside of the UK. The three UK based grants are worth up to £200 each and the three international grants are worth up to £1000 each. If you would like to be considered for one of these, please include a short expression of interest with your abstract submission. Priority will be given to those without access to institutional funding or coming from outside Europe. * Call for papers: Essay Cluster on Political Biofictions (Biographical Fictions) a/b: Auto/Biography Studies  Contact: Jenny Rademacher: vrademacher@babson.edu Deadline for Submissions: March 15, 2024 Political Biofictions By openly playing in the space between the real and the speculative, biofictions constitute thresholds between the situated realities of actual, biographical subjects and the imaginative potential of fictional creation. Thus, while deriving from real sources, biofictions liberate fiction from interacting with only invented worlds. Instead, these works invite us to experiment with our biographical lives and to use invention to evaluate and reshape real-world concerns. Amid the threats posed by delimiting political realities (e.g. dictatorship, war, sectarian conflict, populism), biofictions offer potent outlets to protest powerlessness or the inevitability of such outcomes and to speculate on alternative pasts and futures. For example, they may invite us to revise and reimagine the lives of those who contributed and who were left out of official narratives. Emma Donoghue has referred to biofiction as “voicing the nobodies.” Colum McCann has emphasized the “contested realities” and obscured truths that many writers of biofiction explore—the effort to challenge and interrogate claims to truth and what we can trust. By imaginatively making visible voices and meanings that power has so often obscured, biofictions are inherently political spaces that have the potential to challenge dominant, authoritarian modes of determining the world. In this sense, biofictions are both an outgrowth of a dispersive, uncertain reality and a mode for navigating this context, modeling alternatives for how we manage and rethink its possibilities and pitfalls. The political uncertainties we face are not only the risks of physical dangers to ourselves and our planet—although those are very real—but also to the confidence and trust we have in sources and claims to veracity. The conflicts we are confronting across so many spheres are exacerbated by misleading fictions and conspiracy theories masquerading as fact. Because biofictions employ invention in reimagining biographical lives, they might be misunderstood as undermining the importance of truth, or even fostering the legitimacy of neologisms such as post-truth, truthiness, or “alternative” facts. Yet, it is exactly the opposite. By examining critically the connection to factual realities and the distinct but equally significant responsibility to how we use fiction, biofictions offer potential antidotes against post-truth contagions. Ultimately, post-truth narratives manipulate facts to support convenient fictions, whereas biofictions, when done well, strive to use fiction to better comprehend the real. Possible topics might include (but are not limited to) biofictional works that: (*Please note! Examples of texts are simply illustrative and not intended by any means to be exhaustive. The possibilities are far too many and varied!)
    • Imaginatively recreate the biography of a political figure in ways that undermine official or popular rhetoric and the imposition of false mythologies (Mario Vargas Llosa’s The Feast of the Goat, Joyce Carol Oates’ Blonde, Antonio Muñoz Molina’s Like a Fading Shadow, Anchee Min’s Becoming Madame Mao e.g.)
    • Creatively give voice to overlooked, suppressed, silenced, or otherwise overlooked biographical figures (Colum McCann’s Transatlantic, Barbara Chase-Riboud’s Sally Hemings, J.M. Coetzee’s Foe, Maggie O’Farrell’s Hamnet and The Marriage Portrait e.g.)
    • Invite and explore metaphoric linkages between creatively re-imagined past lives and contemporary politico-historical and sociological contexts and power dynamics (Lauren Groff’s Matrix, Rosa Montero’s The Ridiculous Idea of Never Seeing You Again, Colm Tóibín’s The Magician, David Ebershoff’s The Danish Girl, Colum McCann’s Transatlantic e.g.)
    • Explore subjective, private truths that challenge the treatment of national and political myths, offering more nuanced understandings to the experiences of complicated historical moments and traumas (e.g. Colum McCann’s Apeirogon, Javier Cercas’ Soldiers of Salamis e.g.)
    • Decolonialize a dominant history of subjection, engaging with universal questions of powerlessness (Chika Unigwe’s The Black Messiah, J.M. Coetzee’s Foe, Hassan Najmi’s Gertude, Mario Vargas Llosa’s The Dream of the Celt e.g.)
    • Explore the susceptibility to invest in false and deceptive figures of power and belief (Javier Cercas’ The Imposter, Olga Tokarczuk’s The Books of Jacob, J.M. Coetzee’s The Master of Petersburg, e.g.)
    • Inventively explore how precursors of feminism speak critically to contemporary realities (Rosa Montero’s The Ridiculous Idea of Never Seeing You Again, Anna Banti’s Artemesia, Maggie O’Farrell’s The Marriage Portrait, e.g.)
    • May include anti-biopics that use fiction to engage speculatively with uncertainties around popular and political representations of public figures and others (I, Tonya, Neruda, e.g.)
    • Include more theoretical explorations regarding the contemporary boom in biofiction and the relationship to questions of truth, trust, political uncertainties and risks to our shared humanity
Submission Guidelines Please send expressions of interest and a brief proposal/abstract of @50 words by March 15, 2024. All Inquiries and essays should be sent to Jenny Rademacher at vrademacher@babson.edu. All submitted essays should have a relevant theoretical framework and participate in contemporary conversations within the field of auto/biography studies. Potential contributors may find it helpful to refer to back issues of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies prior to submitting their work for consideration. Completed essays are due July 31, 2024. Essays should be between 7,000-9,000 words in length, including notes and Works Cited. All essays should follow the a/b instructions for authors and style sheet, which can be found at:  https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=raut20 About the Editor: Jenny Rademacher is Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies and Chair of the Arts and Humanities Division at Babson College. She has published widely on genre, identity, and new narrative formats, including the contemporary surge in auto- and biofiction. Her book Derivative Lives: Biofiction, Uncertainty, and Speculative Riskin Contemporary Spanish Narrative (Bloomsbury, 2022) places the biographical novel within the wider context of contemporary thought, exploring the rich field of biofiction in relation to concepts of uncertainty, speculation, and risk in a post-truth age. She received her PhD in Spanish Literature from the University of Virginia, M.A. in International Affairs and Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and an A.B. from Harvard University. * American Women’s Mobility Narratives (proposed special session) Modern Language Association Convention, January 9-12 2025 New Orleans, USA deadline for submissions:  March 15, 2024 contact email: Nina.Bannett25@citytech.cuny.edu How is women’s mobility  exemplified through American women’s fiction, poetry, and memoir?  How do American women’s mobility narratives render women visible or invisible.  Please submit abstracts of approximately 250 words for this proposed special session of MLA 2025 in New Orleans. * CALL FOR PAPERS: LITERARY BIOGRAPHY DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: MARCH 15, 2024 I am pleased to share this call for papers for a guaranteed session of the European Regions Forum at the 2025 MLA Convention (New Orleans, 9-12 January 2025). Please submit proposals for papers that discuss either the practice of writing literary biography or current projects in literary biography in the context of Europe. Please send a 250-word abstract & brief biography by 15 March 2024 to Julia Elsky (jelsky@luc.edu). Julia Elsky, PhD Associate Professor of French Department of Modern Languages & Literatures Loyola University Chicago URL https://mla.confex.com/mla/2025/webprogrampreliminary/Paper26029.html *
Special Issue of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies Lives, Selves, Media and #MeToo: Anticipating Futures, Tracing Histories and Articulating the Present Call for Papers Abstracts due 4 March 2024 This issue explores #MeToo not as an isolated media flare, but as part of a wider social, cultural and historical matrix wherein auto/biographical modes and practices collide and connect with feminist resistance—as well as negotiate and impel its backlash. #MeToo crosses media borders, inviting scholars to consider how media shape and are shaped by political movements, and how transmedia forms a part of this story. Testimony is the dominant form of engagement with the #MeToo hashtag. Millions of tweets have offered testimony and asked for the public to bear witness as people who have long been silent about their experiences of sexual violence, most of them women, speak out on social media. That a feminist phenomenon occurring in the age of the selfie has been propelled by auto/biographical statements, is extremely online, and has “Me” at its centre is possibly unsurprising and legitimately—to scholars of life narrative, at least—fascinating. Me Too began in 2006 as a Black, feminist grassroots movement founded by activist Tarana Burke. The focus was local support for Black girls and women who had survived sexual violence, and Burke used Myspace to spread her message. The Twitter hashtag exploded in 2017 in social media ecosystem different from the 2006 Myspace era. The flood of mass digital testimony drew attention from news media, inspiring books, and breaking a long-held silence by exposing perpetrators of sexual violence, chiefly in the entertainment and media industry. Likewise, #MeToo spills over historical and national borders, and is embedded within broader discourses and histories of feminist activism and sexual violence. We want to explore what has alternately been called the ‘moment’ and the ‘movement’ of #MeToo/Me Too beyond the temporal location of the hashtag and phrase. What conditions, movements, stories, and texts came before #MeToo that benefit from re-examination (or refresh) in light of #MeToo? What conditions, movements, stories, and texts are emerging after #MeToo and might productively be linked to this significant phenomenon? And where might we imagine the future leads now? Have futures been opened up or closed off by #MeToo? What have we learned from the past that would benefit future feminist activism addressing sexual violence? This issue welcomes broad interpretations of “media” to think beyond the social media context and into print media, ephemera, sound and screen media, with a view to examining the significance of mediation (and media contexts) in testimony, auto/biographical practices, and feminist activism. Our suggestions for engaging with this theme include:
    • How media forms and networks (digital, print and beyond) have played a part in feminist resistance
    • Stories, reportage, memoir, and media before and/or after #MeToo
    • The violent rhythms of ‘progress’ and backlash, and how this pattern shapes the stories we tell about gender and violence
    • Backlash politics and social media
    • Hashtag activism
    • Testimony and media(tion)
    • The embeddedness of media in social and political life, relevant to gendered violence and feminist protest
    • Forms of protest and the evolution of protest in relation to gender and violence
    • Addressing the problems of #MeToo
    • Racism, sexism and other forms of ideological violence within activist movements
    • Testimony and feminist media history/feminist activism
    • Posthuman feminist pasts, presents and futures
    • Health humanities approaches to #MeToo
    • Mediating sexual trauma in the past and present
    • Mass testimony and collective trauma
    • Digital activism, policy, and structural change
    • Parallel phenomena (what is occurring parallel to #MeToo and how would we benefit from seeing ‘across’ media and political contexts?)
    • Memoir and other narratives of childhood trauma
    • Feminist resistance, gendered violence and celebrity culture
    • Teaching #MeToo
    • #MeToo futures
    • Memoir of the movement including Tarana Burke’s Unbound: My Story of Liberation and the Birth of the Me Too Movement
We are seeking 250-300 word abstracts for articles of up to 6000 words, and shorter creative or critical contributions of up to 1000 words. Please make clear in your abstract which format your proposal pertains to. Abstracts are due on 4 March 2024, and full papers will be due on 2 September 2024. Please submit abstracts via email to: kylie.cardell@flinders.edu.au and emma.maguire@jcu.edu.au We are also planning a collaborative workshop for potential contributors in July 2024, and details will follow for those whose full papers are requested. Editors The editorial team for this special issue is led by Kylie Cardell (Flinders University) and Emma Maguire (James Cook University). Please submit abstracts via email to: kylie.cardell@flinders.edu.au and emma.maguire@jcu.edu.au Emma Maguire BA(Hons), PhD Lecturer in English and Writing BA Coordinator BA First Year Coordinator College of Arts, Society & Education James Cook University, Australia Digital Content Editor, a/b: Auto/Biography Studies journal Steering Committee Member, International Auto/Biography Association Asia-Pacific Chapter (IABA-AP) Member: International Auto/Biography Association (IABA), Australasian Association of Writing Programs (AAWP), The Life Narrative Lab, Writers SA New article in Life Writing journal:  Field Culture in Unprecedented Times: Writing the Unexpected, Narrating the Future at a Virtual Conference New article in Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly: Shame, Trauma, and the Body After #MeToo: The Year in Australia New book chapter in Career Narratives and Academic Womanhood (ed. Lisa Ortiz-Vilarelle, Routledge 2023): Docile Bodies (of Work): Coaxing the Neoliberal Academic via the Online Researcher Profile * SUMMER CONFERENCE CALL FOR PAPERS: The Auto/Biography Study Group Summer Conference entitled ‘Disappointments and Dissonances’ will take place on 10th-12th July 2024 at Venue Reading, University of Reading. We are pleased to announce the call for papers/installations: https://britsoc.co.uk/events/key-bsa-events/bsa-autobiography-summer-conference-2024-disappointments-and-dissonances/. The abstract submission deadline is 4th March 2024 at 5pm. We welcome papers and presentations that respond to the concept of disappointments and dissonances substantively, theoretically, methodologically and creatively. This year, as last, we also welcome ‘installation pieces’ which might include a poster, creative artefact(s), a short video or other. The keynote will be given by Dr Karin Bacon, Marino, Institute of Education, An Associated College of Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin. Karin’s paper is entitled: ‘A Family Divided by Conflict Politics – disappointments and dissonances’. We invite abstract submissions (250 words) for 30/35-minute oral presentations followed by discussion and for installation pieces (there will be space in the programme for viewing and discussion of these). We are pleased to invite papers from across the broadest range of auto/biographical work, including ‘work-in-progress’ and those testing out innovative approaches, and welcome colleagues and friends from in and outside of the academy at all career stages. Please contact gayle.letherby@plymouth.ac.uk  and/or seerya@tcd.ie for further detail about the conference. The key dates leading up to the conference are as follows: •       Abstract submission deadline: 4th March at 5pm. •       Abstract notification and conference registration opens week beginning: 23rd March. •       Presenter booking deadline: 6th May. •       Delegate booking deadline: 3rd June. •       Conference: 10th-12th July. Registration includes ensuite accommodation and full board: BSA Member Registration: £450, Auto/Biography Study Group Member Registration: £460, Non-Member Registration: £490. SEMINARS: Registration is open for the final two seminars of this academic year. The links to join each event will be sent approximately 24 hours beforehand: Thursday 7th March 2024 at 1700-1800: Life as a fat female body: A feminist narrative inquiry with Iranian women by Somayeh McKian (Independent Academic): https://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/key-bsa-events/life-as-a-fat-female-body-a-feminist-narrative-inquiry-with-iranian-women-by-somayeh-mckian-independent-academic/ Wednesday 1st May 2024 at 1700-1800: Women’s spaces of knowledge: Lady Mary’s contribution to the Covid vaccine by Mich Page: https://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/key-bsa-events/women-s-spaces-of-knowledge-lady-mary-s-contribution-to-the-covid-vaccine/ DENNIS SMITH: Michael Erben recently received words of thanks from Dennis’ family in response to the letter expressing our condolences. They were particularly touched to know that he was held in such high regard by the group. This is a tribute page for your information: https://dennis-smith-1945-2024.muchloved.com/.. The family are collecting for Cruse Bereavement Support. AUTO/BIOGRAPHY STUDY GROUP MEMBERSHIP: In advance of the conference registration opening we thought it would be valuable to remind everyone about the benefits of joining the group. ‘Join us’ information is available here: https://www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/autobiography-study-group/join-us/. As a paid member of the Auto/Biography Study Group you will benefit from reductions on conference costs and publications, free publication in the group’s open access online journal (non-members pay £30 per submission) and a free seminar series. You will also be registered on the JISCmail list: https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A0=BSA-AUTO-BIOGRAPHY-GROUP. The annual payment categories for the 2024 calendar year are £30 for members of the BSA and £40 for non-members. Payment may be made via PayPal by logging in or by debit/credit card and choosing to pay as a guest: https://www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/autobiography-study-group/autobiography-membership/. We are a charity and non-profit group and all proceeds from group subscriptions help to fund our publications and group events. Have a good week. Best wishes Anne Chappell and Carly Stewart Auto/Biography Study Group Convenors Email: anne.chappell@brunel.ac.uk and cstewart@bournemouth.ac.uk Find the Auto/Biography Study Group: https://www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/autobiography-study-group/ Find the Auto/Biography Study Group on X: @AutoBiographySG Join the Auto/Biography Study Group: https://www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/study-groups/autobiography-study-group/join-us/ *

CFP: Historiography and Hagiography in Buddhism and Beyond

July 8-10, 2024 Cambridge University, United Kingdom Deadline for Submissions: February 23, 2024 This international conference aims to bring together scholars working on practices of record-keeping, historiography, and hagiography in the Buddhist tradition and in related cultural fields. Recent years saw a steadily-growing interest in the impact of Buddhism on historiography and hagiography, in tandem with an unprecedented increase in the availability of textual and visual primary sources. Ambitious digitization projects (especially of premodern sources) and the changing landscape of the digital realm offer new opportunities to study premodern and contemporary practices of writing and narration. In this three-days conference, we seek to foster an interdisciplinary discussion on practices of textual and visual recording, storytelling, and memory in Chinese Buddhism and beyond – past, present, and future. This conference is generously sponsored by the Tzu Chi Foundation (慈濟) and hosted by the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Cambridge. The conference will take place at the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, United Kingdom, on 8-10 July 2024 (08/07/2024-10/07/2024). Accommodation and meals will be provided for the duration of the conference. Travel expenses to Cambridge will be covered for conference presenters (please contact organizers for further details). We welcome proposals for papers on topics relating to historiography, hagiography, and narration, including but not limited to:
    • Buddhist historiography and record-keeping
    • Historiography and record-keeping in other Chinese religious traditions
    • Narrating lives of extraordinary individuals (e.g. biographies, autobiographies, hagiographies) in textual, oral, visual, and material forms
    • The intersection of Buddhism and literature
    • Book culture and production of texts in the Buddhist tradition (e.g. in print culture, manuscript culture, publishing practices, patronage of textual production, production of temple gazetteers and mountain gazetteers etc.)
    • Uses of visual arts and the performance arts in creating or supporting Buddhist historiography and hagiography
Proposals for papers should include the following information:
    1. Name, affiliation, and title of position at the affiliated institution (independent scholars are also welcome to apply; please note “independent scholar” in your proposal if relevant)
    1. 250 word abstract
    1. Contact information: email, address, and phone number(s)

The deadline for all proposals is Friday, February 23rd, 2024 (23/02/2024). Proposals should be sent as either Word or PDF to the following email address: hist.hagio@gmail.com For general information and logistical questions, please email the organizing committee at: hist.hagio@gmail.com Regarding the conference, please contact the primary organizer, Dr Noga Ganany at ng462@cam.ac.uk. *Proposals must be submitted in English.

Contact Email hist.hagio@gmail.com * CALL FOR PAPERS Palgrave Handbook of Disability in Comics and Graphic Narratives deadline for submissions:  February 28, 2024 We invite abstracts for articles to be published in a collection showcasing scholarly research related to disability in comics and graphic narratives. This edited volume will highlight insights from both disability studies as well as comics studies. Centering a disability justice ethos, we especially welcome: submissions by disabled authors/creators; collaborative submissions; work that engages with disability life writing and/or disclosure; work that addresses accommodations and accessibility as they relate to comics pedagogy, form, and/or readership. The collection envisions a diverse selection of contributors (i.e. a mix of early, mid-, and established scholars from the humanities, comics studies, and disability studies; disability activists; comics creators; comics journalists; and so on) that represent a range of perspectives, methodologies, and communities across the globe. The contents of the collection may be likewise diverse, including essays by individual and collaborative authors, interviews, and/or creative work. Essays in all languages are welcome (to be published in translation). We encourage examinations of mainstream titles and characters, independent comics, as well as considerations of the ways disability shapes comics form in creative ways. We are especially interested in contributions that explore additional intersections of race, class, sexuality, and gender; and works that challenge ableism in comics theory and/or challenge comics’ ocularcentrism. We especially welcome essays on potential themes and keywords such as:
    • Accessibility
    • Activism
    • Archive
    • Autobiography
    • Coloniality
    • Disability Justice
    • Disability as Method
    • Genre(s)
    • Intersectionality
    • Mental Health/Illness
    • Monstrosity/grotesque
    • Multiculturalism
    • Neurodivergence
    • Pedagogy
    • Sexuality
    • Sound
    • Superheroes and supervillains
    • Touch
    • Transnationalism
    • Vision
We welcome inquiries by email. Please submit 250-300 word abstracts and 50-word bios by February 28th, 2024. After reviewing submissions, the editors will select contributors and then submit a proposal for publication by Palgrave. Final essays will be approximately 5,000-10,000 words depending on the topic. We also welcome submissions of scholarship in comics formats between 10 and 20 pages. For questions, or to submit a proposal, contact keyword.disability.comics@gmail.com * The Empire and I: Individuals in Empires and Postimperial Spaces – 3rd Annual Conference of the RTG 2571 Empires Freiberg, Germany November 28–30, 2024 Deadline for Submissions: February 29, 2024 Analysing the relations between individuals and empires has a long tradition in historiography: from the biographies of “great men” to more recent approaches such as “imperial biographies” and “imperial subjects”. And while the first has rightly been criticised in the past, the latter have shown that there is significant analytical value in studying individuals even when trying to understand macro-phenomena such as empires. As individuals can function as the smallest analytical units for exploring of broader historical developments, focusing on them can shed light on more general political, economic, and social dynamics. Retracing the activities of individuals, therefore, can be used to analyse the factors that shaped living conditions within imperial and postimperial spaces. This approach also opens up new perspectives on the agency of individuals and the strategies they could and did use to thrive and persist within or resist imperial environments. Focusing on individuals also offers possibilities to grasp their influence on empires. Individual actors impacted the way empires evolved, for instance by making use of imperial structures or policies for their own gains. Moreover, the ways individuals thought, spoke, and wrote about imperial environments illustrate how empires are perceived and conceptualised to this day. The relationships between empire and individual can therefore be approached not just through historiography but through a multitude of disciplines and for different time periods and regions. The third annual conference of the RTG 2571 “Empires” likewise aims to examine the relations between individuals and empires from different perspectives. We welcome contributions from all the humanities and social sciences as well as hybrid sciences. We especially encourage scholars in the early stages of their careers (PhD & Postdocs) to submit proposals. Interested applicants are invited to send a working title, an abstract (c. 400 words) for a presentation of 20 minutes and a short CV (no more than two pages) to the mentioned mail adress by February 29th 2024. Any further queries can be directed to the same address. Accommodation in Freiburg will be organised and covered by the RTG “Empires”. We will also reimburse presenters for their travel expenses. Contact Information Aaron Zidar Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg DFG Graduiertenkolleg 2571 „Imperien” Platz der Universität 3 79085 Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany) Contact Email conference-empires@grk2571.uni-freiburg.de URL https://www.grk2571.uni-freiburg.de/events/conferences/annual-conference-2024?s… * CALL FOR PAPERS International Conference on “Diverse Lives: Narratives of Śākyamuni Buddha in Text and Image” October 16–19, 2024 Conference Location: Royal Museum of Mariemont, Belgium Deadline for Submissions: February 29, 2024 The founding figure of Buddhism, Śākyamuni Buddha, has played an enormously important role for South and East Asian – and more recently also Western – cultures and societies. However, there is no authoritative biographic account which would be accepted by the multitude of Buddhist traditions. On the contrary, the stories concerning Śākyamuni’s life are as diverse as the doctrinal and rituals systems found in the various regions and schools of Asian Buddhism. In this context of the lack of cross-regionally and inter-sectarian accepted textual and visual sources, even key events of Buddha’s life have undergone countless interpretations in textual and visual media in the course of Buddhism’s geographical spread and doctrinal diversification. Some of the influential hagiographical accounts of Buddha’s life, such as the Sanskrit Buddhacarita and the Lalitavistara and their renderings in other languages, have attracted the attention of numerous scholars, whereas many lesser-known narratives have remained understudied. The main goal of this conference is thus to gather scholars and discuss unusual variations and interpretations of Buddha’s life stories found in textual and visual materials. The narratives concerning Buddha’s life will be approached from an interdisciplinary perspective, including religious studies, philological and literary studies, archaeology, and art history, to name a few. We invite speakers to present studies which for example focus on geographically localized adaptations of Buddha’s life – both based on visual and textual sources; variations we find in the texts and manuscripts composed in the various languages along the Silk Road and beyond; hybrid accounts of Buddha’s life which incorporate elements drawn from other traditions or cultural contexts; the way Buddha’s life is interpreted in contemporary media; as well as Western interpretations of Buddha’s life stories. There are no limitations concerning the temporal or geographical framework. The International in-person conference is scheduled for 16-19 October 2024 at the Royal Museum of Mariemont, Belgium. This event is organised, in collaboration with the Ghent Centre for Buddhist Studies of Ghent University, at the occasion of the exhibition “Buddha. Experiencing the Sensible” (September 21st, 2024 – April 20th, 2025). Interested participants should submit a 300-word proposal and a short biography (maximum 200 words) as a single Word document to Buddha2024@musee-mariemont.be by February 29th, 2024. The language of presentation will be English. Selected speakers will be notified by the end of March 2024. Transport to and from hotels nearby the conference venue will be provided by the organising institutions. Keynote speaker:  Bernard Faure, Director of the Center for Buddhism and East Asian Religions, Columbia University, Kao Professor of Japanese Religion, Columbia University, Emeritus Professor of Religious Studies, Stanford University Conference organisers: Ann Heirman, Head of the Department of Languages and Cultures, Professor of Chinese Language and Culture, Director of the Ghent Centre for Buddhist Studies, Ghent University Christoph Anderl, Professor of Chinese Language and Culture, Department of Languages and Cultures, Ghent University Lyce Jankowski, Curator of extra-European Art, Domain & Royal Museum of Mariemont Max Deeg, Professor in Buddhist Studies, Cardiff University Neil Schmid, Research Professor, Dunhuang Research Academy * Storytelling as Pedagogy: Historical Biographies in STEM and Social Studies Cain Conference, Science History Institute 7/15-16/2024 Philadelphia USA Deadline for Submissions: February 29, 2024 This Cain Conference will bring together scholars and practitioners of science education and public communication to explore how sharing stories of diverse scientists can help young girls and people of color see themselves as valuable contributors to science, historically and in the future. Organized by Cain Conference Fellow Sibrina Collins, the conference will take place at the Science History Institute in Philadelphia, PA on July 15 – July 16, 2024. Connecting with people is at the heart of storytelling. Studies have shown that sharing a compelling story about someone who has made a new contribution, tool, or discovery may inspire a student to pursue their own career in a STEM field.[i] We invite proposals for presentations or panels that focus on writing, adapting, and teaching with historical scientific biographies and narratives in the context of different formats including:
    • Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CURE)
    • Discussion and/or laboratory courses in K-12 and higher education
    • Large Lecture Courses (incl. flipped classroom formats)
    • Asynchronous online courses and multimedia production
    • Public Learning Environments (incl. churches, museums, and libraries)
We welcome proposals from educators, scholars, historians and biographers, editors and publishers, collections professionals, and others with a professional interest in the use of historical biographies in education. Interested applicants should submit an abstract of no more than 300 words and brief autobiographical sketch (50-100 words) by February 29, 2024. Questions and submissions should be sent to biographies@sciencehistory.org. For updates, please see our conference web page at https://www.sciencehistory.org/visit/events/gordon-cain-conference-2024/ [i] Collins, S.N. The importance of storytelling in chemical education. Nat. Chem. 13, 1–2 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41557-020-00617-7 * Deadline for Submissions: March 1, 2024 CFP – Writers of Extreme Situations: A Multidisciplinary Perspective (3/1/2024; 4/16-18/2024) 58th Comp. World Lit. Conf., California USA Venue: California State University, Long Beach. Hybrid Dates: Tuesday and Wednesday, April 16-17 (in-person presentations only with Zoom projections), Thursday, April 18, 2024 (Zoom presentations only) Plenary Speaker: Christopher Goffard, author and senior staff writer, Los Angeles Times Family crises, exilic conditions, forced migrations, excessive poverty, armed conflicts, political warfare, environmental calamities, workers’ exploitation, pandemics, and all manner of natural or man-made disasters have been rising to unprecedented levels over the last decades. How are extreme situations or situations so extraordinary as to defy imagination represented? What are the poetics underlying them? We welcome conversations about how extreme conditions and situations, (individual, collective, or global) are expressed, analyzed, and engaged from a multidisciplinary perspective, including but not limited to:  Literature, Journalism, Geography, Anthropology, Political Science, Criminology, Linguistics, Ethnic Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Disability Studies, Media Studies, Geology, Human Development, and more. This conference invites paper and panel proposals on all aspects of extreme situations. Possible topics can include but are not limited to: -Literature of extreme situations -Investigative Journalism -Trauma literature -Literatures of genocide -Holocaust memoirs -Feats of survival -Crime narratives -Narratives of addiction -Natural and man-made disasters -Innocent Project LA -Victims speak up: truth to power -The rise against femicide -Wars and exilic narratives -Refugee narratives -Pandemic narratives -Medical malpractice and botched surgeries -Ethics of survival and survivors’ guilt -The Family Secret and the wounded individual -Dementia and violence: nursing homes -Perpetrators and victims -Asylum seekers and their fate in the US -Ethical ordeals: surviving the unimaginable -Memory as a repository of horror -Collapse of ethical systems in a digital world -Institutional responses to catastrophes -Crossing the Mediterranean: the Syrian refugee crisis -Extreme geo-political conflicts -Journalism at work: covering extreme conditions -“The Banality of Evil” in urban settings. -State terrorism and extreme-isms -Millennial fatigue and extremist stances -Monuments of shame -The Kafkaesque in our daily lives -Systemic risks in the 21st Century -Extreme environments -Soft White Underbelly: Mark Laita interviews –The Trials of Frank Carson Podcast (Christopher Goffard) -Deaths in the Grand Canyon and Other National Parks. We are thrilled to announce that the plenary talk will be delivered by Christopher Goffard, Pulitzer Prize winner, journalist for the LA Times, novelist and podcaster, on Wednesday, April 17th, at 2PM (PDT). The title of his talk is: “Crossing the Impossible Bridge in a Dynamite Truck: Observations on Film, Friendship and Collaboration” In “Crossing the Impossible Bridge in a Dynamite Truck,” Goffard will reflect on his friendship and collaboration with one of cinema’s great poets of desperation and obsession, William Friedkin, and of their efforts to bring some of Goffard’s riskier stories to the screen. As a crystallization of Friedkin’s danger-courting artistry—and as a metaphor for their quest to get controversial projects made— Goffard invokes an image from the filmmaker’s 1977 masterpiece Sorcerer, in which a truck laden with nitroglycerin attempts to cross a crumbling suspension bridge in the South American jungle. Submissions for individual presentations and 90-minute sessions are welcome from all disciplines and global / historical contexts that engage with historical, personal, or social instances of extreme conditions and situations. Proposals for 15-20 minute presentations should clearly explain the relationship of the paper to the conference theme, describe the evidence to be examined, and offer tentative conclusions. Abstracts of no more than 300 words (not including optional bibliography) should be submitted by March 1, 2024. Please submit abstracts as a Word document in an email attachment to comparativeworldliterature@gmail.com NB: Please do not embed proposals in the text of the email. Make sure to indicate your mode of preference (Zoom on April 18 and in person only on April 16 and 17) for planning purposes While the conference will be hybrid, all Zoom presentations will take place only on Thursday, April 18, and in-person presentations will take place on Tuesday-Wednesday, April 16-17 (and will be Zoom-projected). We cannot accommodate pre-recorded presentations. The conference committee will review all proposals, with accepted papers receiving notification by March 15, 2024. Contact Information Dr. Kathryn Chew Contact Email comparativeworldliterature@gmail.com URL https://cla.csulb.edu/departments/complit/current-conference/ * Registration for IABA World 2024 is now open! The conference will run from 9 am 12 June to 3 pm 15 June 2024. A detailed programme will be available in due course. The fees are as follows: Early Bird (includes access to all sessions, conference materials, coffees, lunches, reception) to 1 March: 34.000 IKR (approx. 230 EUR/250 USD) Full Price after 1 March:  42.000 IKR (approx. 280 EUR/310 USD) PhD Students and PostDocs (includes access to all sessions, conference materials, coffees, lunches, reception, dinner) 27.000 IKR (approx. 180 EUR/200 USD) For more information see: https://iabaworld2024.hi.is/ Please direct all queries to iabaworld2024@gmail.com * Call for Papers—Edited Volume Mothers, Mothering and Trauma/Intergenerational Trauma Edited by Lamees Al Ethari, PhD and Maria D. Lombard, PhD Deadline for Submissions. March 1, 2024: 250–400-word abstract This edited volume on motherhood and trauma builds on Marianne Hirsch’s concept of postmemory, which states that the “generation after” [will] “grow up dominated by narratives that preceded their birth, whose own belated stories are evacuated by the stories of the previous generation shaped by traumatic events that can neither be understood nor recreated” (Hirsch 22). This volume will attempt to capture some of those very narratives and belated stories that Hirsch refers to in her rendering of the concept of postmemory, especially within the context of displaced motherhood. The chapters that this volume seeks to collect can be scholarly, creative, or visual. In the narratives chosen for this study, relational ties and generational story-telling/story-building are crucial in the construction of self-identity as they establish a sense of history and belonging for the new(er) generations. On one hand they present a personal narrative, while on the other, a communal narrative in which the experiences of a people is brought to light. While historical frameworks or references may be useful as context, the collection aims to examine experiences shaped by contemporary concepts of motherhood and disconnected/de-fragmented motherhood impacted by displacement and trauma. Areas and stories examined can be from the perspective of the mother, the mother/child relationship, the mother/society dynamic, etc. The editors are particularly interested in submissions that contextualize how Hirsch’s concept of postmemory is reflected in their work. Possible topics might look critically at (but are not limited to) generational experiences of trauma and displacement in relation to:
    •  race, culture, class, and sexuality
    • narratives about or by migrant and/ or refugee mothers
    • rhetorics of refugee/displaced motherhood
    • politics and policy on the refugee family
    • family separation, family resettlement
    • refugee children’s literature and the mother figure
    • narratives or research on adoptive mothers, reproductive health care (access to ultrasounds, pre/post-natal care, family planning, etc.)
    • activism and community action/re-action
    • communication, social media, and telling motherhood stories online
Hirsch, Marianne. Family Frames: Photography, Narrative and Postmemory. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1997. Timeline for CFP March 1, 2024: Submission of 250-400 word abstract of your chapter and a 50-word bio. April 1, 2024: Acceptance notifications will be sent to contributors. 15 August 2024: Accepted and complete chapters due (6,000 words maximum with MLA format and references) Submissions and questions should be sent to: Dr. Lamees Al Ethari lalehari@uwaterloo.ca Dr. Maria Lombard maria.lombard@northwestern.edu Editor Bios Lamees Al Ethari, PhD Lamees Al Ethari holds a PhD from the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Waterloo, where she has been teaching creative writing and literature since 2015. She is a nonfiction editor with The New Quarterly and a co-founder for The X Page: AStorytelling Workshop for Immigrant Women. She is in the process of completing an autoethnographic monograph titled, Patterns of Telling: Women’s Autobiography in theDiaspora, which is a critical exploration of women’s narratives of displacement. She has published, From the Wounded Banks of the Tigris (2018) and Waiting for the Rain: An IraqiMemoir (2019), in which she reflects on her experiences of the 2003 American invasion of Iraq, the violent aftermath, and her migration from home. Her poems have appeared in About PlaceJournal, The New Quarterly, The Malpais Review, and the anthology Al Mutanabbi Street StartsHere. Maria D. Lombard, PhD Maria Lombard is the assistant dean for academic affairs at Northwestern University in Qatar. Her research focuses on writing studies, with interests in second-language writing pedagogy, minority and gendered voices, and travel writing. Her scholarly publications include refereed articles and proceedings, as well as book chapters, on belonging, displacement, and motherhood. Her recent edited volume, Reclaiming Migrant Motherhood: Identity, Belonging, andDisplacement in a Global Context (Lexington Books, 2022) examines the representations and lived experiences of migrant, refugee, and otherwise displaced mothers in literature, film, and original ethnographic research. *

 W. G. Sebald at 80: A (Critical) Celebration of Life and Works

Conference Date: Saturday, May 18, 2024 (ON ZOOM) Deadline for Submissions: March 1, 2024  This conference invites graduate students and beyond, including lecturers and independent scholars, to join in a critical celebration of the works of the unique Anglo-German author W. G. Sebald (1944-2001). Hailed by legendary critic Susan Sontag in a 2000 essay published in Times Literary Supplement, she asked whether “literary greatness [was] still possible” and concluded “one of the few answers available to English-language readers is the work of W. G. Sebald.” Several journal articles, book chapters, and collections have been published about this eccentric author (see the bibliography below), and yet, he remains largely unknown to Western audiences. This conference hopes to bring scholars out of the woodworks and contribute their thoughts and ideas about Sebald and any of his various works, including his essays, i.e., On the Natural History of Destruction, and literary prose, i.e., After NatureVertigoThe EmigrantsThe Rings of Saturn, and Austerlitz. There is no one guiding theme under which to produce critical evaluations of Sebald’s texts. Instead, given the eclecticism of Sebald’s subject matter, diverse approaches are encouraged, including, but not limited to: Postcoloniality Orientalism Gender and Sexuality Bio- and necropolitics Trauma Archive Gothic Ecocriticism Spatiality Temporality Narratology Genre Animal Studies Historiography Religion Rhetoric Thing Theory Photography Frankfurt School Psychoanalysis Thanatourism Translation Please submit a 200-250 word abstract, along with a brief biographical statement and your time zone in order to best approximate appropriate times for presentations, to wgsebald80conference@gmail.com. Full papers should aim to be 10-15 minutes in length. The conference will be held online over Zoom at no charge and, depending on the amount of submissions, may roll over into two days – for now, it is tentatively scheduled on what would have been the author’s 80th birthday (May 18, 1944). (Zoom link will be sent out a week before the conference). Also, select papers will be solicited to be compiled in an edited collection on the works of W. G. Sebald. Details to come. Bibliography Angier, Carole. Speak, Silence: In Search of W. G. Sebald. Bloomsbury Circus, 2021. Burns, Rob, and Wilfried van der Will. “The calamitous perspective of modernity: Sebald’s negative ontology.” Journal of European Studies, vol. 41, no. ¾, 2011, pp. 341-358. DOI: 10.1177/0047244111413700 Fischer, Gerhard, editor. W.G. Sebald: Schreiben ex patria/ Expatriate Writing. Rodopi, 2009. Groves, Jason. “Writing after Nature: A Sebaldian Ecopoetics.” German Ecocriticism in the Anthropocene, edited by Caroline Schaumann and Heather I. Sullivan, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, pp. 267-292. Johannsen, Anja K. “‘The contrarieties that are our yearnings’: Allegorical, nostalgic and transcendent spaces in the work of W. G. Sebald.” Journal of European Studies, vol. 41, no. ¾, 2011, pp. 377-393. DOI: 10.1177/0047244111413704 Long, J. J., and Anne Fuchs, editors. W. G. Sebald and the Writing of History. Königshausen & Neumann, 2007. Long, J. J., and Anne Whitehead, editors. W. G. Sebald – A Critical Companion. U of Washington P, 2004. McCulloh, Mark Richard. Understanding W. G. Sebald. University of South Carolina Press, 2003. McCulloch, Mark, and Scott Denham, editors. W. G. Sebald: History – Memory – Trauma. De Gruyter, Inc., 2006. Schwarz, Lyn Sharon, editor. the emergence of memory: Conversations with W. G. Sebald. Seven Stories Press, 2007. Silverblatt, Michael. “A Poem of an Invisible Subject.” the emergence of memory: Conversations with W. G. Sebald, edited by Lyn Sharon Schwarz, Seven Stories Press, 2007, pp. 76-86. Wolff, Lynn L. W. G. Sebald’s Hybrid Poetics: Literature as Historiography. De Gruyter, 2014. Zisselsberger, Markus, editor. The Undiscover’d Country: W. G. Sebald and the poetics of travel. Camden House, 2010. *

 “Narrating Lives” International Conference on Storytelling, (Auto)Biography and (Auto)Ethnography

Rome, Italy and Online, 5/31-6/2/2024

https://life-history.lcir.co.uk/

Deadline for Submissions: March 1, 2024 London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research Life-history approach occupies the central place in conducting and producing  (auto)biographical and (auto)ethnographic studies through the understanding of self, other, and culture. We construct and develop conceptions and practices by engaging with memory through narrative, in order to negotiate ambivalences and uncertainties of the world and to represent (often traumatic) experiences. The “Narrating Lives” conference will focus on reading and interpreting (auto)biographical texts and methods across the humanities, social sciences, and visual and performing arts. It will analyse theoretical and practical approaches to life writing and the components of (auto)biographical acts, including memory, experience, identity, embodiment, space, and agency. We will attempt to identify key concerns and considerations that led to the development of the methods and to outline the purposes and ethics of (auto)biographical and (auto)ethnographic research. We aim to explore a variety of techniques for gathering data on the self-from diaries to interviews to social media and to promote understanding of multicultural others, qualitative inquiry, and narrative writing. Conference panels will be related, but not limited, to:
    • Life Narrative in Historical Perspective
    • Qualitative Research Methods
    • Oral History, Memory and Written Tradition
    • Journalism and Literary Studies
    • Creative Writing and Performing Arts
    • (Auto)Biographical Element in Film Studies, Media and Communication
    • Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy
    • Narrative Medicine
    • Storytelling in Education
    • Ethics and Politics of Research
Submissions may be proposed in various formats, including:
    • Individually submitted papers (organised into panels by the committee)
    • Panels (3-4 individual papers)
    • Posters
Proposals should be sent to: life-history@lcir.co.uk. * BIO’s Hazel Rowley Prize for First-Time Biographers Sponsored by the Biographers International Organization (BIO), the Hazel Rowley Prize offers $5,000 for the best book proposal from a first-time biographer, plus a careful reading by an established agent. Submissions due March 1. Guidelines and entry forms are available on the BIO website: https://biographersinternational.org/award/hazel-rowley-prize/ Contact Information Michael Gately, Executive Director, BIO Contact Email execdirector@biographersinternational.org URL

rnational.org/award/hazel-rowley-prize/

* Call for Papers, Political Biofictions (2/18/2024; 1/9-12/2025) MLA New Orleans USA Alexandre Gefen (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CRNS) and Virginia Newhall Rademacher (Babson College) seek 1 to 2 additional panelists for the seminar, Political Biofictions at MLA 2025. MLA 2025 will be held January 9-12 in New Orleans, LA. Political Biofictions  Biofictions consciously reference historical subjects as their protagonists and then open those life narratives to imaginative possibility. By constituting thresholds between the situated realities of actual, biographical subjects and the imaginative potential of fictional creation, biofictions liberate fiction from interacting only with invented worlds. Instead, these works invite us to experiment with our biographical lives and to use fiction to evaluate and shape real-world concerns. The 2025 MLA Annual Convention theme of visibility is the perfect context for this session on Political Biofictions, especially in light of the crises and conflicts we face across the globe. Emma Donoghue has referred to biofiction as “voicing the nobodies.” Colum McCann has referred to the “contested realities” and obscured truths that writers of biofiction try to reveal – the effort to challenge and interrogate claims to truth and what we can trust. By imaginatively making visible voices and meanings that power has so often obscured, biofictions are inherently political spaces that defy dominant, authoritarian modes of determining the world. We invite diverse approaches, from more pointedly political critiques (Mario Vargas Llosa’s The Feast of the Goat, Joyce Carol Oates’ Blonde, Antonio Muñoz Molina’s Like a Fading Shadow, Colum McCann’s Apeirogon, Anchee Min’sBecoming Madame Mao) to morewide-ranging cultural critiques (Maggie O’Farrell’s The Marriage Portrait, Colm Toíbín’s  The Magician, Lauren Groff’s Matrix, Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace, e.g.) as just a very few examples. If interested, please contact Professor Jenny Rademacher at vrademacher@babson.edu with a brief (one paragraph) proposal by Sunday February 18. Virginia Newhall Rademacher, PhD Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies Chair, Arts and Humanities Division Babson College Babson Park, MA 02457 vrademacher@babson.edu WebEx personal room: https://babson.webex.com/meet/vrademacher Author Page: Derivative Lives (Bloomsbury, 2022) *

4 PhD Positions “The Aggressor: Self-Perception and External Perception of an Actor Between Nations” (Heidelberg or Bochum, Germany)

Deadline for Applications: February 18, 2024 Heidelberg University (Department of History) and the Ruhr University Bochum (Faculty of History) invite applications for up to four PhD positions within the framework of the international research project “The Aggressor: Self-Perception and External Perception of an Actor Between Nations” (sponsored by the Daimler and Benz Foundation) to start in spring 2024 and to be hosted by either of the two institutions. The interdisciplinary project, headed by Prof. Dr. Thomas Maissen (Heidelberg University), investigates the identity-forming construction of national enemy images across Europe, which are shaped by aggressors from neighboring countries. The project examines the dynamics of personalization of such enemy imagery, with special attention to concrete historical figures. As ideal types or social figures, they represent hostile groups in collective memory. It comparatively researches and systematizes the perception and interpretation of concrete enemies as aggressors based on historical case studies, focusing on their discursive construction and changing significance in the politics of memory. A detailed description of the project can be found at: https://www.uni-heidelberg.de/fakultaeten/philosophie/zegk/histsem/forschung/project_aggressor_en.html Your tasks:
    • Conceptualization and execution of a doctoral project in German or English over the course of three years, pending an evaluation after the first year
    • Active participation in the further development of the broader project and in its events such as graduate seminars and workshops
Your profile:
    • Above-average degree (Master’s or equivalent) at the time of taking the position
    • Excellent doctoral project proposal
    • Good knowledge of German or English; other language skills are welcome
We offer:
    • A three-year (1+2) fixed-term contract at Heidelberg University or the Ruhr University Bochum
    • Coordinated supervision of the doctoral project by several members of the project team
    • Integration into an international interdisciplinary network of leading scholars from multiple established European research institutions
    • Highly motivating research environment in a strong academic team
    • Participation in international conferences and opportunities for publication of own research results
    • The chance to design exciting projects in the field of Public History
    • Salary based on the collective bargaining agreement of the German federal states (TV-L E13, 65%)
The doctoral project can be freely formulated within the framework of the above-mentioned description. For dissertations with a relevant topic that have already progressed, final funding with a shorter duration is conceivable. For questions regarding the content of the job profile, please contact Prof. Dr. Thomas Maissen (thomas.maissen@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de). Applications in German or English should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, certificates, proof of language skills and professional experience (if applicable), two short academic letters of reference, and an outline of the doctoral project with details on the desired supervision and host university (max. 20,000 characters including spaces and bibliography) and should be sent as a single PDF file to:  aggressorprojekt@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de. The deadline is February 18, 2024. The interviews are expected to take place online on March 1, 2024. The participating institutions stand for equal opportunities and diversity. Qualified female candidates are especially invited to apply. Persons with severe disabilities will be given preference if they are equally qualified. Information on job advertisements and the collection of personal data is available at www.uni-heidelberg.de/en/job-market Contact Information Prof. Dr. Thomas Maissen, Department of History, Heidelberg University, Grabengasse 3-5, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany Contact Email thomas.maissen@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de URL e/fakultaeten/philosophie/zegk/histsem/forschung/pr… * Exploring Historical War Experiences through Digital Sources and Methodologies Workshop 23–24 May 2024 Tampere University, Finland Deadline for Applications: February 12, 20204 Historians have increasingly striven to understand war from the standpoint of human experience in recent decades. The emotional, psychological, and deeply traumatic experiences of people caught up in violence have become focal points of historical research, particularly concerning conflicts like the World Wars of the 20th century. This workshop discusses the study of war experiences through digital sources and methods. War experiences have been analyzed most often by closely examining the fates of individual people and their ego-documents like letters, diaries, and poems, but digitalization has opened possibilities to explore war from a broader perspective. The digitization of archives has made it easier to access millions of wartime publications, such as newspapers and parliamentary records, now only a few clicks away. Additionally, recent advancements in handwritten text recognition are making historical ego-documents, such as letters, digitally accessible. Transforming documents into data broadens the scope of research from traditional close reading to text-mining methods and creates new opportunities to present war on digital and visual platforms. What are the implications of digitalization for the study of war experiences? Are individual experiences at risk of being neglected in digital, data-driven research? Or can digitalization offer historians new ways to tell stories and convey experiences of war? It is important to emphasize that experiences should not be understood only as narratives of, or written by, individual people. Experience can also be understood more broadly as a mediating sphere between the macro and micro levels where different impulses (personal, social, cultural, and political) merge to form meanings, concepts, actions, and practices. We invite submissions of individual papers and panel discussions that present and analyze cases of historical study of war experiences through digital sources and methodologies. The topics can include, but are not limited to:
    • The concept of experience in digital history
    • Source critical reflection on ego-documents, testimonies, and narrative in the digital realm
    • The role of individual people in digital history
    • Mining war experiences and emotions
    • Silence and trauma in digital data
    • Representing war experiences through numerical data and visualizations
Submission guidelines Please send an abstract of 300 words and a short biography including your name and affiliation to ilari.taskinen@tuni.fi by Monday 12 February 2024. Notification of acceptance will be sent by 29 February 2024. The workshop takes place at Tampere University, Finland on 23–24 May 2024. The workshop is free for selected participants and provides lunch, coffee, and dinner. The organizers can help to cover travel and accommodation expenses for those without their own funding. Please indicate if you need assistance when submitting. Organizers Project: Digital History and Handwritten Sources (DIGIKÄKI) The Research Council of Finland’s Centre of Excellence in the History of Experiences (HEX) Contact Information Ilari Taskinen (Tampere University) Contact Email ilari.taskinen@tuni.fi URL https://research.tuni.fi/hex/event/call-for-papers-exploring-historical-war-exp… * Call for Papers Janet Frame at 100, special issue of The Journal of Commonwealth Literature Deadline for abstracts: 15th February 2024  The events of Janet Frame’s remarkable life – thanks in part to the success of her three-volume autobiography – have long overshadowed critical discussions and readings of her wider oeuvre, which includes a range of life narratives, novels, short stories, and poetry. On the hundredth anniversary of her birth, this special issue establishes new understandings of Frame’s work in and for the twenty-first century. Working to establish Frame as a key figure in modern Anglophone literature, this centenary issue scrutinises her experimental approach to literary forms, styles, genres, political orientations, and more. Co-edited by Andrew Dean (Deakin University, AUS), Emma Parker (University of Bristol, UK), and Nicholas Wright (University of Canterbury NZ) this issue solicits articles (7000-7500 words) which discuss Frame’s writing and themes such as:
    • Late modernist literature
    • Experimentations with literary form (metafiction; autofiction; satire; the bildungsroman)
    • Aotearoa New Zealand, postcolonial, or late colonial literatures
    • Records of violence/institutions/imperialism
    • Nationalism, both political and cultural
    • Disability and illness
    • The southern hemisphere
    • Eco-critical readings (oceanic imaginaries, environmental disasters)
    • Adaptations for the screen and stage
    • Translation and literary reception
    • Teaching: reflections on classroom experience and/or pedagogy
    • Posthumous publications and literary afterlives
Deadline for submission of abstracts, 15th February 2024, to emma.parker@bristol.ac.uk, andrew.dean@deakin.edu.au and nicholas.wright@canterbury.ac.nz Full articles due 1st August 2024 (for internal peer review) with final submissions and external peer review 1st November 2024. For full submission guidelines please see: https://journals.sagepub.com/author-instructions/JCL *

CFP: Writers of Extreme Situations: A Multidisciplinary Perspective

deadline for submissions:  February 15, 2024 contact email:  comparativeworldliterature@gmail.com CFP: 58th Annual Comparative World Literature Conference Venue: California State University, Long Beach. Hybrid Dates: Tuesday, April 16 (Zoom presentations only), Wednesday and Thursday, April 17-18, 2024 (in person presentations only with Zoom projections) Plenary Speaker: Christopher Goffard, author and senior staff writer, Los Angeles Times Family crises, exilic conditions, forced migrations, excessive poverty, armed conflicts, political warfare, environmental calamities, workers’ exploitation, pandemics, and all manner of natural or man-made disasters have been rising to unprecedented levels over the last decades. How are extreme situations or situations so extraordinary as to defy imagination represented? What are the poetics underlying them? We welcome conversations about how extreme conditions and situations, (individual, collective, or global) are expressed, analyzed, and engaged from a multidisciplinary perspective, including but not limited to:  Literature, Journalism, Geography, Anthropology, Political Science, Criminology, Linguistics, Ethnic Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Disability Studies, Media Studies, Geology, Human Development, and more. This conference invites paper and panel proposals on all aspects of extreme situations. Possible topics can include but are not limited to: -Literature of extreme situations -Investigative Journalism -Trauma literature -Literatures of genocide -Holocaust memoirs -Feats of survival -Crime narratives -Narratives of addiction -Natural and man-made disasters -Innocent Project LA -Victims speak up: truth to power -The rise against femicide -Wars and exilic narratives -Refugee narratives -Pandemic narratives -Medical malpractice and botched surgeries -Ethics of survival and survivors’ guilt -The Family Secret and the wounded individual -Dementia and violence: nursing homes -Perpetrators and victims -Asylum seekers and their fate in the US -Ethical ordeals: surviving the unimaginable -Memory as a repository of horror -Collapse of ethical systems in a digital world -Institutional responses to catastrophes -Crossing the Mediterranean: the Syrian refugee crisis -Extreme geo-political conflicts -Journalism at work: covering extreme conditions -“The Banality of Evil” in urban settings. -State terrorism and extreme-isms -Millennial fatigue and extremist stances -Monuments of shame -The Kafkaesque in our daily lives -Systemic risks in the 21st Century -Extreme environments -Soft White Underbelly: Mark Laita interviews The Trials of Frank Carson Podcast (Christopher Goffard) -Deaths in the Grand Canyon and Other National Parks. We are thrilled to announce that the plenary talk will be delivered by Christopher Goffard, Pulitzer Prize winner, journalist for the LA Times, novelist and podcaster, on Thursday, April 19th, at 2PM (PDT). The title of his talk is: “Crossing the Impossible Bridge in a Dynamite Truck: Observations on Film, Friendship and Collaboration” In “Crossing the Impossible Bridge in a Dynamite Truck,” Goffard will reflect on his friendship and collaboration with one of cinema’s great poets of desperation and obsession, William Friedkin, and of their efforts to bring some of Goffard’s riskier stories to the screen. As a crystallization of Friedkin’s danger-courting artistry—and as a metaphor for their quest to get controversial projects made— Goffard invokes an image from the filmmaker’s 1977 masterpiece Sorcerer, in which a truck laden with nitroglycerin attempts to cross a crumbling suspension bridge in the South American jungle. Submissions for individual presentations and 90-minute sessions are welcome from all disciplines and global / historical contexts that engage with historical, personal, or social instances of extreme conditions and situations. Proposals for 15-20 minute presentations should clearly explain the relationship of the paper to the conference theme, describe the evidence to be examined, and offer tentative conclusions. Abstracts of no more than 300 words (not including optional bibliography) should be submitted by January15, 2024. Please submit abstracts as a Word document in an email attachment to comparativeworldliterature@gmail.com NB: Please do not embed proposals in the text of the email. Make sure to indicate your mode of preference (Zoom on April 16 and in person only on April 17 and 18) for planning purposes While the conference will be hybrid, all Zoom presentations will take place only on Tuesday, April 16, and in-person presentations will take place on Wednesday-Thursday, April 17-18 (and will be Zoom-projected). We cannot accommodate pre-recorded presentations. The conference committee will review all proposals, with accepted papers receiving notification by February 15, 2024. *

Call for papers – International Colloquium–Échappées belles – Correspondance of Surrealist Women

deadline for submissions: January 27, 2024 contact email:  lemieux-cloutier.eve@courrier.uqam.ca Organized by Andrea Oberhuber (Montreal University), Sylvano Santini (University of Quebec in Montreal) et Eve Lemieux-Cloutier (University of Quebec in Montreal) Montreal, October 23-25 2024 Where do we stand, almost 100 years after André Breton published the First Manifesto of Surrealism, in our understanding of what Georgiana Colvile and Kate Conley, in La femme s’entête (1998), have called “the feminine part” of the third historical avant-garde? Is it still necessary in 2023 to add a question mark, as the curators did in the case of the Surréalisme au féminin? exhibition at the Musée de Montmartre in summer 2023? Would this symbolize a doubt about the historical presence and aesthetic contribution of numerous female creators – writers and artists, often both at the same time – to the Surrealist movement? It’s true that, in the first pages of the manifesto, Breton evokes a castle in a “rustic setting, not far from Paris” where his “handsome and cordial” friends have taken up residence. He names them all, one by one, before concluding by imagining “and gorgeous women, I might add”, without bothering to specify their names. Over the past thirty years, a growing number of literary critics and art historians have put names and images to these “gorgeous women ” (Rubin Suleiman, 1990, Caws, Kuenzli and Raaberg, 1991, Conley, 1996, Rosemont, 1998, Colvile, 1999, among others). We now know that Simone Kahn and Mick Soupault were immortalized in Man Ray’s group photographs, that the young Gisèle Prassinos was the “femme-enfant” par excellence (Conley and Mahon, 2023) for quite some time, and that the group generally became more welcoming of creative women in the post-war period (Bonnet, 2006). Nor is there any need to revisit the triple role of muse-model-mistress in which young women authors and artists were mostly confined, and which for many was a means of drawing closer to Breton’s “group”, finding new ideas and values, while others have settled for a deliberately marginal position within the Surrealist nebula. Whether their relationship was one of proximity or distance, varying according to the key moments in their careers, their contribution to Surrealist aesthetics and ethics – since the two are intimately linked in the avant-garde movements of the first half of the 20th century – is no longer in doubt today. It seems to us that the centenary of the publication of the founding manifesto offers an opportunity to consider the past-present-future of Surrealism from a perspective that gives pride of place to the feminine. This bias in favor of women’s legacy, particularly in the field of correspondence, is intended to go beyond a binary vision of masculine and feminine, to breathe new life into movement studies and perpetuate creative practices to the present day. No progress, however radical, can be made without a return to the past. Surrealist women creators were witnessed to an era of upheaval that profoundly changed the conditions of art and forms of life. This was the desire of the avant-garde in general and Surrealism in particular, although it has been a long time coming. Women’s art made an original and integral contribution to the creation of these new conditions. And the reasons that explains the late realization of the will to change life are the same that might clarify the delay in the discovery of women’s work. We must avoid repeating this delay by hesitating to join their works to the forms of life that produced them. If the end of art’s autonomy is an essential contribution of the historical avant-gardes, despite their failure, as Peter Bürger (1984) demonstrated long ago, it goes beyond the question of gender. We must recognize, however, that its ultimate consequences affect women more intensely, whose subversive works have not been as decontextualized and neutralized by bourgeois recuperation and the art market as those of men. Besides, in his thesis on the historical failure of the avant-garde, Bürger never mentions the existence of women’s Surrealist works. Without wishing to deny their access to economic capital – they have the same right to it as men – their works still retain their subversive power. It’s this power that we need to bring to light, by revisiting and questioning the forms of life that gave rise to them. As part of the 100th anniversary of Surrealism in 2024, we propose to organize a colloquium on what we might be called a blind spot in surrealism studies to date, prompting us to reflect on it together: the correspondence of writers and artists whom we associate closely or remotely with the movement. They (hers) – Claude Cahun, Leonora Carrington, Lise Deharme, Leonor Fini, Simone Kahn, Nelly Kaplan, Dora Maar, Lee Miller, Suzanne Muzard, Gisèle Prassinos, Dorothea Tanning and Unica Zürn, to name but a few – knew each other from close and far-flung Surrealist circles. Although they sometimes maintained an ongoing correspondence with one of the eminent representatives of Surrealism, there are few examples of letters they addressed to each other. Examples include the correspondence between Simone Kahn and her cousin Denise Lévy, or the few letters exchanged between Claude Cahun and Adrienne Monnier. In the majority of cases, female Surrealist artists corresponded with their male counterparts: Nelly Kaplan and Leonor Fini with André Pieyre de Mandiargues, Gisèle Prassinos with Henri Parisot, Lise Deharme with Pierre Reverdy, Unica Zürn with Henri Michaux and, of course, Jacqueline Lamba with André Breton. While it is generally believed that male writers and artists pursue their work by shaping and editing their correspondence – they somehow know that it will be read – we shouldn’t think that women don’t care. We need to get rid of all gendered stereotypes about epistolary writing, such as the one suggesting that women neglect the literary value of their letters in favor of spontaneity. As Brigitte Diaz (2006) rightly points out, the various gendered stereotypes associated with correspondence should no longer have a place in epistolary studies. This will be all the more true in our colloquium, which, rather than redoing the history of Surrealism, aims to extend and refine it by questioning the modes of sociability favored by women, their desire to collaborate, their friendships and loves, their criticisms, their ambitions, their moods – in short, their aesthetic, political and social sensibilities. In short, it will explore the multiple links – from everyday life to political reflections to questions of advice on a work in progress, for example – that several generations of Surrealist creators established between writing, creation and life in an era that, in more ways than one, can still inspire our own. Proposals for papers – whether for research or research/creation – which may concern published or archival correspondence by women, or, from a broader perspective, the question of epistolary writing by women, should be around 300 words long and accompanied by a brief bio-bibliographical note. Written in French or English, they should be sent simultaneously to Andrea Oberhuber (andrea.oberhuber@umontreal.ca), Sylvano Santini (santini.sylvano@uqam.ca) and Eve Lemieux-Cloutier (lemieux-cloutier.eve@courrier.uqam.ca) no later than January 27, 2024. In the subject line of your message, please indicate “Colloque. Échappées belles”. Please note that the colloquium organizers are planning to submit a funding application to cover part of the travel and subsistence expenses of colloquium participants. Further information will be sent to candidates whose proposals have been accepted by the scientific committee. Bibliography* Bonnet, Marie-Jo, Femmes artistes dans les avant-gardes, Paris,Odile Jacob, 2006. Bürger, Peter, Theory of the Avant-Garde, trad. Michael Shaw, Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 1974. Caws, Mary Ann, Rudolf Kuenzli et Gwen Raaberg (dir.), Surrealism and Women, Cambridge, The MIT Press, 1991. Colvile, Georgiana, et Katharine Conley (dir.), La femme s’entête. La part du féminin dans le surréalisme, Paris, Lachenal et Ritter, coll. « Pleine Marge », 1998. Colvile, Georgiana, Scandaleusement d’elles: trente-quatre femmes surréalistes, Paris, Jean Michel Place, 1999. Conley, Katharine, Automatic Woman, Nebraska, University of Nebraska Press, 1996. Conley, Kate, et Alyce Mahon, «The “Problem of Woman” in Surrealism », International Journal of Surrealism, vol. 1 n° 1, 2023, p. v-ix. Diaz, Brigitte, et Jürgen Siess (dir.), L’épistolaire au féminin : Correspondances de femmes (xviiie-xxe siècle),Caen, Presses universitaires de Caen, 2006. Oberhuber, Andrea, Faire œuvre à deux. Le livre surréaliste au féminin, Montréal, Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal, coll. « Art + », 2023. Rosemont, Penelope (dir.), Surrealist Women, An International Anthology, Texas, University of Texas Press, coll. « Surrealist Revolution », 1998. Suleiman, Susan Rubin, Subversive Intent: Gender, Politics, and the Avant-Garde, Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1990. * 2024 International PhD Conference “Lived Experiences”, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (hybrid format) June 6 and 7, 2024 Deadline for submissions: January 31, 2024 Call for Papers We are pleased to announce the call for papers for Lived Experiences, the international two- day PhD conference that takes place in Brussels, Belgium, on June 7th, and online on June 8th, 2024. This conference aims to create a platform for doctoral students specializing in literary studies, literary translation studies, and theatre studies to showcase their research and engage in discussions on the profound impact of personal narratives and lived experiences in shaping creative works. It provides an excellent opportunity for emerging scholars to actively participate in scholarly dialogues, share their findings, and contribute to the broader academic discourse. Theme and Scope Numerous scholars have explored how the book as a medium shapes the ways in which authors practice life writing. In “Putting Lives on the Record: The Book as Material and Symbol in Life Writing” (2017), Anna Poletti proposes an innovative approach to biography studies focusing on that centrality of “the book as both a medium and a symbol” to both “the practice and the scholarship of life writing” (Poletti, 460). However, a reading strategy, which emphasizes the relationship between a life writing practice and its medium/form, can be applied not only to book-based practices, but also to writing grounded in lived experience across various media, media combinations, and culturally defined forms of writing. Recently, life writing studies took an intermedial and transcultural turn (Rippl, 147), marked by publications such as the volume Intermediality, Life Writing, and American Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, edited by Nassim Winnie Balestrini and Ina Bergmann (2018), Experiments in Life-writing: Intersections of Auto/biography and Fiction, edited by Lucia Boldrini and Julia Novak (2017), and Anna Poletti’s (2020) monograph Stories of the self: Life writing after the book. Even more recently, Claudia Jünke and Désirée Schyns published Translating Memories of Violent Pasts: Memory Studies and Translation Studies in Dialogue (2023), a collection of essays from memory studies and translation studies investigating the exploration of memories of violence through the practices of interlingual and intercultural literary translation. As Jünke and Schyns highlight in their introduction to the last-mentioned work, cultural translation already implies a form of remembering: the target text always retains its dual context. It connects the past of the source to practices of rewriting and dynamics of cultural transmission in the present. Lived Experiences seeks to further our understanding of the ways different (combinations of) media, genres, and writing practices (e.g., literary translation) can allow for different expressions and explorations of personal experience. It aims to focus on lived experiences as a catalyst for (literary) creativity, with texts using the conventions and the material, modal, formal, and symbolic affordances of media, genres, and writing practices in creative ways to express specific forms of lived experiences (such as traumatic, formative, or shared cultural experiences). By bringing together scholars of life writing and other literary practices in which lived experience plays a central role, it invites participants to reflect both on how media and genres shape creative forms of life writing and how the need or desire to represent, analyze, or simulate lived experiences can inform practices of literary creation. We encourage participants to explore diverse aspects of lived experiences within the realm of literature and other media, including but not limited to:
    1. Autobiographical narratives and memoirs: Analyzing the ways in which personal stories intersect with creative expression and exploring the relationship between fact and fiction.
    1. Representations of marginalized and underrepresented voices: Investigating how literature becomes a platform for amplifying and centering marginalized experiences and challenging dominant narratives.
    1. Trauma, resilience, and healing: Examining the depiction of lived experiences of trauma in literature and other media and exploring the transformative power of storytelling in the process of healing and resilience.
    1. Cultural heritage and identity: Exploring how creative works reflect, preserve, and redefine cultural identity and heritage.
    1. Lived experiences in translation: Investigating the role of language mediation in shaping and representing diverse lived experiences across linguistic and cultural boundaries.
Submission Guidelines We invite doctoral students to submit abstracts for a 20-minutes presentation, providing the following information:
    1. Title of the Paper
    1. Abstract (250–300 words)
    1. Brief Biography (100 words)
Please submit your abstracts via email to lived.experiences2024@gmail.com no later than January 31st, 2024. Please also indicate your affiliation and your preference for presenting your paper either in person or online. The conference will be held in English. Participation is free of charge. Important Dates
    • Submission Deadline: 31 January 2024
    • Notification of Acceptance: 21 February 2024
    • Conference Date: 7–8 June 2024
Selected papers presented at the conference may have the opportunity to be published in a special issue of the Journal for Literary and Intermedial Crossings (JLIC), based at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. For further inquiries, please contact us at lived.experiences2024 * Biography Lab 2024 (1/20/2024) Biographers International Organization (BIO). Held on ZOOM.   Biographers International Organization (BIO) is excited to announce Biography Lab 2024, which will be held via Zoom on Saturday, January 20, 2024, from 10:30 am – 5:00 pm Eastern (New York) time. BIO invites participants at all levels of interest and experience in the craft of biography to participate in three sequential 90-minute forums led by prize-winning biographers. A social hour concludes the day. The distinguished keynote speaker is Kai Bird, the author of five biographies, including the Pulitzer-Prize-winning and bestselling American Prometheus about Robert Oppenheimer. The three forum leaders are James McGrath Morris, author of multiple biographies about journalists and other writers; Janice P. Nimura, Pulitzer-Prize finalist for The Doctors Blackwell; and Ray A. Shepard, award-winning biographer of Black lives for young readers. Registration: Free to BIO members and students; $60 for nonmembers (fee includes a year’s BIO membership). Go here to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/biography-lab-2024-tickets-742496776847 * Call for Applications — Leon Levy Center for Biography Fellowships (1/4/2024) CUNY NY USA

FEATURED JOB: The Graduate Center, CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK, Leon Levy Center for Biography – 5 $72 K Biography Fellowships

The Leon Levy Center for Biography invites applications for four 2024 – 2025 Biography Fellowships and one Leon Levy /Alfred P. Sloan Fellow in science biography. Each resident fellow receives a stipend of $72,000, research assistance, writing space and library privi- leges. They also participate in monthly seminars and the intellectual life of the Graduate Center, CUNY. Application deadline: Jan 4, 2024 Website: llcb.ws.gc.cuny.edu Contact Information Thad Ziolkowski, Deputy Director, the Leon Levy Center for Biography tziolkowski@gc.cuny.edu URL https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=66559 * Call for Papers “Through Their Eyes…” – Biographical Research in the Digital Age Deadline For Submissions: January 4, 2024 PaRDeS 30 (2024) Journal of the Association for Jewish Studies in Germany / Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien e.V. Editor: Dr. Björn Siegel (Institute for the History of the German Jews, Germany) Guest-Editor: Prof. Dr. Andrea Sinn (Elon University, USA) Biographical studies have always been central to the historically working humanities, however, the relevance of biographical research seems to have gained importance throughout the last years, calling for a deeper analytical study as well as a critical re-evaluation of such a newly evolving “biographical turn”. Especially in an increasingly digitalized world, including academia, life stories seem to offer new and candid, but also personal and local lenses through which to examine, understand and present historical narratives, cultural phenomena, or literal productions. Different (auto)biographical sources offer the unique opportunity to see history “through their eyes” and provide authentic and insightful perspectives on the past and the present and can therefore, when viewed critically, serve as valuable historical records. Such personal insights into the past and present not only enable researchers to reconstruct and preserve different life stories, but offer a unique opportunity to study political, cultural and social networks and spaces, but also to analyze the interwoven feelings, thoughts and beliefs of people who experienced past realities. However, these sources also raise questions about the interests and perspectives of the writer(s), the reliability and subjectivity of the individual, as well as the constructiveness of the related texts and sources. Therefore, biographical research not only represents an interesting tool and promising methodology, but also poses considerable challenges to researchers in the humanities in general, and Jewish Studies in particular. The challenges are largely connected to phenomena such as (forced) migration, the evolution of diasporas and exiles, the consequences of multilingualism and transnational networks, questions of acculturation and representation, influences of religious principles, social habits or gender relations as well as the effects of changing moral concepts, philosophies, and identities. The worldwide spread of digitization seems to have solved some of these challenges, such as the issues of availability or legibility, but it also leads to new demands and difficulties, when studying biographies. While these phenomena might be universal, they seem to be inherent in Jewish history and culture, thus, making biographical research in Jewish Studies a complex, but also promising methodology. Therefore, the journal PaRDeS is seeking contributions that explore the potential of the “biographical turn in Jewish Studies” and aims to examine its impact on the study and representation, but also preservation of Jewish history, culture, and religion in the digital age. We welcome contributions from fields including but not limited to history and literature, political and cultural studies, sociology and anthropology, as well as contributions focusing on digital studies as well as archeology, archival studies etc. Potential contributions may focus on any character, locality or time period, related to Jewish life stories. Potential papers might focus on the following (not exhaustive) topics and questions, pose examples to illustrate the changing settings and/or
    • What are the specific challenges to write Jewish biographies/life stories in the digital age?
    • How important are biographies in Jewish history, religion and/or philosophy and has itchanged to write a biography in an ever more digitized world?
    • How can one life story influence the study of Jewish history, culture, and religion anddoes the function of the individual and/or collective transform in a digital world?
    • What kind of benefits does the digital age offer/suggest for the of study of Jewishhistory, language(s), religion, and/or culture? And, how does it influence the socialconstruction of a life story?
    • Is digitization expanding the source base of biographical research and does it change theavailability, readability and/or accessibility of sources (e.g. texts and multimedia sources)?
    • How does digitization change the materiality of the sources?
    • How are Jewish biographies used today, e.g. in academia, memory culture, educationalstrategies or public debates and did the representation of Jewish life changed by newlydeveloped digital tools?
    • How do museums and archives modify their strategies to preserve “Jewish life stories” inthe digital age?
    • Do digital biographical studies offer new insights and tools to decode and analyzeemotions or thoughts, but also trauma or violence?Proposals for papers (max. 500 words) and a short CV (max. 100 words) should be submitted to the editors, Björn Siegel (bjoern.siegel@igdj-hh.de) and Andrea Sinn (asinn@elon.edu), by January 5, 2024. The candidates will be notified on January 15, 2024. The submission of the finished papers is tentatively scheduled for May 2024. The full article should be 30.000 to 35.000 characters including spaces. All submissions will undergo a blind peer-review process.PaRDeS is an interdisciplinary journal that ensures its quality through a blind peer review; all articles published in PaRDeS are indexed in Rambi: Index of Articles on Jewish Studies. PaRDeS is published online in open access and in print. Previous issues are available at this link:Contact Information
Editors: Björn Siegel (bjoern.siegel@igdj-hh.de) and Andrea Sinn (asinn@elon.edu) Contact Email bjoern.siegel@igdj-hh.de URL https://publishup.uni-potsdam.de/solrsearch/index/search/searchtype/series/id/37 * Call for Papers  Acts of Witnessing on Film American University of Paris July 17, 2024 – July 18, 2024 Deadline for Submissions: January 8, 2024 The definitions, uses, policies, and norms of testimony continue to be debated, with discussions fueled by a large scientific literature; works of philosophy and aesthetics (Frosch, & Pinchewski, 2009, Goutte, 2016, El Madawi, 2020, Détue, 2022) explore the relationship between filmed oral testimonies and historical facts, the narrative processes created by this medium in the Era of the Witness, the contours of truly cinematic testimonies, and even of testimony as a new documentary form (Leimbacher, 2014, Katz, 2018). At the intersection of Trauma Studies, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and Memory and Media Studies, scholars have conducted research into audiovisual productions about the Holocaust as well as repressions in Latin America, the Middle-East, North Africa, and Asia (cf. the selected bibliography). These works are characterized by a constructivist perspective and an interest in the role of documentary filmmakers in the writing of history. This conference reflects through a historical perspective on the act of witnessing on film. Beyond “testimonial” cinema (Garibotto, 2019), we hope to approach testimonies as a practice, shaped by the specific environments of their national cinematographic cultures. How are enunciative devices reconfigured through the technical and institutional mediations inherent to the production of knowledge? How can we address the social and political stakes of archiving at the time of creation (omissions, negotiations, political pressures…)? Which epistemological approaches can be used to analyze testimonial functions assigned after the fact (such as previous footage reassigned for other purposes and uses, witness retractions regarding propaganda)? Studies on the historicity of individual accounts in documentaries (most often Anglophone and Francophone) situate their emergence in the 1960s (Leimbacher, 2014). This conference also proposes to account for prior decades and to introduce a global and comparative perspective. We wish to shed light on sensitivities to oral expression specific to various documentary traditions (Zéau, 2020), including those that developed under authoritarian and dictatorial regimes. These elements will be put in dialogue with various approaches to conceptualizing evidence, the document, and the audio trace. In so doing, we hope to pave the way for further research into the international circulation of ideas and expertise. In order to understand the listening conditions (Comolli, 1995) of a verbal testimony centered on personal experiences of violence, it is essential to recognize to what extent the topic is both political and conflictual. It is our wish to explore this dimension of communication in these societies that are torn apart, in particular in authoritarian regimes and police states. We also seek to question the pressures coming from institutions and social groups that lie behind the emergence of testimonies in cinema by comparing examples from various national cinemas. A part of the conference will be dedicated to the dissemination of filmed-based testimonies (their geographical circulation, infrastructure, breadth, and accompanying narratives). This conference is situated at the intersection of the history of cinema and a reflection on the act of witnessing that considers the social history of mass violence and the history of the end of dictatorships. We hope that it will be multidisciplinary and will foster connections between various cultural areas of research. We welcome proposals in French or English from a diversity of theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches. The conference will take place on June 17 and 18, 2024 at The American University of Paris. Submission criteria:  Please send your proposals in English or French before January 8, 2024. Please indicate the argument and issues raised by the topic of your communication and do not exceed 500 words. Submissions are to be sent to the organizing Committee (schaeffercenter@aup.edu). Authors will be responded to in February 2024. The presentation should be of 20 minutes. Organization Committee : Luba Jurgenson (Sorbonne Université), Constance Pâris de Bollardière (AUP), Brian Schiff (AUP), Irina Tcherneva (CNRS) Scientific Committee, in alphabetical order: Ruth Beckermann (filmmaker) Jennifer Cazenave (Boston University) Jochen Hellbeck (Rutgers University) Luba Jurgenson (Sorbonne) Sylvie Lindeperg (University Paris 1) Ania Szczepanska (University Paris 1) Irina Tcherneva (CNRS) Indicative bibliography 
    • Paul Bernard Nouraud and Luba Jurgenson (ed.), Témoigner par l’image, Paris, Petra, 2015.
    • Paul Bernard Nouraud, Luba Jurgenson, Irina Tcherneva (ed.), Témoigner par l’image II, Paris, Petra, forthcoming in 2023.
    • Véronique Campan, Marie Martin, Sylvie Rollet (ed.), Qu’est-ce qu’un geste politique au cinéma ? Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2019.
    • Catherine Coquio, La littérature en suspens. Écritures de la Shoah : le témoignage et les œuvres, Paris, L’Arachnéen, 2015.
    • Efren Cuevas, Filming History from Below: Microhistorical Documentaries, Columbia University Press, Wallflower Press, 2022.
    • Frédérik Détue, Témoigner au cinéma : une action dans l’histoire, Presses Universitaires de Paris Nanterre, 2022.
    • Frédérik Détue & Charlotte Lacoste, Témoigner en littérature, Europe n° 1041-1042, janvier-février 2016).
    • Stefanie El Madawi, Approaching Contemporary Cinematic I-Witnessing, PhD thesis, University of Huddersfield, 2020.
    • Paul Frosh & Amit Pinchevski, Media Witnessing. Testimony in the Age of Mass Communication, Pallgrave Macmillan, 2009.
    • Verónica Garibotto, Rethinking testimonial cinema in postdictatorship Argentina: beyond memory fatigue, Indiana University Press, 2019.
    • Martin Goutte, « Le témoignage au rythme des images et des mots : accélération et accumulation », Écrire l’histoire [online], 16 | 2016, pp. 155-163.
    • Luba Jurgenson & Alexandre Prstojevic, Des Témoins aux héritiers, Paris, Petra, 2012.
    • Aurélia Kalisky, « Pour une histoire culturelle du testimonial. De la notion de “témoignage” à celle de “création testimoniale” », PHD thesis, 2013, Paris 3 University.
    • Rebecka Katz Thor, Beyond the Witness. Holocaust Representation and The Testimony Of Images. Three Films by Yael Hersonski, Harun Farocki And Eyal Sivan, Stockholm, Art and Theory Publishing, 2018.
    • Irina Leimbacher, More than Talking Heads: Non-fiction Testimony and Cinematic Form, PHD thesis, University of Berkley, 2014.
    • Sylvie Lindeperg & Annette Wieviorka, Univers concentrationnaire et génocide : voir, savoir, comprendre, Paris, Mille et une nuits, 2008.
    • Rory O’Bryen, Literature, Testimony and Cinema in Contemporary Colombian Culture : Spectres of la Violencia, Woodbridge, Rochester, NY, Tamesis, 2008.
    • Bhaskar Sarkar & Janet Walker (ed.), Documentary Testimonies: Global Archives of Suffering, New York, Routledge, 2010.
    • Annette Wiewiorka, The Era of the Witness, Ithaca, Cornell University Press, 2006.
    • Caroline Zéau, Le cinéma direct : un art de la mise en scène, l’Âge d’homme, 2020.
    • Revue Images Documentaires « La Parole Filmée », 1995, n° 22.
*

Call For Papers: Rasanblaj Fanm: Stories of Haitian Womanhood, Past, Present and Future, Institute for Black Atlantic Research, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom,

10-12 July 2024 Deadline for Submissions: January 13, 2024 Haitian women are regarded as the poto mitan (central pillar) of Haitian society. As caregivers, warriors, healers, artisans, traders, cultivators, manbos, storytellers, companions and agitators, they have been vital agents in shaping the fortunes of Haiti’s revolutionary anticolonial encounters and its quest for sovereignty and legitimation as an independent state. However, this term of veneration conceals diverse forms of political, social and discursive exclusion that women in Haiti and across the dyaspora confront in the present, and the myriad forms of silence and neglect to which they have been subjected in the historical record. The little that we know of the women whose courage, ferocity, resilience and generosity paved a course for independence, postcolonial statehood and the universal and permanent abolition of slavery in 1804 is often shrouded in mythology, which, as Colin Dayan has highlighted, “not only erases these women but forestalls our turning to [their] real lives.” Moreover, these legendary “sheroes” of Haiti’s past have often been exploited for the sake of political opportunity, symbolically deployed in the service of nationalist sleights of hand which obscure the precarity, insecurity, exploitation and vulnerability of Haitian women in the present. Piecing together the scattered fragments produced by the violence and ruptures of the colonialist archive and the continuing violence, neglect and co-optation of the dominant political oligarchy necessitates a form of rasanblaj, or (re)assembly, a practice advocated by Gina Athena Ulysse which “demands that we consider and confront the limited scope of segregated frameworks to explore what remains excluded in this landscape that is scorched yet full of life, riddled with inequities and dangerous and haunting memories.” Through rasanblaj, multiple modalities and disciplinary perspectives offer pathways of intersection. This conference invites opportunities to (re)assemble narratives, theorisations, performances, mobilisations and representations of Haitian womanhood, past, present and future. It welcomes proposals for 15-20-minute presentations from scholars, artists, activists, performers, creators and organisers that grapple with these diverse assemblages of Haitian womanhood. Potential topics of discussion include (but are not limited to):
    • (Under)representations of women in histories of the Haitian Revolution
    • Literary, artistic and filmic re-imaginings of Haiti’s revolutionary “sheroes” and women of Haiti’s pre- and post-revolutionary history
    • Haitian women as creators of art, literature, film, music and dance
    • Haitian women as subjects in art, literature, film and other media
    • The history of the feminist movement in Haiti
    • Haitian girlhood and education: where it’s been, where it is, where it’s going
    • The restavek system in Haiti and its particular impact on girls and young women
    • Land-tillers and Haiti’s moun andeyo
    • Makers, artisans and Madan Sara
    • Women and culinary traditions in Haiti
    • Cultural veneration of women icons and the notion of the poto mitan
    • Haitian women in the dyaspora
    • Manbos and the primacy of women in Vodou
    • Women elders, matriarchs and oral storytellers
    • Fashion icons and beauty queens from Haiti’s past and present
    • Women’s fashion in Haiti and the dyaspora
    • Women-led social justice organisations in Haiti and across the dyaspora
    • Stateswomen and women of the judiciary in Haiti
This event marks 220 years of Haitian independence, 200 years since Marie-Louise Christophe, first and only Queen of Haiti, departed Britain, and 90 years since the end of the U.S. Occupation of Haiti (1915-1934). It also celebrates the tenth anniversary of the Institute for Black Atlantic Research, whose record of hosting international events celebrating Haitian history and culture is established. As a radically transnational, interdisciplinary, collaborative, anticolonial and feminist endeavour, we aspire to create a conference that is inclusive in its structure and its mode of dissemination, and will make provisions for presenters in English, French and (where possible) in Kreyòl. Though we hope to assemble as many delegates in one common space as possible for this ambitious project, we recognise the challenges and potential barriers to travel (especially for our Haitian contingent). For this reason, and in order to promote inclusive discussions, there will be some opportunities for remote and hybrid participation.* A selection of the accepted papers may be invited to further develop their research for inclusion in an edited volume that may be produced after the conference. Confirmed keynote speakers include the Haitian-born artist Patricia Brintle, Ayitian Ourstorian and Vodouvi Professor Bayyinah Bello and filmmaker and journalist Etant Dupain Proposals for papers, panels, film/video presentations, workshops, and roundtables are due by 13 January 2024. Please submit an abstract of up to 300 words (these should be “blinded”, with names and affiliations removed, for peer review), along with a separate document containing a short biography of no more than 200 words (to include name and institutional/organisational affiliation if applicable). Proposals for complete panels of three speakers (or up to a maximum of four, keeping in mind that sessions will run for 90 minutes) are also welcomed. For full panel submissions, a designated group representative should collate abstracts and speaker biographies. All materials should be sent to the conference organisers, Dr M. Stephanie Chancy and Dr Nicole Willson at rasanblajfanm@gmail.com by the deadline date. * Proposals should indicate language requirements and any needs for remote participation.

Conference Committee

Dr M. Stephanie Chancy, Digital Library of the Caribbean, University of Florida Dr Nathan Dize, Washington University in St. Louis Dr Rachel Douglas, University of Glasgow Dr Raphael Hoermann, Institute for Black Atlantic Research, University of Central Lancashire Isabelle Dupuy, Writer and Trustee of the London Library Dr Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall, California State University San Marcos Dr Nicole L. Willson, Institute for Black Atlantic Research, University of Central Lancashire Contact Email rasanblajfanm@gmail.com URL https://www.fanmrebel.com/media/cfp-rasanblaj-fanm-stories-of-haitian-womanhood-past-present-and-future * (Re)Tracing Self, World, and Agency in Narratives of Transformation Université Laval’s Graduate Conference for English Literature (ULGCEL) March 15, 2024 (Hybrid) Deadline for Submissions: January 14, 2024  “Writing and performing should deepen the meaning of words, should illuminate, transfix and transform.” –bell hooks In literary studies, scholars and writers such as bell hooks have highlighted the transformative potential of words, revealing that writing and artistic performance are not merely acts of creation but journeys toward self-discovery and social change. As we navigate the complexities of our contemporary society, marked by profound shifts and challenges, the need for narratives of transformation has become more urgent. In an era that grapples with social justice, environmental crises, and cultural transformation and revitalization, we invite scholars from various fields to engage with the theme of “Narratives of Transformation.” This call for papers seeks to reflect on writing and artistic performance as vehicles for personal and collective healing and empowerment. We invite papers on all narrative forms and genres that inspire change, challenge the status quo, and bring forth stories that (re)trace and weave together individual and collective pasts, presents, and futures. Université Laval’s 2024 Graduate Conference for English Literature proposes to engage narratives of transformation to consider questions such as:
    • In what ways can narratives of transformation serve as a catalyst for personal growth, social change, or healing in our contemporary society?
    • How do authors explore the intersectionality of identities, such as race, gender, or class, in the context of narratives of transformation?
    • What are the roles of storytelling and writing in challenging the status quo and inspiring change in today’s world?
    • What ethical and social responsibilities should writers and scholars consider when engaging with narratives of transformation?
    • How can narrative (re)imagine and bridge past, present, and future, and to what effect?
    • How does literature employ narrative techniques to depict transitions and convey the aesthetics of change and transformation?
ULGCEL 2024 invites graduate student presentations that explore such questions as they relate to literature, film, graphic novels, television, video games, or wherever narrative is found. We welcome a variety of theoretical and critical approaches and encourage presentations of 15-20 minutes. Topics for consideration encompass, but are not confined to:
    • Intersectionality
    • Multiculturalism
    • Identity and Representation
    • Gender and Sexuality
    • Postcolonial Narratives
    • Environmental Narratives
    • Dystopian and Utopian Narratives
    • Transcultural Narratives
    • Narrative and Ethics
    • Narrative and Memory
The conference will be held in a hybrid format on March 15, 2024. Speakers can present in person on the UL campus or via Zoom. We invite graduate students (MA, PhD, as well as advanced undergraduates) from various disciplines (Literature, Translation Studies, Film Studies, Cultural Studies, Indigenous Studies, History, etc.) to submit proposals. Visit the website for information on post-conference publishing opportunities. Please submit an abstract of 250 words and a biography of 50 words to: aeglea@asso.ulaval.ca. Include your name, affiliation, degree program, e-mail address, equipment needs, as well as the title of your presentation, and upload the document as both PDF and Word attachments. UPDATE: The deadline for proposals is now January 14, 2024. You will be informed of our decision by January 21, 2024. Website: https://aegleaulaval.wixsite.com/home/about-9 *

(Para-)Military Violence, War Crimes in Post-Soviet Conflicts and Narratives of the Russo-Ukrainian War: New Avenues of Methodology and Research

May 21-23, 28-29, 2024 Application deadline: January 15, 2024. Potsdam and Jerusalem Leibniz-Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung Potsdam and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in cooperation with the Pilecki Institute, the Lemkin Institute for Genocide Prevention and the University of New Europe (UNE) organize a joint international workshop that will take place in two locations: The Leibniz-Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung Potsdam (ZZF) (May 21-23, 2024) and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (May 28-29, 2024). The first part of the workshop at the Leibniz-Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung Potsdam will take place within the research framework KonKoop (Conflict and Cooperation in Eastern Europe: The Consequences of the Reconfiguration of Political, Economic, and Social Spaces since the End of the Cold War). It will primarily focus on the topic of (para-)military violence over a period of time starting with the collapse of the USSR till present. The Mutiny of the Wagner group in summer 2023 has highlighted the significance of armed militias for understanding conflict, violence and war in the post-Soviet space. The dissolution of the USSR was preceded by the disintegration of the Soviet Army and the rise of armed groups, local strongmen and warlords in parts of the Caucasus, in Central Asia and in Moldova. From the 1990s onwards irregular formations of armed men played a significant role in various conflicts from Chechnya to the Donbas. These men, as well as the regular armed units of Russia used violence and committed war crimes in the conflicts following the dissolution of the USSR. The workshop will assemble both those who have contributed to the ongoing discussion on methodological approaches in the study of violent groups, including ethical questions, as well as researchers who have already studied sources and collected data in the field. Presentations will include work on the conflicts of the late USSR and the 1990s as well as more recent studies about the Russian war against Ukraine (starting in 2014). The goal of the workshop is to gain a better understanding of the origins, the actors as well as the forms and consequences of irregular military violence from perestroika to the full-scale invasion of Ukraine in 2022. The workshop language is English. Submissions should include a one-page abstract and a short CV. Please send all materials by 15 January 2024 to alyona.bidenko@zzf-potsdam.de Applications are welcome from scholars and nonacademic research professionals such as journalists and activists. Some of the participants’ travel costs will be reimbursed upon request. In cooperation with the University of New Europe network a publication of some of the contributions is planned with a transcript in the “New Europes” book series. Organizing committee: Alyona Bidenko (ZZF/ KonKoop), Jan Claas Behrends (ZZF/ Viadrina U) Contact email: alyona.bidenko@zzf-potsdam.de For more information see. www.zzf-potsdam.de www.konkoop.de neweurope.university The Potsdam Workshop is supported by funds from the Federal Ministry of Research (BMBF) The second part of the workshop at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem will concentrate on the Russo-Ukrainian war and explore a range of topics related to how the war is narrated, constructed and interpreted by its immediate witnesses: refugees from Ukraine who left the country to various destinations, primarily to Europe and Israel. Topics that we intend to discuss include but are not limited to the following: I. History of the war seen from “within” We look forward to discussing the major narrative strands in the stories about living in Ukraine during the war (possibly, under the Russian occupation), of flight/evacuation to other countries and of current refugeehood in the country of destination. We aim here at enhancing our understanding of the social reality, micropolitics of everyday life and larger social processes as all these were altered by the war. Some of the foci in this discussion may include: 1) grass-root agency in the situation of war: where and how it is produced and sustained, how it facilitates micro-level social practices, how it shapes interaction in larger social networks and how it is inscribed in the workings of formal institutions or organizations; 2) various choices (practical, moral, political, linguistic, etc.) involved in people’s war-time experience contexts and how these choices reflect people’s individual and group-based political allegiances and humanitarian commitments; 3) individual and collective identity(ies) and their role in shaping people’s vision of the broader context of Russo-Ukrainian war, of their war-time experiences in Ukraine and later in their new host countries, as well as of the broader political agendas on the international level against which these identities are negotiated. II. Methodology We are also looking forward to discussing methodologies underlying our oral history research with particular regard to the nature of our interviews and to some extent participant observation. First, here we may focus on the ontologies of the texts produced in our work with particular regard to the following aspects: a) “translatability” of the war experience, particularly of the trauma experience, and “conditions of felicity” under which communication of this experience becomes possible; b) the role of individual and collective subjectivities invoked in people’s stories as categories of the scholarly analysis; c) critique of the nature of oral narratives produced in a multiple-stage process of immediate perception and postponed reflection of the witnesses, as well as the interpretation on the part of researchers and their resulting value for the academic discourse; d) crystallization of earlier “raw” testimonies into structured narratives with specific civil agendas, as well as various social, political and cultural factors that impact this process; e) possible theoretical framings that allow oral narratives to become part of the academic discourse. Second, we may discuss the place of our findings within the existing discourses in social sciences and humanities, such as “anthropology of emergency,” identity-and-agency theory, actor-network theory, anthropology of everyday life, genocide studies, Ukrainian studies, European studies, Israel studies, studies of colonialism and post-colonialism, diaspora and nationalism studies, aliyah studies, etc. Third, we might give thought to how ethnographic and anthropological perspectives on the one hand provide the possibility of different framings of historical events and processes as compared to official documentary sources, but on the other, how they may complement each other to expand our perspective on the object of our study. In other words, how oral history may be integrated into the larger historical canon and how this synthesis may provide a more human-oriented perspective upon the war. III. Further collaborative efforts Last but not least, we are planning to discuss our further research around the theme of the Russo-Ukrainian war, including development of joint projects, creation of cross-referenced archival depositories and establishing research networks with other academic institutions. Applications are welcome from scholars and nonacademic research professionals. We particularly welcome researchers who have been doing oral history research with war-time Ukrainian refugees, as well as scholars in social sciences more broadly. Application deadline: January 15, 2024. Accommodation costs in Israel will be covered. Organizing committee: Semion Goldin (Hebrew U of Jerusalem), semyon.goldin@mail.huji.ac.il, Anna Kushkova (Hebrew U of Jerusalem), anna.kushkova@mail.huji.ac.il Contact email: anna.kushkova@mail.huji.ac.il (Anna Kushkova) Contact Information The Leibniz-Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung Potsdam (ZZF): Alyona Bidenko (ZZF/ KonKoop), Jan Claas Behrends (ZZF/ Viadrina U). Contact email: alyona.bidenko@zzf-potsdam.de. Hebrew University of Jerusalem: Semion Goldin (Hebrew U of Jerusalem), semyon.goldin@mail.huji.ac.il, Anna Kushkova (Hebrew U of Jerusalem), anna.kushkova@mail.huji.ac.il. Contact email: anna.kushkova@mail.huji.ac.il (Anna Kushkova). Contact Email alyona.bidenko@zzf-potsdam.de * Deadline for proposals: January 11, 2024 CFP – Genres in Transit: The Novel of Memory as World Literature Eighth Annual Conference of the Memory Studies Association (MSA) — “Memories in Transit” Lima, Peru, 18 to 20 July 2024  https://www.memorystudiesassociation.org/call-for-papers-msa-annual-conference-2024-lima-peru/ This panel is rooted in the research done on the novel of memory in Romania, in the frame of the project The Novel of Memory in Postcommunism: Subgenres, Generations, Transnational Networks and it aims at a wider, transnational and trans-continental mapping of the genre and its local/ global embodiments and traditions. In the last four decades, the novel of memory emerged in various parts of the world, spanning spaces and experiences, most notably in postcolonial, posttotalitarian and posttraumatic situations, in such a proportion that it can be argued it now reaches the scale of a world genre. Counting among its representatives such authors as Salman Rushdie (with Midnight’s Children, 1981), Toni Morrison (with Beloved, 1987), Herta Muller (with The Hunger Angel, 2009), Mircea Cartarescu (with Blinding, 1996), Laura Alcoba (with The Rabbit House, 2007), Gilbert Gatore (with The Past Ahead, 2012) the novel of memory took on challenges of postmodern form vs. political responsibility, but mostly that of memory, often in the form of autofiction, challenging history. However this world genre is discussed, whether in terms of multidirectionality (Michael Rothberg), generationality (Astrid Erll), or postmemory (Marianne Hirsch), the debate is still open on how it came about globally, what subgenres and formulas it favored, if and how it traveled from one author or culture to another. As Wai Chee Dimock puts it in „Genre as World System: Epic and Novel on Four Continents” (2006), literary genres enter a network of interconnection, not of genealogical relations, highlighting „a remote spectrum of affinities, interesting when seen in conjunction, but not themselves organically linked”. Likeliness, Dimock emphasizes, issues “from environments roughly similar but widely dispersed”. Situated at the intersection of memory studies and literary studies, the panel invites papers on the various national embodiments of the novel of memory from Eastern Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, South Asia and the Pacific, addressing, but not limited to, the following topics:
    • how memory and literary formulas are intertwining in various political contexts
    • how multidirectionality manifests itself (or not) in the forms of this genre
    • how the different geocultural embodiments of the novel of memory deal with variation and resemblance
    • to what extent the novel of memory contributes to the decolonizing of memory being done now in multiple memory cultures and academic contexts.Wider surveys of the genre in national/ transnational frames, as well as individual case studies of authors and literary works are welcome. Scholars from literary, memory, and lifewriting studies interested in these topics may send a brief proposal (200-300 words) to andreea.mironescu@uaic.ro, if possible, no later than January 11, 2024. The deadline for panel submissions to the MSA conference is January 15, 2024.Many thanks and best wishes for 2024,Andreea Mironescu Senior Researcher, Institute of Interdisciplinary Research – Department of Social Sciences and Humanities Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Andreea-Mirones
* Call for Panel Participants: Memories and Legacies of the World War II Nikkei Incarceration “Memories in Transit,” Memory Studies Association Conference July 18–20, 2024 Lima Peru https://www.memorystudiesassociation.org/call-for-papers-msa-annual-conference-2024-lima-peru/ Deadline for Submissions January 9, 2024 This proposed panel explores personal and public remembrance of the North American incarceration of persons of Japanese descent throughout the Second World War (1941–1945), particularly how memories of the event are evoked and mobilized in different historical contexts and conversations. Engaging with key concepts of memory activism (Gutman, Rigney, Wüstenberg), postmemory (Hirsch), and multidirectional memory (Rothberg), among others, we examine how several present-day social movements and political initiatives draw on memories of Nikkei wartime exclusion to challenge contemporary forms of political violence and to fight for more just, equitable, and secure futures. We address the following questions: How can memories of the past be used to combat violence and to motivate political action and solidarity in the present? How do memories of the Japanese diaspora and western exclusion move across and between multiple generations, geographies, populations, and cultures? Further, how can practices of remembrance build community between different groups and draw connections between diverse social movements and political struggles? Spanning the disciplines of history, literature, and media studies, this panel addresses these questions and others by exploring how memories and remembrance of the Nikkei wartime incarceration influences our society today—including ongoing discussions about racial repair, environmental destruction, and coloniality. Ultimately, the panel seeks to offer new and critical insights into the political, activist, environmental, and embodied legacies of the Japanese American incarceration. We invite scholars interested in participating to send a short paper abstract to Kelsey Moore (kelseymoore@ucsb.edu) and Jen Noji (jnoji@g.ucla.edu)as soon as possible, but ideally no later than January 9. NB: All panel materials will be submitted by January 15, 2024. Call for Panel Participants – MSA 2024 (Lima, Peru, July 18-20) [Announcement] * Call for Panel Participants: Memories and Legacies of the World War II Nikkei Incarceration “Memories in Transit,” Memory Studies Association Conference July 18–20, 2024 Lima Peru https://www.memorystudiesassociation.org/call-for-papers-msa-annual-conference-2024-lima-peru/ Deadline for Submissions January 9, 2024 This proposed panel explores personal and public remembrance of the North American incarceration of persons of Japanese descent throughout the Second World War (1941–1945), particularly how memories of the event are evoked and mobilized in different historical contexts and conversations. Engaging with key concepts of memory activism (Gutman, Rigney, Wüstenberg), postmemory (Hirsch), and multidirectional memory (Rothberg), among others, we examine how several present-day social movements and political initiatives draw on memories of Nikkei wartime exclusion to challenge contemporary forms of political violence and to fight for more just, equitable, and secure futures. We address the following questions: How can memories of the past be used to combat violence and to motivate political action and solidarity in the present? How do memories of the Japanese diaspora and western exclusion move across and between multiple generations, geographies, populations, and cultures? Further, how can practices of remembrance build community between different groups and draw connections between diverse social movements and political struggles? Spanning the disciplines of history, literature, and media studies, this panel addresses these questions and others by exploring how memories and remembrance of the Nikkei wartime incarceration influences our society today—including ongoing discussions about racial repair, environmental destruction, and coloniality. Ultimately, the panel seeks to offer new and critical insights into the political, activist, environmental, and embodied legacies of the Japanese American incarceration. We invite scholars interested in participating to send a short paper abstract to Kelsey Moore (kelseymoore@ucsb.edu) and Jen Noji (jnoji@g.ucla.edu)as soon as possible, but ideally no later than January 9. NB: All panel materials will be submitted by January 15, 2024. Call for Panel Participants – MSA 2024 (Lima, Peru, July 18-20) [Announcement] *

Symposium Selfing and Shelving: Zines, Zine Media, and Zintivism

deadline for submissions:  December 31, 2023 Zines are extremely versatile and shapeshift across various historical and cultural contexts. The term covers a wide range of objects with different aesthetic and material qualities as well as contexts of production and reception: Zines accommodate the collective concerns of fans and activists (zintivism) and the personal voice of the diarist and letter writer. Since the rise of digital media, zines and their aesthetics have become portable: Digitised and digital zines exist alongside blogs, social media, podcasts, and substacks, which seem to exhibit zine-y tendencies, while digital infrastructures have changed the ways that print zines are produced, distributed, and archived. At the same time, print media, including zines, have seen a revival and postdigital reinvention, not the least as a paper-based escape from screens. In this new constellation, we propose to revisit questions like: Where does the zine begin and end and how have its meanings changed for readers, collectors, and makers? How can contemporary developments of the zine (like the wave of quaranzines) change our understanding of its meaning, genealogy, and archive? And what, and where, are zines now? This symposium suggests considering these questions through the lens of –       shelving – the zine at home, on the shelves of libraries, archives, and collectors, its repurposing and disassembling, its neglect as ephemera as well as remediation through reprints and staging in exhibitions, coffee table books, etc. –       and ‘selfing’ – the zine as a tool in making identities and ‘working on the self,’ as a ‘third space’ for new subjectivities, as ‘sticky’ with affects, as the glue of communal belonging (local/transnational), as resource for ‘subcultural capital’ and distinction, and as conduit for relationships and activism. We especially welcome papers that propose theoretical approaches which attend to the materiality of zines and zine production and consider the printed zine as only one form of zine media. We are interested in new approaches to zines as well as in investigations of media and objects that borrow from, reference, mimic, disguise as, or are influenced by the zine – that are in some way zine-y and take the format, aesthetics, tone, and /or affect beyond paper. Please send an abstract (ca. 300 words) + short bio to safazli@uni-mainz.de and milos.hroch@fsv.cuni.cz by December 31, 2023 This symposium is designed as a friendly space for established and emerging scholars to share and discuss ideas. We also encourage practitioners to apply and are happy to accommodate non-academic formats of presentation. Organisers Sabina Fazli, Obama Institute, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany Miloš Hroch, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic * Call for Papers: Selbstporträts Expressionismus, Ausgabe 20/2024 Herausgegeben von Kristin Eichhorn und Johannes S. Lorenzen  Deadline for Abstracts 1/1/2024 Das Selbstporträt gehört zu den klassischen Motiven der Malerei, führt darüber hinaus aber auch zu der für die Moderne zentralen Frage nach den Wechselwirkungen zwischen Künstler*in und Werk. Es rückt den Produktionsprozess ebenso ins Zentrum wie den Menschen dahinter und erlaubt so neben der programmatischen Selbstverortung auch eine Diskussion über Art und Rolle künstlerischen Schaffens, die weit über bildende Kunst hinausgeht. In der Moderne werden deren mediale Möglichkeiten durch die Fotografie entscheidend erweitert, auch die Selbstdarstellung der kunstschaffenden Persönlichkeit verändert sich – man denke an die Akte von Egon Schiele, der sich oft selbst nackt und stilisiert malte und damit durchaus für Kontroversen sorgte. Künstlerische Selbstinszenierung durch Spiegelung der eigenen Person im eigenen Werk ist auch in der Literatur möglich und weit verbreitet. So ist es kein Zufall, dass viele Protagonisten im Werk Franz Kafkas als „K“ eingeführt werden und die frühen Romane von Johannes R. Becher autobiografische Züge aufweisen bzw. reale Lebensereignisse des Autors verarbeiten. Hintergrund dieser neuen Fokussierung auf das Selbst sind nicht zuletzt auch das Aufkommen der Psychoanalyse und dem Begriff eines ‚Ichs‘, das sich vor dem Hintergrund verdrängter Traumata und Sexualität gesellschaftlich konstituieren muss, sowie der weitgehende Wegfall religiöser und spiritueller Bedeutungsmuster, die das moderne Subjekt auf die eigene Biografie und die eigenen Lebensentscheidungen zurückwirft. Hat es das self-fashioning (Stephen Greenblatt) schon in der Renaissance gegeben, nimmt der Druck zur Selbstinszenierung vor dem Hintergrund miteinander konkurrierender und oft kurzlebiger (avantgardistischer) Strömungen zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts noch einmal deutlich zu, die nicht ohne Grund ihre Positionen durch so viele Manifeste begründen. Hinzu kommt, dass die Rolle des Künstlers zeitgenössisch stark über seine Rolle zur Gesellschaft definiert wird. Er kann als poeta vates eine quasireligiöse Seherfigur darstellen, sich entweder durch Elitarismus oder durch Provokation und Antibürgerlichkeit von der restlichen Gesellschaft absetzen und in mehr oder weniger konkreter politischer Verankerung ihre grundlegende Veränderung anstreben: In jedem Fall gehen Kunst und Leben eine enge Verbindung ein, bezeugen und beglaubigen sich gegenseitig. Künstlertum gilt es biografisch in Szene zu setzen und das Werk muss wiederum zu der Persona passen, der sich sein*e Erschaffer*in verpflichtet fühlt. So sind die Grenzen zwischen Fiktion und Realität nicht zuletzt in der Literatur des Expressionismus fließend, etwa wenn Else Lasker-Schüler als Figur in ihren Texten auftaucht, dort eine fiktive Identität als Prinz Jussuf annimmt, als der sie gleichzeitig wiederum im realen Leben auftritt. Häufig hat das Selbstporträt im Expressionismus also keine rein abbildende Funktion. Es entwickelt sich vielmehr ein komplexes Wechselspiel zwischen Original und Abbild, das die Grenzen zwischen beiden ebenso verwischt, wie es die Frage aufwirft, wo die Kunst endet und das Leben beginnt. Das geplante Heft möchte diesen und anderen Aspekten des Selbstbildnisses im Expressionismus vertieft nachgehen. Dabei sind sowohl Überlegungen zur generellen Praxis der Selbstverortung und Selbstinszenierung möglich wie auch die Auseinandersetzung mit einzelnen (bildkünstlerischen) Selbstporträts bzw. Alter Egos in narrativen Formaten (Literatur, Film). Abstracts zu diesen, aber gerne auch anderen thematisch einschlägigen Aspekten von nicht mehr als 2.000 Zeichen senden Sie bitte bis zum 1. Januar 2024 an eichhorn@neofelis-verlag.de und lorenzen@neofelis-verlag.de. Zudem werden unabhängig vom Thema des Hefts auch immer Vorschläge für Rezensionen oder Diskussionsbeiträge zu aktuellen Forschungsdebatten entgegengenommen, die Phänomene der aktuellen Expressionismus-Rezeption vorstellen und besprechen. Die fertigen Beiträge sollten einen Umfang von 20.000 Zeichen (inkl. Leerzeichen und Fußnoten) nicht überschreiten und sind bis zum 1. Juli 2024 einzureichen. Das Heft im November 2024. ENGLISH VERSION The self-portrait is one of the classical motifs of painting, but it also leads to the question of the interaction between artist and work, which is central to modernism. It focuses on the production process as well as on the person behind it and thus, in addition to the programmatic self-positioning, also allows a discussion about the nature and role of artistic creation that goes far beyond fine art. In the modern era, photography decisively expands the media possibilities of art, and the self-portrayal of the artistic personality changes as well – think of the nudes of Egon Schiele, who often painted himself naked and stylized, thus causing controversy. Artistic self-dramatization by mirroring one’s own person in one’s own work is also possible and widespread in literature. Thus it is no coincidence that many protagonists in Franz Kafka’s work are introduced as “K” and that the early novels of Johannes R. Becher have autobiographical features or process real life events of the author. The background to this new focus on the self is not least the emergence of psychoanalysis and the concept of an ‘I’ that has to constitute itself socially against the background of repressed traumas and sexuality, as well as the widespread disappearance of religious and spiritual patterns of meaning, which the modern subject could relate to his own biography and his own life decisions. If self-fashioning (Stephen Greenblatt) already existed in the Renaissance, the pressure for self-dramatization increases again significantly at the beginning of the 20th century against the background of competing and often short-lived (avant-garde) currents, which not without reason justify their positions through so many manifestos. In addition, the role of the artist is contemporary strongly defined by his role to society. As poeta vates, he can represent a quasi-religious seer figure, set himself apart from the rest of society either through elitism or through provocation and anti-bourgeoisie, and strive for its fundamental change in more or less concrete political anchoring: In each case, art and life enter into a close relationship, testifying to and authenticating each other. Artistry must be staged biographically, and the work must in turn fit the persona to which its creator is committed. Thus the boundaries between fiction and reality are fluid, not least in the literature of Expressionism, for example when Else Lasker-Schüler appears as a character in her texts, assuming there a fictitious identity as Prince Jussuf, as whom she in turn appears in real life. Please send abstracts on these, but also gladly other thematically relevant aspects of no more than 2,000 characters to eichhorn@neofelis-verlag.de and lorenzen@neofelis-verlag.de by January 1, 2024. In addition, regardless of the theme of the issue, we also always accept proposals for reviews or discussion papers on current research debates that present and discuss phenomena in the current reception of Expressionism. Final articles must be in German but translations will be accepted. Finished articles should not exceed 20,000 characters (including spaces and footnotes) and should be submitted by July 1, 2024. The issue in November 2024. Journal of Perpetrator Research Special Issue: Complicit Testimonies The Journal of Perpetrator Research is seeking submissions for a special issue on the theme of Complicit Testimonies, scheduled for publication in Spring 2025, and guest-edited by Ivan Stacy (Beijing Normal University). deadline for submissions: December 10, 2023 Introduction Shoshona Felman and Dori Laub wrote their seminal Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History (1992) as a result of their experiences with the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale. For this reason, they developed a model in which testimony is closely connected to the subject position of victimhood and the experience of trauma. This relationship has endured in academic research on testimony, with Avishai Margalit, for example, proposing the figure of the “moral witness” as one that has experienced directly the suffering produced by atrocity; it also appears in more recent contributions to The Future of Testimony: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Witnessing (edited by Jane Kilby and Anthony Rowland, 2008) and the Palgrave Handbook of Testimony and Culture, in which the editors Sara Jones and Roger Woods write in their introduction that “the urge to communicate the unique experience is the impulse behind much testimony from survivors of trauma”. Endeavours to explicate the nature of testimony as written or told by those who have lived through extreme suffering are necessary and valuable, yet the creation of testimony does not necessarily presuppose a state of victimhood or an experience of trauma. Analysis of perpetrator testimony by writers including Leigh Payne, Ute Hirsekorn and Sue Vice has productively complicated the relationship between testifier, the account they produce, and their role in historical events. However, the tendency to adjectivize testimony with a particular subject position – typically in the form of “victim testimony” or “perpetrator testimony” – presents a further problem: if, as Margalit argues, “testimony, not direct observation, is our basic source of evidence and knowledge,” to categorize that primary source of knowledge itself with the value-laden labels of “victim” or “perpetrator” imposes an a priori framework for interpreting events and experiences that are still in the process of becoming known. Moreover, as Primo Levi’s well-known elaboration on the “gray zone” in The Drowned and the Saved shows, the blurring of boundaries between victims and perpetrators was one of the central mechanisms by which the camps functioned, as a means of securing the complicity even of those whose lives they were designed to destroy. For this reason, the concept of complicity, and the uncertain moral positions that it encompasses, offers a valuable but hitherto under-theorised approach to studying testimony. The aim of this special issue of the Journal of Perpetrator Research is therefore to explore the relationship between complicity and the creation and reception of testimony from an interdisciplinary perspective. In a general sense, complicity is an increasingly important concept for understanding the negative consequences of actions in an ever-more interconnected world, and as Christopher Kutz notes, “the most important and far-reaching harms and wrongs of contemporary life are the products of collective actions, mediated by social and institutional structures.” Moreover, language itself is at once shaped by social and institutional pressures while also creating and performing complicity with those structures of power: as Thomas Docherty argues, complicity with institutions tends to operate through the “establishment of a reduced lexicon.” This special issue is intended to consider testimony in light of the particular challenges posed by the concept of complicity, and in doing so to examine the nature of narrative accounts created in a moral “gray zone.” Topics for articles in this special issue might include, but are not limited to:
    • Language and form in complicit testimonies
    • Literary and cultural representations of complicit testimonies
    • Affective responses to compromised testimony
    • Complicity and the generic boundaries of testimony
    • Distinctions between perpetration and complicity
    • Complicity and adjacent concepts (beneficiaries and implicated subjects)
    • Categories of complicity (collaborating, consorting, condoning and conniving)
We intend that the special issue will represent a range of disciplines, and we are particularly interested in articles from non-European and non-Anglophone perspectives. Deadline for submissions: Abstracts of around 300 words should be submitted to Ivan Stacy at ivanstacy@gmail.com, no later than 10 December 2023. Queries can be directed to the same email address. Full articles of 6,000-10,000 words will be due by 30 June 2024, with publication scheduled for Spring 2025. * Call for abstracts for a special issue of the International Mad Studies Journal (IMSJ), Maddening the Academy Deadline for Submissions, December 15, 2023 Guest Editors: Meaghan Krazinski (she/they), Syracuse University Jersey Cosantino (they/them), Syracuse University Jennifer Poole (she/her), Toronto Metropolitan University May Friedman (she/her), Toronto Metropolitan University Both traditional formats and non-traditional forms are welcome (and encouraged!). Deadline to submit abstracts: December 15th 2023, with publication in 2025 Call For Abstracts: The academy (noun): A place. A body. A collection of bodies, of bodyminds that bend/are bent toward who and what is considered “normal”. Never neutral, always operating in the context and coordinates of space and time including histories of in/access(ability). The academy often functions to suppress, oppress, invalidate, and erase m/Mad knowledges, ideas, thoughts, and expressions, while at the same time producing forms of madness by pathologizing ways of being that exist outside the boundaries of “normal”. The academy is a geopolitical space that reproduces itself and extends its control beyond the physical campus, while entwined in legacies of violence that reflect how education and the medical-industrial complex are always and have always been tools of white supremacy, ableism, sanism, and colonialism. Yet, while seeking to distance itself and rid itself of m/Madness, the academy encircles itself around it, quite literally, in its histories and investments in control of Mad/mad(dened) people, leaving traces of these hauntings (Gordon, 2008) and becomings in its wake. In this special issue of the International Mad Studies Journal, we seek to explore how Mad Studies, bodyminds, knowledges, meaning-making, thoughts, ideas, creativity, and imaginations, engage in an ongoing process of m/Maddening the academy and being m/Maddened by the academy. We operate from a shared understanding that the academy is rooted in the glorification of a particular colonial, white supremacist, neoliberal, Western, Global North ideological and political context and we seek to transgress this. Therefore, we invite a multitude of definitions of what the academy is, has been, and can be. We are especially grateful to scholars Juan Carlos Cea-Madrid and Tatiana Parada for their 2021 article “Maddening the Academy: Mad Studies, Critical Methodologies and Militant Research in Mental Health” from which the title of this special issue pays homage. We invite submissions from individuals with complex and multifaceted m/Mad(dening) relationships to the academy, including folks who were excluded from the academy, who rejected the academy, who found home and community within the academy, who long/ed for the promises of the academy, who helped to carve more accessible pathways through the academy, who seek to watch the academy burn once and for all…the list is endless. The ways that we, as guest editors of this special issue, practice and dream of m/Maddening the academy and hold space for the stories and felt-sense experiences of those m/Maddened by the academy are made possible because of histories of global activist and community-based resistance to psychiatrization, and the controlling, harmful practices of the psy-disciplines. Thus, a m/Maddening of the academy encompasses an infinite array of experiences and perspectives, backgrounds and identity intersections, pasts and presents, all the while perpetually seeking m/Mad(dened) futures that are liberatory for all. Abstract Submissions: We encourage abstract submissions to this special issue of the International Mad Studies Journal, “Maddening the Academy,” by December 15, 2023 via email to mkrazins@syr.edu. If alternative dates are helpful, we welcome these requests. Abstracts should:
    • be approximately 250 words that describe what will be discussed/addressed in your final article/submission and how this is connected to the theme of the special issue
    • include an approximately 100 word bio
    • include clear references to/engagement with Mad Studies scholarship/Mad movement building.
Estimated Publication Timeline (that also honors m/Mad time, Crip time, queer time, etc.):
    • August 2023: CFA is shared publicly
    • December 15, 2023: Author abstracts are submitted to guest editors
    • February 2024: Editors begin to contact authors
    • August 2024: Author final submissions due
    • Peer Review
    • Author Revisions
    • Copyediting
    • Special issue ready for publication: Winter/Spring 2025
Accessibility: Please note that we intend this special issue to also take up a process of m/Maddening academic outputs. As a result, we are open to processes which may make submission and contribution to this issue more accessible, nourishing and open to all. Please let us know what specific processes, including timelines, can best support your engagement. Final Submission Formats: In addition to traditional scholarly writing, we welcome arts-based, poetic, musical, autobiographical, photographic, and other non-normative contributions. Because the journal is entirely virtual, video, audio and other creative formats and offerings can be distributed and are warmly welcomed. We request that you include a brief written/recorded description of your arts-based contribution that highlights the submission’s connections to the special issue theme and personal significance. Contributors may choose to have their submission peer reviewed or reviewed only by editors. For more information, please feel free to reach out to us. Final Submission Word Count: There is no minimum word-count for scholarly writing  submissions of finished articles. We do ask that you please not exceed 5,000 words and to reach out to us directly if your piece will likely exceed this word count. For more information on this special issue, including possible themes and topics that we welcome you to explore, please feel free to reach out and we would be happy to share a longer, more detailed call for abstracts. Guest Editor Bios: Meaghan Krazinski: Meaghan (she/they), is a doctoral student in Special Education at Syracuse University with advanced study in women’s and gender studies. They seek to privilege neurodivergent ways of knowing as a means of resisting the pathologizing logics of the academy. Their most recent work investigates the relationships between healing, trauma, race, and disability labels. They also have a forthcoming work on the topic of Autistic understandings of gender and identity. Meaghan is white, multiply neurodivergent, and has education, class, and citizenship privileges with English as a first language. They hold a master’s in inclusive special education and a certificate of advanced study in disability studies from Syracuse University. Jersey Cosantino: Jersey Cosantino (they/them), a former K-12 educator, is a doctoral candidate in Cultural Foundations of Education at Syracuse University, completing certificates of advanced study in women’s and gender studies and disability studies. Jersey’s scholarship resides at the intersections of Mad studies and trans studies and, utilizing disability and transformative justice frameworks, their research centers the experiences and subjectivities of Mad, neurodivergent, trans, non-binary, and gender non-conforming individuals. Through oral history and autoethnography, Jersey seeks to construct Mad trans archives that create pathways and portals to Mad trans futures, imaginaries, and elsewheres. Using Mad trans methodologies that challenge sanism, ableism, and transmisia, Jersey’s research confronts medical model discourses and the pathologizing gaze of the psychiatric industrial complex. Jersey identifies as Mad, neurodivergent, queer, trans, and non-binary and is white with class, education, and citizenship privilege. They are a co-facilitator for SU’s Intergroup Dialogue Program and a co-editor of the International Mad Studies Journal. Jersey holds a master’s degree in high school English education (‘14) and a graduate certificate in mindfulness studies (‘19) from Lesley University, and a bachelor’s degree in English and studio art from Wellesley College (‘09). Jennifer (Jen) Poole (she/her) is a white, first generation settler to T’karonto (Treaty 13). Jen identifies as M/maddened and along with race, class, education, employment, citizenship,  language and other privileges, lives with disability, pain and fear.  As an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work at Toronto Metropolitan University, Jen’s work sits in the confluence of madness and grief, and while companioning learners is Jen’s professional priority, current (re) search projects focus on grief in the classroom, sanism, care, decolonizing education and knowledge. Jen is also a settler trainer for the Centre for Indigegogy at Wilfrid Laurier University, a Fellow at the Centre for Critical Qualitative Health Research at the University of Toronto and a Teaching Fellow at Toronto Metropolitan University. Additionally, Jen is a proud bonus parent, a TEDX talker and a long time community peer supporter.  Jen is happiest outside. May Friedman: May Friedman (she/her) works as a faculty member at Toronto Metropolitan University.  May’s research looks at unstable identities, including bodies that do not conform to normative tropes of race, ethnicity, ability, size, beauty and health.  Most recently much of May’s research has focused on intersectional approaches to fat studies considering the multiple and fluid experiences of both fat oppression and fat activism.  Drawing on a range of arts-based methods including digital storytelling as well as analyses of treasured garments, May has explored meaning making and representation in relation to embodiment and experience. Email questions to: mkrazins@syr.edu Please share out with all who may be interested! Live Link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vTlHcfa54_hj9tEbB8fh8L_237sJ__vkY4Wu4dFifV_rzvut5nSIs1CZs2wkGUjC_XTb7-B-P5k6AIs/pub ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ May Friedman (she/her) Professor School of Social Work and School of Fashion Toronto Metropolitan University 350 Victoria St. Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 Office: 208-D Eric Palin Hall 416-979-5000 x552525

may.friedman@torontomu.ca

*

Conference Announcement–Diaries in the 20th Century: Testimony, Memory, Self-Construction (12/8-9/2023) Dublin, Ireland, and Zoom

We are thrilled to announce the upcoming international conference Diaries in 20th Century: Testimony, Memory, Self-Construction, sponsored by the UCD Humanities Institute, the College of Arts and Humanities, the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, and the Foundation for Italian Studies. The conference will be held at University College Dublin, Newman Building on 8 and 9 December 2023, and will be live-streamed on Zoom. Please refer to the programme to see the location of the parallel sessions. If you wish to attend the conference either in person or on Zoom, please register here. For further details, please visit UCDiaries2023, and if you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact us at ucdiaries2023@gmail.com. Best wishes, The organisers Valeria Taddei and Mara Josi Dr Valeria Taddei (she/her) IRC Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellow School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics University College Dublin Dr Mara Josi (she/her), Ph.D. Cantab FWO Junior Postdoctoral Fellow, Ghent University The Research Foundation – Flanders * Journal of Perpetrator Research Special Issue: Complicit Testimonies The Journal of Perpetrator Research is seeking submissions for a special issue on the theme of Complicit Testimonies, scheduled for publication in Spring 2025, and guest-edited by Ivan Stacy (Beijing Normal University). deadline for submissions: December 10, 2023 Introduction Shoshona Felman and Dori Laub wrote their seminal Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History (1992) as a result of their experiences with the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale. For this reason, they developed a model in which testimony is closely connected to the subject position of victimhood and the experience of trauma. This relationship has endured in academic research on testimony, with Avishai Margalit, for example, proposing the figure of the “moral witness” as one that has experienced directly the suffering produced by atrocity; it also appears in more recent contributions to The Future of Testimony: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Witnessing (edited by Jane Kilby and Anthony Rowland, 2008) and the Palgrave Handbook of Testimony and Culture, in which the editors Sara Jones and Roger Woods write in their introduction that “the urge to communicate the unique experience is the impulse behind much testimony from survivors of trauma”. Endeavours to explicate the nature of testimony as written or told by those who have lived through extreme suffering are necessary and valuable, yet the creation of testimony does not necessarily presuppose a state of victimhood or an experience of trauma. Analysis of perpetrator testimony by writers including Leigh Payne, Ute Hirsekorn and Sue Vice has productively complicated the relationship between testifier, the account they produce, and their role in historical events. However, the tendency to adjectivize testimony with a particular subject position – typically in the form of “victim testimony” or “perpetrator testimony” – presents a further problem: if, as Margalit argues, “testimony, not direct observation, is our basic source of evidence and knowledge,” to categorize that primary source of knowledge itself with the value-laden labels of “victim” or “perpetrator” imposes an a priori framework for interpreting events and experiences that are still in the process of becoming known. Moreover, as Primo Levi’s well-known elaboration on the “gray zone” in The Drowned and the Saved shows, the blurring of boundaries between victims and perpetrators was one of the central mechanisms by which the camps functioned, as a means of securing the complicity even of those whose lives they were designed to destroy. For this reason, the concept of complicity, and the uncertain moral positions that it encompasses, offers a valuable but hitherto under-theorised approach to studying testimony. The aim of this special issue of the Journal of Perpetrator Research is therefore to explore the relationship between complicity and the creation and reception of testimony from an interdisciplinary perspective. In a general sense, complicity is an increasingly important concept for understanding the negative consequences of actions in an ever-more interconnected world, and as Christopher Kutz notes, “the most important and far-reaching harms and wrongs of contemporary life are the products of collective actions, mediated by social and institutional structures.” Moreover, language itself is at once shaped by social and institutional pressures while also creating and performing complicity with those structures of power: as Thomas Docherty argues, complicity with institutions tends to operate through the “establishment of a reduced lexicon.” This special issue is intended to consider testimony in light of the particular challenges posed by the concept of complicity, and in doing so to examine the nature of narrative accounts created in a moral “gray zone.” Topics for articles in this special issue might include, but are not limited to:
    • Language and form in complicit testimonies
    • Literary and cultural representations of complicit testimonies
    • Affective responses to compromised testimony
    • Complicity and the generic boundaries of testimony
    • Distinctions between perpetration and complicity
    • Complicity and adjacent concepts (beneficiaries and implicated subjects)
    • Categories of complicity (collaborating, consorting, condoning and conniving)
We intend that the special issue will represent a range of disciplines, and we are particularly interested in articles from non-European and non-Anglophone perspectives. Deadline for submissions: Abstracts of around 300 words should be submitted to Ivan Stacy at ivanstacy@gmail.com, no later than 10 December 2023. Queries can be directed to the same email address. Full articles of 6,000-10,000 words will be due by 30 June 2024, with publication scheduled for Spring 2025. * Deadline for Submissions Dec. 1, 2023

CFP: “Witnessing / Becoming” – University of Toronto, Centre for Comparative Literature, March 22-23, 2024

“‘I bear witness’—that means: ‘I affirm (rightly or wrongly, but in all good faith, sincerely) that that was or is present to me, in space and time (thus, sense-perceptible), and although you do not have access to it, not the same access, you, my addressees, you have to believe me, because I engage myself to tell you the truth, I am already engaged in it, I tell you that I am telling you the truth. Believe me. You have to believe me.’” – Jacques Derrida (“Poetics and Politics of Witnessing” 76) Witnessing is more than seeing, more than recounting testimony. A witness to an event is its participant, whether central or peripheral. In its continuity, the act of witnessing carries us past the immediate crisis of an event, into a post-event life. Processes of witnessing have manifested as fluid, ongoing testimonies, conveyed through various mediums such as novels, memoirs, autobiographies, reports, and films, among others. One could argue that at the core of these testimonies lies what Nadine Gordimer describes in “Literary Witness in A World of Terror: The Inward Testimony” (2009) as “the duality of inwardness and the outside world” (Gordimer 68), the dual exploration of one’s inner self and the external world, the quest to reconcile oneself with the uncertainties inherent in evolving events and the imperative to conceive new meanings of self-identity. We invite papers that consider how testimony has been represented not only as a form of documented eyewitness literature, but also as a process that entails transformations, and encounters that elicit new forms of becoming. By conjugating witnessing with becoming, we invite you to move past the eventuality of crisis, to understand language as irrevocably tied to the process of bearing witness, remaking itself continuously against the possible threat of erasure, “as if it were being invented at every step, and if it were burning immediately” (Jacques Derrida The Post Card 11). Differing subjectivities, selves, and life stories emerge in different environments. How might the act of bearing witness to uncodified subjective experiences and marginalized social realities challenge narratives of dominant power structures? To return to the temporal disconnect between the witnessed event and the performance of testimony, becoming can take a similar form. To become is to recognize the same temporal disconnect, to look backwards at what once was, yet no longer remains. Becoming might be a reading of the past, enacted in tandem with the witness’ attempt to reconstruct it, which remains eternally out of reach. How do these two forms interact with one another? How else might they intertwine? As an interdisciplinary conference, we encourage submissions from a variety of fields, such as literature, philosophy, history, ethnography, anthropology, media studies, disability studies, sociology, art history, religious studies, and gender studies. We welcome papers related (but not limited) to the following topics:
    • Testimonial Literature
    • Ethics of Bearing Witness
    • Living & Writing
    • Socio-political events in literature
    • Performativity
    • Transnationality & the Diaspora
    • Queerness & Alterity
    • Black Studies
    • Indigeneity & Decolonial thought
    • Planetary Subjectivity vs. Capitalist Globalism
    • Language & Translation
    • Temporality & the Self
Those who wish to participate in the conference should submit an abstract of no more than 250 words, along with a short bio. Abstracts must be sent, as attachments, to utorontocomplitconference@gmail.com before December 1, 2023. Emails should include the author’s name, institutional affiliation, and contact information. Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes. Contact Information Zichuan Gan, co-organizer PhD student Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Toronto z.gan@mail.utoronto.ca Contact Email utorontocomplitconference@gmail.com *

CFP: Biographies Area of the 2024 Popular Culture Association (PCA) Conference

March 27-30, 2024, Chicago USA Deadline for Paper Proposals: November 30, 2023 The Biographies Area of the Popular Culture Association (PCA)  is soliciting papers for the 2024 conference that examine the connections between biography and popular culture. Papers and full panel presentations regarding any aspect of popular culture and biography are encouraged. Potential topics might include: – Biography and entertainment, art, music, theater – Biography and film – Biography and criminal justice – Television programs about biography – Biography and urban legends – Biography and folklore – Biography and literature – Scholarly Biography – Controversial Biography – Psychoanalysis and Biography – Historical Biography – Political Biography – Autobiography The conference will be held March 27-30, 2024 at the Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile. Sessions are scheduled in 1½ hour slots, typically with four papers or speakers per standard session.  Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes. Below are some recent titles of presentations in the Biographies Area panels: ·Sex, Drugs, and Rock-n-Roll: Celebrity Biography through the Lens of Autopsy ·Will Rogers: American Folk Hero or Elitist Fraud ·Manufacturing “Soupy Sales:” Biographical Insights in the Emergence of a Comic Entertainer Please see this link for details and guidelines on submitting to the conference: https://pcaaca.org/general/custom.asp?page=submissionguidelines If interested in submitting for the conference, please provide the title and abstract of your presentation. Contact Information Susie Skarl Associate Professor/Urban Affairs Librarian UNLV Libraries Las Vegas, NV 89154 702-895-2141 susie.skarl@unlv.edu OR susieskarl@gmail.com Contact Email susie.skarl@unlv.edu *

Haunting Lives, edited collection, call for abstracts

Deadline for Submissions November 30, 2023

Are you a creative writer who consciously plays with techniques that transgress the borders between fiction and nonfiction? What is it that attracts you to this liminal space between the two, and what new writing territory do you want to form there? Your work might be in auto/bio/fiction, the historical or nonfiction novel, speculative history or a hybrid genre. You might balk at these categories as reductive and antipathetic to this genre-defying writing. Haunting Lives is an edited collection that will illuminate this border country, help readers to navigate or succumb to its strange terrain and examine the spectres that live there. We are looking for chapters that interrogate creative practice, to investigate how you came to this border country and what you are doing with your writing there.  We want chapters that explore your transgressions and subversions of these borders. We want you to map your challenges to a rigid borderline and to illuminate the effects you create. We are looking for chapters which do this in relation to your own work and with reference to the work of other writers and conceptual frameworks. Think Gordon Burn, Ali Smith’s Seasons quartet of novels or Jay Bernard’s poetry collection, Surge. You might draw on personal/family/cultural memory in your work. You might make stories out of archival documents and objects. How do you bring your imaginative processes to bear on this material to turn it into creative writing? You might be interested in:

    • The subjective
    • The intersectional
    • Telling historical stories from new perspectives
    • Challenging the hegemony of dominant versions of history
    • Bringing hitherto invisible and silenced characters and voices to the fore
    • The creative art of braiding personal and researched stories together
    • Collage techniques
    • Formal experimentation and playfulness
We are particularly interested in the ways that such writing creates powerful haunting effects and sheds uncanny light on real events and people. Ghosts have become a significant trope in recent border writing – Alison MacLeod’s short story collection, All the Beloved Ghosts, experiments with form to tell family histories, combine an autobiographical story with that of Princess Diana and to speculate about making a citizen’s arrest on Tony Blair. Edward Parnell’s Ghostland is both an exploration of the landscape of British ghost stories and a ghost story about his own family. Dylan Trigg says, of returning to a place which holds memories, ‘I am not alone in this memory… I am followed at all times by the ghosts who continue to coinhabit my memories, despite no longer existing in the material world’ Liminal space is the privileged place where ghosts can be brought to light and the past can be brought back to haunt us. Ethan Kleinberg has begun to theorise the concept of hauntological history and the importance of creative writing to it. He foregrounds the role of the imagination in how we make meaning: ‘I use literary fiction as a privileged site that exposes the way the past haunts history’. You might make a virtue of the gorgeous unreliability, peculiarity and rich singularity of memory or you might conjure ghosts/characters from old photographs and official documents. Dan Coxon and Richard V Hirst have identified the uncanny turn in recent fiction: ‘in modern literature, the Uncanny, ‘has become one of its dominant features.’ We want to extend their discussion. Teaching on a creative nonfiction module while my students are simultaneously studying a fiction module seems increasingly nonsensical to me. I begin the module by suggesting that nonfiction is not the opposite of fiction and by the end I steer students toward the border country where they can cross between fiction and nonfiction to tell haunting stories of reality. If you teach Creative Writing, your chapter might also interrogate pedagogical issues raised by these border writings. Such writing is as old as literature itself – Plutarch’s Parallel Lives were more morality tales than they were reliable biographies. In the twentieth century Virginia Woolf turned to fantasy and magical realism to illuminate the life of Vita Sackville-West in Orlando. But in recent times the ’truth’ contract, as outlined by Philippe Lejeune (although even he rescinded it), has been a guiding premise of so much Creative Nonfiction. It has become limiting and debilitating. The litigation against James Frey and his publishers, which resulted in A Million Little Pieces having to be moved across the border and sold as fiction rather than nonfiction, might be seen as a low ebb in this rigid categorisation of creative texts, driven as much, if not more, by marketing as by creative imperatives. We want to highlight and showcase the richness, variety and complexity of writing which claims to be neither or both at the same time. The collection will be co-edited by Dr Helen Pleasance and Professor Rob Edgar, of the York Centre for Writing at York St John University. Chapters should be between 4 and 6000 words. Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a short biography of no more than 150 words or questions about the project to hauntinglives@outlook.com by 30 November * Call for Abstracts – Turntable Stories  An Edited Collection Deadline for Submissions–Abstracts: November 30, 2023 Turntable Stories will be a collection of stories, memories and histories. It will be an exploration of turntable culture through creative non-fiction in the form of memoir, essays, autoethnography, personal histories and reflections. We want your experiences of club culture and of bedroom mixing. We want to know about your turntable heroes and your turntable buddies. Contributions might feature memories of a life-altering rave or cider-soaked indie-disco. They might be about niche scenes and subcultures. They might be about your local pub and its funk and soul night. The focus might be broad and cultural or specific and personal. Stories can be funny, heart-breaking, weird or all of these things. Contributors can be DJs, collectors, shop owners, researchers, scholars or simply lovers of material culture. What’s important is the foregrounding of narratives that explore our relationship with our decks, what we use them for and how they shape our musical and cultural memories. The turntable is a significant material presence in our cultural and musical life. Our record players sit in dusty corners of our living rooms, take centre stage in clubs, sit sparkling in upmarket shop windows or sad and neglected in the local Cash Converter. They are coveted, mythologised and fetishized. They are functional and material objects that make our record collections spring into life. The recent celebrations of hip hop’s fiftieth birthday take DJ Kool Herc’s Bronx party in August 1973 as a starting place. The 18-year-old DJ (known to his mum as Clive Campbell) made the innovative leap to using two turntables at once. In doing so, he ‘played two copies of the same record, a technique known as the merry-go-round where one moves back and forth, from one record to the next, looping the percussion portions of each track to keep the beat alive’. 1 The DJ as artistic maverick and tastemaker was born. With him came the wheels of steel, the ones and twos, the decks. With this new way to entertain, the DJ’s understanding of music, crowds and spaces soon became a significant and ubiquitous presence in global cultures and subcultures. By the turn of the new century, turntables sat in bars, clubs, festival stages and carnival floats. To DJ was as legitimate as any other musical skill. DJs became celebrities, superstars and icons. Turntablists showed off lightening sleights of hand. Musical lexicon now included scratching, mixing, break pauses and drops. DJs travelled the world with record boxes on wheels. Grooving across polished departure lounge floors in a timeless and looping party zone. But the turntable has always been a domestic item too. It’s been a hand-me-down from sibling to sibling. It’s been saved up for and bought from brightly lit high-street electrical stores. It’s been a set of broken Technics 1200s with a mixer thrown in for 20 quid a week over a couple of years. It’s been an untouchable presence in the living room, part of a gleaming stack system used only by Dad when he’s doing the crossword with his War Movie themes LP on or by Mum when she is soundtracking her evening G&T with James Taylor.2 Decks have been set up in bedrooms, taken to teenage house parties, smuggled into pirate stations at the top of tower blocks. They’ve been direct drive and belt driven. They’ve arrived in boxes with mysterious German and Japanese names printed on them. They’ve been cased in shiny pine and in smudged plastic. They’ve made that hiss and thunk when they hit vinyl. They’ve got dusty. They’ve sat unused but never really disappeared. But then, as the new century arrived, it all stopped. We didn’t need our record players. Clubs moved on too when the CDJ made an appearance. The warning signs were there in the 80s and 90s when tapes and CDs jostled for position. ‘Much more convenient’, we were told.  Our loyalty was tested. Then the pocket-sized gadgets appeared. They held thousands of songs. Then laptops. Suddenly we could access all the music we needed through a few mouse clicks. Sometimes it cost nothing. Music lost its magic. Our tribes and genres dissolved. Record shops looked sad and empty. Record collections were ditched. They ended up in charity shops and car boot sales. They were stashed in lofts and damp garages next to that old turntable. Only a few of us stuck with it. We kept buying them. We keep cleaning them. We keep talking about them. We kept our turntables moving. Now? Turntables have returned.  They are a retro item and a new fascination. Youngsters buy them for playing their new ‘vinyls’. There is a revival. The shops have reappeared and you can buy a flat white in them now. Portable record players like your grandma owned are must-have items for your socials. There are days put aside for buying records. You can order slip mats with a photo of your dog on them. T-shirts have pictures of those old knackered 1200s on them. It all come round full circle. A full revolution. What all of this means is stories and narratives and this is where you come in. We are interested in contributions of between 3000 and 4000 words. Contributions can include memories, observations, academic articles or any combination of these forms. We welcome contributions from experienced writers and from first time writers. Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a short biography of no more that 150 words or questions about the project to turntablestories@outlook.com by November 30th 2023. This collection will be curated by the editors of Venue Stories3 (Equinox 2023). Turntable Stories will follow a similar format. * CFP: Biographies Area of the 2024 Popular Culture Association (PCA) Conference March 27-30, Chicago USA Deadline for Submissions: November 30, 2023 The Biographies Area of the Popular Culture Association (PCA)  is soliciting papers for the 2024 conference that examine the connections between biography and popular culture. Papers and full panel presentations regarding any aspect of popular culture and biography are encouraged. Potential topics might include: – Biography and entertainment, art, music, theater – Biography and film – Biography and criminal justice – Television programs about biography – Biography and urban legends – Biography and folklore – Biography and literature – Scholarly Biography – Controversial Biography – Psychoanalysis and Biography – Historical Biography – Political Biography – Autobiography The conference will be held March 27-30, 2024 at the Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile. Sessions are scheduled in 1½ hour slots, typically with four papers or speakers per standard session.  Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes. Below are some recent titles of presentations in the Biographies Area panels: ·Sex, Drugs, and Rock-n-Roll: Celebrity Biography through the Lens of Autopsy ·Will Rogers: American Folk Hero or Elitist Fraud ·Manufacturing “Soupy Sales:” Biographical Insights in the Emergence of a Comic Entertainer If interested in submitting for the conference, please provide the title and abstract of your presentation. Deadline for Paper Proposals: November 30, 2023 Contact Information Susie Skarl Associate Professor/Urban Affairs Librarian UNLV Libraries Las Vegas, NV 89154 702-895-2141 Contact Email susie.skarl@unlv.edu

A Cultural History of Trans Lives in the Middle Ages (300-1450)

deadline for submissions:  November 20, 2023 We warmly invite submissions to contribute to A Cultural History of Trans Lives in the Middle Ages (300-1450), edited by J. D. Sargan and Micah James Goodrich. In the past several years, the emerging field of premodern trans studies has taken shape across disciplinary, geographical, and chronological lines. Our volume, A Cultural History of Trans Lives in the Middle Ages (300-1450), which spans over one thousand years of history, will serve to index these critical conversations among medievalists and anticipate new contours that our discussions may take. Please take a moment to look at the main series CFP here: https://bit.ly/CHTLvol1-6 Our volume proceeds from the assumption that there are many ways to tell the story of trans lives before the terminology “transgender” came into existence in the mid-twentieth century. While many medieval ideologies of sex and gender held that the discrete categories of “male” and “female” were spiritually innate and physically immutable, there were other currents of thought that saw the gendered body as porous, open, fluid, and textual. The boundaries of the body could stretch back in time, inhabit multiple places, be alive but not quite, and move between earthly corporeality and divinity. It is this portability of medieval gender that resonates with the prefixial trans- in “transgender,” denoting a state of motion, action, and flux, that our volume seeks to highlight. While the eight chapters in this volume spotlight a topical approach to trans lives in the Middle Ages (law, arts, medicine, etc.), we encourage contributors to think capaciously and extravagantly about how “trans lives” can be imagined. All Bloomsbury’s Cultural Histories are formed of 6 volumes, each volume covering a specific period and all the volumes in an individual History sharing the same set of broad chapter themes. This allows readers to follow a theme across history as well as study it in the context of a particular period. Authors should approach these chapters as a broad survey of the chapter topic, rather than an exposition of the author’s specific research area. That said, we do encourage authors to draw from their expertise. The Chapter titles for these volumes proceed as follows: Chapter Breakdown Chapter One: Law and Social Control [This chapter should take as its focus ‘law’ and ‘regulation’] Contributors for this chapter may consider topics and inquiries such as:
    • Formal and informal laws and legal structures (e.g. sumptuary laws)
    • Scales of law (divine, state, social)
    • Extralegal lives of social control and/or agency
    • Carcerality and embodiment
    • Law and/as violence
    • Law and/as liberation
    • Law and labor
    • Law and movement
Chapter Two: Bodies, Treatment, and Care [This chapter should take as its focus ‘science’ and ‘medicine’] Contributors for this chapter may consider topics and inquiries such as:
    • Medieval scientia and gender
    • Trivium/quadrivium and the body
    • Medieval medicine
    • Reproduction and embodiment
    • Gender-affirming medical care
    • Medical violence (anatomical texts, surgical manuals, “corrective” surgery)
    • Pastoral care
    • “Body-health” and “Soul-health”
Chapter Three: Spirituality and the Sacred [This chapter should take as its focus ‘spirituality’ and ‘the sacred’] Contributors for this chapter may consider topics and inquiries such as:
    • Religious practice across the medieval world (Judaism, paganism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and beyond)
    • Theological doctrine
    • Spiritual practices
    • Cosmologies
    • Sacred ritual
    • Genres of devotion
    • Spiritual embodiments
Chapter Four: Ideas, Debates, and Polemics [This chapter should take as its focus ‘ideas’ and ‘discourse’] Contributors for this chapter may consider topics and inquiries such as:
    • Elite and vernacular cultural ideas re: gender
    • Public gender(s)
    • Speeches, sermons, debates, public discourse
    • Epistolary traditions and exchange of ideas
    • Premodern biopolitics
    • Gender and/as education, scholastic discourse
    • Authenticity, reality, and legitimacy in social discourse
    • Ideas about the self, self-knowledge
    • Philosophies of personhood, identity, embodiment
Chapter Five: Representation and the Arts [This chapter should take as its focus ‘art’ and ‘aesthetics’] Contributors for this chapter may consider topics and inquiries such as:
    • Visual registers of gender and embodiment
    • Aesthetics and/of gender
    • Architectures of gender
    • Drama, plays, performance
    • Medieval media and embodiment
    • Visual censorship and circulation
    • Visibility, invisibility
    • Symbology, typology
    • The senses in art
Chapter Six: Bodies on Display [This chapter should take as its focus ‘bodies’] Contributors for this chapter may consider topics and inquiries such as:
    • Bodies in public fora (theaters, prisons, workplaces, markets, courtrooms/records, trades, health settings, etc.)
    • Imbrication of race, capacity, disability, and gender
    • Shapes, forms, structures
    • The partitive body
    • Care and cultivation of the body
    • The body as meaning-making and world-making
Chapter Seven: Material Culture [This chapter should take as its focus ‘things’ and ‘objects’] Contributors for this chapter may consider topics and inquiries such as:
    • Material registers of gender and embodiment
    • Things, objects
    • “Artifice”
    • Prosthetics and material additions to the body
    • Archaeology
    • “Mundane” things and everyday objects
    • Material modes of signaling transness
Chapter Eight: Natural and Unnatural [This chapter should take as its focus ‘nature’] Contributors for this chapter may consider topics and inquiries such as:
    • Natural philosophy
    • Metrics of naturalness/unnaturalness
    • Human/animal/plant divide
    • Animacies
    • Taxonomies, categories
    • Supernatural (monsters, giants, fairies, etc.)
The CFP is open to anyone working in any discipline and geographical area on trans studies in the medieval period (c.300-1450). We especially encourage trans scholars to submit. Please indicate if you would be interested in collaborating with another author on a chapter. Submit a 250 word abstract outlining your vision of the chapter that you’d like to write along with a brief bio and CV to the volume editors, J.D. Sargan and Micah Goodrich by November 20th [Extended Deadline] to james.sargan@uga.edu and mjgood@bu.edu * Call for Papers–Freedom on the Move and Fugitivity in North American Slavery March 15-16, 2024 Cornell University, Ithaca, USA Deadline for Submissions; November 20, 2023 Freedom on the Move (FOTM) will hold a symposium at Cornell University on March 15-16, 2024 to gather scholars (including early career and graduate students), librarians, archivists, and teachers to discuss the future of fugitivity studies and the impact of FOTM in scholarship, pedagogy, and the digital humanities. We invite scholars to propose papers that are based on Freedom on the Move or related topics of fugitivity. Accepted papers will be pre-circulated among confirmed conference attendees. The resulting in-person discussion will, we hope, advance our collective understanding of self-liberation, racialized surveillance and policing, and marronage and fugitivity, while also helping to build a larger research community. What is Freedom on the Move? With the advent of newspapers in the American colonies, enslavers published advertisements to try to capture freedom-seekers. Jailers posted additional ads describing people they had apprehended. While created to control the movement of enslaved people, the advertisements ultimately preserved the details of individual lives – their personality, appearance, and life story. Freedom on the Move is a database that houses these advertisements. FOTM serves as a research aid, a pedagogical tool, a resource for genealogists, and a starting point for all those who want to use these historical documents in new and creative ways. Interested parties should submit a CV and one-page proposal or abstract (no more than 250 words) to FOTM@cornell.edu by November 20, 2024. Project descriptions should include a brief overview of the argument, sources, the significance of the project, and the current status of the paper (yet to be written, in progress, drafted, completed). Final papers should be between 20-30 pages double-spaced and must be submitted to FOTM@cornell.edu by February 29, 2024 to allow time for circulation to registered attendees and fellow panelists. Contributors will be notified of acceptance by December 8, 2023. An honorarium will be provided for accepted papers, and some travel assistance will be available with priority allocated to graduate students and early career scholars who are presenting papers. All questions and submissions should be sent to FOTM @ cornell.edu . For more information about Freedom on the Move, please visit https://freedomonthemove.org/ Contact Information Department of History Cornell University Contact Email FOTM@Cornell.edu URL https://freedomonthemove.org * Events updates from the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing First – we are disappointed to announce that we have made the difficult decision to cancel this Tuesday’s colloquium on Writing Jewish Women’s Lives. We hope to rearrange the date for next term, and will announce the new date in due course. Meanwhile, the Programme for Writing Jewish Women’s Lives will begin instead with our two Literary Salons, on 7th November and 21st November. And for all our other events please read on! This week we have begun our two term-time writing groups, and over the next couple of weeks we look forward to welcoming you to our first public talks of term – the first of which is online on Sunday night – as well as offering you the chance to join us for a special workshop on non-fiction publishing on 31st October. Further details on these and more below. Best wishes, Alice and the OCLW team Events in 3rd week: Tuesday 24 October, 2pm-3.30pm, Buttery Diane Watt: The Gentlewoman from Reedham: Re-encountering Margaret Paston through her letters, in the 21st century Focusing on selected letters written by Margaret across her lifetime, from the years immediately following her marriage to those leading up to her death, this talk takes the events described as the starting point for a micro-biography. Diane Watt is Professor of Medieval English Literature and Co-Director of SGS (the Sex, Gender and Sexualities Research Centre) at the University of Surrey. In person only. Book here. Tuesday 24 October, 5.30-7pm, LWA Lucas Miller: ‘Thou wast not born for death’: Keats and the Living Art of Writing Literary Lives Lucasta Miller discusses her experiences as a life-writer in the light her of her most recent book, Keats: A Brief Life in Nine Poems and One Epitaph. Free event. Book here Friday 27 October, 10.30am-12.30pm, English Faculty: Laura Marcus Life-Writing Workshops Robert Douglas-Fairhurst and Hermione Lee: Life-Writing and Illness Free event, priority given to students in the English Faculty. Book here. Events in 4th week: Tuesday 31 October, 1pm-8pm, Buttery: Publishing Non-Fiction workshop With Eli Keren and Kate Walsh from United Agents, and featuring a Q&A with Blake Morrison, concluding with a drinks reception. In the first half of the afternoon, receive general advice on crafting compelling book proposals, mastering query letters, and navigating the competitive publishing landscape. In the second half, seize the opportunity to pitch your work and receive feedback on your ideas. £90, £81 for Friends of OCLWBook for the event here. Tuesday 31 October, 5.30-7pm: Weinrebe Lecture, LWA Blake Morrison in conversation with Hermione Lee: Two Sisters and the Art of Life-Writing Blake Morrison reflects on the challenges, rewards and ethics of putting together family memoirs. Free event. Book here Coming up soon 6th week: Wednesday 15 November, 2pm-3.30pm, online only Pragya Agarwal and Rebecca Donner: Rewriting Women’s Lives Free for members of our Research Network (join here). Find out more and register for the event here. Literary Salons – Writing Jewish Women’s Lives 5th week: Tuesday 7 November, 2pm-3.30pm, Buttery: Rebecca Abrams. Free event, in person and via Zoom. Book here.    and 7th week: Tuesday 21 November, 1.30pm-3.30pm, Buttery: Rebecca Abrams in conversation with Natasha Walter. Free event, in person and via Zoom. Book here. Writing groups Interested in discussion life-writing you’ve read, or perhaps you’re working on a project of your own? We run two weekly writing groups during term time, each group costs just £15 per session, and you can join at any time. Mondays in term time, in-person and online, 11am-12.30pm Friends of OCLW Life-Writing Discussion Group, with Charlie Lee-Potter For an introduction to life-writing, well-known and lesser known authors in the field, and to try your own hand at life-writing, join our friendly weekly group. Find out more here. Thursdays in term time, online only, 3pm-4.30pm Feedback Group, with Alice Little Whether you have a work in progress or simply want to learn how to give and receive feedback, join our small-group sessions to read and discuss life-writing projects. Sign up here. *

Translation, Transposition, and Travel in the Global Nineteenth Century Society for Global Nineteenth-Century Studies World Congress 16 to 19 January 2025 Gulf University for Science and Technology, Kuwait Deadline for Submissions: November 15, 2023 (Panels); December 15, 2023 (Papers)

Keynote speakers: Marwan Kraidy, Northwestern University Qatar Regenia Gagnier, University of Exeter Arthur Asseraf, University of Cambridge Sarga Moussa, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle

The period between 1750 and 1914 was marked by change, motion, and mobility. Advances in transport and the expansion of imperial powers brought together an array of peoples and facilitated contact between different cultures. These cultural encounters spurred the discovery of new information and of efforts to transmit, mask, or contain it. Translation played a seminal role in informing the public about the changing world and its interconnections. Imaginative writings and scientific concepts were subject to transposition and adaptation across languages and cultures. Indeed, global modernizing processes were due, to some extent, to travel, translation, and transposition. For its second world congress to be held in Kuwait from 16 to 19 January 2025, the Society for Global Nineteenth-Century Studies is pleased to invite proposals on the theme of “Translation, Transposition, and Travel in the Global Nineteenth Century.” We welcome proposals for papers and panels that explore transits between places, languages, cultures, and ideas. Topics may include (but are not limited to):
    • Travel and adventure
    • Initiatic journeys
    • Travel narratives and nautical fiction
    • Pilgrimage
    • Slave trade and the forced movement of peoples
    • Circulations, transfers, and migrations
    • Nomadism
    • Problems in translation (e.g., political humour, the absurd, nonsense, etc.)
    • Exile and displacement
    • Explorers and expeditions
    • Science fiction
    • Intermedial translation
    • Steamers and trains
    • Colonization
    • Translation and life writing
    • Transfer of knowledge
    • Cultural transposition
    • Adaptation across cultures
    • Transmediality and transnationalism
    • Transfer and transmission
    • Texts and their contexts
    • Transposition in music
    • Transposition and translation
    • Travel maps and cartographies of navigation
    • Books as travelling objects
    • Photography, painting, and travel
    • Tourism and visual culture
    • Nomadic narratives
    • Translation and the discovery of new cultures
    • The re/discovery of ancient civilizations/Egyptomania
    • Translation and the discovery of European modernity
In addition to paper and panel proposals related to the conference theme, we also welcome proposals for prearranged special panels on topics in global nineteenth-century studies more broadly: Methodology OR Pedagogy Roundtables: Sessions focused on methodological approaches to studying and practical strategies for teaching the nineteenth century in a global context. Big Ideas: Sessions focused on a single thought-provoking topic related to the global nineteenth century. The format may vary from standard panels (three presenters and a moderator) to lightning roundtables (five to eight presenters delivering short, provocative position papers) to others that may be proposed. Proposals (due 15 November for panels; 15 December for individual papers) Individual paper proposals should consist of an abstract (200-250 words), brief biography (80- 100 words), and full contact information in a single pdf document or Word file. Panel proposals should include abstracts for 3-4 papers, a brief rationale that connects the papers (100-200 words), and biographies of each participant (80-100 words) in a single pdf or Word file. All proposals should include 3 to 5 keywords.  Successful panel proposals will include participants from more than one institution, and, ideally, represent a mix of disciplines/fields and career stages. Panel proposals should also indicate the category for evaluation: general conference program or special session; Methodology or Pedagogy Roundtable; or Big Ideas. Although the working language of the conference is English, a limited number of slots will be available for presentations in Arabic. Location and requirements The congress will be held at the Global Studies Center, Gulf University for Science and Technology, in Kuwait. Modern, prosperous, and safe, Kuwait boasts a unique cultural mix, a longstanding tradition of the theatrical arts, diverse cuisine, and some of the best beaches in the region. Presenters, panel chairs, and workshop participants must be current members of the Society for Global Nineteenth-Century Studies at the time of the World Congress. For more information on membership, visit www.global19c.com . Proposals and questions should be directed to the Program Committee: societygncs@gmail.com. Please visit the 2025 Congress website for the most up-to-date information: https://www.sgncscongress.com Contact Email societygncs@gmail.com URL https://www.sgncscongress.com/ *

CAMPS, CARCERAL IMAGINARIES, & CRITICAL INTERVENTIONS

May 30, 2024 – June 2, 2024 Graz, Austria Deadline for Submissions–Oct. 23, 2023 This international conference which is co-sponsored by the Center of Inter-American Studies at the University of Graz and the Department of English at the University of Puerto Rico at Río Piedras, offers a forum within which graduate students, scholars, writers, practitioners, and the formerly incarcerated can come together to productively consider imprisonment, internment, and related technologies of enclosure as well as examples of resistance, protest, and struggle that have emerged in reaction to them. The history of the Americas shows that numerous groups have been confined in camps. These include detainees, inmates, prisoners, internally displaced people, asylum seekers, refugees, migrants, children, racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities, activists, and victims of political persecution, among others. It traverses events such as Cuba’s War for Independence, Japanese internment, the Viet Nam War, U.S. military operations at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, the corporatization of migrant detention, and the construction of camps at the U.S. southern border, among other events, many of which remain under-documented. In popular discourse, camps are often associated with short-term humanitarian operations related to the provision of shelter, food, and access to legal assistance. While some camps have functioned this way, scholars from numerous fields in the humanities and social sciences have signaled concerns about their proliferation and the extent to which they facilitate far-reaching cycles of punishment and abuse.  Their work demonstrates that the body politic frequently deems the people held in camps to be threatening and undeserving of “full rights” while contributing to their misrepresentation and marginalization. These and related insights prompt us to problematize how camps have been used as well as the assumption that they are necessary or effective. Building on the first conference in this series, in which five former detainees from Guantánamo discussed their lives in military prison camps and the memoirs they have written about their experiences, the conference seeks to cultivate interdisciplinary and intersectional exchanges that creatively navigate the space between “free society” and knowledge about encampment and a broad typology of camps and camp-like institutions. These include “assembly centers,” barracoons, slave depots, detention and internment camps, prisoner-of-war camps, labor camps, “black sites,” offshore detention centers, concentration and re-education camps, and prison units, among others. While proposals from all fields are welcome, the organizers anticipate ample participation from persons from the following fields: inter-American studies, literary studies, cultural studies, legal studies, critical prison studies, Caribbean studies, critical discourse analysis, sociocultural analysis, history. Graz is an opportune environment for work on camps, Guantánamo, and rights given its status as the first “Human Rights City” in Europe. The conference will include keynotes and presentations by former prisoners, academics, and prize-winning writers and poets. Planning of an array of other activities that will enrich the experience of participants is underway. These will be posted on our website as they are confirmed. Abstracts of 200-350 words for 20-minute presentations or panel proposals consisting of three to four participants should be submitted to camps2024@uni-graz.at by October 23, 2023 along with a biography of 100 words or less. Proposals for presenting poetry, art, film, and other creative work will also be considered. The languages of the conference are English and Spanish, and abstracts are welcome in both languages. Topics to be discussed include but are not limited to:
  • The past and present of Guantánamo Bay’s detention facilities
  • Education, creative writing, and literacy projects in jails and prisons
  • Language of (non)belonging and the homeland
  • Prison literature and the literature of human rights
  • The internment of people of Japanese ancestry during WWII
  • The ethics of encampment and captivity
  • Haitian detention camps in Fort Allen, Puerto Rico
  • Abolitionism, military prisons, and legal personhood
  • Camp-based protest, resistance, and solidarity (art, hunger strikes, writing, legal action, the historical record)
  • Borders, biometrics, biopolitics, security, and media representations of camps
  • The Mauritanian and other films about Guantánamo Bay, the War on Terror, and human rights
  • Prisoners of war and refugee camps, (e.g., WWI and WWII, in the Caribbean and elsewhere in the Americas)
  • Mass incarceration’s genealogical links to slavery, war, and empire
  • Immigrant experiences in literature
  • Refugee camps and understandings of “well-founded fear of persecution”
  • Testimony, activism, and human rights advocacy
  • Memoirs, essays, and poetry by former detainees, prisoners, and activists
  • Dimensions of personal identity (intersections of race, class, gender, religion, age, sexual orientation)
  • Public memory projects and archives of witness
  • Truth and reconciliation commissions in the Americas and in the global context
Contact Information camps2024@uni-graz.at *

Conference: Urban Lives: Amsterdam Diaries and Other Stories of the Self

Date: 26-28 October 2023, Amsterdam Venue: University Library, Singel 425, Doelenzaal, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands Website: https://vu.nl/en/events/2023/amsterdam-diaries-and-other-stories-of-the-self-conference In October 2025, Amsterdam will celebrate its 750th anniversary. In light of this upcoming celebration, two of the city’s institutes of higher education, the University of Amsterdam and the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, are organising a conference on Amsterdam diaries and other stories of the self. An exciting lineup of panels, workshops and key-note lectures given by our esteemed colleagues Julie Rak, Nina Siegal, Nadia Bouras and Diederik Oostdijk will provide each participant with a panoply of intellectually stimulating new insights on various aspects of life writing and the beautiful city of Amsterdam. The final programme for the event is available here. Registration for the conference is free of charge and open until 16 October (via the website). For more information, please consult our conference website, or contact us at: AmsterdamUrbanLivesConference@gmail.com *

CFP: Stardom and Fandom, Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference

February 21 — 24, 2024, Albuquerque, New Mexico deadline for submissions: October 31, 2023 contact email: lzubernis@wcupa.edu Proposals for papers and panels will be accepted starting September 1st for the 45th annual SWPACA conference. One of the nation’s largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels. The Area Chair for Stardom and Fandom invites paper or panel proposals on any aspect of stardom or fandom. The list of ideas below is limited, so if you have an idea that is not listed, please suggest the new topic. We are an interdisciplinary area and encourage submissions from multiple perspectives and disciplines. Topics might include:
  • Studies of individual celebrities and their fans
  • Studies focused on specific fandoms
  • The reciprocal relationship between stars and fans
  • Impact of celebrity and fame on identity construction, reconstruction and sense of self
  • Reality television, TikTok, YouTube and the changing definition of ‘stardom’
  • The impact of social media on celebrity/fan interaction
  • Celebrity/fame addiction as cultural change
  • The intersection of stars and fans in virtual and physical spaces (Twitter, TikTok, Instagram, conventions)
  • Celebrity and the construction of persona
  • Pedagogical approaches to teaching stardom and fandom
  • Anti-fans and ‘haters’
  • Fan shame, wank, ‘puriteens’ and fandom policing
  • Gendered constructions of stars and fans
  • Historical studies of fandom and fan/celebrity interaction
All proposals must be submitted through the conference’s database at http://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca SWPACA offers monetary awards for the best graduate student papers in a variety of categories. SWPACA also offers travel fellowships for undergraduate and graduate students. For more information, visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/graduate-student-awards/ For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at http://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/  Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. Including a brief bio in the body of the proposal form is encouraged, but not required.  For information on how to submit a proposal for a roundtable or a multi-paper panel, please view the above FAQs and Tips page. Registration and travel information for the conference will be available at http://southwestpca.org/conference/conference-registration-information/ For 2023, we are excited to be at a new venue, the Marriott Albuquerque (2101 Louisiana Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110), which boasts free parking and close proximity to dining, shopping, and other delights. We look forward to receiving your submissions! *

Call for Papers: Kings & Queens Royal Studies Network 13th Annual Conference May 27-28, 2024 American University of Paris and Châteaudun Castle, France Deadline for Submissions—October 31, 2023

The Royal Studies Network is delighted to launch a call for papers for our thirteenth annual Kings & Queens conference: Gift-giving and Communication Networks. The 2024 conference is conceived to mark the fifth centenary of the death of Queen Claude de France (1499-1524). It will be hosted at The American University of Paris for the first two days (May 27-28). Then it will move to the Châteaudun castle in the Loire Valley where, on May 29, it will hone in on Claude de France and women in Loire Valley courts. The general theme piggybacks on three former conferences: K&Q#2 (Making Connections: Alliances, Networks, Correspondence & Comparisons), K&Q#5 (Dynastic Loyalties), and K&Q#10 (Royal Patronage: Material Culture, Built Heritage & the Reach of the Crown). Presentations will be accepted in both English and French. In keeping with the spirit of the Royal Studies Network, proposals may deal with courtly gift-giving and communication networks in all times and places. We welcome submissions from professionals, postgraduate researchers, independent and early career scholars. While in-person presentations are preferred, the two days at The American University will be hybrid with online content, allowing for some degree of live streaming or recording of sessions. Please send your proposal to kchevalier@aup.edu. The deadline for submissions (250 words for an individual proposal, 500 words for a panel) is 31 October 2023. Please specify whether your presentation will be in person or online, and include a title and a short CV. You should receive a notification of acceptance no later than 15 December 2023. All queries should be directed to Kathleen Wilson-Chevalier at The American University of Paris via email to kchevalier@aup.edu. Contact Information All queries should be directed to Kathleen Wilson-Chevalier at The American University of Paris via email to kchevalier@aup.edu. More general queries on the Kings & Queens Conference series can be addressed to Elena (Ellie) Woodacre, via the Royal Studies Network (RSN). Full details of the call can be found on the link below–you can also use this weblink to contact the RSN.

* Call for papers for a Special Cluster in a/b: Autobiography Studies Spaniards across the Americas after the Spanish Civil War: “I am from the Country Called Exile” / Españoles en las Américas después de la Guerra Civil: “Soy del país del exilio”   Deadline for Submissions October 31, 2023 a/b: Auto/Biography Studies invites academic researchers to contribute to a special cluster  that seeks to recover the life writing practices by Spanish women and children who have been displaced across the Americas–North, Central and South America–since the Spanish Civil War (1936) and the almost four decades of Francisco Franco’s dictatorship in order to fill some important gaps in the historiography, literature, and social studies at both sides of the Atlantic. The soon approaching 90th anniversary of the Spanish American Exile marks the urgency of this project. Many Spanish families were exiled across the Atlantic, and yet, their history of diaspora and exile across the Americas has been largely ignored.  The lack of representation of these diasporic experiences and the artistic, literary and intellectual work of Spaniards is one the greatest impediments to the reconstruction of a collective narrative or collective memory of exile.  To that end, we aim to bring together scholars to raise awareness of the many forms of life writing produced by Spanish women and/or children who were exiled during and after the Spanish civil war, especially those reflecting on the impossibility of belonging to a distant and absent homeland as well as to an imposed new “home” in the American continent. We see this cluster as one of the first steps against the erasure of the historic memory of Spanish women’s and children’s exile, which not only contributes to the study of Spanish and American life writing practices, but also gives voice to those who have been forgotten across the Américas. Our title recovers a quote by José de la Colina—one of these exiled children—, who insists in defining his identity with the shocking statement “soy del país del exilio,” which translates to “I am from the country called Exile,” showing the identity crisis caused by the imposed exile and the impossibility of belonging. Ultimately, this special cluster aims to recover the collective memory of Spaniards and their experiences of war, exile and diaspora to reconstruct this “country called Exiled” and its many lives. As a guide, we invite participants to reflect upon the following questions:
  • How has the experience of the Spanish exile after the Civil War shaped the identity/identities of the women and/or children across the Americas and how has it been reflected in their life writing practices?  
  • How do Spanish women and/or children exiled across the Americas after the Civil War reflect on their new Spanish-American identity/identities in their life writing practices?
Estimated Timeline
  • October 30, 2023: Chapter proposals of 500 words and a 150-word bio due. Please submit to: Dr. María Gómez Martín, mgomezmartin@csusm.edu, and Dr. Ana Roncero Bellido, aroncerobellido@lewisu.edu
  • November 30, 2023: Notifications/acceptances sent
  • May 15, 2024: Complete chapters (4,500-6,000 words) due
  • September 15, 2024: Internal Reviews Due
  • December 15, 2024: Revisions Due
  • May 1, 2025: Manuscript sent to publisher
  • Special cluster to be published in the first volume of 2026, a/b: Auto/Biography Studies 41.1
Please send any questions to Dr. Maria Gomez Martin (mgomezmartin@csusm.edu) and Dr. Ana Roncero-Bellido (aroncerobellido@lewisu.edu). Contributions should be original and shouldn’t be under consideration for any other publication. Submissions are accepted in English and Spanish. Spanish call for papers Convocatoria para la presentación de artículos para número monográfico: españoles en las Américas después de la Guerra Civil: “Soy del país del exilio” a/b: Auto/Biography Studies invita a investigadores académicos a contribuir en un número monográfico que tiene como objetivo recuperar las prácticas auto/biográficas de mujeres y niños españoles que han sido desplazados en las Américas (América del Norte, Central y del Sur) desde la Guerra Civil española (después de 1936) y las casi cuatro décadas de dictadura franquista, con el fin de llenar algunos vacíos importantes en la historiografía, la literatura y los estudios sociales a ambos lados del Atlántico. En este número pretendemos reunir a académicos para dar a conocer las muchas formas de escritura auto/biográfica producidas por mujeres y niños españoles que fueron exiliados durante y después de la guerra civil española, especialmente aquellos que reflexionan sobre la imposibilidad de pertenecer a una patria lejana y ausente, así como a un nuevo “hogar” impuesto en el continente americano. En última instancia, este trabajo colaborativo ayudará a recuperar la memoria colectiva de las experiencias de la guerra, el exilio y la diáspora de los españoles en las Américas para reconstruir lo que José Colina, uno de estos niños exiliados, describió como “el país llamado exilio”. A modo de orientación, invitamos a nuestros participantes a reflexionar sobre la siguiente problemática:
  • ¿Cómo ha moldeado la experiencia del exilio español después de la Guerra Civil la identidad/identidades de las mujeres y/o niños en las Américas y cómo se ha reflejado en sus ejercicios de escritura autobiográfica?
  • ¿Cómo reflexionan las mujeres y/o niños españoles exiliados en las Américas después de la Guerra Civil sobre su nueva identidad/identidades hispanoamericanas en sus ejercicios de escritura autobiográfica?
Las contribuciones que deseen participar en esta convocatoria se harán llegar a las coordinadoras del monográfico por correo electrónico (Dr. María Gómez Martín, mgomezmartin@csusm.edu y Dr. Ana Roncero Bellido, aroncerobellido@lewisu.edu). Calendario tentativo:
  • 30 octubre 2023: último día para enviar propuestas de 500 palabras y una nota biográfica de 150 palabras a Dr. María Gómez Martín, mgomezmartin@csusm.edu, y Dr. Ana Roncero Bellido, aroncerobellido@lewisu.edu
  • 30 noviembre 2023: Notificación de las contribuciones aceptadas.
  • 15 mayo 2024: Último día para enviar capítulos (4,500-6,000 words)
  • 15 septiembre 2024: Completar revisiones internas
  • 15 diciembre 2024: Último día para enviar revisiones.
  • 1 mayo 2025: Se enviará el manuscrito completo.
  • El monográfico se publicará en el primer volumen de 2026, a/b: Auto/Biography Studies 41.1
Las contribuciones deben ser originales y no deben estar bajo consideración para ninguna otra publicación. Se aceptan ensayos en inglés y español. * Reckoning with the past: Soviet communism in postcolonial Australian perspective Academic workshop (and publication) 24 November 2023, 9am-5pm, The Australian National University, Canberra Abstract deadline: 1 November, 2023 Expatriate East European writers like Kapka Kassabova and Lea Ypi have portrayed their countries of birth (Bulgaria, Albania) as colonized territories. This perspective on Eastern Europe, however, is not common in Australian life writing in English. There does exist an archive of Australian life narratives in languages other than English, the languages of Eastern Europe, like Polish, Latvian, Ukrainian or Hungarian, which does share this perception of Soviet bloc countries as colonized places. But this archive is not widely known. In fact, the “Soviet story” is largely missing from public narratives and understanding of World War II and its aftermath in Australia. This is in spite of the fact that Australia is the home to many survivors of the Stalinist regime and their descendants: a great number of refugees evacuated from the USSR, from gulags in Siberia, Kazakhstan and Turkestan, were among the over 180,000 displaced persons resettled to Australia under the post-war mass migration scheme. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine brought to the attention of a broader cross-section of Australian society historic events that were previously largely ignored or unknown (such as Stalin’s Holodomor famine of the 1930s). It also brought to the fore instances of Russia’s manipulation of historical memory under Putin’s regime and the long history of Russian imperialism that underpins his war against Ukraine. It might thus be a good time to explore parallels between the (post)colonial and (post)socialist realms, and reflect on questions such as: Where does Siberia feature in an Australian imaginary? Can Australia apply familiar postcolonial paradigms to its approaches to and understandings of Eastern Europe? We acknowledge the ambiguity of the term “Eastern Europe”; here we are using it to refer to Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe – essentially, the countries of the former Soviet bloc and Yugoslavia. While a post-colonial approach to describing the condition of Eastern European countries is commonly used by academics in the region, Western scholars of postcolonialism have been reluctant to extend the paradigm to include the Soviet empire (e.g. Şandru 2012; Skórczewski 2006). In the 2011 Cambridge History of Postcolonial Literature (Quayson 2011), “not only is there no chapter dedicated to East-Central European countries, but the editor of the two volumes does not even consider the possibility of including one” (Terian, 2012). The blame for such exclusion is often placed by critics on the Marxist foundations of post-colonial theory and postcolonial scholars’ unwillingness to accuse the Soviet Union of imperial behaviours (Şandru 2013). We are looking for contributors to this academic workshop and the publication that will follow (a special issue or edited volume), who are working on various forms of life narrative (life writing, oral history, autobiographical fiction, etc.) and are interested in offering a critical reading of cultural productions, a critical response to the existing scholarship on views of Soviet communism in Australia, or a personal, creative response to the debate. Papers can address, among others, topics within broader themes including: –          Memories of Eastern Europe in Australia –          Soviet colonialism in Australian perceptions –          Translating (post)colonialisms –          Multilayered meanings of East European socialism in Australia –          Curating memory –          “Communism in the family” – remembering earlier generations Please send a 250-word abstract with a short bio by 1 November 2023 to Dr Kasia Williams (ANU Centre for European Studies) kasia.williams@anu.edu.au and Dr Mary Besemeres (ANU School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics) mary.besemeres@anu.edu.au *

Bloomsbury Cultural History of Trans Lives, Vol 4: The Eighteenth Century

deadline for submissions: November 1, 2023 Sal Nicolazzo (UC Davis), Scott Larson (University of Michigan), and Aixia Huang (SOAS), co-editors

The historical period of 1650-1800 includes massive historical transformations with particular purchase for the history of gender, yet this period has only begun to attract substantial attention from scholars of trans studies. This volume seeks to gather work that engages rigorously with trans studies methodologies while deepening the field’s engagement with historical periods and materials across regions, languages, and disciplines.

We invite chapter proposals that think broadly about “trans lives” in the long 18th century, though we do not propose one stable meaning of “trans lives” in this period or in our historical methodologies; rather, we welcome work that questions or pushes back against prioritizing what is legible as “trans” for contemporary readers/scholars and that opens a wide range of inquiry into the histories of categories, institutions, and practices that shape “trans lives” either in the past or in the present. At the same time, we acknowledge the colonial frameworks that have shaped this volume’s periodization, and we welcome work that critically interrogates the periodization of “the long 18th century.” This volume is part of the Cultural History of Trans Lives series, under contract with Bloomsbury and edited by Blake Gutt, Greta LaFleur, and Emily Skidmore. The series, which we expect will be released as open access after its first year of publication, aims for a broad readership across and beyond academia. We particularly seek proposals for chapters that can both advance scholarly conversations on trans histories of this period and speak to a broader audience of academics across fields, students, activists, community members, and anyone interested in the histories that shape trans lives now. Each volume in the series will contain eight chapters naming broad, general topics (outlined in more detail in the general series call for contributions). We welcome a wide variety of interpretations of the chapter topics from specific disciplinary, geographical, and methodological vantage points. We also understand that contributions might potentially fall under multiple possible categories, and so we welcome proposals that name multiple potential chapters of interest. We seek contributions from writers from a wide range of academic or nonacademic placements, career stages, and disciplinary locations. To propose a contribution, please send a CV and a brief chapter proposal (maximum 500 words) to chtlvol4@gmail.com. *

CFP: Archival Lives/Lives in the Archive (11/01/23; Sewanee Medieval Colloquium, April 5-6 2024)

deadline for submissions:  November 1, 2023 contact email:  ddavies@uh.edu Archival research has always been a cornerstone of medieval studies, but recent work has  reinvigorated the field by transforming our understanding of the lives of late-medieval authors  and people alike. The discovery of new evidence in the case of Cecily Chaumpaigne and  Geoffrey Chaucer, contentious debates around identifying “Chaucer’s Scribe” Adam Pinkhurst  and recovery of figures such as Eleanor Rykener and the rebels of 1381 all demonstrate how  archival research enriches our understanding of the medieval past. This thread invites  contributions that foster new understandings of lives in the archives and bring a theoretical eye to  the practice of archival research itself. Proposals might address new microhistories of medieval  figures; the need for what Saidiya Hartman names “critical fabulation” to address archival  silences and erasures; the colonial and imperialist history of institutions such as the National Archives; the archival lives of poets such as Thomas Hoccleve and John Lydgate; medieval  manuscripts as technologies of the archive; the limits of empirical history as an analytic for  literary history; and theorizations of archival “discovery” as a colonial epistemology. This thread will consist of a series of panels. You can choose to submit a paper or a pre-organized panel. Each panel will have a faculty respondent. SUBMIT A PAPER ABSTRACT (DUE NOV 1):  Proposals for papers can touch upon any aspect of the general theme, and we encourage proposals from medievalists of any discipline and any geographic area. Scholars can apply to the general call, or to specific sub-themes 12(10%) . We accept proposals from anyone with a Ph.D. or who is in the process of gaining a doctorate. Abstracts should be submitted by November 1, 2023. PROPOSE A PANEL (DUE NOV 1):  We also invite participants to submit whole panels of papers, that is, a pre-organized panel. Professional organizations often submit panels from among their membership, but individual are also invited to do the same. To submit a full panel, you need to send a description of the panel, a CV and abstract for the papers you would like to include, and suggestions for possible respondents. Panel proposals are due November 1, 2023. More information here: https://new.sewanee.edu/academics/medieval-colloquium/2024-conference-info/conference-sub-themes/archival-lives-lives-in-the-archives/ CENTER FOR BIOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH / UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I AT MĀNOA Monday, October 30 4:30-6:00pm EDT/3:30-5:00pm CDT/2:30-4:00pm MDT/1:30-3:00pm PDT/10:30am-12noon HST Online Book Launch and Celebration in honor of Cynthia G. Franklin’s Narrating Humanity: Life Writing and Movement Politics from Palestine to Mauna Kea (Fordham UP, 2023) Cynthia G. Franklin is Professor of English at the University of Hawai‘i. She coedits the journal Biography, and is author of Academic Lives: Memoir, Cultural Theory, and the University Today (2009) and Writing Women’s Communities: The Politics and Poetics of Multi-Genre Anthologies (1997). PRESENTATIONS BY: Maryam Griffin, Assistant Professor, University of Washington Fred Moten, Professor, New York University Bill V. Mullen, Professor Emeritus of American Studies, Purdue University Nadine Naber, Professor, University of Illinois; founder, Liberate Your Research Workshops With informal response by Cynthia Franklin Moderator: J. Kēhaulani Kauanui, Professor of American Studies and Anthropology, Wesleyan University TO REGISTER FOR THE EVENT GO HERE TO ORDER COPIES GO HERE *

Queen Elizabeth II: Life, Times, Legacies

17-19 April 2024 Lisbon, NOVA School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Portugal  Deadline for Submissions, October 15, 2023 The reign of the late Queen Elizabeth II (1952-2022) was the longest so far in the history of the British monarchy. Partly due, without doubt, to its exceptional duration, her seventy-year reign witnessed momentous events with far-reaching consequences, such as the end of the Empire; the decline of Britain on the international political scene; the ‘troubles’ and unrest within the British Isles and the prospect of a DisUnited Kingdom; the emergence and consolidation of popular and youth cultures and the relationship between the Crown and the media, to name but a few. The period is also of particular interest for Anglo-Portuguese Studies, as it raises issues such as the political relations between the two oldest allies during the Salazar/Caetano regime, the official visits, the impact of World War II, decolonisation, and the Revolution of the 25th April 1974, amongst others. Keynote speakers: João Carlos Espada (IEP, Universidade Católica Portuguesa) John Darwin (Nuffield College, University of Oxford) Martin Dale (University of Minho) Pedro Aires Oliveira (IHC — NOVA FCSH / IN2PAST) Philip Murphy (University of London) Steve Marsh (University of Cardiff) Teresa Pinto Coelho (IHC — NOVA FCSH / IN2PAST) >> Official website This International Conference seeks to analyse and assess Elizabeth’s life, times, and legacies across a broad range of disciplines, themes and topics, such as:
    • The British Monarchy
    • The British and Other European Monarchies
    • Monarchy and National Identity(ies)
    • Monarchy and Republic
    • British Institutions
    • Britain and the Emergence of Popular and Youth Cultures
    • Britain and the Welfare State
    • Britain in/and Europe
    • Britain and Brexit
    • Britain and Portugal: The Alliance during Elizabeth II’s Reign
    • Britain in/and the World
    • Britain and the USA: A Special Relationship?
    • The Queen and the European Monarchies
    • The Queen: Biographies and Chronicles
    • The Queen in Literature
    • The Queen in/and the Visual Arts
    • The Queen in/and the Media
    • Screening the Queen: Cinema and Television
    • Staging and Singing the Queen: Theatre and Music
    • The Queen and the (Re)Invention of Tradition(s)
    • The Queen, Memorabilia, and Merchandising
    • The Queen in/and Fashion
    • Royal Spaces and Geographies
    • The Queen in and out of doors: Sport, Animals, and Pets
    • The Queen and her Royal Residences
    • The Royal Family: Past, Present (and Future?)
    • Other
Languages: English and/or Portuguese Submissions The organisers will welcome proposals for 20-minute papers. Submissions should be sent by email to elizabeth2legacy@gmail.com including the title of the paper, an abstract (250-300 words), the author’s data (name, affiliation, contact address) and the author’s bio-note (150 words). Deadline for proposals: 15 October 2023 [NEW!] Notification of acceptance: 30 November 2023 Deadline for registration: 31 December 2023 Registration Fees: Physical (On-site) Presentation: 130€ Online Presentation: 120€ On-site (Physical) Listener: 80€ Online Listener: 70€ Students: 30€ Members of the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, CETAPS, IHC, IN2PAST and external supervisors to NOVA FCSH Masters in Teacher Education: Free All delegates are responsible for their own travel arrangements and accommodation. Contact Information For any inquiries, please contact the organising committee via email. Contact Email elizabeth2legacy@gmail.com * Craig Howes, List Manager Send notices for posting to craighow@hawaii.edu To browse current listings and the IABA-L archive, go to
https://manoa.hawaii.edu/cbr/iaba-listserv/
TO SUBSCRIBE https://hawaii.us14.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=4b810d876f2fee4b91c849f87&id=5ed81693cc International Auto/Biography Association Worldwide https://sites.google.com/ualberta.ca/iaba/home IABA Student and New Scholar Network (SNS) https://iabasns.wordpress.com on Facebook: facebook.com/IABASNS * Deadline for Submissions October 15, 2023 International Film Festival & Symposium on Celebrity: Between Fame and Infamy (10/15/2023; 2/22-3/8/2024) Texas, USA Texas State University is excited to announce its International Film Festival & Symposium on Celebrity: Between Fame and Infamyin San Marcos, Texas, February 22 – March 8, 2024. The festival will explore the topic of celebrity through a series of feature films and related artefacts (videos, edited clips, filmed performances, etc.) and conclude with a day-long symposium dedicated to the scholarly discussion of celebrity in films and filmic works from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Historical and Theoretical Background  Going back to eighteenth-century Europe, when the notion of celebrity arose, two models come to mind. On the one hand, an unknown writer publishes a text the paradoxical argument of which creates a scandal among literati who, by publishing counterarguments and stoking the writer to continue the controversy, gather a sizable audience and designate a philosopher in the making—Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Achieving fame within a few years, the author of The Social Contractnonetheless sees his work condemned to be burnt upon its release in 1762. On the other hand, and on the opposite end of the social hierarchy, is Marie-Antoinette, Dauphine of France, facing rival image-makers who create, subvert, or degrade the future royal icon, regardless of her own disposition to personify royalty and make herself personable to the public. Fame and infamy work in a seesaw manner in the production of celebrity. In the early twentieth century, German sociologist Max Weber laid the groundwork for a modern concept of celebrity as the secularization of charismatic authority in the age of capitalism. For Weber, charisma–a notion rooted in theology that alludes to the supernatural or superhuman qualities of an individual as a gift from God–has evolved into celebrity in the “disenchanted,” secularized age of modernity. Writing at the dawn of mass media and increasing popularity of motion pictures, Weber pointed to the development of celebrity culture as a phenomenon created and sustained by moving images and their global circulation. Today, film and short videos often mediate whose histories and art we celebrate. Global celebrities like Viola Davis, Leonardo DiCaprio, Timothée Chalamet, and Zendaya, to TikTok influencers and micro-celebrities, use their platforms for social critique, whether in film, documentaries, music videos, or edited clips. Celebrity is sometimes criticized as vacuous, dictated by likes, views, and followers—often quantity over quality, and amusement over art. We make celebrities into idols and watch as they negotiate their fame and infamy. Importantly, no discussion of celebrity is complete without a discussion of political accountability and the publicists, fans and paparazzi who often enable and produce celebrities. Call for Submissions We invite proposals for papers and presentations of artists’ own film/video works that explore the concept of celebrity as a political, social, and/or cultural phenomenon. Below is a list of potential topics: • Celebrity and image-making from style to fraud; politics of authenticity versus hyper-constructed roles • From celebrity to icon to genius: how does celebrity morph into exceptional creativity? • Using celebrity for cultural change; mainstreaming subcultures; micro-celebrity and the rise of niche cultures • Celebrity, the shaping of polity, and vice versa • Celebrity, censorship, “cancel culture,” and accountability • Mapping celebrity; influencer geopolitics and the circulation of influence • Celebrity and hyper-consumerism • Celebrity and the vicarious life • Scandal as origin of the celebrity phenomenon • The aftermath of celebrity; surviving celebrity; posthumous celebrity Please send all paper/presentation proposals—including a title, a 300-400 word abstract, and a 100-200 word mini-bio—before October 15, 2023, to cm25@txstate.edu or lvalencia@txstate.edu. Sessions will be plenary, and papers will be selected for publication. Texas State is a public university in Central Texas and a Hispanic-Serving Institution with a diverse student population of 38,000+. Located 30 minutes away from Austin, where the SXSW Film & TV Festival will take place March 8-16, 2024, the University is dedicated to increasing access to the arts and internationalizing higher education in the state. Contact Information Carole Martin, Professor of French, Texas State University, cm25@txstate.edu Louie Valencia, Associate Professor of Digital History, Texas State University, lvalencia@txstate.edu Contact Email cm25@txstate.edu URL https://internationalfilmfestivalandsymposiumonce * Deadline for submissions: October 9, 2023

Call for Book Chapters: Recovering Lost Voices 19th-century British Literature

This collection aims to continue the work of diversifying the 19th-century British literary canon. Many authors who were revolutionary and popular during their time are now underrepresented in the current scholarly field. The essays in the collection will touch on underread texts and authors as well as underappreciated characters in more traditionally canonical works. We welcome essays using lenses such as disability studies, trauma theory, critical race theory, queer theory, postcolonial studies, and more. Chapter proposals can include but are not limited to:
    • Underread 19th-century British authors
    • 19th-century diaries or letters that have been critically ignored
    • Approaches to underread or unappreciated works using
        • Disability theory
        • Queer theory
        • Critical race theory
        • Postcolonial studies
        • Trauma studies
    • Examinations of minor or ignored characters in canonical works
Please submit an abstract no longer than 500 words to Michaela George ( Michaela.George@unh.edu) and Elizabeth Drummey (Elizabeth.Drummey@unh.edu), the volume editors. A * “Beyond Words: Interdisciplinary Intersections of Creative Writing and Wellbeing” bookandvolumeofthemind@gmail.comCONTACT: CALL DEADLINE: 500-word abstracts by FRIDAY 6th OCTOBER 2023 EDITORS: Dr Caty Flynn (The Genre Lab.) & Professor Ursula Hurley (University of Salford) CONTEXT The phrase “creative writing” is used in wellbeing interventions as a catch-all term for many forms of practice. Currently, there is scant research to back up claims of efficacy, and little insight in terms of what the actual benefits of specific creative writing practices are, why these benefits occur, and how we can utilise this knowledge for shaping such practices so that we can get the most out of them. We believe passionately that creative writing can, indeed, improve wellbeing. But, we want to present a collection of investigations into the mechanisms of why and, by doing so, lay blueprints for how. This important intersection between wellbeing and creative writing has yet to be addressed robustly and this collection attempts to do so. Creative writing research is inherently interdisciplinary. As Mi Csikszentmihalyi explains, “being able to braid together ideas and emotions from disparate domains is one way writers express their creativity” (263). Science and psychology recognise the broader implications of creative writing’s applicability, evidenced by a wealth of developments over the last century, including but not limited to the explicit influences apparent in everyone from Freud to Damasio to Hofstadter, to Narrative Psychology (see Sarbin, 1986) and Drama Therapy (see Jones, 1996). Theorists of all disciplines typically turn to storytelling to elucidate their points. But, what can creative writing do for these fields beyond offering metaphors or analogies (useful as that may be)? What can creative writing do in terms of application, theory, communication, and creative conceptualisation with regard to wellbeing? In this proposed collection, we seek to move beyond metaphor towards mutual enrichment. The overall purpose of the volume is to showcase innovative methodologies and new theories, highlight benefits and challenges, offer frameworks and directions for future research, and encourage new developments at the intersection of creative writing practice and wellbeing. Our enquiry considers the implications for creative practice; psychological and therapeutic practice; self-help; intersectionality, social justice and transformation; and experimental scientific research. SUGGESTED THEMES/TOPICS We aim to be inclusive in terms of discipline, approach, and background. We encourage both single-author and collaborative submissions, and chapters which incorporate practice-based research or creative or hybrid forms into process or presentation, thereby making form as well as content part of the research, as well as more traditional academic chapters. We are interested in chapters that foreground specific genres of writing or specific areas of wellbeing, and those which take a broader view. We encourage personal investigations as well as social research. Essentially, we are open to receiving any creative and robust response to the brief from any and every disciplinary perspective, to showcase the diversity of current practices and their transformative potential. Of particular interest is interdisciplinary work that can creatively raise issues, themes, and topics such as: • Creative writing as a practice through which to shift perspective, question given rules and habitual behaviours, and imagine things otherwise. • Connections between the processes and concepts of writing and those of the cognitive and social sciences. Comparative essays on concepts from psychology, mental health, neuroscience, sociology etc with concepts from creative writing i.e., stories and brain processes, rhetorical/literary devices as biological/psychological/emotional functions/tools. • How can we make creative writing concepts accessible beyond literacy, vision, or any other barrier which impedes engagement? Chapters might imagine brail or audio methods, oral storytelling, dramatic or musical performance, games, and/or inclusive social facilitations. • Re-imaginings, syntheses, or innovative extensions of traditional or existing theory from an interdisciplinary lens – i.e., creative writing and psychology. • Case-studies, evaluative reports, cameos, co-constructed content or other outputs from creative writing wellbeing intervention trials or projects. • The capacities of creative writing to constitute a free and accessible mode of self-care for a large demographic of people in ways that support intersecting social inequalities observable in accessing effective mental health, wellbeing, and self-development support. • Are all types of creative writing good for us? Are certain types of writing “better” for us or more transformational, and others “worse” for us or regressive? In terms of reading or writing, particular genres or styles or movements or periods or practices. • Specific genres & their wellbeing potential / mental health utility/resonance; specific mental health conditions explored through the lens of creative writing; specific outcomes – self-expression; reconceptualisation; control; confidence; change; perspective; reflection; etc. • Evolutionary advantages of creative writing. • Disciplinary, sectoral, and/or any other challenges, difficulties, issues, or barriers in creative writing wellbeing research, development, engagement, and evaluation, including but not limited to ethical procedure, methodology, engagement, skillset, resources, knowledge base, facilitation, publication, funding, collaboration, and interdisciplinary working. How can we transform or overcome these challenges? • Robustly researched theoretical essays regarding the “why” and “how” of wellbeing/self-development benefits which emerge from creative writing. • The potential of creative writing for social change, resisting injustice, and transforming perceptions. • Methodologies for creative writing & mental health research and innovation. • Theoretical, experimental, and creative investigations of concepts and practices such as journaling; self-expression; life-writing; self-writing; and so on. • How can we build co-construction, community involvement, and social engagement into creative writing wellbeing projects? • Everyday utility/application of creative writing concepts/practices for self-care/expression/development. • The future of writing for wellbeing – directions/next steps; predictions/hopes; necessary changes; potential problems. All chapters must constitute fully-integrated interdisciplinary work – a dialogue between fields, rather than a reading of one discipline through another in a one-way dynamic. All of these topics/ideas can be approached in whatever genre of writing feels appropriate. However, we do expect there to be rigorous interdisciplinary research, reading, and critical thinking underpinning even the most creative or experimental chapter. We interpret creative writing broadly, so do contact us if you are unsure about definitional boundaries. ___________ Format: We invite 500-word Abstracts for 5,000-10,000-word chapters (negotiable). Please include up to 5 keywords and a brief biography of the author(s) which includes an institutional affiliation and your contact email. Send your abstract to: bookandvolumeofthemind@gmail.com Deadline for Abstracts: 06/10/2023. Accepted authors will be notified 20/10/2023. Accepted chapters to be delivered no later than 19/04/2024. Editorial team: Dr Caty Flynn (The Genre Lab.) & Professor Ursula Hurley (University of Salford) REFERENCES Cozolino, L. (2010). The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Healing the Social Brain. 2nd ed. New York: W. W. Norton. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2013). Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention. New York: Harper Perennial. Damasio, A. (2000). The Feeling of what Happens. London: Vintage. Freud, S. (2008). The Interpretation of Dreams. Oxford: Oxford’s World Classics. Hofstadter, D. (2007). I am a Strange Loop. Philadelphia: Basic Books. Koestler, A. (1975). The Act of Creation. London: Picador. Lakoff, G. & Johnson, M. (2003). Metaphors We Live By. London: University of Chicago Press. Prentiss, S. and Walker, N. eds. (2020). The Science of Story: The Brain Behind Creative Nonfiction. London: Bloomsbury. Professor Ursula Hurley (she/her) Equality, Diversity and Inclusion lead School of Arts, Media & Creative Technology / Room 203 Crescent House University of Salford, Manchester M5 4WT T: +44(0) 161 295 2851 u.k.hurley@salford.ac.uk  /   www.salford.ac.uk * Call for papers Fragmented Lives IABA (International Auto/Biography Association) World Conference 2024 Reykjavik, 12-15 June 2024 in collaboration with the Centre for Studies in Memory and Literature, University of Iceland deadline for submissions, Oct. 1, 2023 The IABA World Conference 2024 will be held at the University of Iceland in collaboration with the Centre for Studies in Memory and Literature 12-15 June 2024. The theme of the conference is ‘Fragmented Lives.’ We invite proposals for individual papers or panels of 3-4 papers as well as round-table suggestions on that theme. The world is fragmented in different ways in our times, due to wealth disparity, migration, and the continuing climate catastrophe. The digital revolution means that lives are now lived online as well as off – where fragmented identities and selves are played out. The recent pandemic can also be said to have fragmented our sense of time. This in turn shapes life writing and self-expression. As Eva Karpinski has argued ‘the autobiographical fragment is uniquely suited to address the discontinuities and ruptures of history, experience, and memory’ (Karpinski 2013), and that is why we turn to this theme to gain new insights into auto/biographical writing. One of the key issues at stake in auto/biographical narration is memory, and memory is usually incomplete, fragmented. Narrative is at times used to reflect this fragmentation, or it is used to paper over the cracks, to create a cohesive narrative out of a fragmented past. The biographer is also faced with fragmentary knowledge of the past when writing on another’s life, a past which is then pieced together. We are looking for papers on how lives and life writing can be addressed and examined in light of fragmentation. Themes and issues include, but are not limited to
    • fragmented narrative
    • fragmented identity
    • fragmented ecologies
    • fragments of a life
    • fragmented genres
    • digital fragmentation
    • fragmented pasts
Please send abstracts (300 words) or panel/round-table suggestions, and short bio (150 words) to IABAWorld2024@gmail.com by 1 October 2023. Further information will b e available soon on https://memory.hi.is/iaba-world-2024/ Archives in Transit: From Personal Life Histories to Public Experiences as Academics Northeast Modern Language Association March 7-10, 2024 Boston USA Submission Deadline: September 30, 2023, at: https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20713 Abstract While life in the academy often precludes acknowledging one’s own personal and familial life histories and experiences, generative and embodied scholarship in the humanities requires a thorough reckoning with our positionality and intersectionality. In this creative session, participants traverse from the personal to the professional by paying homage to the roots that lead to routes. This creative session invites all participants to express aspects of their personal identities that factor into both professional academic work and personal experiences of life in the academy. As a creative session, genre and modality are flexible. Genres can range anywhere from poetry to (non-)fiction as well as dance. Presentational modalities can include, but are not limited to, the gestural, spoken, written, visual, and audial. After panelists have performed, drawn, presented and/or read their work, there will be a collaborative discussion followed by an interactive discussion between attendees and performers. If there is ample time, an engaging discussion regarding the connections between the personal and the professional will conclude the session. We will end by jointly considering how our personal life experiences augment our abilities as instructors, writers, scholars, and life-long learners. Description The creative session will consist of 3-6 presenters who will perform, present, or draw aspects of their personal identities that factor into both professional academic work and personal experiences of life in the academy. Genre and modality are flexible. Additional Information For questions or concerns, please contact the session organizer at: andrea.dawn.bryant@gmail.com *

Ecologies of Exile: Exploring Literature Penned by Persecuted Writers during the Holocaust

Northeast Modern Language Association March 7-10, 2024 Boston USA Submission Deadline: September 30, 2023, at: https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20750 Abstract This seminar concerns the powerful and poignant canon of exile literature and focuses on works penned by authors who were forced to flee Nazi Germany. Working together, we will consider the diverse range of voices, themes, and artistic expressions that emerged from these exiled authors and artists. We will embark on a literary journey as we traverse across lines of identity to analyze works of memoir, fiction, essays, and poetry cultivated by individuals who sought safety transnationally. We will explore the interrelations between exile, stylistic and thematic choices, and conceptions of identity, belonging, and resistance. Some areas of consideration are to include, but are not limited by, the following: · The relationship between loss, displacement, and artistic imagination · Sentiments of belonging, longing for home, and cultural identity · Writing as resisting totalitarianism, persecution, and the Holocaust · The transformative power of narrating survival and resilience · Connections between emotional experiences and literary form This seminar explores identity in exile and the powerful role literature plays as an act of resistance against oppression. We invite participants to engage with a diverse array of voices and perspectives from authors who underwent displacement and persecution, thus nurturing a deeper understanding of literary contributions as they are located within the broader socio-political context of their respective situations. We additionally seek to encounter how literary expression, survival, and displacement allow a deeper understanding regarding how their contributions to a literary landscape prove to be a remaining act of resistance and fortitude. The seminar seeks to nurture the opportunity for participants to encounter the multilayered, transnational, and multilingual legacy penned by exiled writers fleeing Nazi Germany. Working together, we will honor the voices, perspectives, experiences, and work of our chosen authors and consider how their works continually contribute to understanding how human experience shapes persecution and the search for belonging. Description This seminar will consider the diverse range of voices, themes, and artistic expressions that emerged from exiled authors and artists during and following the Holocaust. Additional Information If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the session organizer at: andrea.dawn.bryant@gmail.com Contact Information Andrea Dawn Bryant Contact Email andrea.dawn.bryant@gmail.com URL https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20750 *

Avatars, Heteronyms, Phantoms: Life Writing, Literary Masks, and the Dispersion of the Self

American Comparative Literature Association Meeting March 14-17, 2024 Montreal, Canada Deadline for Submissions: September 30, 2023 As the age of online avatars as a source of anonymity is superseded by the obverse phenomenon (instead of real persons under fictitious names, algorithms using real names are increasingly part of our horizon of anxiety and expectation), it is time to look back on the complex transactions between literary avatars and life-writing. In the chapter “Playing for Real” from her book Derivative Lives (2022), Virginia Rademacher has noted the “progressive loss of the real to the simulated”, but also, as its correlative, the “dispersion of authority through the intervention of other players” (136). In this way, a biofictional or autofictional game in which the author thinks they hold behind-the-scenes control over the thresholds between imagination and the real ends up hijacked by the democratized rights of anyone’s claims to intercede in this hybrid invention. This seminar invites papers exploring the genealogy of contemporary writers’ literary avatars and/ or contextualizing these social media ephemerides as part of a broader literary tradition. If we think of Cervantes’s famous conceit of “Don Quixote” as a translation of Cide Hamete Benengeli’s writings, auctorial alter-egos can be said to be coextensive with the history of modern literature. They first start springing from the page as the made-up authors of eighteenth-century pseudo-translations (Vanacker 2018), a tradition which culminated in the nineteenth century (Toremans 2017). With the advent of periodicals, a new stage opens for invented names, often with personalities attached. From the plethora of “pseudo-persons” in Blackwoods’ Magazine in the 1820s (Esterhammer 2020, 38) to Coleridge’s alter-egos (Knox 2010, 425) or John Clare’s “Don Juan”, playing nearly tongue-in-cheek with his known delusion of being Lord Byron, the Romantics did not lack their avatars. Only Modernist authors seemed to outdo them, (re)inventing hybrid life-writing forms from “autobiografiction” (Saunders 2010) to heteronymy. Fernando Pessoa, creator of over seventy alternative selves, seems to hold a record for literary deception, but only if we do not count Romain Gary, the Lithuanian-born “French Ambassador to Hollywood”, multilingual writer, and pseudo-translator of his own “Promise at Dawn”, who pulled the impossible feat of winning the Goncourt Prize twice (under different names). In most of these cases, the “false” selves have deep auto/biographical roots, thus complicating common assumptions in biofiction and autofiction scholarship about the importance of onomastic identity between the protagonist and a historical figure. In exploring the avatar as a reincarnation of the heteronym, but also as a phantomatic return of auctorial anxieties about authenticity and the real, this seminar proposes to look at the dispersion of the self into a kaleidoscope of names and personas through the lens of life-writing. Laura Cernat, Todd Avery, and I will be co-chairing the sessions. We are interested in the literary precursors of contemporary biographical masks, avatars, and pseudonyms. We welcome proposals pertaining to a variety of cultures and historical periods and exploring the phenomenon of writing under another name or forging an entire fictive identity, in the form of made-up editors or columnists, made-up authors of pseudotranslations, or other literary conceits meant to disturb the univocal relationship between author and written work. Organizer: Laura Cernat Co-Organizer: Virginia Rademacher Contact the Seminar Organizers Virginia Newhall Rademacher, PhD Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies Chair, Arts and Humanities Division Babson College Babson Park, MA 02457 vrademacher@babson.edu WebEx personal room: https://babson.webex.com/meet/vrademacher Author Page: Derivative Lives (Bloomsbury, 2022) *

CFP–Graphic Biographical Fiction (9/31/2023) Edited Collection

Deadline for Submissions: September 30, 2023
Hello everyone,
I am happy to announce that my colleague Maria Juko and I are co-editing a volume of essays on graphic biographical fiction that explores the connections and tensions between comic studies and biofiction studies. I hope some of you will consider contributing to our volume. Here’s the call for papers! Nancy Pedri Graphic Biographical Fiction Scholars have only recently turned a critical eye towards the fictionalization of real people despite biofiction’s popularity on the literary market since the 1980s. Unlike autobiographies or biographies, rather than a truthful account of the person’s life story, biofiction centres on a creative interpretation of a real person’s life in which they become a character. Following David Lodge, who emphasized that the biographical novel “takes a real person and their real history as the subject matter for imaginative exploration” (8), Michael Lackey emphasizes that “the biographical novel is, first and foremost, fiction” (5). Further refining his definition of this literary form, Lackey explains how “the author of biofiction fictionalizes a historical person’s life in order to project into existence his or her own vision of life and the world” (Biofiction 13). Despite its growing popularity in life writing studies (Lackey, Latham, Layne), there has been a lack of research in graphic narratives that dramatize the lives of real people across words and images. In this issue, we take our cue from Paul Franssen and Ton Hoenselaars, who wished to “locate this genre in the field of literary production” (18), to locate it in the field of comics studies. As such, this special issue seeks to fill an important gap in exploring the tensions and productive relationships between biofiction and the graphic medium. Graphic biographical fiction asks us to reflect on several questions about storytelling, reading, and consumption and marketing patterns. These include, but are not limited to: – What is the relationship between graphic biographical fiction from graphic biography, historical fiction, or portraiture? – How does graphic biographical fiction impact our understanding of biographical fiction? – How does graphic biographical fiction address identity or the fact/fiction divide? – What questions about authorship does graphic biographical fiction raise? – What implications for character does graphic biographical fiction’s fictionalized treatment of a real person have? – How do graphic biographical fictions navigate the dangers of imposture, falsification, or sensationalism? – How does the visual aspect of graphic biographical fiction contribute to the dramatization of a real person and a real life? – To what extend are readers encouraged to merge the real life person with their work/ creative output? – What real life people are represented in graphic biographic fiction, and what makes them a suitable choice for authors? – Why do graphic biographical novels from European countries often focus on British or American subjects? – How is this genre promoted and why? – What readership does this genre attract and why?
Please send an abstract (200-300 words) and a short biography (100 words) to both editors, Maria Juko (mariajuko@gmail.com) and Nancy Pedri (npedri@mun.ca)
Deadline: 31 September 2023
Works Cited Franssen, P and Hoenselaars T. 1999. “Introduction: The Author as Character. Defining a Genre.” In Granssen, P and Hoenselaars, T. editors. The Author as Character Representing History Writers in Western Literature. Fairleigh Dickinson UP, pp. 11-38. Glaser, Brigitte Johanna. ‘Mediating Postcolonial Issues through Graphic Biofiction: Comics as a New Frontier in the Study of Literatures in English’. In: Michael Keneally, Rhona Richman Keneally, Wolfgang Zach (Hrsg.). editors. Literatures in English: New Frontiers of Research, Tübingen 2014. Lackey, Michael. “Locating and Defining the Bio in Biofiction!. a/b: Auto/ Biography Studies, vol. 31, no. 1, 2016. pp. 3-10. ———, Biofiction. An Introduction. Routledge, 2022. Latham, Monica. 2012. “Serv[Ing] Under Two Masters!. a/b: Auto/Biography Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, 2012. pp. 354-373. Layne, Bethany, editor. Biofiction and Writers! Afterlives. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2020. Lodge, David. The Year of Henry James: The Story of a Novel: With other Essays on the Genesis, Composition, and Reception of Literary Fiction. Penguin, 2007. —- Nancy Pedri, Professor & Head English, Memorial University of Newfoundland https://www.mun.ca/faculty/npedri/ Memorial University’s campuses are situated in the traditional territories of diverse Indigenous groups. We acknowledge with respect the diverse histories and cultures of the Beothuk, Mi’kmaq, Innu, and Inuit. *

Touring Travel Writing III: Between Fact and Fiction International Conference

Date: November 9-10 2023 Venue: NOVA FCSH, Colégio Almada Negreiros (Campus de Campolide) deadline for submissions: September 30, 2023 touringtravelwriting@gmail.com CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies, Universidade Nova, Lisbon) and CELIS (Centre de Recherches sur les Littératures et la Sociopoétique, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand) once again join efforts and organise this international conference which aims to be a locus of debate on the many facets of travel writing, a research area that has emerged as a relevant topic of study in the Humanities and Social Sciences in the last few decades. Papers on the following topics are welcome: Anglophone travel writing on the Portuguese-speaking world Lusophone travel writing on the Anglophone World Travelling to write Travel writing, the novel, poetry and drama Travel writing as report Travel and visual culture Travel writing, Humanities and the Social Sciences Travel writing, gender and power Travel writing, (post)colonial discourse and decoloniality Travel writing and (forced) migration Travel writing, imagined communities and imagology Travel writing and tourist culture Travel writing and (in)tangible heritage Travel writing and exploration Travelling as gentrification Travel writing, censorship and surveillance Travel writing and (auto)biography Travel writing and Otherness Travel writing, politics and ideology Travel writing and ethics Travel writing, mobility and conviviality Maps as travel narratives Travel, Fantasy, Children’s Literature and Young Adult Fiction Sound/Food/Smell/Touch/Visual/Ecoscapes in Travel Writing Travel writing in/as translation Utopian and dystopian travel narratives Science and travel writing History of Travel Writing Travel writing: theory and criticism Intertextuality in travel writing The rhetorics of travel writing Teaching Travel Writing Travel Writing and ‘World Literature’ Keynote speakers: Carl Thompson (University of Surrey, UK) Catherine Morgan-Proux (Univ. Clermont-Auvergne, France) Susan Pickford (Univ. de Genève, Switzerland) Papers and pre-organized panels: The conference languages are English and Portuguese. Speakers should prepare for a 20-minute presentation. Please send a 300-word abstract, as well as a short biographical note (100 words), by September 30th, to: touringtravelwriting@gmail.com Proposals for papers and pre-organized panels (in this case, please also include a brief description of the panel) should include full title of the paper, name, institutional affiliation, contact details, a short bionote and AV requirements (if any). Notification of abstract acceptance or rejection will take place by October 5, 2023. Registration fees: • Full fee: 80 Euros • Students: 40 Euros (ID required) Payment must be made until October 20, 2023. After this date proposals will no longer be considered. For further queries please contact: cetaps@fcsh.unl.pt or touringtravelwriting@gmail.com or mzc@fcsh.unl.pt Delegates are responsible for their own travel arrangements and accommodation. The conference website will soon provide useful information. Payment: Payment by bank transfer: Payment by Pay Pal Reference: CETAPS CONGRESSOS – 610245 BIC: TOTAPTPL IBAN: PT50 0018 000321419114020 13 Tax identification number: 501559094 This is additional data your bank may require: Account Owner: FCSHUNL – Research Units Bank: BANCO SANTANDER TOTTA S.A. For PayPal payments, use the email: dgfc@fcsh.unl.pt Identify your payment referring to: CETAPS 610245 International Conference (Touring Travel Writing III). Please add PayPal international taxes: PT + EURO zone: 3,4% + 0,35€ Rest of the World: 4,90% + 0,35€ Full Fee: 83,07 € (PT & EURO zone) 83,92 € (Rest of the World) Student Fee: 41,71 € (PT & EURO zone) 42,31 € (Rest of the World) Please send a copy of your confirmed payment to: cetaps@fcsh.unl.pt Event website: http://www.touringtravelwriting.wordpress.com 9(14.1%) Organized by the Anglo-Portuguese Studies research area. Organizing Committee: Maria Zulmira Castanheira Rogério Miguel Puga Gabriela Gândara Terenas Miguel Alarcão João Paulo Pereira da Silva Isabel Oliveira Maria da Conceição Castel-Branco Marco Neves Administrative support: Cristina Carinhas: cetaps@fcsh.unl.pt Mariana Gonçalves: cetapsgestao@fcsh.unl.pt *

A Light in the Fog: Creative Writing about Adoption

Northeast Modern Language Association Convention, March 7-10, 2024, Boston, USA deadline for submissions:  September 30, 2023 Poets and Writers: consider submitting for a panel at the Northeast Modern Language Association Convention, March 7-10, 2024, in Boston. Panelists will read original work focused on some aspect of adoption and participate in a discussion. To submit an abstract, go to https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20738 or the NeMLA website and look for panel 20738. Submission deadline is September 30. Panel Description: A recent article in The New Yorker discusses the “emotional aftermath” America’s 7 million adoptees face. The article uses the term “coming out of the fog” to describe an adoptee’s realization, sometimes triggered by an event in adulthood, about their situation and how it influences many aspects of their lives, especially personality and interactions with others. Adoptions were once secretive affairs, often with a birth mother signing away parental rights, and infants and children housed in institutions run by religious charities or the state until claimed by a couple. Contemporary adoption has many faces: open adoption, foster to adoption, transracial and international adoptions. Of course, further complicating the landscape, inexpensive DNA testing makes it possible for adoptees to locate biological families, with a variety of results. This panel asks poets and prose writers, especially adoptees, to share their work on adoption as a way of reflecting on and discussing this complex topic. Jerry Wemple contact email:  jwemple@commonwealthu.edu  *

Women in French 11th International Colloquium “Precarious Lives/Vies Précaires”

March 28-30, 2024, The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, deadline for submissions:  September 30, 2023 contact email:  gmstamm@ua.edu The COVID-19 pandemic, war in Ukraine threatening not only Europe but also shedding new light on other ongoing conflicts in Africa and the Middle East, series of climate change-related natural disasters, and attendant economic strain have thrown into relief what many of us were already aware of: the precarity of our own lives and that of those around us, human and nonhuman. However, as in most cases, that precarity is exacerbated by a number of systemic factors that impact us differently based on our position and identity. Women disproportionately left the workforce during the pandemic and many of the reasons driving this exodus were out of their control. Economic strain has been hardest on women of color; women, children, and minority genders make up the majority of refugees, including climate refugees. Despite being the “grande cause du quinquennat” during the first Macron term (and now renewed for the second), feminicide and domestic violence more widely continue to plague France, mirroring what has been happening in the rest of the world. For Women in French 2024 we invite you to consider the ways in which the precarity of women’s lives throughout history has been depicted in French and Francophone literature and culture. What are the factors that exacerbate that precarity? What or who else is vulnerable to these circumstances? In what ways has resilience emerged in response to these pressures? We welcome proposals of individual papers and entire panels on topics related to the overarching theme “Precarious Lives.” The conference will take place in Tuscaloosa, AL at The University of Alabama March 28-30, 2024. While the organizers envision a largely in-person event, accommodations will be made for a limited amount of colleagues who need to participate remotely. Possible topics may include but are not limited to : Migration, immigration, asylum War and genocide Environment and ecology Sexual and domestic violence Class and economic dependency/independence Race, sexual orientation, other intersectional identities Charge mentale Vulnerability studies Illness and disability studies Memory studies Women and mythology Exile Women in second-class citizen status Natural disasters and survival Precarity and science fiction Women and precarious democracies Women and world order Early emancipation movements Transatlantic studies Women and revolution Participants may present in English or in French. Please send a 250-300 word abstract and short bio to wif2024@ua.edu by September 30, 2023. Participants will be notified of acceptance by October 31, 2023. Panel proposals should include a short (about 100 word) proposal for each paper and a description of the unifying idea of the panel of the same length, as well as a brief bio of each participant. One Book, One WiF In partnership with our colleagues in WiF UK-Ireland, WIF North America is furthering the ‘One Book, One WiF’ project that began in 2017. The aim of this initiative is to help promote critical interest in less known French and Francophone women writers and thus to increase the readership of their corpus. The author for the 2024 conference is Meryem Alaoui and the text is La Vérité sort de la bouche du cheval (2018). Proposals for papers or a panel on this book or the author in general are welcomed. *

Abundant Silence: Narrative and Artistic Strategies of Resistance (Seminar)

Northeast MLA Conference, March 7-10, 2024 Boston, USA Deadline for Submissions—September 30, 2023 contact email: kaminerv@utica.edu This seminar builds on successful past seminars on the roles and limits of narrative in bearing witness to trauma and injustice. This year, we examine relationships between silence and abundance as artistic resistance strategies against colonial, racist, and exclusionary narratives. Silence is often discussed as an absence, but silences in literature and art are also abundant with meaning. On one hand, silences can refuse appropriations of voice and hegemonic interpretive frameworks. On the other hand, they can create echoes that produce new interpretations or ways of reading trauma and injustice. In this way, silences can be sites of excess, abundance, and plenitude. They can connect readers, authors, characters, and people represented in texts; they can produce spaces for love and care, for innovative relationships and ethical commitments. With this in mind, we invite participants to consider some of the following questions: What are the tensions between silence and abundance in literature and art? What can we, as readers or as scholars, learn from embracing these tensions rather than trying to resolve them? When and how might we think of silences as being full? How can silences bring something other than narrative into being? How can silences draw our attention to absences? When and how do silences echo? What stories are told by silences, absences, or things that don’t speak? In what ways are these artworks and literature more than products to be consumed? Do the ideas of surplus, abundance, and/or plenitude offer a framework for understanding the meanings of narrative silences? In what ways can silence and abundance interweave to create spaces of care or resistance? In what ways can silences reflect and contribute to thriving? Papers on all genres, media, and geographical contexts welcome. Please submit 200-word abstract and bio to the portal: https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20397 *

The Rise of Autoliterature

Northeast MLA Conference, March 7-10, 2024 Boston, USA Deadline for Submissions—September 30, 2023 contact email: calliein@buffalo.edu This panel will analyze autofiction and autotheory as contemporary literary genres still on the rise, with particular interest in putting the two in conversation with each other.
Autofiction and autotheory continue to grow in popularity as forms of contemporary life writing. Despite their differences, these two genres share a concern in representations of selfhood and subjective experience that explicitly engage and are shaped by other literary and philosophical texts. Moreover, by emphasizing the intertextuality of lived experience, they both challenge (1) the perceived conventionality of more established life writing genres, such as memoir, and (2) everyday assumptions of unmediated, individual self-expression. This panel will analyze autofiction and autotheory as contemporary literary genres still on the rise, with particular interest in putting the two in conversation with each other. Papers may engage autofiction or autotheory, or the relationship between the two, as genres, market categories, or artistic practices; look closely at specific works of autofiction and/or autotheory; or explore other forms of what we might call “autoliterature.” As the session title suggests, papers that historicize the emergence and development of autofiction and/or autotheory or that broadly analyze their ideological functions and features in a particular national or cultural context are especially welcome. Abstracts are due Sep 30, 2023, and should be submitted through NeMLA’s submission portal ( https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20337 NeMLA 2024 will take place in person at Boston, MA on March 7-10, 2024. More information about the convention can be found on the NeMLA website https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html Please feel free to reach out with any questions to calliein@buffalo.edu. * Adapted Lives and Spectral Presences Northeast MLA Conference, March 7-10, 2024 Boston, USA Deadline for Submissions—September 30, 2023 https://networks.h-net.org/group/announcements/20004229/adapted-lives-and-spectral-presences-nemla-2024 The theme of the NeMLA 2024 Conference in Boston, MA is “Surplus.” This panel focuses on adaptations in which historical subjects, especially writers, artists, and musicians, serve as “co-authors” of the adaptation itself, challenge the conventions of historical fiction and biopics. These adaptations inscribe or stage what is surplus in the archive, as historical personages articulate previously unspoken thoughts, concealed desires, or the keys that help subsequent generations understand their political, social, or creative endeavors. Elizabeth Freeman coined the term erotohistoriography to describe an “anti-systemic method” that does not so much seek to write the past into the present as to encounter the past already in the present by “treating the present itself as a hybrid.” In these encounters, dead bodies may come back to life as spectral or corporeal figures, activating alternate temporalities that disrupt hegemonic, regulatory time. Erotohistoriography effects a “counterhistory” informing later artistic productions, particularly when the resuscitated body is used to “effect, figure, or perform” cross-generational encounters, revealing how lived experiences of marginalized groups and individuals can be erased, rewritten, or reconfigured. Closely aligned with the concept of queer temporality, erotohistoriography forges cross-generational alliances that facilitate what Jill Dolan calls “utopian performatives.” This panel invites presentations on hybridizations of past and present in adaptations in which cross-generational encounters are a foundational element of their representational apparatuses, whether these encounters are manifest in the imaginations of the subjects or authors of historical fiction, or spectral and corporeal presences in adaptations intended for film and live performance. Please submit abstracts of 250 words for consideration by September 30 through NeMLA’s submission portal at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/User/SubmitAbstract/20803 0(0%) Contact Information David Pellegrini, Eastern Connecticut State University Contact Email pellegrinid@easternct.edu *

“You’ve Got Me in My Feelings”: Discomfort and Discourse of “Excessive” Emotions in Trauma Memoir

deadline for submissions:  September 30, 2023 Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Conference 2024 Boston, MA March 7-10, 2024 Trivialization of trauma is an increasing concern for scholars and clinicians alike, and Americans often culturally employ the language of trauma in hyperbolic or sarcastic ways, but does this humor or hyperbole also couch collective cultural unease with overwhelming emotions?  In The Body Keeps the Score, Bessel van der Kolk reminds us that “the essence of trauma is that it is overwhelming, unbelievable, and unbearable,” making bearing witness to it discomfiting and making witnesses acutely aware of their own mortality salience (197). In order to heal from traumatic experience, van der Kolk and van der Hart argue, “Traumatic memories are the unassimilated scraps of overwhelming experiences, which need to be integrated with existing mental schemes, and be transformed into narrative language,” concluding that it is necessary to “return to the memory often in order to complete it” (176). While what is traumatizing to one individual may not be for another, the vast majority of people will experience something that elicits particularly overwhelming, “negative” emotions, like grief, terror, or rage. While society tends to embrace collective shows of emotion that are viewed as “positive,” narratives that are focused on a happy ending, or storytelling that is neatly packaged to encourage consumerism or crowdfunding, too often Americans devalue, denigrate, and avoid individual experience of overpowering emotions to our individual and collective detriment.  In trauma memoir—memoir that narrates traumatic experience(s) of the author—the reading public functions as witness to these raw, private experiences of emotion, providing a necessary space for readers to learn to sit with the discomfort of intense, inconvenient emotions while also seeing how the memoirist copes and, most importantly, survives. This accepted panel invites explorations and analyses of “excessive” or inconvenient emotions in trauma memoir.  For general inquiries, please contact Danielle French, Kent State Universitydfrenc12@kent.edu.  Finally, no remote presentations are permitted per NeMLA guidelines, so please be ready to present in Boston.  For all general guidelines and 2024 NeMLA Conference information see: https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html. Please submit your paper proposals to:  https://cfplist.com/nemla/User/SubmitAbstract/20533. *

Violences Big and Small: Personal Stories of Resilience and Revelation

deadline for submissions:  September 30, 2023 Northeast MLA Conference (NeMLA 2024, Boston) March 7–10, 2024 contact email:  mejias@strose.edu This creative panel will be dedicated to nonfiction stories of excess and loss, of fear and humiliation. Through personal accounts that unfold around moments of trauma—of violences big and small—we will explore the place of resilience and revelation amid a surplus of pain. The panel draws inspiration from chronicles of normalized racial discrimination such as Marco Avilés’ No soy tu cholo (2018), as well as from works like Lo que no tiene nombre (2013), Piedad Bonnet’s book on how schizophrenia devastated her son, and Annie Ernaux’s brutally honest account of an illegal abortion in the autobiographical novel L’événement (2000). Similar impulses can be found in contemporary English language authors of memoirs and essays such as Tara Westover (Educated, 2018), Maggie O’Farrell (I am, I am, I am, 2018), and Emilie Pine (Notes to Self, 2019). “It is essential to write about things that hurt and isolate so that we feel less alone,” O’Farrell has said. In agreement with her statement, this panel’s organizing principle is that, by writing about our moments of greatest vulnerability, we may be able to create a space of authentic communion with other human beings. Send 250-word proposals. They must include a short sample of the text that you’re proposing to read. Up to six personal stories written in Spanish will make up this panel. Given time limitations, the texts selected for reading should be between 900 and 1,000 words long. Please use this link to send your proposal: https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20746 *

Behind the Scenes: The Literary Documentary, Scene II

Northeast Modern Language Association Convention, March 7-10, 2024–Boston USA deadline for submissions:  September 30, 2023 contact email:  kblombart@verizon.net Literary documentaries have become a popular pedagogical tool in higher education. Abstracts are invited from literary, media/film, and legal studies’ professionals to share their experiences, expertise and perspectives on the processes and complexities in creating a literary documentary. Literary documentaries in the past decade have become not only popular in higher education, but they are popular among the general public.  These documentaries, an excellent medium for teaching poets and writers, offer audiences a culturally rich, fascinating aspect of a writer’s daily life (i.e., Creeley, Olson, Merwin, de Prima, Sendak, Percy; see 2014 AWP), revealing poignant, intimate scenes of his/her creative life. However, what are the pitfalls of biographical misinterpretation in a brief, 60-minute glimpse into a writer’s life? Whom to interview for a “real” portrayal (friends, family, scholars)? How to “pitch” your doc to sell your film? What are the complexities to consider, for example the plan from idea to reality, funding, marketing?  What are the legal considerations of copyright, contracts, insurance, distribution, royalties? Which documentaries are considered worthy entries in the national and international film festivals?  250-300 word abstracts. *

CFP for Roundtable “Translation, Travel Writing, and Excess”

NorthEast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Annual Convention, March 7-10, 2024 Deadline for submissions: September 30, 2023 Chairs: Sanjukta Banerjee (York University) Elisa Leonzio (Università di Torino ,  Freie Universität Berlin) The notion of “excess” in translation and travel (writing) brings to attention the plurality of the unfamiliar often put away as “lack”. It is also connected to critical awareness of and engagement with the polysemy of others leading to inquiries that can accommodate “thick description”, “thick translation”, and point to the ambiguity and ambivalence of both the translated and the translator. How does excess figure in representations constructed and circulated by travel and translation? How is it turned into “lack” and “omission”? What processes are involved in the determination of details as “junk” (Bender and Marrinan 2005) — archived yet excluded — but not necessarily as “garbage”? What kinds of deviations from received knowledge get left out in translation ? What are the ethical dimensions of these inquiries? And how can we engage productively with the notion of excess? This roundtable seeks to explore these and other relevant questions in translation and travel (writing) as co-constitutive and distinct practices. We want to draw particular attention to the significance of ambiguity as a vital resource for exploring the limits of representation constructed and facilitated by translation and travel. We invite perspectives, especially those relevant to the global south, from theoretical and creative works and from across disciplines, including, but not limited to, translation studies, travel writing studies, cultural and media studies, and archival studies. Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words for presentations (5-7 mins) by September 30, 2023 at https://cfplist.com/nemla/User/SubmitAbstract/20794 For additional information, please contact sanjukta1@sympatico.ca  or elileo@zedat.fu-berlin.de Contact Info: For information about conference: support@nemla.org For information about roundtable: sanjukta1@sympatico.ca  OR  elileo@zedat.fu-berlin.de Contact Email: sanjukta1@sympatico.ca URL: https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20794 * Deadline for Submissions Sept. 30 2023

The Rise of Autoliterature (NeMLA 2024 panel)

This panel will analyze autofiction and autotheory as contemporary literary genres still on the rise, with particular interest in putting the two in conversation with each other.
Autofiction and autotheory continue to grow in popularity as forms of contemporary life writing. Despite their differences, these two genres share a concern in representations of selfhood and subjective experience that explicitly engage and are shaped by other literary and philosophical texts. Moreover, by emphasizing the intertextuality of lived experience, they both challenge (1) the perceived conventionality of more established life writing genres, such as memoir, and (2) everyday assumptions of unmediated, individual self-expression. This panel will analyze autofiction and autotheory as contemporary literary genres still on the rise, with particular interest in putting the two in conversation with each other. Papers may engage autofiction or autotheory, or the relationship between the two, as genres, market categories, or artistic practices; look closely at specific works of autofiction and/or autotheory; or explore other forms of what we might call “autoliterature.” As the session title suggests, papers that historicize the emergence and development of autofiction and/or autotheory or that broadly analyze their ideological functions and features in a particular national or cultural context are especially welcome. Abstracts are due Sep 30, 2023, and should be submitted through NeMLA’s submission portal (https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20337). NeMLA 2024 will take place in person at Boston, MA on March 7-10, 2024. More information about the convention can be found on the NeMLA website (https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html). Please feel free to reach out with any questions to calliein@buffalo.edu. * Deadline for Submissions September 30, 2023

“You’ve Got Me in My Feelings”: Discomfort and Discourse of “Excessive” Emotions in Trauma Memoir

deadline for submissions: September 30, 2023 Danielle French, Kent State University dfrenc12@kent.edu Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Conference 2024 Boston, MA March 7-10, 2024 Trivialization of trauma is an increasing concern for scholars and clinicians alike, and Americans often culturally employ the language of trauma in hyperbolic or sarcastic ways, but does this humor or hyperbole also couch collective cultural unease with overwhelming emotions?  In The Body Keeps the Score, Bessel van der Kolk reminds us that “the essence of trauma is that it is overwhelming, unbelievable, and unbearable,” making bearing witness to it discomfiting and making witnesses acutely aware of their own mortality salience (197). In order to heal from traumatic experience, van der Kolk and van der Hart argue, “Traumatic memories are the unassimilated scraps of overwhelming experiences, which need to be integrated with existing mental schemes, and be transformed into narrative language,” concluding that it is necessary to “return to the memory often in order to complete it” (176). While what is traumatizing to one individual may not be for another, the vast majority of people will experience something that elicits particularly overwhelming, “negative” emotions, like grief, terror, or rage. While society tends to embrace collective shows of emotion that are viewed as “positive,” narratives that are focused on a happy ending, or storytelling that is neatly packaged to encourage consumerism or crowdfunding, too often Americans devalue, denigrate, and avoid individual experience of overpowering emotions to our individual and collective detriment.  In trauma memoir—memoir that narrates traumatic experience(s) of the author—the reading public functions as witness to these raw, private experiences of emotion, providing a necessary space for readers to learn to sit with the discomfort of intense, inconvenient emotions while also seeing how the memoirist copes and, most importantly, survives. This panel invites explorations and analyses of “excessive” or inconvenient emotions in trauma memoir.  For general inquiries, please contact dfrenc12@kent.edu.  Finally, no remote presentations are permitted per NeMLA guidelines, so please be ready to present in Boston. Please submit your paper proposals to:  https://cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/20533.  * Deadline for Submissions October 1, 2023 Fragmented Lives Call for papers Reykjavik, 12-15 June 2024 in collaboration with the Centre for Studies in Memory and Literature, University of Iceland IABA (International Auto/Biography Association) World Conference 2024 The IABA World Conference 2024 will be held at the University of Iceland in collaboration with the Centre for Studies in Memory and Literature 12-15 June 2024. The theme of the conference is ‘Fragmented Lives.’ We invite proposals for individual papers or panels of 3-4 papers as well as round-table suggestions on that theme. The world is fragmented in different ways in our times, due to wealth disparity, migration, and the continuing climate catastrophe. The digital revolution means that lives are now lived online as well as off – where fragmented identities and selves are played out. The recent pandemic can also be said to have fragmented our sense of time. This in turn shapes life writing and self-expression. As Eva Karpinski has argued ‘the autobiographical fragment is uniquely suited to address the discontinuities and ruptures of history, experience, and memory’ (Karpinski 2013), and that is why we turn to this theme to gain new insights into auto/biographical writing. One of the key issues at stake in auto/biographical narration is memory, and memory is usually incomplete, fragmented. Narrative is at times used to reflect this fragmentation, or it is used to paper over the cracks, to create a cohesive narrative out of a fragmented past. The biographer is also faced with fragmentary knowledge of the past when writing on another’s life, a past which is then pieced together. We are looking for papers on how lives and life writing can be addressed and examined in light of fragmentation. Themes and issues include, but are not limited to
    • fragmented narrative
    • fragmented identity
    • fragmented ecologies
    • fragments of a life
    • fragmented genres
    • digital fragmentation
    • fragmented pasts
Graduate students and early career researchers are especially encouraged to apply individually and with panels. A workshop for this group is also planned and reduced conference fees will be available. Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Anna Poletti is associate professor of English at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. They research life writing in contemporary Anglophone media and culture, and specialize in archival research, queer and feminist theory, and cultural studies methodologies. Anna’s research explores two primary themes: 1) the variety of roles life writing plays in contemporary societies, politics and cultures, and 2) the way people use media technologies and material culture to attach meaning to lived experience. Exploring these themes, Anna has published on topics such as Andy Warhol’s use of the cardboard box, digital storytelling, zines, selfies, graphic medicine, and youth-led climate activism. Their books include: Stories of the Self: Life Writing After the Book (New York University Press, 2020), Intimate Ephemera: Reading Young Lives in Australian Zine Culture (Melbourne University Press, 2008), and Life Narratives and Youth Culture: Representation, Agency and Participation (with Kate Douglas, Palgrave 2016). Anna co-edited the Eisner Award-nominated collection Graphic Medicine (with Erin La Cour, University of Hawai’i Press, 2021), and Identity Technologies: Constructing the Self Online (with Julie Rak, University of Wisconsin Press, 2014). Their first novel (hello, world?) explores online identity, sexuality and gender, and will be published by Semiotext(e) in 2024. With Kate Douglas and John Zuern, Anna is a Series Editor of the book series New Directions in Life Narrative for Bloomsbury. Erla Hulda Halldórsdóttir is a Professor of Women’s and Gender History at the University of Iceland. She has published works on women’s and gender history, biography, correspondence, and (women’s) historiography. Among her works in Icelandic is the monograph Nútímans konur (Women of Modernity, 2011) in which she relies heavily on correspondence when exploring women’s education and the construction of gender in late 19th century Iceland. In 2020 she co-authored the award-winning book Konur sem kjósa. Aldarsaga (A Centenary of Women Voters, 2020) in which the authors study women’s citizenship and agency in 20th-century Iceland. Among her works in English are articles in Life Writing (2010, 2015) and Women’s History Review (2018). She co-edited Biography, Gender, and History: Nordic Perspectives (2016) and wrote a chapter in The Palgrave Handbook of Auto/Biography (2020). Erla Hulda is now working on two projects related to correspondence and life writing. First, it is the publication (2023) of 50 love letters written by an Icelandic student in Copenhagen to his fiancé in Iceland, 1825-1832 – before and after he betrayed her. Second, for publication in 2024, the biography of Sigríður Pálsdóttir (1809-1871) who wrote 250 letters to her brother for half a century. For both these cases only one side of the correspondence has survived. Please send abstracts (300 words) or panel/round-table suggestions, and short bio (150 words) to IABAWorld2024@gmail.com by 1 October 2023. For more information see https://iabaworld2024.hi.is/. * ‘1974-2024: Annie Ernaux’s Years – a Global Perspective’ International Conference University of Edinburgh & University of St Andrews 3-5 October 2024 Deadline for Submissions: 29 September 2023 With Annie Ernaux’s participation (pending confirmation) Confirmed keynote speaker: Prof. Barbara Havercroft, University of Toronto Annie Ernaux’s writings have gained increasing international attention in recent years, especially since the English translation of Les Années (The Years), seen by many as her masterwork, was published in 2017 and shortlisted for the International Booker Prize in 2019. The global reach of her works culminated in the award of the 2022 Nobel Prize in Literature ‘for the courage and clinical acuity with which she uncovers the roots, estrangements and collective restraints of personal memory’. This prestigious prize, that she was the first French female writer to receive, anchored her status as a major 20th and 21st-century author and instantly brought her global fame – she was for instance the guest of honour at the New Delhi world book fair in 2023. Most of Ernaux’s writings are non-fictional and depict the life experiences of a French woman born in 1940, as much as an experience of Frenchness across genders, social classes and generations. Yet, despite being situated in a specific time, space and in personal experience, critics and readers have often commented on the universal reach of her works. Fifty years after the publication of Les Armoires vides (Cleaned Out) in 1974, her debut autobiographical novel partly based on her back-alley abortion in the 1960s, this conference aims to interrogate the universal dimension of Ernaux’s books and locate them in an international context, assessing the significance of her writings beyond the French-speaking world. As more translations of her books become available, this event will seek to broaden the scope of academic criticism on her works and shed light on her links with past and contemporary world literature, by examining her influences and legacy as a writer and public intellectual figure. Although the scholarship on Annie Ernaux emerged in the English-speaking world in the 1980s, this event will be the first international, solely English-speaking conference focusing on her work. We are particularly pleased to host this event in Scotland where Ernaux’s talks in August 2019 as part of the International Book Festival attracted a very large audience, both in French and in English, which was a testimony to the reach and relevance of her works. The conference will take place in the historic locations of Edinburgh and St Andrews across three days, with an opening evening at the French Institute in Edinburgh. Questions and themes that will be addressed in the conference include, but are not limited to:
    • the international reception and ‘universal’ dimension of Annie Ernaux’s works
    • the ‘transpersonal’ nature of her work, between the personal and the collective
    • life-writing and genre hybridity (between fiction and non-fiction, intimacy and extimacy)
    • perceptions and representations of time
    • gender, identity and bodily experiences; self and others
    • ageing, abortion and illness narratives
    • the portrayal of post-1945 socio-political and cultural changes in France and beyond (e.g. feminism, social mobility…)
    • travels and the significance of other countries and other cultures (eg. Venice; the USSR…)
    • the influence of international authors and artists on her writing; Ernaux’s legacy as a writer and her influence on contemporary authors and artists worldwide
    • questions of translation and adaptation, across languages and media (intermediality)
    • teaching Ernaux worldwide and pedagogical matters
    • national and international fame, legitimacy, and the question of ‘popularity’ and popular culture; the 2022 Nobel Prize award
    • Ernaux’s status as a leftist intellectual and committed writer; the political scope of her work in France and beyond
We invite proposals for 20-minute papers (in English) to be sent before 29 September 2023 to both conference organisers:
    • Dr Fabien Arribert-Narce (Senior Lecturer in French, School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures, University of Edinburgh), f.arribert-narce@ed.ac.uk
    • Dr Elise Hugueny-Léger (Senior Lecturer in French, School of Modern Languages, University of St Andrews), esmh@st-andrews.ac.uk
About the conference organisers: Dr Fabien Arribert-Narce is Senior Lecturer in French and Comparative Literature at the University of Edinburgh. He is the author of Photobiographies: pour une écriture de notation de la vie (Barthes, Roche, Ernaux) (Champion, 2014), and editor of L’Autobiographie entre autres (Peter Lang, 2013), The Pleasure in/of the Text (Peter Lang, 2021), and Intermedial Encounters Between Image, Music and Text (Peter Lang, 2023). His recent publications include articles on Ernaux’s ‘photojournal’ in Écrire la vie and uses of photography in Mémoire de fille. Dr Elise Hugueny-Léger is a Senior lecturer in French at the University of St Andrews. Her research focuses on contemporary life-writing and the creative writing process – she recently published Projections de soi: identités et images en mouvement dans l’autofiction (Presses Universitaires de Lyon, 2022). She is the author of Annie Ernaux, une poétique de la transgression (Peter Lang, 2009) and co-created the bilingual website www.annie-ernaux.org. In recent years, her work on Ernaux has focused on the reception of her books, including internationally, as well as on Ernaux’s creative process. Proposals for papers should include the name, affiliation and email address for all paper authors, as well as a brief (max. 250 words) abstract, paper title and biographical note (max. 50 words). Proposals from practitioners, translators and members of the publishing community are particularly welcome alongside proposals from established academics and early-career scholars and PhD students. Proposals from international speakers are particularly welcome. The provisional programme of the conference will be announced at the beginning of 2024. This project will lead to a peer-reviewed publication of selected papers.
https://www.annie-ernaux.org/conferences/2024-edinburgh-st-andrews/
The University of Edinburgh is a charitable body, registered in Scotland, with registration number SC005336. Is e buidheann carthannais a th’ ann an Oilthigh Dhùn Èideann, * Time to register for IABA Asia-Pacific The conference is online, from Tuesday, September 26 until Thursday, September 28 No registration fee, but you must be registered to attend. https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/the-5th-iaba-asia-pacific-conference-tickets-705755302107?aff=oddtdtcreator
11(10%) The 5th IABA Asia-Pacific Conference Eventbrite – IABA Asia-Pacific Steering Committee presents The 5th IABA Asia-Pacific Conference – Tuesday, 26 September 2023 | Thursday, 28 September 2023 – Find event and ticket information. www.eventbrite.com.au
——- – on behalf of the  IABA Asia-Pacific steering committee http://iabaasiapacific.wordpress.com * 19-23 August, 2024 | Oulu, Finland 4th World Congress of Environmental History Deadline for Submissions: Sept. 18, 2023 CALL FOR PAPERS FOR A PANEL PANEL: Environmental biography as a methodological challenge https://nomadit.co.uk/conference/wceh2024/p/13626?utm_source=conference&utm_medium=sendy&utm_campaign=wceh_cfp_share David Hsiung (Juniata College) and Maarit Leskelä-Kärki (University of Turku), Convenors Short Abstract: This panel investigates the multidisciplinary field of environmental biography as a way to study the relationship between environment and humans from the perspectives of environmental humanities, history, and life writing studies. This panel investigates the multidisciplinary field of environmental biography, or like Jessica White (in “From the Miniature to the Momentous: Writing Lives through Ecobiography.” a/b: Auto/Biography Studies. Volume 35, 2020 – Issue 1: Life Writing in the Anthropocene. 2020) put it: ecobiographies. What is environmental or ecobiography? How do we understand environment, and the interaction between human and nature in biographical life-narratives? What sources can we use in writing biographies from environmental perspectives? The panel seeks for inspiring contributions discussing the possibilities and challenges of writing environmental biographies from different time periods and geographical areas. Biographical approach can concern an individual, but also couple and group biographies as well as prosopographies are possible perspectives. We encourage papers that discuss methodological and ethical challenges of doing biography from an environmental perspective particularly in the overlapping fields of environmental humanities, history, and life writing studies. Maarit Leskelä-Kärki Kulttuurihistorian yliopistonlehtori FT, Kulttuurihistorian ja elämänkerronnan dosentti (Turun yliopisto ja Lapin yliopisto) Kulttuurihistoria Arcanum, Vatselankatu 220500 Turun yliopisto 050-5344 627 (gsm) Varajohtaja / SELMA: Centre for the Study of Storytelling, Experientiality and Memory Maarit Leskelä-Kärki Senior Lecturer in Cultural History PhD, Title of Docent Department of Cultural History Vice Director / SELMA: Centre for the Study of Storytelling, Experientiality and Memory Arcanum, FIN-20500 University of Turku +358  50 5344627 maarit.leskela@utu.fi Vatselankatu 2 maarit.leskela@utu.fi https://nomadit.co.uk/conference/wceh2024/p/13626 * Life Narrative and the Digital: An Interdisciplinary Conference Date: 27 September 2023, 09:00-18:30 Venue: Sitzungssaal, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dr.-Ignaz-Seipel-Platz 2, 1010 Vienna Registration Deadline: 20 September 2023 Website: https://digital-bio-2023.acdh.oeaw.ac.at/ This one-day conference explores the possibilities, uses, and challenges of digital methods and technologies for auto/biographical research and practice. We are particularly interested in the following questions:
    • In what ways can digital methods and technologies aid the study and analysis of biographical data?
    • How can the digital help us devise innovative pathways to the representation of historical individuals’ lives? (e.g. digital platforms)
    • To what extent do digital formats of life narration tie in with new trends in auto/biographical scholarship and practice? (e.g. metabiography, relational biography, persona studies, group biography, object biography, etc.)
    • How do we deal with uncertainty and the issue of data quality in the digital representation of biographical data?
The final programme for the event is available here: https://digital-bio-2023.acdh.oeaw.ac.at/data/html/program.html Registration for the conference is free of charge and open until 20 September: https://pretix.eu/digitalbio/ Please note that this is a hybrid event and that you should indicate your preference for either in-person or online participation. For more information, please consult our conference website, or contact us at amp@oeaw.ac.at. * ELN ELN Personhood, Spirit, and the Afterlife English Language Notes, Special Issue 62.2 (October 2024) Abstracts due: Sept. 1, 2023; Full length Sept. 21, 2023 SCOPE: English Language Notes invites submissions for a special issue that will explore the dynamic nature of personhood as it relates to various notions of spirit and the afterlife. This interdisciplinary issue seeks to encourage discussions on empirical functionalism and ontological personalism of a person’s individuation, and the textural and palpable expressions of individuality. The editors are interested in how the construction of personhood considers the interaction of the material and immaterial, and how it is informed by the realm outside of the material in its ability to describe itself. The issue aims to examine posthumous legacies through acts of archival and rhetorical deconstruction in all ways it may reverberate in society, culture, counter-culture, economics, politics, spirituality, and more. The editors also consider how the individual is shaped by cultural nostalgia, religious mythos, competing secular belief systems, and occult practices. As scholars of rhetoric, the editors are interested in how language plays a part in developing the intersectional contexts of race, class, gender, and citizenship around spiritual, moral, and ethical foundations as it relates to the construction of personhood in spirit and body. This issue seeks to publish a wide variety of perspectives from various points of critical inquiry including scholarly and creative work / practice that expands our notions of the academic West. The issue also aims to explore the construction of personhood as both cultural precept and narrative surveillance in popular culture, media, film, art, and global literatures. We welcome contributions that discuss how artistic practice mirrors spiritual practice in the formation of personhood in times of cultural upheaval, and how personhood functions as civic, historical, and cultural afterlife. TOPICS OF INTEREST: We invite scholarly and creative contributions from writers in all fields who engage the subject of personhood as a transdisciplinary trope through which we may consider questions such as:
    • How does the individual access the spiritual or immaterial realm for personal or creative development?
    • How does the concept of Afterlife shift in relation to the contemporary political, social, cultural, and private constructs? How do the prevailing concepts of Afterlife shape the individual?
    • How does the immaterial or spiritual inform medical or bodily care practices, and how do scientific and medical studies interact with the spiritual in generative ways?
    • How does the construction of personhood function as both cultural precept and narrative surveillance in popular culture, media, film, art, and global literatures? In what ways does artistic practice mirror spiritual practice in the formation of personhood in times of cultural upheaval? How does personhood function as civic, historical, and cultural afterlife.
    • In what capacity can humanist discourse accommodate notions of pre-life personhood and identity as antecedent to the body despite naturalist and cognitive definitions of personhood which privilege consciousness and cognition?
    • How might digital personhood, biotechnology, and the expansion of nonhuman and posthuman agency reshape both spiritual and secular understandings of longevity and afterlife?
SUBMISSION: Submissions may include essays, scholarly-adjacent critical essays, lyric essays, poetry, and genre-fluid texts that take an innovative approach to developing the creative artifacts. Interested authors should feel free to contact the guest editors: Ruth Ellen Kocher at ruthellen.kocher@colorado.edu and KP Kaszubowski at kpkaszu@gmail.com. Potential contributors may submit abstracts by September 1, 2023 or submit a completed article, essay, or creative piece by September 21, 2023. While the editors invite standard-length, single-author academic articles, we are open to other methods of critical inquiry and creative expression related to the issue’s theme: position papers, clusters, roundtable discussions, interviews, dialogues, and so on. Essays will undergo peer review. All submissions should adhere to Chicago-style citations, notes and bibliography system. Work should be uploaded to our submission portal herehttps://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/dup-eln IMPORTANT DATES: Submission Deadline: September 21, 2023 Notification: November 30, 2023 Publication Date: October 2024 ___________________________________ About English Language NotesA respected forum of criticism and scholarship in literary and cultural studies since 1962, English Language Notes (ELN) is dedicated to pushing the edge of scholarship in literature and related fields in new directions. Broadening its reach geographically and trans-historically, ELN opens new lines of inquiry and widens emerging fields. Each ELN issue advances topics of current scholarly concern, providing theoretical speculation as well as interdisciplinary recalibrations through practical usage. Offering semiannual, topically themed issues, ELN also includes “Of Note,” an ongoing section featuring related topics, review essays or roundtables of cutting-edge scholarship, and emergent concerns. ELN is a wide-ranging journal that combines theoretical rigor with innovative interdisciplinary collaboration. Contact Information Ruth Ellen Kocher (ruthellen.kocher@colorado.edu), KP Kaszubowski (kpkaszu@gmail.com), Guest Editors Contact Email eln@colorado.edu URL: https://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/dup-eln * Introducing Southeast Asian Lives and Histories at UC Berkeley Deadline for Submissions, September 15, 2023 We invite applications for the first year of the annual UC Berkeley CSEAS Southeast Asian Lives and Histories small grants program. Applicants must be enrolled at or affiliated with UCB, other UCs, CSUs, or institutions located in Southeast Asia. Should you have any questions, don’t hesitate to email cseas@berkeley.edu(link sends e-mail). For applicants from UC Berkeley, other UCs, and CSUs— The UC Berkeley Center for Southeast Asia Studies is seeking participation in our Southeast Asian Lives (SEALIVES) small grants program from students and faculty with long-term and emergent research and community engagements with Southeast Asians in California or abroad. We are interested in supporting and training students and faculty in multiple approaches to life and oral history collection that include long format, annotated interviews, genealogical or other multi-generational approaches, film, and photography. We aim to support life history research on Southeast Asians of diverse class, educational, occupational, sex/gender, racial/ethnic, linguistic, and regional backgrounds. Small grants of $3,500.00 will fund all components of an interview project with one or two individuals in Southeast Asia or California. Please submit a completed application form (downloadable here(PDF file)) and the following supporting materials packaged as a single PDF:
    1. A proposal of no more than 600 words that includes:
        1. a summary of your research project and how your proposed interview(s) fit within its scope;
        1. the site where you will conduct your interviews and the expected language(s) to be used in the interviews;
        1. your reasons for selecting these potential interviewees; and
        1. the medium of the interviews (film, text, audio, multimodal).
2. A 1-page, detailed budget and justification (travel, accommodations, stipend for interviewee(s), translation and transcription (if needed), etc.). We highly encourage applications from graduate students and early career researchers, as well as scholars from non-area studies disciplines and inter-disciplinary programs for whom a country or region of Southeast Asia or a diaspora community in California is part of their research. Send applications to cseas@berkeley.edu(link sends e-mail) by Sep 15, 2023 with the subject line “SEALIVES Proposal 2023-2024_California.” Decisions will be made by mid-October 2023 and funds will be disbursed by summer 2024. Recipients of this grant will be required to participate in a fully-funded, in-person, two-day training workshop held in early 2024 with other grant recipients. They will also join a colloquium for sharing about their experiences in Fall 2024. For applicants affiliated with institutions in Southeast Asia— The UC Berkeley Center for Southeast Asia Studies is seeking participation in our Southeast Asian Lives (SEALIVES) small grants program from students and faculty with long-term and emergent research and community engagements with Southeast Asians living in various parts of the world. We are interested in supporting and training students and faculty in multiple approaches to life and oral history collection that include long format, annotated interviews, genealogical or other multi-generational approaches, film, and photography. We aim to support life history research on Southeast Asians of diverse class, educational, occupational, sex/gender, racial/ethnic, linguistic, and regional backgrounds. Small grants of $3,000.00 will fund all components of an interview project with one or two individuals in Southeast Asia undertaken by individuals affiliated with institutions in Southeast Asia (Luce guidelines delineate Southeast Asia as Brunei, Cambodia, Timor-Leste, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam). Please submit a completed application form (downloadable here(PDF file)) and the following supporting materials packaged as a single PDF:
    1. A proposal of no more than 600 words that includes:
        1. a summary of your research project and how your proposed interview(s) fit within its scope;
        1. the site where you will conduct your interviews and the expected language(s) to be used in the interviews;
        1. your reasons for selecting these potential interviewees; and
        1. the medium of the interviews (film, text, audio, multimodal).
2. A 1-page, detailed budget and justification (travel, accommodations, stipend for interviewee(s), translation and transcription (if needed), etc.). Please use your local currency and convert amounts to USD using OANDA(link is external). Include both currencies in your budget. We highly encourage applications from graduate students and early career researchers, as well as scholars from non-area studies disciplines and inter-disciplinary programs for whom a country or region of Southeast Asia or a diaspora community in California is part of their research. Send applications to cseas@berkeley.edu(link sends e-mail) by Sep 15, 2023 with the subject line “SEALIVES Proposal 2023-2024_Southeast Asia.” Decisions will be made by mid-October 2023 and funds will be disbursed by summer 2024. Recipients of this grant will be invited to virtually participate in a two-day training workshop held in early 2024 with other grant recipients. They will also virtually join a colloquium for sharing about their experiences in Fall 2024. For undergraduate applicants from UCB— The UC Berkeley Center for Southeast Asia Studies is seeking participation in our Southeast Asian Lives (SEALIVES) small grants program from UC Berkeley undergraduate students with research interests in life histories of Southeast Asians in California. We are interested in supporting and training students in multiple approaches to life and oral history collection that include long format, annotated interviews, genealogical or other multi-generational approaches, film, and photography. We aim to support life history research on Southeast Asians of diverse class, educational, occupational, sex/gender, racial/ethnic, linguistic, and regional backgrounds. Small grants of $1,500.00 will fund all components of an interview project with one individual in California. Please submit a completed application form (downloadable here(PDF file)) and the following supporting materials packaged as a single PDF:
    1. A proposal of no more than 600 words that includes:
        1. a summary of your research project and how your proposed interview(s) fit within its scope;
        1. the site where you will conduct your interviews and the expected language(s) to be used in the interviews;
        1. your reasons for selecting these potential interviewees; and
        1. the medium of the interviews (film, text, audio, multimodal).
2. A 1-page, detailed budget and justification (travel, accommodations, stipend for interviewee(s), translation and transcription (if needed), etc.). Send applications to cseas@berkeley.edu(link sends e-mail) by Sep 15, 2023 with the subject line “SEALIVES Proposal 2023-2024_Undergraduate.” Decisions will be made by mid-October 2023 and funds will be disbursed by summer 2024. Recipients of this grant will be required to participate in a fully funded, in-person, two-day training workshop held in early 2024 with other grant recipients. They will also join a colloquium for sharing about their experiences in Fall 2024. Contact Information UC Berkeley Center for Southeast Asia Studies (CSEAS) Contact Email cseas@berkeley.edu https://ieas.berkeley.edu/centers/center-southeast-asia-studies-cseas/southeast… * Memory, Melancholy and Nostalgia – 8th International Interdisciplinary Conference 7-8 December 2023 -in person (Gdansk, Poland) – online (via Zoom) Deadline for Submissions
    •  onsite presenters –  25 September 2023 
    •  online presenters – 15 October 2023
CALL FOR PAPERS: In our modern world, which some have argued to be disjointed while immersing itself ever deeper in crisis, the turning back towards “the olden days” and the ensuing nostalgia constitute a noticeable phenomenon, both individually (the memory of biography) and collectively (the memory of History). Another important – and seemingly also quite noticeable – phenomenon  is the longing for something vague, indefinite or never existent. Hence, during our interdisciplinary conference we would like to concentrate on the phenomena of nostalgia and melancholy. We are interested in all expressions of longing for the past, from the reassuring and action-propelling ones to those which paralyze us, bringing despair and utter dejection. We want to describe the experience of nostalgia and melancholy in its multifarious manifestations: psychological, social, historical, cultural, philosophical, religious, economic, political, artistic, and many others. We will also devote considerable attention to how these phenomena appear and transform in artistic practices: literature, film, theatre, and visual arts. This is why we invite researchers representing various academic disciplines: anthropology, history, psychology, psychoanalysis, sociology, politics, philosophy, economics, law, literary studies, theatre studies, film studies, memory studies, nostalgia studies, migration studies, consciousness studies, dream studies, gender studies, postcolonial studies, medical sciences, psychiatry, cognitive sciences, design, project management and others. Different forms of presentations are encouraged, including case studies, theoretical investigations, problem-oriented arguments, and comparative analyses. We will be happy to hear from both experienced scholars and young academics at the beginning of their careers, as well as students. We also invite all persons interested in participating in the conference as listeners, without giving a presentation. We hope that due to its interdisciplinary nature, the conference will bring many interesting observations on and discussions about the role of memory, melancholy and nostalgia in the past and in the present-day world. Our repertoire of suggested topics includes but is not restricted to: I. Memory and Affects – unwanted memory – nostalgia or melancholy? – non-melancholic nostalgia – nostalgia and longing – the healing power of nostalgia – nostalgia as an illness – nostalgia and depression – nostalgia and psychoanalysis II. Common Experiences – nostalgic epochs – nostalgic nations – nostalgic generations – nostalgia and the myth of eternal return – nostalgia, melancholy and totalitarianisms – nostalgia and war – nostalgia and melancholy of the expelled – nostalgic patriotism – nostalgia and nationalism – nostalgia and gender – nostalgia and religion – nostalgia and language – nostalgia and melancholy in the postmodern world – nostalgia and post-memory III. Individual Experiences – return to childhood – nostalgia for something indefinite – nostalgia for the future – nostalgia for a traumatic experience – nostalgia, melancholy and old age – nostalgia, melancholy and death – nostalgia, melancholy and mourning – nostalgia, melancholy and love – nostalgia, melancholy and imagination – nostalgic phantasms – nostalgic dreams IV. The Arts – nostalgia and melancholy as a theme in literature, film, and theatre – nostalgic literature – nostalgic cinema – literature and the arts as a vehicle of memory – literature, theatre and film in search of lost time – nostalgic literary genres – melancholic artists V. Society – nostalgia and political movements – nostalgia, melancholy and memory places – nostalgia, melancholy and memorials – nostalgia, melancholy and incentives – nostalgia, melancholy and community development – nostalgia, melancholy and migration – nostalgia, melancholy and meaning-making – nostalgia, melancholy and drive to change- nostalgia and travelling – nostalgia and food – nostalgia and climate changing Scientific Committee: Professor Wojciech Owczarski – University of Gdańsk, Poland Professor Polina Golovátina-Mora – NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Please submit abstracts (no longer than 300 words) of your proposed 20-minute presentations, together with a short biographical note to: conferencenostalgia@gmail.com  Contact Information Conference Office Contact Email conferencenostalgia@gmail.com http://www.inmindsupport.com/nostalgia-conference * Deadline for Submissions September 11, 2023 Call for Chapter Contributors—Cambridge Companion to U.S. First Ladies Book Project We are seeking chapter contributors for an edited book titled Cambridge Companion to U.S. First Ladies. According to the series editor, the Cambridge Companion books offer “introductions/overviews to particular themes/events/figures. The books usually consist of 12-15 essays and they present the latest ideas/research/scholarship in a comprehensive and accessible manner. Students make up a portion of the readership for these books, but they are also read by general readers and individual scholars who are interested in the topic. When done correctly, the books not only provide an overview, but also make an important intervention into the study of the particular topic at hand.” Cambridge Companion to U.S. First Ladies will explore the social, cultural, and political influence of the first lady institution and the women who’ve held the position. We already have contributors covering the following subjects: first ladies as political assets/liabilities, first ladies in wartime, first ladies and slavery/civil rights, first ladies’ role in international diplomacy, first ladies as trendsetters, first ladies as Mourners-in-Chief, first ladies’ use of media, and representations of first ladies in film. But there’s still a lot of ground to cover, so we’re looking for additional authors to contribute chapters on topics such as:
    • First ladies as model of American womanhood/Impact of gender norms on first ladies
    • First ladies as social advocates
    • Legacy, memorialization, and public memory of first ladies
    • First ladies and illness
We’re also open to other chapter themes, particularly those covering first ladies and/or topics that are underrepresented in previous works. We’re looking to recruit authors from diverse research and professional perspectives including history, political communication, public address, museum studies, political science, and media studies. Final chapters will be 8,000 – 10,000 words, including endnotes, using Chicago Manual of Style, 17-th edition Notes-Bibliography formatting. The project timeline is as follows:
    • September 11: Call for contributors – letters of interest due
    • Late September: Contributors selected & begin first drafts
    • April 2024: First drafts due
    • May/June 2024: Edited chapters returned
    • July/August 2024: Revisions due
    • August/September 2024: Final edits
    • October 2024: Submission of completed manuscript to press
If you’d like to contribute to this project, please submit the following to editors Lisa Burns (Lisa.Burns@quinnipiac.edu) and Teri Finneman (finnemte@gmail.com) by noon ET on Monday, September 11-th: a short blurb explaining your interest in the project, a brief abstract/chapter sketch (150 – 300 words) on the topic you want to cover, and a short bio (about 75 words) detailing your related research experience. Authors selected to participate will be notified by September 22nd. Contact Information Lisa Burns (Quinnipiac University) and Teri Finneman (University of Kansas) Contact Email Lisa.Burns@quinnipiac.edu * Call for Papers: Dear Liz (edited by Órla Meadhbh Murray & Maria Tamboukou) Abstract deadline: 4th September 2023  Edited book proposal intended for Routledge’s Literary Studies in the Social Sciences (series editor Maria Tamboukou) Calling any scholars who use Liz Stanley’s work. This edited collection will showcase how different scholars have been inspired or influenced by Liz Stanley’s work. We are looking for chapters of around 6000 words discussing your own work in relation to an aspect of Liz’s work. This could be focused on new research, reflecting on previous work, or even pedagogical reflections and all chapters will start with a short letter entitled ‘Dear Liz’, which will be the central title of the book. Chapters can be solo- or co-authored. Please send an abstract (up to 300 words) and a short bio (up to 100 words) via email to: orla.m.murray@durham.ac.uk AND m.tamboukou@uel.ac.uk by 4th September 2023. Full chapters will be due by end of June 2024. Thanks, Órla Dr. Órla Meadhbh Murray (she/her) Lecturer in Sociology, Durham University Co-founder Institutional Ethnography Network * Literature and Life Writing Midwest Regional Meeting of the Conference on Christianity and Literature October 23-24, 2023 Wheaton College deadline for submissions:  September 7, 2023 This conference brings together scholars of Christianity and literature with contemporary writers of spiritual memoir to celebrate religious life writing and consider the forms, features, and thematic possibilities within the range of associated genres. How do literary works and forms shape portrayals of spiritual life? What might literature accomplish in the spiritual life within writer and reader? How might the literary space of religiously inflected life writing offer particular theological content? This conference will involve traditional panels, creative readings, and student panels, as well as a scholarly keynote. Attendees will also have the opportunity to attend readings and large public talks by several contemporary spiritual memoir writers, including Esau McCaulley, author of the forthcoming memoir How Far to the Promised Land? and Daniel Nayeri, award-winning author of Everything Sad is Untrue, who will be on campus that week The scholarly keynote will be given by Jeffrey W. Barbeau (Ph.D., Marquette University), professor of theology at Wheaton College, editor of The Coleridge Bulletin, and a writer on British Romanticism, religion and literature, and the history of Christian thought. He is the author or editor of numerous books, including The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism and Religion(2021) and Religion in Romantic England: An Anthology of Primary Sources (2018). Possible topics include the following:
    • problems in genre: spiritual memoir/spiritual autobiography/spiritual life writing
    • periodization of religious life writing
    • traditions/inheritance in spiritual life writing
    • trends in contemporary spiritual life writing
    • portrayal of the divine in spiritual life writing
    • children’s literature and/as spiritual life writing
    • confession, failure, hamartiology in spiritual life writing
    • social media (e.g. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Substack) and spiritual life writing
    • celebrity/publicity/the public square and spiritual life writing
    • race and spiritual life writing
    • the morphology of conversion (or deconversion) in spiritual life writing
    • private writings/unpublished autobiographical material
    • fictional spiritual life writing
    • politics of religious life writing
    • religious life writing as theory/theology
    • poetic genres and spiritual life writing
    • gender within spiritual life writing
    • literary epigraphs and allusions within spiritual life writing
    • biblical form and language in religious life writing
    • emplottedness within religious life writing
    • development and decline in religious life writing
    • “deconstruction” (or deconstruction!) and spiritual life writing
    • visions, transcendence, and the miraculous within spiritual life writing
    • sentiment and emotion in spiritual life writing
    • narratives of enslavement and/as spiritual life writing
    • rhetorics of spiritual autobiography
    • ethical pitfalls within spiritual life writing
    • portraying others’ lives/portraying one’s own life in spiritual life writing
    • the individual and the church/community of faith in spiritual life writing
As always, the Midwest CCL is open to other proposals concerning the relationship of Christianity and literature, including panel proposals.  Undergraduate students must submit their entire paper for consideration; eligible undergraduate papers will be entered into the national CCL Undergraduate Writing Contest for a cash prize and publication on the CCL website. Send abstracts (200-400 words) via email to cclconference@wheaton.edu by Sept. 7 2023. Panel proposals welcome.  Accepted abstracts/panels will be notified promptly. Participants in the conference must be members of the Conference on Christianity and Literature. Questions may be sent to tiffany.kriner@wheaton.edu. * Deadline for Submissions, August 31, 2023 CFP–“Animal Subjects” (8/31/2023; 2/14-17/2024) College Art Association Conference, Chicago, USA The emergence of animal studies as a distinct field in the last twenty years has led to increased interest in treating animals as subjects. While we can never fully grasp the entirety of an animal’s experience and world, as famously argued by Thomas Nagel, animal subjectivity has been taken up in contemporary art and scholarship in part to examine consider how we can cultivate positive multispecies entanglements that respect animal agency. On the other hand, animal experiences in historical contexts like bestiaries and cabinets of curiosities, circuses and freakshows, zoos and menageries are slowly being recentered to recognize how animals regularly had to navigate the systems of colonialism, capitalism, and bio-politics. The supposedly inferior status of animals in the Enlightened hierarchy of being was used to justify the subjugation of colonial subjects, whether through visual and linguistic rhetoric or through physical proximity, while pets and exotic animals in menageries served as extensions of their human owners, reflecting the latter’s power and status. How can we talk about animals meaningfully without falling prey to the binary of human vs non? This panel invites papers that explore animal histories in relation to systems of power, both past and present. Its goal is to recenter animal subjecthood and to ask what it means to write animal narratives, whether this is a form of speaking-for or if doing so is to conduct a critical intervention into the humanist approach to art history. Field(s) of Study: Time Period: Modern (1800-present) (**will also consider abstracts for papers focusing on the 18th century**) Topics: Social History Topics: Animal Studies Topics: Environmental Art Key dates  August 31: Deadline to submit proposals. September 18: Session chair deadline to finalize sessions, inform participants via email invitation. Accepted submitters will receive an email to access their own SC after September 25. October: Conference registration opens, and full conference schedule is posted. How to submit 
    • Instructions for submission are provided here
Prior to submission, ensure the following steps are completed 
    • Create a CAA account. Membership is not mandatory at this stage. If you are not a member, you can create an account at the provided link. Skip the payment and joining process for now.
    • Prepare your presentation title and abstract, adhering to the 250-word limit.
    • Prepare a condensed CV, approximately 2 pages in length.
    • (Optional) Gather relevant images or documentation. Please limit this section to five images that support your proposal.
Contact Information Margaryta Golovchenko Ph.D. candidate (she/her/hers) History of Art and Architecture Department University of Oregon Contact Email mgolovch@uoregon.edu URL https://caa.confex.com/caa/2024/webprogrampreliminary/Session12941.html *

Makeshift Historiographies: Case Studies in HIV/AIDS Cultural Archives

College Art Association Annual Conference, February 14–17, 2024, Hilton Chicago. deadline for submissions:  August 31, 2023 For hundreds of artists who died of AIDS-related causes, only scant traces of their work—if any at all—exist in institutional archival repositories. Therefore, art-historical work revolving around the ongoing HIV/AIDS pandemic has often called for inventive archival methods that blend traditional forms of research with community work and emotional labor. Over the last fifteen years, scholars and activists have contended with the gaps and erasures in such archives as well as the geographic, racial, and gender biases that have characterized many historical projects. In so doing, many have necessarily drawn on and even created community-based repositories, personal collections, and oral history initiatives. The precarity and preciousness of such archives are central topics in recent scholarship, including Marika Cifor’s, Viral Cultures: Activist Archiving in the Age of AIDS (2022), Jarrett Earnest’s Devotion: Today’s Future Becomes Tomorrow’s Archive (2022), and Alexandra Juhasz and Theodore Kerr’s We Are Having This Conversation Now: The Times of AIDS Cultural Production (2022). Indebted to these texts, our panel calls for papers focused on case studies elaborating on archival methods related to art histories of HIV/AIDS. Seeking to acknowledge the efforts of scholars, curators, and archivists who have worked to complicate this emergent canon and reimagine the terrain of AIDS cultural production, we welcome papers that reintroduce artists or their legacies into public and scholarly discourse, detailing the journey from discovery, inquiry, analysis, and sharing. We are especially interested in papers offering methodological reflections that might be of use to individuals engaged in parallel projects. This CFP is for a panel at the College Art Association’s 112th Annual Conference, February 14–17, 2024 at the Hilton Chicago. This is an in-person panel. You are invited to submit your presentation proposals before August 31. More information about how to submit can be found here: https://caa.confex.com/caa/2024/webprogrampreliminary/meeting.html Kyle Croft and Jackson Davidow @ College Art Association contact email: kcroft@visualaids.org * Personal documents and ephemera as sources for interdisciplinary Holocaust scholarship CFP for a special issue of Holocaust Studies: A Journal of Culture and History Deadline for Submissions, August 31, 2023 Edited by Hannah Holtschneider (University of Edinburgh) and Amy Simon (Michigan State University) Since the 1970s, and proliferating in the 1980s, works of life-writing and of academic scholarship have sought to reconstruct the experience of individuals during persecution, and as refugees in different parts of the world. In the past decade micro-historical research has drawn increasingly on personal documents from the Holocaust. Branching out from works on Holocaust testimony and memoirs, literary scholars have engaged with diaries, letters and other ego-documents, and sociologists, linguists and ethnographers have shown interest in personal archives of families affected by the Holocaust. At the same time, the past two decades have seen a rise in publications of memoirs and other forms of life writing that engages specifically with such sources. Typically, such works proceed from one disciplinary perspective and rarely engage with scholarship working on similar sources but with a different scholarly method. Yet, a conversation of scholars in different disciplines working on the same documentary evidence is still lacking. Volumes such as The Diary: The Epic of Everyday Life models a different approach by bringing together literary and cultural scholars with historians in the exploration of diary writing. The proposed special issue seeks to facilitate a similar conversation and bring together scholarship on personal documents from the Holocaust. The aim is to develop and test multi- and interdisciplinary work regarding the value of different ways of approaching and interrogating these sources. We expect historians, literary scholars, linguists and translation scholars, historical anthropologists and sociologists among others to contribute to this special issue. We also encourage those working on documents from hitherto unexplored archival collections of Jewish refugees to majority-world locations, to propose contributions. To this end we are inviting proposals for research articles of 7,000-12,000 words (incl. references and bibliography), annotated translations and research notes. We expect to host two gatherings during the writing process to engage in productive conversation about the  links between topics and cross-disciplinary approaches. The finished articles should act both as stand-alone research papers and model a methodological conversation across the entire special issue suggesting new directions for research in this field. Possible themes engaging personal documents and ephemera from the Holocaust could include, but are by no means limited to:
    • Multiple approaches to the same sources to explore gains of multidisciplinary research and opportunities for interdisciplinary work
    • The role of emotions for writing about personal archives
    • The relevance of materiality
    • Space and place in personal documents
    • Gender as an analytical category
    • Connecting micro- with macro-history
    • Language, translation and genre
    • The value of engaging one collection of documents or a single diary
    • The value of working across a number of collections or different sources
    • Ethical considerations of writing about the lives of ‘private’ individuals
    • Sociological, anthropological, historical, literary theory arising from engagement with personal documents
​​​​Timeline:
    • Notification to submit full article by 30 September 2023.
    • Publication is envisaged by the end of 2025.
Contact Info: Dr Hannah Holtschneider, University of Edinburgh, UK Contact Email: h.holtschneider@ed * CFP for Palgrave Handbook on Parenthood in Popular Culture, Deadline for abstracts: 31 August 2023 Edited by Elizabeth Podnieks (Toronto Metropolitan University) and Helena Wahlström Henriksson (Centre for Gender Research at Uppsala University) As editors of the Palgrave Handbook on Parenthood in Popular Culture, which is under contract and has 15 commissioned chapters, we seek approximately 25 additional chapters (6,500-7,500 words) on topics related to parenthood in popular culture. We aim to foreground Indigenous, racialized, LGBTQ+ and non-normative experiences, in contributions that explore popular cultural representations of parental identities from intersectional perspectives, and from diverse cultural and geopolitical locations. Chapters may focus on either mothers/mothering/motherhood or fathers/fathering/fatherhood, or interrogate parents/parenting/parenthood as more comprehensive terms, across genders and in non-binary contexts. We also welcome contributions focusing on non-motherhood/non-fatherhood. By “popular culture,” we signal an expansive term that includes, but is not limited to, the following mediated texts and expressions: literature, TV, film, magazines, journalism/news, social media and technology, music, performance/theatre, advertising, sports, politics, video games and virtual reality, comics/graphics, tattoo art, fine art, public art/graffiti, exhibitions, and fashion. With this Handbook we aim to showcase contemporary representations of parents, parenting, and parenthood in twenty-first-century popular culture, critically assessing how these representations help to shape, respond to, and redefine notions of families and parents, as well as popular culture genres, in the new millennium. As described on its website, “Palgrave Handbooks are high-quality, original reference works that bring together specially-commissioned chapters, cutting-edge research, and the latest review articles in their fields. Our Handbooks provide an unparalleled overview of a specific field of research, while also setting the agenda for future directions of the discipline.” (https://www.palgrave.com/gp/palgrave-handbooks). Schedule: 31 August 2023: Abstract (approx. 250-350 words) due to both editors: lpodniek@torontomu.ca; helena.henriksson@gender.uu.se
    • 1 October Acceptance of Abstracts from Editors
    • 15 January 1st draft of chapter due
    • 15 March Revisions feedback from Editors
    • 1 May 2024: final version of chapters due
    • Fall 2024: editors submit final book manuscript to press
If you have any questions, please send queries to both editors: lpodniek@torontomu.ca; helena.henriksson@gender.uu.se * Deadline for Submissions Aug. 25, 2023 “Metafiction, Autofiction, and Other Metanarrative Forms of Storytelling” Dear members, I am leading a seminar on “Metafiction, Autofiction, and Other Metanarrative Forms of Storytelling” at the MSA conference with invited speakers Brian McHale and Josh Toth. Please consider participating. Registration has commenced and will end on August 25. If you are interested in participating, all you need to do is sign up now. You do not submit an abstract at this point. Five- to seven-page papers are due about a five weeks prior to the conference. More information about MSA seminars can be found here: https://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa2023/seminarOverview.html Modern Studies Association Conference, New York, October 26-29, 2023 Leader:
    • Lissi Athanasiou-Krikelis, Associate Professor, New York Institute of Technology
Invited Participants:
    • Josh Toth, Professor, MacEwan University,
    • Brian McHale, Emeritus, Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor, Ohio State University
Metafiction, Autofiction, and Other Metanarrative Forms of Storytelling   With three recent publications on metafiction in the last two years—Truth and Metafiction by Josh Toth (2021), Metafiction and the Postwar Novel: Foes, Ghosts, and Faces in the Water by Andrew Dean (2021) and Metafiction by Yaël Schlick (2022)—there is a resurgence of interest in the theory and practice of this literary form, which had fallen from favor after reaching its pinnacle in the eighties. This seminar seeks to explore the various metanarrative facades of fiction, while also expanding perspectives on metanarrative commentary outside verbal storytelling from modernism to postmodernism and beyond. The seminar will attempt to address the following questions. What are the theoretical frameworks that shape metafiction, and what do recent renditions (works by Salvador Plascencia, Hernan Diaz, Susan Choi to name a few) indicate about its development? Is metafiction a self-enclosed hermeneutics, or does it also foreground issues of class, gender, sexuality, or race as seen in novels such as Mat Jason’s Pym? If metafiction is favored by male authorship–as some claim–how do women writers like Margaret Atwood, Clarice Lispector, Amanda Michalopoulou, Rachael Cusk, and others fit in? How is metafiction manifested and what purposes does it serve in specific genres: graphic novels, children’s and young adult fiction, autobiography/memoire/life-writing, poetry, film, or other forms of visual and verbal storytelling? What is the role of metanarrative commentary in popular culture in general? At a time when commercials, documentaries (Netflix: Adams Knows Everything), cartoons (Netflix: A Tale Dark & Grimm), and puppet shows (The Immortal Jellyfish Girl) employ metanarration, it is imperative that we reexamine meta-references across genres. Presenters will have the opportunity to submit their work in a companion on Metafiction, edited by Lissi Athanasiou-Krikelis and Josh Toth, currently under contract with Routledge. Regards, Lissi Athanasiou-Krikelis, Ph.D. Associate Professor of English​ Director, Interdisciplinary Studies New York Institute of Technology 16 West 61st Street, Room #608 New York, NY 10023 website: https://lissiathanasioukrikelis.com/ *

“Death in Public” /// C19 ’24 Panel Proposal (8/21/2023; 3/14-16/2024) Pasadena USA.

deadline for submissions:  August 21, 2023 Please consider submitting an abstract for the following panel proposal for The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists’ (C19’s) 2024 conference in Pasadena. Feel free to reach out with any questions.
Death in Public In “Sex in Public,” Berlant and Warner urged us to consider how sex—something seemingly private—is indeed “mediated by publics.” Similar to Berlant and Warner, we investigate how the concept of death, broadly defined, was determined, imagined, augmented, and regulated as a public spectacle throughout the nineteenth century. Although our contemporary image of a good death is often one of relatives and loved ones gathered around a hospital bed in hushed silence, or the calm stillness of the hospice room, the American public is simultaneously entranced by the idea of spectacular death. Years into a resurgence of the popularity of true crime, it remains the most widely listened-to podcast genre in the United States. On social media platforms such as TikTok, interest in natural burials, morbid curiosities, serial killers, and the paranormal has been used to scam viewers into buying apps, supplements, and home security devices. Offline, the COVID-19 pandemic has politicized and publicized death and sickness on a national and global scale, in a way perhaps last seen during the 1917 flu epidemic. In one age of public interest in death, we look back to another. Biological, social, and political deaths became increasingly public in the United States throughout the nineteenth century, both as a result of highly visible, recognizable violence, such as chattel slavery, the Civil War, and presidential assassinations, as well as more insidious cultural and institutional phenomena, such as the rise of Native American residential schools, tenement housing, and asylums in the second half of the century. These events inspired interests in mesmerism and esoteric death rituals at the time, such as spirit photography and séances, that permeated contemporary religious and literary imaginations. In the twenty-first century, humanities scholars continue to respond to these events, nuancing their understandings of death and dying and revealing how the increasingly public nature of these phenomena enable them to enter new contexts and adopt new meanings. This panel seeks projects that investigate death and the public imagination throughout the nineteenth century, including but not limited to those that consider:
    • Infectious diseases and epidemics (smallpox, cholera, yellow fever, measles, malaria, etc.)
    • Public displays of grief and mourning
    • Imaginations of the “good” and “bad” death
    • Eugenics
    • Social or political death, imprisonment, or institutionalization
    • Chronic illness, terminal illness, and/or disability
    • Ghosts and hauntings, mediums and mesmerism
    • “The little death”
    • Public deaths (murders, assassinations, executions, etc.)
    • Death in/and/of the Archive
    • Queer temporalities, queer deaths
If you would like to be considered for this panel, please email a 250-word abstract as well as a brief biography to Lucy Wallitsch (lucy.wallitsch@emory.edu) and Alex Anderson (ande1204@purdue.edu) by 5:00 p.m. ET on Monday, August 21.  * Thirteenth Biennial MESEA Conference, June 12-14, 2024, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu – Moving Cultures, Moving Ethnicities Open Period for Submissions: August 15, 2023 – November 15, 2023 Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
    • John McLeod (University of Leeds)
    • Anna-Leena Toivanen (University of Eastern Finland)
    • Atlantic Studies Lecture TBC
Those of us who are “world”-travelers have the distinct experience of being different in different “worlds” and of having the capacity to remember other “worlds” and ourselves in them. – Maria Lugones, “Playfulness, ‘World’-Travelling, and Loving Perception” (1987) We believe the one who has power. He is the one who gets to write the story. So when you study history, you must ask yourself, Whose story am I missing? Whose voice was suppressed so that this voice could come forth? Once you have figured that out, you must find that story too. From there you get a clearer, yet still imperfect, picture. – Yaa Gyasi, Homegoing (2016) The MESEA 2024 conference invites contributions that address the diverse layers, definitions, and ‘pathways’ of mobility, including the mobility of people from one place to another, crossings and intersections of cultures, and the formation of hybrid cultural forms. At the same time, mobility, border-crossings, and migration move people emotionally, either directly or through a wide range of cultural representations, and generate various emotional responses ranging from joy and relief to fear, loss and frustration. Affecting both those who travel, those who stay, and those encountered when journeying, such experiences are personal and collective, local and global, theoretical and empirical, and reveal the perplexing nature of mobility, whether this is voluntarily or involuntarily ventured. This conference aims to look into the pluriform contact zones that form with regard to global mobility, and to further explore the ways migration affects experience in diverse ethnic and postcolonial contexts. We seek to examine questions such as:
    • How does mobility from the perspective of affect and lived experience shed light on the variety of modes and genres of (post-)migrant experiences?
    • How are the experiences of displacement, forced migration, and other conditions of unfreedom represented in narrative?
    • How are narratives of mobility and migration formed and articulated historically?
    • To what degree do narratives of mobility contribute to the formation of transnational and translocal communities, and which narratives in various affective registers circulate within them?
    • In what ways are individual and collective memories of mobility (re)framed emotionally, for instance through expressions of melancholy, dissociation, grief, or vulnerability?
    • How is the crossing of cultural borders and transculturation articulated in world literature, film, and performance art?
    • What kind of emergent and/or alternative cultural practices are connected with mobility? How do they challenge dominant notions of identity and belonging?
The 2024 MESEA Conference seeks to explore the diversity of the phenomenon in the nexus of culture, history, borders, and geopolitics. Potential paper and panel submissions can address but are not limited to topics such as follows:
    • nostalgia and narratives of return
    • narratives of forced migration, human trafficking, deportation, and transportation
    • trauma, displacement, and emplacement
    • Gothic journeys and uncanny spaces
    • tragedy, comedy, melodrama, and other genres of migration narratives
    • mourning, melancholia, and migration
    • activism, solidarity, consciousness raising
    • autobiography and memory
    • transforming and hybridizing cultural practices and texts
    • cosmopolitanisms
    • climate migration/mobility
    • home(-making) in migration
    • border communities
    • rebordering and debordering
    • gendered perspectives on mobility
    • the ethics and economics of migration
    • migration as an opportunity
Abstracts should be submitted to our website at https://mesea.org/ between August 15 and November 15, 2023. Submitters will receive notification of acceptance by January 10, 2024. The conference will be arranged as an onsite conference at UEF Joensuu Campus. Preference will be given to complete panel proposals with an inter/transdisciplinary and/or transnational focus. Panels may not include more than 2 participants from the same institution. Presenters are expected to be members of the association in 2024. Previous MESEA Conferences have led to high quality publications (https://mesea.org/publications/). As in previous years, MESEA will award at least one Young Scholars Excellence Award. For more information please visit: http://www.mesea.org Contact Email ludmila_martan@yahoo.com URL https://mesea.org/joensuu-2024/ *

“Death in Public” /// C19 ’24 Panel Proposal (8/21/2023; 3/14-16/2024) Pasadena USA.

deadline for submissions:  August 21, 2023 Please consider submitting an abstract for the following panel proposal for The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists’ (C19’s) 2024 conference in Pasadena. Feel free to reach out with any questions.
Death in Public In “Sex in Public,” Berlant and Warner urged us to consider how sex—something seemingly private—is indeed “mediated by publics.” Similar to Berlant and Warner, we investigate how the concept of death, broadly defined, was determined, imagined, augmented, and regulated as a public spectacle throughout the nineteenth century. Although our contemporary image of a good death is often one of relatives and loved ones gathered around a hospital bed in hushed silence, or the calm stillness of the hospice room, the American public is simultaneously entranced by the idea of spectacular death. Years into a resurgence of the popularity of true crime, it remains the most widely listened-to podcast genre in the United States. On social media platforms such as TikTok, interest in natural burials, morbid curiosities, serial killers, and the paranormal has been used to scam viewers into buying apps, supplements, and home security devices. Offline, the COVID-19 pandemic has politicized and publicized death and sickness on a national and global scale, in a way perhaps last seen during the 1917 flu epidemic. In one age of public interest in death, we look back to another. Biological, social, and political deaths became increasingly public in the United States throughout the nineteenth century, both as a result of highly visible, recognizable violence, such as chattel slavery, the Civil War, and presidential assassinations, as well as more insidious cultural and institutional phenomena, such as the rise of Native American residential schools, tenement housing, and asylums in the second half of the century. These events inspired interests in mesmerism and esoteric death rituals at the time, such as spirit photography and séances, that permeated contemporary religious and literary imaginations. In the twenty-first century, humanities scholars continue to respond to these events, nuancing their understandings of death and dying and revealing how the increasingly public nature of these phenomena enable them to enter new contexts and adopt new meanings. This panel seeks projects that investigate death and the public imagination throughout the nineteenth century, including but not limited to those that consider:
    • Infectious diseases and epidemics (smallpox, cholera, yellow fever, measles, malaria, etc.)
    • Public displays of grief and mourning
    • Imaginations of the “good” and “bad” death
    • Eugenics
    • Social or political death, imprisonment, or institutionalization
    • Chronic illness, terminal illness, and/or disability
    • Ghosts and hauntings, mediums and mesmerism
    • “The little death”
    • Public deaths (murders, assassinations, executions, etc.)
    • Death in/and/of the Archive
    • Queer temporalities, queer deaths
If you would like to be considered for this panel, please email a 250-word abstract as well as a brief biography to Lucy Wallitsch (lucy.wallitsch@emory.edu) and Alex Anderson (ande1204@purdue.ed) by 5:00 p.m. ET on Monday, August 21. *

Call for Papers

“Wildness and Wilderness in American Travel Writing” The Society for the Study of American Travel Writing (SSATW) at the American Literature Association Fall Symposium

Oct. 26-28, 2023. Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Deadline for Submissions: August 10, 2023 The Society for the Study of American Travel Writing (SSATW) seeks proposals for a panel on “Wildness and Wilderness in American Travel Writing” at the American Literature Association’s Fall Symposium (October 26-28, 2023, in Santa Fe, New Mexico). Scholarship on any region or era of American Travel Writing is welcome. The unfamiliar, unexplored, and unsettled places have long captivated the American literary imagination and travel writing. Whether we think of wilderness as sacred, shrinking, imagined, or simulated, how has the spectacle of wildness, in unsettled or settled spaces, impinged upon representations of the American scene by travelers? Proposals might consider how travel writers have metaphorically linked subject matter and creative practice in renditions of confronting geograpies of wilderness and wildness. They might also think about the impact that the wild or the wildernss has had on individual writers, ideas of nation, or constructions of genre. Please submit abstracts of approximately 300 words no later than August 10, 2023, to Susan Roberson (susan.roberson@retiree.tamuk.edu). Early submissions are welcome. Contact Info: Susan Roberson Contact Email: susan.roberson@retiree.tamuk.edu * Women and the Sea in the Early Modern World University of Plymouth UK, Sept. 6 and 7, 2023 Deadline for Submission August 6, 2023 In-Person Online Hybrid We invite submissions for 20-minute papers from PhD students, early career researchers and established researchers from across the world. The symposium will run in a hybrid and in-person format. Call for papers The call for papers is now open. Proposals may cover topics that includes but are not limited to the themes listed below. Please email your abstract of 200–300 words and a short biography/CV to elaine.murphy@plymouth.ac.uk. The closing date for abstracts is Sunday 6 August 2023. Themes that will be covered include
    • Experiences of women at sea
    • Women living and working in maritime communities (dockyards, port towns, fishing)
    •  Women and the Navy
    •  Women and piracy
    •  Women and migration
    •  Enslaved women and the sea
    •  Indigenous women and the sea
    •  Women and private companies (EIC, VOC etc)
    •  Material culture of women at sea
    •  Lives ashore – separation from sailor husbands/family members
    •  Gender and the sea
Organisers 
    • Dr Anna Maria Forssberg, Vasa Museum
    • Dr Deborah Hamer, New Netherlands Institute
This event is free to attend. Registration is required and will be available soon. Please contact elaine.murphy@plymouth.ac.uk with any queries. URL https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/whats-on/women-and-the-se * Call for Book Chapters: Memory Studies: An Anthology of Perspectives Chapter proposals are invited for a volume on contemporary memory and literary studies edited by Dr. D. Sudha Rani ( VNRVJIET ), Dr. Rachel Irdaya Raj ( VNRVJIET ), Dr.Shashibhusan Nayak (GP Nayagarh). Deadline for abstract submission: 30 July 2023 Abstract selection notification: 30 August 2023 Complete Paper Submission: 30 October 2023 Memory studies is an increasingly diverse, interdisciplinary, and dynamic field of knowledge that spans multiple disciplines. Sociologists, psychologists, literary critics, media, cultural studies scholars, and natural and applied scientists have been exploring the concepts and application of memory to evolve a theoretical, conceptual, and methodological framework to investigate this emerging field of study. Memory—personal, collective, cultural—is crucial to the formation, conservation, and preservation of the identity of an individual, community, society, and nation. The act of remembering involves narration, and storytelling is a form of storing. As narration moves from oral, written, and visual forms to the digital, it becomes imperative to understand the interface between and among the human and the non-human, digital and analog, and its impact on memory and its narrativization. The explosion of technology allows us to know what we need to know and preserve what we want our future generations to know. To study and document certain forms of knowledge that are crucial to defining who we are, this interdisciplinary edited collection aims to bring together researchers, academics, technologists, corporates, and students to discuss, debate, and understand the various storytelling strategies adopted by different communities, regions, and nations to record and preserve their identities and collective memories. Since technology has assumed a crucial role in this endeavor, it is necessary to assess the impact of technology on both the content and form of memory and its narration. The edited collection attempts to understand how the past, present, and future are formed, framed, mediated, and remediated through various forms of storytelling. Drawing on the theoretical and methodological approaches offered by literary, cultural, and media studies, history, sociology, psychology, as well as science and technology, this edited collection hopes to investigate the cultural representations of languages, communities, regions, and nations in oral histories, life writings, testimonies, and fictional and nonfictional narratives. The edited collection would examine issues related to memory, identity, representation, and narrativization and the impact of digital technology on memory studies and storytelling. The edited collection invites papers on the following themes but is not limited to: •          Memory studies—theories and praxis •          Modes and methods of storytelling—of languages, communities, nations, and   regions •          Impact of digital technologies on memory and memory studies •          Language, literature, and memory •          Interdisciplinarity and intersectionality of memory and memory studies. •          Memory and oral history •          Memory and life writing •          Memory and archive •          Memory and erasure •          Memory and marginality •          Memory and textuality •          Memory, cognition, and critical theory •          Memory and the Medium of fiction •          Memory and (mis)representation •          Memory and production of identities Submissions Abstracts of about 200 words, along with up to six keywords, a 50-word bio-note, institutional affiliation, and contact details, should be emailed by 30 July 2023 to shashienglish@gmail.com as a single MS Word document attachment. Chapter requirements: A chapter should be max. Eight thousand words, including footnotes and bibliography adhering to the MLA 9th edition. Important Dates: Deadline for abstract submission: 30 July 2023 Abstract selection notification: 30 August 2023 Complete Paper Submission: 30 October 2023 *

Exploring the Nexus of Healing, Stories, and Illness in the Nineteenth Century and Today

“The Nineteenth Century Today: Interdisciplinary, International, Intertemporal” IN-CSA Conference (Durham University in Durham, UK from July 10 – July 12, 2024). deadline for submissions: August 1, 2023 Call for Papers, “Exploring the Nexus of Healing, Stories, and Illness in the Nineteenth Century and Today” for “The Nineteenth Century Today: Interdisciplinary, International, Intertemporal” IN-CSA Conference (Durham University in Durham, UK from July 10 – July 12, 2024). Please submit a 250-word abstract and a 2-page CV by August 1, 2023 to Melissa Rampelli at mrampelli@holyfamily.edu The nineteenth century witnessed profound transformations in medical practices, literary expressions, and societal attitudes toward health and illness. This panel aims to shed light on the intricate relationship between healing, storytelling, and illness (broadly conceived) during this pivotal period. In light of the IN-CSA’s interdisciplinary, international, and intertemporal theme, papers exploring the legacies–either across time, disciplines, or cultures–of the dynamic between nineteenth-century narrative, illness, and healing are particularly welcome.
*

Fans, Fandoms, and Celebrity Studies – Northeast PCA Hybrid Fall Conference 2023

deadline for submissions:  August 1, 2023 The Northeast Popular/American Culture Association (NEPCA) Fans, Fandoms, and Celebrity Studies Area invites presentation submissions for NEPCA’s hybrid conference to be held October 12 – October 14, 2023 in-person at Nichols College and virtually, via the Zoom platform. This area encourages submissions that focus on interrogating the ideas and the ideals of fans and fandoms, and why we idolize celebrities. We welcome submissions from all theoretical and philosophical perspectives. We are open to submissions in any area of fan and celebrity studies including but not limited to:
    • Creation and authenticity of fandoms
    • Fandoms, diversity and inclusion
    • Celebrity marketing, advertising, and public relations
    • Social media use and celebrity status
    • Defining fandoms
    • Fandoms and politics
    • Celebrities and illness
    • Sport fandoms and celebrities
    • Issues of fame and what it means to be famous in our culture
    • Fandom comparisons between cultures
    • Trust and value of celebrity
    • An individual celebrity
The deadline for the submission of abstracts is August 1, 2023. Please use this form to submit your abstract: https://bit.ly/NEPCA23CFP If you have questions about this Area/the NEPCA Conference please see: https://nepca.blog/2023-annual-conference/ or feel free to reach out to NEPCA’S Fans, Fandoms, and Celebrity Studies Area Chair: Dr. Shelly Jones at jonesmc@delhi.edu  The Centre for Modernist Cultures at the University of Birmingham is delighted to mark the formation of the Modern Letters Editing Network (MoLE) with a virtual workshop:  Working with Modern Letters: Ford Madox Ford, Katherine Mansfield, Virginia Woolf  on Monday, 17 July, 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm  The discussion will be led by: Professor Claire Davison, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3 Professor Sara Haslam, Open University And moderated by Professor Max Saunders, University of Birmingham You are invited to a Zoom meeting. When: Jul 17, 2023 02:00 PM London Register in advance for this meeting: https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMvf-6przItH9UWfNyu2pA-C_sng1zIsFf9 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining. Max Saunders Ford Madox Ford | Reaktion Books Major new centenary exhibition of paintings and drawings by Alfred Cohen has gone online: Works – Alfred Cohen | Ben Uri Gallery and Museum with accompanying fully-illustrated book: https://www.accartbooks.com/uk/store/pv/9780900157691/alfred-cohen/max-saunders-sarah-macdougall/ Imagined Futures: Writing, Science, and Modernity in the To-Day and To-Morrow Book Series, 1923-31 https://global.oup.com/academic/product/imagined-futures-9780198829454?q=saunders&lang=en&cc=gb# * The Centre for Modernist Cultures at the University of Birmingham is delighted to mark the formation of the Modern Letters Editing Network (MoLE) with a virtual workshop:  Working with Modern Letters: Ford Madox Ford, Katherine Mansfield, Virginia Woolf  on Monday, 17 July, 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm  The discussion will be led by: Professor Claire Davison, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3 Professor Sara Haslam, Open University And moderated by Professor Max Saunders, University of Birmingham You are invited to a Zoom meeting. When: Jul 17, 2023 02:00 PM London Register in advance for this meeting: https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMvf-6przItH9UWfNyu2pA-C_sng1zIsFf9 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining. Max Saunders Ford Madox Ford | Reaktion Books Major new centenary exhibition of paintings and drawings by Alfred Cohen has gone online: Works – Alfred Cohen | Ben Uri Gallery and Museum with accompanying fully-illustrated book: https://www.accartbooks.com/uk/store/pv/9780900157691/alfred-cohen/max-saunders-sarah-macdougall/ Imagined Futures: Writing, Science, and Modernity in the To-Day and To-Morrow Book Series, 1923-31 https://global.oup.com/academic/product/imagined-futures-9780198829454?q=saunders&lang=en&cc=gb# Deadline for Submissions July 7, 2023 International Auto/Biography Association Asia-Pacific Conference 2023  26th-28th Sept 2023 (online conference) “Life Narrative in Unprecedented Times: Writing the Unexpected, Narrating the Future”.  The pandemic has functioned as a reminder of the importance of life storying and testimony as records of experience, as information sharing, or as creative engagement. This conference explores the ways momentous events shape life narration in the past, now, and for the future, for instance, the role of journalism in circulating personal stories, understanding of the impacts of mental health, and a renewed engagement in family and community histories. Each of these themes has been particularly notable during COVID-19. We invite proposals that address life narratives at unprecedented times, but also how life narrative is located by recent histories in diverse contexts and temporality. The conference welcomes critical and creative responses including, but not limited to, the themes outlined below: *narrating ‘the new normal’ *disrupted/stalled futures *national/ regional/ local life narratives *narrating isolation/ lockdown *non-human and post-human lives, particularly connections during COVID/isolation *illness narratives *stories of grief and loss *ageing and storytelling *life narrative as record-keeping *memorabilia, materials and objects *social media / the rise of TikTok *children and youth as life narrators *Reality television, trends and shifts *non-fiction podcasts *travel narratives/post-COVID *genre shifts (journalism, the essay) *narratives of work and employment Papers will be 10-15 minutes in length. Proposals of 300 words + bios of 50 words should be sent to iaba.asiapacific@flinders.edu.au by 7th July 2023. —————————-
Kate Douglas (she/her) Professor of English College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences +61 402440223 www.flinders.edu.au/people/kate.douglas
* Call for Proposals: The 39 I.S.E.B. Conference Life Stories Across Times and Spaces Courtyard Marriott in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  (Conference site on Webpage: https://isebio.com/index.html) Conference Date: October 5-7, 2023  Submission Deadline: June 15, 2023  The International Society for Educational Biography (I.S.E.B.) invites proposals for its annual conference, to be held in partnership with The Society of Philosophy and History of Education (S.O.P.H.E.), October 5-7, 2023, at the Courtyard by Marriott Oklahoma City Downtown in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. CONFERENCE THEME: This year’s conference theme is Life Stories Across Times and Spaces.  Through the lens of time and space, we offer a robust conference space to examine the diverse forms of life writing characterizing the contemporary field. The genres of life writing include biographies such as Plato’s dialogues to St. Augustine’s Confessions, from 1-minute TikTok clips to the voluminous biographies of Winston Churchill, from Anne Frank’s diary to Princess Diana in The Crown.  We invite proposals with a special focus on the temporal and spatial dimensions of life writing and lives as they unfold as well as their writing and reception. This theme recognizes we are living in historic times that demand rigorous scrutiny and This theme recognizes we are living in historic times that demand rigorous scrutiny and discussion of the boundaries of the past and the present and between here and there. We welcome studies at any stage about biographies of all sorts, lengths, modes, and purposes, with the belief that they illuminate facets of humanity and education. Papers and presentations may include, but are not limited to, one or more of the following topics: 1. Educational biographies: constructions of self, learners, educators, agents, and communities 2. Life writing in academic discourses and spaces 3. Life recordings on social media: TikTok, Podcast, and Biopics 4. From the personal to the political: diaries, biographies, autobiographies, and beyond 5. Amplifying minoritized and subaltern voices in life writing 6. Reminiscing about the past and envisioning the future: work, family, and life 7. Conceptions of memory and time: how personal time, social events, national crises, and historical epochs framing our memories 8. Theories and practices of life writing: genres, recordings, and reconstructions 9. Perspectives and genres: autoethnography, testimonio, biography, ethnography, memoir, etc. 10. Fictionalizing historical figures in books, films, science-fiction 11. Geographic and spatial tellings: the influence of space and place in life writing SUBMISSION POLICIES:
    • Participants: Submissions are welcome from ISEB members, non-members, and independent scholars both inside and outside the US.  Graduate students and international scholars are particularly welcome to submit proposals.  Please note that non-members whose proposals are accepted are expected to become members when registering for the conference, in order to be included in the program.
    • In-Person and Virtual Participation: This conference is primarily an in-person space with opportunities for virtual presentation as well. Virtual presentations can only be offered to individual papers and panel presentations. Speakers of virtual presentations should send 15-minute video clips of their presentations no later than Monday, October 2, to ensure a smooth rendition. The speakers should be available on Zoom during the panel sessions to respond to questions. The speakers should be available on Zoom during the panel sessions to respond to questions.  If the entire panel will be virtual, all presenters must designate the same participation mode.  Virtual presenters pay the same conference fee as in-person participants.  While we will do our best to make the presentation process as seamless as possible, technological glitches are always a risk.
    • Format: Submissions should fall into one of four formats—individual papers, panels, roundtable discussions, and poster sessions.  See below for more details.
    • Abstract link: Participants must submit a title and an abstract (no more than 300 words) by June 15, 2023.  Please submit your abstract here.
PRESENTATION TYPES:
    1. Individual Papers: Presentations should be 15-20 minutes long.
    1. Panels: This category is for a 90-minute session comprised of three or four presentations on a common topic.  Each panel should have an organizer responsible for submitting the panel proposal.  The proposal must include 1) a title for the panel and titles of individual presentations, and 2) an abstract (up to 500 words) for the panel.
    1. Roundtable Discussion: This category facilitates interactive discussions of issues pertinent to biographies of all types.  Each roundtable lasts for 90 minutes; the panel may have up to seven members.  The panelists should take no more than 45 minutes to present their views and leave the remaining time for interaction with the audience.  The panel organizer should also serve as the moderator.  The proposal must include 1) a title for the roundtable, and 2) a summary (up to 500 words) describing the perspectives and attitudes panelists have toward the topic.
    1. Poster Sessions: We invite submissions for this popular form of presentation posters, where the presenter displays visually a topic relevant to the conference theme and responds to audience’s questions on the spot.  Guidelines are
    1. Time: 60 minutes
    1. Location: Tables in the conference area
    1. Format: Corrugated display board—trifolds opens to roughly 36” x 48” or rollable posters of similar size
    1. Additional Media (optional): Laptops to share photos and brief videos
FURTHER INFORMATION: For more information, please email smou@depauw.edu or visit https://isebio.com/index.html Contact Info: Dr. Sherry Mou DePauw University Contact Email: smou@depauw.edu *

Representations of Ethnic Deportations from Eastern and Central Europe to the Soviet Union During and After World War I

Deadline: July 15, 2023 Call for Papers We are seeking contributors to a special issue or edited volume on representations of ethnic deportations from Eastern and Central Europe to the Soviet Union (1930-during and after WWII) favoring representations from ethnic minority groups. Articles are not limited to but can focus on:
    • first and second generation memory, postmemory (Hirsch) as expressed in life-writing, literary representations of all genres, art of all genres
    • on “portable monuments” (Rigney), narratives/stories/histories that could be re-written, appropriated, and transformed in new contexts
    • cultural memory and translation, the circulation of memory between places and languages
    • analyses of varied forms of curating memory (online exhibits, traveling exhibits, museums, monuments, installations, performance, anniversaries and commemorations, film, documentaries)
    • how, in the absence of a crystallized, hard memory, the historical documents and the representations analyzed serve as viable examples of soft memory that succeed in memorializing the forced labor camps experience in its collective and individual forms (‘Soft’ and ‘hard’ memory of deportation (Etkind) in collective and individual forms)
    • new English translations of works (poems, songs, diary entrances, letters, postcards, notes, etc.) by ethnic deportees, if they are subject of analysis or commentary and relate to the cluster and do not exceed 5 pages.
Please send up to 1,000-word proposals by July 15, 2023. Contact Info: Anca Luca Holden, aholden@amherst.edu Oana Popescu Sandu opopescusa@usi.edu Contact Email: ancaholden@yahoo.com * Deadline for Submissions July 15, 2022 Hegemony and peripherality in autobiographical writings: texts, contexts, visibility *** XXII Symposium of the Osservatorio scientifico della memoria autobiografica scritta, orale e iconografica                                                              Academia Belgica, Via Omero 8 ROMA 5, 6, 7 December 2023 Promoted and organized by: Mediapolis.Europa ass. cult. http://mediapoliseuropa.com/ and by Grupo de Investigación “Lectura, Escritura, Alfabetización” (LEA), Universidad de Alcalá Seminario Interdisciplinar de Estudios sobre Cultura Escrita (SIECE), Universidad de Alcalá Nowadays, great store is set on autobiographical – and more generally private – documentation. In the past decades, archives for the preservation of documents have multiplied, while it seems to us that studies aimed at examining their forms remain less satisfactory. However, the latter represent an essential aspect that helps us to understand not just the content of a document but the way of forging it, of forging a testimony, and how documents were made transmissible and comparable. Some questions arise in this regard: – Can the texts of authors and writers be subjected to the same methods of formal analysis? – In what way does the concept of hegemony transpire in an autobiographical text? – How can memory be safeguarded and given value? – Can contemporary society be observed through a clear distinction between social classes? What kind of terminology should be adopted to classify them? – How do the works of authors and writers interact? – To what extent has the digital revolution expanded autobiographical practice and how does it transform it? Submitting the various bodies of work to the same methodological criteria regardless of designation by content or social background appears to be a reasonable intent. The history of culture and science teaches us how the move from listing to classification in the 17th century, as illustrated by Foucault (1966: 137-176), made it possible to make scientific data comparable. What follows are some points aimed at suggesting some of the possible outlines around which a line of research can be developed. 1. Recognizing oneself within a minority culture. The issue of hegemonies was addressed by Antonio Gramsci (1975). The observation whereby those who exercise hegemony tend to give conformity to language and every form of expression, therefore making them cohesive and comparable, contrasts with the plurality of minority cultures, which are less inscribable into formal constants. There is a vast body of documentation – illustrated and discussed by Antonio Castillo Gómez (2022), among others – on the many archival initiatives that developed especially at the beginning of the 20th century to preserve these sources, and on their now widely acknowledged importance. It is precisely the spurious origins of these sources that make a formal classification of the texts more difficult, at least at first glance. Unlike authors, writers do not aim to pursue a style, as Barthes points out (1996: 153). Writers should not necessarily be understood as ordinary people. Leonardo da Vinci regarded himself as a writer and not as an author, “not a literary man,” as he defined himself writing to Ludovico il Moro in 1482. He did not know Latin very well, and for this reason he was not regarded as a man of letters. The book Kafka. Toward a Minor Literature (G. Deleuze-F. Guattari, 1975) leads to foundational reflections on this issue, which should constitute a new alphabet for the very conception of the term ‘culture’. In this text Deleuze and Guattari highlight how being without roots, being de-territorialized, leads not to an impoverishment of thought and expressions, but rather to exploring from the margins, from the borders: a distancing that makes it possible to glimpse new lexical, conceptual forms that are open to exchange. Every minority culture (which today have multiplied thanks to the many languages that are circulating, to the multiple forms of coexistence that are necessary in a world in motion) can constitute the instrument required to prevent culture from being ossified into apparatuses. Minority culture develops languages and a conception of space that is labyrinthine, de-confined, thereby suggesting new perspectives. So, who feels legitimized to write? How can experiences that do not come from a canonical style be made well-rounded, rich? In this view, the archives and the written testimonies of ordinary people should not be regarded as mere hunting grounds, but as texts in the strict sense of the term. Chasse aux archives [hunting the archives] is the expression used by Philippe Lejeune to define the voracity for texts from minority and testimonial cultures: “The idea that, within some generations, your texts are tampered with in order to gain information on any subject, without knowing what they are about […] would be disgusting. In order to avoid these misunderstandings, I would strongly emphasize that ‘Hunting is prohibited’”. (Ph. Lejeune 2005: 120-121. The translation is mine). 2. Far from where? In the case of autobiographical writing, it is possible to glimpse a feeling of being or not being part of a hegemonical entity in the position assumed by the subject as it shows itself to be or not be an integral part of a centre or of a periphery. This is not just about a marginality based on social grounds, but more cogently based on a vision of the subject’s own language and culture in their potential to be relevant within a context (Fabio Dei 2018). How does an individual conceive of his or her centrality? Where, when, and how is it possible to circumscribe the position of a writer relaying his or her own life? How does the assumption of a certain stance define an autobiographical narration, legitimise it, structure it also in view of an external glance, of a real, imagined or searched visibility? How does the narrating ‘I’ adopt a perspective of introjection or of extimité, centripetal or centrifugal? Lontano da dove is the title of a book by Claudio Magris (1989). It deals with the drama of thousands of people, their conditions at the time of the crumbling of the powerful Hapsburg Empire. It is a metaphor for the conception of centre and periphery, of hegemony and marginality, of exile as an essential condition. An idea that, starting from a political-cultural analysis, grows into a lexicon, into cultural models, it delineates individual destiny. Magris’s Lontano da dove highlights the difficulty encountered by an individual who, not being part of the hegemonic culture, is observed/observes him/herself and is positioned/positions him/herself as a marginal body. 3. The semantics of the autobiographical text The narrating ‘I’ manifests itself through expressions that testify to its sociocultural and topographical position, and that inscribe it into certain spatial-temporal categories. As George Lakoff and Mark Johnson write (2004 [1980]) in their study Metaphors we live by (see the paragraph “The Me-First Orientation”), our way of narrating is modelled on modi pensandi. A whole cultural conception governs these forms of expression, in which the individual modulates self-narration and relates to the world around him or her. Word order was studied by William Cooper & John Robert Ross (1975). Even the choice of the mother’s or the other’s language and its modelling are cues to the posture of the ‘I’, just as photographs and the ever-widespread selfies signal how self-representation is intended. In other words, in adopting a written or audio-visual register, the ‘l’ allows us to understand how and where it positions itself. Photographic and video images define its autography. Like every form of expression, language is a system composed of relations. In order to understand its meaning, a mapping is necessary, which can be delineated through contents or voids: analysing the use of languages proves to be a tool for outlining not just established but potential relations (L. Hjelmslev 2009). Iconographic expressions such as selfies and those found on the Internet (P. Sibilia 2008) follow the same pattern: showing or not showing reveals a willingness to not just self-narrate in the present but to envision what one would like to be. In the same passage, Hjelmslev argues that language forms itself into a tangle of empty places founded on a veritable difference in potential. 4. The position of the ‘I’ and the language referred to the body An example: in psychiatric patients – who are quintessentially marginal – oral, written and graphic expressions are still closely anchored to the body, to physical actions. Binswanger, a psychiatrist with long-time experience of dialogue with patients, writes: “Out of the blue”, “being in seventh heaven” are expressions of our Dasein, our being. And even though myths and poetry allow us, though a universalizing metaphorical language, to share sensations, feelings and psychic experiences, the “I nonetheless remains the original subject of what raises or falls” (L. Binswanger 2012: 42. The translation is mine). Binswanger, who had inscribed his vision into Heidegger’s philosophy for a long time, gradually distanced himself from his ontological conception to immerse it into concrete cases. An entire vocabulary places the acts of the patient’s Dasein into space: vertiginous height, ascension, altitude, infinity, etc. (L. Binswanger 1971: 237-245). It is possible to suppose that the desire to evade, to disengage, in psychiatric patients determines its lexicon. More generally, in autobiographical writings reference to the body as a vehicle of experiences that crossed it appears to be important. 5. The ‘truth”: what the ‘I’ shows or conceals. Transparency and obstruction The truth is the foundational theme of every autobiography. It can be granted by the pact that the writer makes with the reader. Philippe Lejeune’s work docet (Ph. Lejeune: 1975). The theme of truth powerfully crosses autobiographical writing. Writing about oneself and claiming that it is true implies a pact with a whole series of confirmations and complex manoeuvres. Autofictions intend to escape this criterion. Rousseau’s Confessions, a classic of autobiographical writing, is born as a form of self-externalization that makes uncertainties public in order to justify actions that, within the framework of one’s way of recounting, should be justified. Starobinski calls this attitude ‘transparency and obstruction’.  “Rousseau desired communication and transparency of the heart. But after pursuing this avenue and meeting with disappointment, he chose the opposite course, accepting – indeed provoking – obstructions, which enabled him to withdraw, certain of his innocence, into passive resignation.” (J. Starobinski 1971 : 1. The terms in italics are in the original text). Every kind of writing – and, a fortiori, autobiographical writing – exposes and conceals realities that can nonetheless be glimpsed. In sum, this is Poppea’s veil, which lets us see and not see, thereby raising, demanding more questions than certainties (J. Starobinski 1961). Resolving and understanding the distinction between truth and falsehood requires the use of many coordinates (N. Frogneux 2021); it cannot be submitted to an automatic judgement, either in the historical or in the autobiographical field (see: Carlo Ginzburg, Il filo e le tracce. Vero falso finto 2015). Even adopting a codified language (as Lotman and Bachtin note: see infra) can be a concealment, or an illusion that you can judge a book by its cover. Often, a strong determination to show that the truth is being told is also realized through reference to realia, to what is visible and concrete. In many autobiographies, writers include registry documents. With utmost precision, they mention dates and places in order to make their testimony more believable (B. Barbalato 2009). 6. How writers conceive of hegemony by adopting certain codified forms Lotman writes that a great man or a bandit must find a good reason for regarding himself as an individual who has the right to biography (J. Lotman 1985: 194). Writing life stories, both biographical and autobiographical, requires a formal choice. For this reason, Lotman asserts that a peasant’s opportunistic use of the language of the church or of bureaucracy allows him to inscribe himself into a legitimacy. Also, think of what Bachtin (103) says about unsophisticated culture, about the peasant who, living in an isolated context, believes that every language corresponds exactly to the reality that he wants to designate. The same conviction is shared by André Gide, who asserts that often unsophisticated sources formally represent a copy of the copy (A. Gide 1997 [1926-1950]: 572). Gide dispels the misunderstanding of the authenticity of the document of ordinary people. No writing is spontaneous, let alone the authenticity of those who do not practise writing. The codes to which one resorts can be regarded as a passepartout for the legitimization of one’s own narration and conception of truth, which is thus validated (see A. Castillo Gómez 2016 and V. Sierra Blas 2018). Another important observation by Bachtin concerns the diversity in conceiving and observing a life path today and in antiquity. In antiquity, public and private space was conceived of as one and the same thing. In self-representation there was no difference between an internal self and an external one. The topos was the agora (Ibid.: 279-282). This call for papers invites proposals aimed at examining writers’ and authors’ ways, forms and goals of self-expression, and it intends to investigate mutual contaminations and interferences. Besides what has already been said, particular attention is to be paid to how self-narration presents itself as opening towards the future, how it lets its expectations transpire. In writings there is a quid, a void whose contours, whose latencies are difficult to intercept but nonetheless exist. Wishes are not always openly expressed; often they can be glimpsed between the lines of a text. As Binswanger writes, writing about oneself is a way of letting the future come to oneself. (1971: 261). How can this aspect be interpreted, understood? Michail Bachtin 1979 [1975- Mosca 1955]:1975], “La parola nella poesía e la parola nel romanzo”, 83-108, “La biografía e l’autobiografia antica”, 277-293, in Id., Estetica e romanzo, transl. by Clara Strada Janovic, Torino, Einaudi. Beatrice Barbalato (2009), “L’ipersegnicità nelle testimonianze autobiografiche”, 387-400, in Silvia Bonacchi (ed.), Intr. Anna Tylusińska-Kowalska, Le récit du moi: forme, strutture, modello del racconto autobiografico, in Kwartalnik neofilologiczny, Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw 29-30 April 2008. editor: Franciszek Grucza. B. Barbalato-Albert Mingelgrün (eds.) 2012, Télémaque, Archiver et interpréter les témoignages autobiographiques, Louvain-la Neuve, Presses Universitaires de Louvain. Roland Barthes  1998 [“Tel Quel”, 1964], “Écrivains et écrivants”, in Essais critiques, Paris, Seuil. Ludwig Binswanger 1971 [1947], “Le sens anthropologique de la présomption”, 237-245, in Id., Introduction à l’analyse existentielle, translated from the French by Jacqueline Verdeaux and Roland Kuhn, preface by R. Kuhn and Henri Maldiney, Paris, Éd. de Minuit.Rêve et existence 2012 [1930] translation and introduction Françoise Dastur, postface by E. Basso, Paris, Vrin. Antonio Castillo Gómez 2022, “Voix subalternes. Archives et mémoire écrite des classes populaires”, 117-135, in S. Péquignot and Y. Potin (dir.), Les conflits d’archives, France, Espagne, Méditerranée, Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes. Daniele Combierati 2010, Scrivere nella lingua dell’altro, Bruxelles, Peter Lang. William Cooper & John Robert Ross 1975, “World order”, 63–111, in R. E. Grossman et al. (eds.), Papers from the parasession on functionalism, Chicago: Chicago Linguistic Society.

Fabio Dei 2018, Cultura popolare in Italia da Gramsci all’Unesco, Bologna, il Mulino.

Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari 1975, Kafka. Pour une littérature mineure, Paris, Éd. De Minuit. Michel Foucault 1966, “Classer”, 137-176, in Id, Les mots et le choses, Paris, Gallimard. Nathalie Frogneux, “Une phénoménologie de la vie mensongère”, in Le Phénomène humain. Revue Philosophique de Louvain 118(4), 2021, 573-591. doi: 10.2143/RPL.118.4.3290142. André Gide 1997, Journal 1926-1950, Paris, Gallimard, vol. II. Carlo Ginzburg 2006), Il filo e le tracce. Vero falso finto, Feltrinelli, Milano. Louis Hjelmslev 1975, Résumé of a Theory of Language. Travaux du Cercle linguistique de Copenhague, vol. XVI. Copenhague: Nordisk Sprog- og Kulturforlag. –        (2009), Teoria del linguaggio. Résumé, = TLR, Vicenza, Terra Ferma, Vicenza. Antonio Gramsci 1975, Quaderni del carcere, 3, Quaderni 12-29, critical edition of the Istituto Gramsci by Valentino Gerratana, Torino, Einaudi. Georges Lakoff, Mark Johnson, 2003 [1980], Metaphors We Live By, Chicago-London, The University of Chicago Press. Philippe Lejeune 1975, Le pacte autobiographique, Paris, Seuil. – “Je ne suis pas une source”, Entretien de Ph. Artières, 115-137, in Id., Signes de vie – Le pacte autobiographique 2, 2, Seuil 2005. Ronan Le Roux, « De quoi jouit l’archiviste ? Méditation certalienne sur le ‘vol d’âme’ », in Elodie Belkorchia, Georges Cuer, Françoise Hiraux (dir.), Du matériel à l’immatérielLa Gazette des archives n°262 (2021-2). Jurij M. Lotman 1985, “Il diritto alla biografia”, in Id., La semiosfera-L’asimmetria e il dialogo nelle strutture pensanti, edited and translated from the Russian by Simonetta Salvestroni, Venezia, Marsilio. Claudio Magris 1989, Lontano da Dove, Joseph Roth e la tradizione ebraico-orientale, Torino Einaudi. Paula Sibilia 2008, O show do eu: a intimidade como espetáculo, Rio de Janeiro, Nova Fronteira. Verónica Sierra Blas 2016, Cartas presas. La correspondencia carcelaria en la Guerra Civil y el Franquismo, Madrid, Marcial Pons. Jean Starobinski 1961, “Le voile de Poppée”, 7-27, in Id, L’oeil vivant, Gallimard, 1961. – Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Transparency and Obstruction. Trans. by Arthur Goldhammer. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1988. Judging panel: Beatrice Barbalato, Mediapolis.europa ass, cult., Université catholique de Louvain Antonio Castillo Gómez, Universidad de Alcalá Nathalie Frogneux, Université catholique de Louvain Verónica Sierra Blas, Universidad de Alcalá Symposium organized by: Mediapolis.Europa (Irene Meliciani: managing director) Mnemosyne o la costruzione del senso, Presses universitaires de Louvain Grupo de Investigación “Lectura, Escritura, Alfabetización” (LEA), Universidad de Alcalá Seminario Interdisciplinar de Estudios sobre Cultura Escrita (SIECE), Universidad de Alcalá This symposium is part of the research project Vox populi. Espacios, prácticas y estrategias de visibilidad de las escrituras del margen en las épocas Moderna y Contemporánea (PID2019-107881GB-I00), financed by the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación and by the Agencia Estatal de Investigación (Spain). Suggestions for sending proposals   The languages admitted for submission are: Italian, Spanish, French, English, Portuguese. Everyone is allowed to write in one of these languages. There will be no simultaneous translation. A passive understanding of these languages is desirable. A) Deadline for submission: 15 July 2023. The abstract will be composed of 250 words (max), with citation of two reference sources, and a brief CV (max: 100 words), with possible mention of two of one’s own publications, be they articles, books, or videos. The judging panel will read and select every proposal, which is to be sent to beatrice.barbalato@gmail.com, antonio.castillo@uah.es For information: beatrice.barbalato@gmail.com, antonio.castillo@uah.es,  irenemeliciani@gmail.com The authors of the accepted proposals will be notified by 30 July 2023. B) Regarding enrolment in the colloquium, once the proposals are accepted the fees are: Before 30 September 2023: 150.00€ From 1 to 30 October 2023:  180.00€ Enrolment fee cannot be accepted in loco For graduate students: Before 30 September 2023: 100.00€ From 1to 30 October 2023:   90.00€ Enrolment fee cannot be accepted in loco Once the programme is established, no change is allowed. For activities related to this topic at the University and cultural centers in Spain see the sites http://www.siece.es/   http://grafosfera.blogspot.com/ For information on the symposia organized in previous years by the Osservatorio della memoria autobiografica  scritta, orale e iconografica, visit the site: http://mediapoliseuropa.com/ Deadline for Submissions July 7, 2023 International Auto/Biography Association Asia-Pacific Conference 2023  26th-28th Sept 2023 (online conference) “Life Narrative in Unprecedented Times: Writing the Unexpected, Narrating the Future”.  The pandemic has functioned as a reminder of the importance of life storying and testimony as records of experience, as information sharing, or as creative engagement. This conference explores the ways momentous events shape life narration in the past, now, and for the future, for instance, the role of journalism in circulating personal stories, understanding of the impacts of mental health, and a renewed engagement in family and community histories. Each of these themes has been particularly notable during COVID-19. We invite proposals that address life narratives at unprecedented times, but also how life narrative is located by recent histories in diverse contexts and temporality. The conference welcomes critical and creative responses including, but not limited to, the themes outlined below: *narrating ‘the new normal’ *disrupted/stalled futures *national/ regional/ local life narratives *narrating isolation/ lockdown *non-human and post-human lives, particularly connections during COVID/isolation *illness narratives *stories of grief and loss *ageing and storytelling *life narrative as record-keeping *memorabilia, materials and objects *social media / the rise of TikTok *children and youth as life narrators *Reality television, trends and shifts *non-fiction podcasts *travel narratives/post-COVID *genre shifts (journalism, the essay) *narratives of work and employment Papers will be 10-15 minutes in length. Proposals of 300 words + bios of 50 words should be sent to iaba.asiapacific@flinders.edu.au by 7th July 2023. —————————-
Kate Douglas (she/her) Professor of English College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences +61 402440223 www.flinders.edu.au/people/kate.douglas
* Call for Proposals: The 39 I.S.E.B. Conference Life Stories Across Times and Spaces Courtyard Marriott in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  (Conference site on Webpage: https://isebio.com/index.html) Conference Date: October 5-7, 2023  Submission Deadline: June 15, 2023  The International Society for Educational Biography (I.S.E.B.) invites proposals for its annual conference, to be held in partnership with The Society of Philosophy and History of Education (S.O.P.H.E.), October 5-7, 2023, at the Courtyard by Marriott Oklahoma City Downtown in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. CONFERENCE THEME: This year’s conference theme is Life Stories Across Times and Spaces.  Through the lens of time and space, we offer a robust conference space to examine the diverse forms of life writing characterizing the contemporary field. The genres of life writing include biographies such as Plato’s dialogues to St. Augustine’s Confessions, from 1-minute TikTok clips to the voluminous biographies of Winston Churchill, from Anne Frank’s diary to Princess Diana in The Crown.  We invite proposals with a special focus on the temporal and spatial dimensions of life writing and lives as they unfold as well as their writing and reception. This theme recognizes we are living in historic times that demand rigorous scrutiny and This theme recognizes we are living in historic times that demand rigorous scrutiny and discussion of the boundaries of the past and the present and between here and there. We welcome studies at any stage about biographies of all sorts, lengths, modes, and purposes, with the belief that they illuminate facets of humanity and education. Papers and presentations may include, but are not limited to, one or more of the following topics: 1. Educational biographies: constructions of self, learners, educators, agents, and communities 2. Life writing in academic discourses and spaces 3. Life recordings on social media: TikTok, Podcast, and Biopics 4. From the personal to the political: diaries, biographies, autobiographies, and beyond 5. Amplifying minoritized and subaltern voices in life writing 6. Reminiscing about the past and envisioning the future: work, family, and life 7. Conceptions of memory and time: how personal time, social events, national crises, and historical epochs framing our memories 8. Theories and practices of life writing: genres, recordings, and reconstructions 9. Perspectives and genres: autoethnography, testimonio, biography, ethnography, memoir, etc. 10. Fictionalizing historical figures in books, films, science-fiction 11. Geographic and spatial tellings: the influence of space and place in life writing SUBMISSION POLICIES:
    • Participants: Submissions are welcome from ISEB members, non-members, and independent scholars both inside and outside the US.  Graduate students and international scholars are particularly welcome to submit proposals.  Please note that non-members whose proposals are accepted are expected to become members when registering for the conference, in order to be included in the program.
    • In-Person and Virtual Participation: This conference is primarily an in-person space with opportunities for virtual presentation as well. Virtual presentations can only be offered to individual papers and panel presentations. Speakers of virtual presentations should send 15-minute video clips of their presentations no later than Monday, October 2, to ensure a smooth rendition. The speakers should be available on Zoom during the panel sessions to respond to questions. The speakers should be available on Zoom during the panel sessions to respond to questions.  If the entire panel will be virtual, all presenters must designate the same participation mode.  Virtual presenters pay the same conference fee as in-person participants.  While we will do our best to make the presentation process as seamless as possible, technological glitches are always a risk.
    • Format: Submissions should fall into one of four formats—individual papers, panels, roundtable discussions, and poster sessions.  See below for more details.
    • Abstract link: Participants must submit a title and an abstract (no more than 300 words) by June 15, 2023.  Please submit your abstract here.
PRESENTATION TYPES:
    1. Individual Papers: Presentations should be 15-20 minutes long.
    1. Panels: This category is for a 90-minute session comprised of three or four presentations on a common topic.  Each panel should have an organizer responsible for submitting the panel proposal.  The proposal must include 1) a title for the panel and titles of individual presentations, and 2) an abstract (up to 500 words) for the panel.
    1. Roundtable Discussion: This category facilitates interactive discussions of issues pertinent to biographies of all types.  Each roundtable lasts for 90 minutes; the panel may have up to seven members.  The panelists should take no more than 45 minutes to present their views and leave the remaining time for interaction with the audience.  The panel organizer should also serve as the moderator.  The proposal must include 1) a title for the roundtable, and 2) a summary (up to 500 words) describing the perspectives and attitudes panelists have toward the topic.
    1. Poster Sessions: We invite submissions for this popular form of presentation posters, where the presenter displays visually a topic relevant to the conference theme and responds to audience’s questions on the spot.  Guidelines are
    1. Time: 60 minutes
    1. Location: Tables in the conference area
    1. Format: Corrugated display board—trifolds opens to roughly 36” x 48” or rollable posters of similar size
    1. Additional Media (optional): Laptops to share photos and brief videos
FURTHER INFORMATION: For more information, please email smou@depauw.edu or visit https://isebio.com/index.html Contact Info: Dr. Sherry Mou DePauw University Contact Email: smou@depauw.edu *

Representations of Ethnic Deportations from Eastern and Central Europe to the Soviet Union During and After World War I

Deadline: July 15, 2023 Call for Papers We are seeking contributors to a special issue or edited volume on representations of ethnic deportations from Eastern and Central Europe to the Soviet Union (1930-during and after WWII) favoring representations from ethnic minority groups. Articles are not limited to but can focus on:
    • first and second generation memory, postmemory (Hirsch) as expressed in life-writing, literary representations of all genres, art of all genres
    • on “portable monuments” (Rigney), narratives/stories/histories that could be re-written, appropriated, and transformed in new contexts
    • cultural memory and translation, the circulation of memory between places and languages
    • analyses of varied forms of curating memory (online exhibits, traveling exhibits, museums, monuments, installations, performance, anniversaries and commemorations, film, documentaries)
    • how, in the absence of a crystallized, hard memory, the historical documents and the representations analyzed serve as viable examples of soft memory that succeed in memorializing the forced labor camps experience in its collective and individual forms (‘Soft’ and ‘hard’ memory of deportation (Etkind) in collective and individual forms)
    • new English translations of works (poems, songs, diary entrances, letters, postcards, notes, etc.) by ethnic deportees, if they are subject of analysis or commentary and relate to the cluster and do not exceed 5 pages.
Please send up to 1,000-word proposals by July 15, 2023. Contact Info: Anca Luca Holden, aholden@amherst.edu Oana Popescu Sandu opopescusa@usi.edu Contact Email: ancaholden@yahoo.com * Deadline for Submissions July 15, 2022 Hegemony and peripherality in autobiographical writings: texts, contexts, visibility *** XXII Symposium of the Osservatorio scientifico della memoria autobiografica scritta, orale e iconografica                                                              Academia Belgica, Via Omero 8 ROMA 5, 6, 7 December 2023 Promoted and organized by: Mediapolis.Europa ass. cult. http://mediapoliseuropa.com/ and by Grupo de Investigación “Lectura, Escritura, Alfabetización” (LEA), Universidad de Alcalá Seminario Interdisciplinar de Estudios sobre Cultura Escrita (SIECE), Universidad de Alcalá Nowadays, great store is set on autobiographical – and more generally private – documentation. In the past decades, archives for the preservation of documents have multiplied, while it seems to us that studies aimed at examining their forms remain less satisfactory. However, the latter represent an essential aspect that helps us to understand not just the content of a document but the way of forging it, of forging a testimony, and how documents were made transmissible and comparable. Some questions arise in this regard: – Can the texts of authors and writers be subjected to the same methods of formal analysis? – In what way does the concept of hegemony transpire in an autobiographical text? – How can memory be safeguarded and given value? – Can contemporary society be observed through a clear distinction between social classes? What kind of terminology should be adopted to classify them? – How do the works of authors and writers interact? – To what extent has the digital revolution expanded autobiographical practice and how does it transform it? Submitting the various bodies of work to the same methodological criteria regardless of designation by content or social background appears to be a reasonable intent. The history of culture and science teaches us how the move from listing to classification in the 17th century, as illustrated by Foucault (1966: 137-176), made it possible to make scientific data comparable. What follows are some points aimed at suggesting some of the possible outlines around which a line of research can be developed. 1. Recognizing oneself within a minority culture. The issue of hegemonies was addressed by Antonio Gramsci (1975). The observation whereby those who exercise hegemony tend to give conformity to language and every form of expression, therefore making them cohesive and comparable, contrasts with the plurality of minority cultures, which are less inscribable into formal constants. There is a vast body of documentation – illustrated and discussed by Antonio Castillo Gómez (2022), among others – on the many archival initiatives that developed especially at the beginning of the 20th century to preserve these sources, and on their now widely acknowledged importance. It is precisely the spurious origins of these sources that make a formal classification of the texts more difficult, at least at first glance. Unlike authors, writers do not aim to pursue a style, as Barthes points out (1996: 153). Writers should not necessarily be understood as ordinary people. Leonardo da Vinci regarded himself as a writer and not as an author, “not a literary man,” as he defined himself writing to Ludovico il Moro in 1482. He did not know Latin very well, and for this reason he was not regarded as a man of letters. The book Kafka. Toward a Minor Literature (G. Deleuze-F. Guattari, 1975) leads to foundational reflections on this issue, which should constitute a new alphabet for the very conception of the term ‘culture’. In this text Deleuze and Guattari highlight how being without roots, being de-territorialized, leads not to an impoverishment of thought and expressions, but rather to exploring from the margins, from the borders: a distancing that makes it possible to glimpse new lexical, conceptual forms that are open to exchange. Every minority culture (which today have multiplied thanks to the many languages that are circulating, to the multiple forms of coexistence that are necessary in a world in motion) can constitute the instrument required to prevent culture from being ossified into apparatuses. Minority culture develops languages and a conception of space that is labyrinthine, de-confined, thereby suggesting new perspectives. So, who feels legitimized to write? How can experiences that do not come from a canonical style be made well-rounded, rich? In this view, the archives and the written testimonies of ordinary people should not be regarded as mere hunting grounds, but as texts in the strict sense of the term. Chasse aux archives [hunting the archives] is the expression used by Philippe Lejeune to define the voracity for texts from minority and testimonial cultures: “The idea that, within some generations, your texts are tampered with in order to gain information on any subject, without knowing what they are about […] would be disgusting. In order to avoid these misunderstandings, I would strongly emphasize that ‘Hunting is prohibited’”. (Ph. Lejeune 2005: 120-121. The translation is mine). 2. Far from where? In the case of autobiographical writing, it is possible to glimpse a feeling of being or not being part of a hegemonical entity in the position assumed by the subject as it shows itself to be or not be an integral part of a centre or of a periphery. This is not just about a marginality based on social grounds, but more cogently based on a vision of the subject’s own language and culture in their potential to be relevant within a context (Fabio Dei 2018). How does an individual conceive of his or her centrality? Where, when, and how is it possible to circumscribe the position of a writer relaying his or her own life? How does the assumption of a certain stance define an autobiographical narration, legitimise it, structure it also in view of an external glance, of a real, imagined or searched visibility? How does the narrating ‘I’ adopt a perspective of introjection or of extimité, centripetal or centrifugal? Lontano da dove is the title of a book by Claudio Magris (1989). It deals with the drama of thousands of people, their conditions at the time of the crumbling of the powerful Hapsburg Empire. It is a metaphor for the conception of centre and periphery, of hegemony and marginality, of exile as an essential condition. An idea that, starting from a political-cultural analysis, grows into a lexicon, into cultural models, it delineates individual destiny. Magris’s Lontano da dove highlights the difficulty encountered by an individual who, not being part of the hegemonic culture, is observed/observes him/herself and is positioned/positions him/herself as a marginal body. 3. The semantics of the autobiographical text The narrating ‘I’ manifests itself through expressions that testify to its sociocultural and topographical position, and that inscribe it into certain spatial-temporal categories. As George Lakoff and Mark Johnson write (2004 [1980]) in their study Metaphors we live by (see the paragraph “The Me-First Orientation”), our way of narrating is modelled on modi pensandi. A whole cultural conception governs these forms of expression, in which the individual modulates self-narration and relates to the world around him or her. Word order was studied by William Cooper & John Robert Ross (1975). Even the choice of the mother’s or the other’s language and its modelling are cues to the posture of the ‘I’, just as photographs and the ever-widespread selfies signal how self-representation is intended. In other words, in adopting a written or audio-visual register, the ‘l’ allows us to understand how and where it positions itself. Photographic and video images define its autography. Like every form of expression, language is a system composed of relations. In order to understand its meaning, a mapping is necessary, which can be delineated through contents or voids: analysing the use of languages proves to be a tool for outlining not just established but potential relations (L. Hjelmslev 2009). Iconographic expressions such as selfies and those found on the Internet (P. Sibilia 2008) follow the same pattern: showing or not showing reveals a willingness to not just self-narrate in the present but to envision what one would like to be. In the same passage, Hjelmslev argues that language forms itself into a tangle of empty places founded on a veritable difference in potential. 4. The position of the ‘I’ and the language referred to the body An example: in psychiatric patients – who are quintessentially marginal – oral, written and graphic expressions are still closely anchored to the body, to physical actions. Binswanger, a psychiatrist with long-time experience of dialogue with patients, writes: “Out of the blue”, “being in seventh heaven” are expressions of our Dasein, our being. And even though myths and poetry allow us, though a universalizing metaphorical language, to share sensations, feelings and psychic experiences, the “I nonetheless remains the original subject of what raises or falls” (L. Binswanger 2012: 42. The translation is mine). Binswanger, who had inscribed his vision into Heidegger’s philosophy for a long time, gradually distanced himself from his ontological conception to immerse it into concrete cases. An entire vocabulary places the acts of the patient’s Dasein into space: vertiginous height, ascension, altitude, infinity, etc. (L. Binswanger 1971: 237-245). It is possible to suppose that the desire to evade, to disengage, in psychiatric patients determines its lexicon. More generally, in autobiographical writings reference to the body as a vehicle of experiences that crossed it appears to be important. 5. The ‘truth”: what the ‘I’ shows or conceals. Transparency and obstruction The truth is the foundational theme of every autobiography. It can be granted by the pact that the writer makes with the reader. Philippe Lejeune’s work docet (Ph. Lejeune: 1975). The theme of truth powerfully crosses autobiographical writing. Writing about oneself and claiming that it is true implies a pact with a whole series of confirmations and complex manoeuvres. Autofictions intend to escape this criterion. Rousseau’s Confessions, a classic of autobiographical writing, is born as a form of self-externalization that makes uncertainties public in order to justify actions that, within the framework of one’s way of recounting, should be justified. Starobinski calls this attitude ‘transparency and obstruction’.  “Rousseau desired communication and transparency of the heart. But after pursuing this avenue and meeting with disappointment, he chose the opposite course, accepting – indeed provoking – obstructions, which enabled him to withdraw, certain of his innocence, into passive resignation.” (J. Starobinski 1971 : 1. The terms in italics are in the original text). Every kind of writing – and, a fortiori, autobiographical writing – exposes and conceals realities that can nonetheless be glimpsed. In sum, this is Poppea’s veil, which lets us see and not see, thereby raising, demanding more questions than certainties (J. Starobinski 1961). Resolving and understanding the distinction between truth and falsehood requires the use of many coordinates (N. Frogneux 2021); it cannot be submitted to an automatic judgement, either in the historical or in the autobiographical field (see: Carlo Ginzburg, Il filo e le tracce. Vero falso finto 2015). Even adopting a codified language (as Lotman and Bachtin note: see infra) can be a concealment, or an illusion that you can judge a book by its cover. Often, a strong determination to show that the truth is being told is also realized through reference to realia, to what is visible and concrete. In many autobiographies, writers include registry documents. With utmost precision, they mention dates and places in order to make their testimony more believable (B. Barbalato 2009). 6. How writers conceive of hegemony by adopting certain codified forms Lotman writes that a great man or a bandit must find a good reason for regarding himself as an individual who has the right to biography (J. Lotman 1985: 194). Writing life stories, both biographical and autobiographical, requires a formal choice. For this reason, Lotman asserts that a peasant’s opportunistic use of the language of the church or of bureaucracy allows him to inscribe himself into a legitimacy. Also, think of what Bachtin (103) says about unsophisticated culture, about the peasant who, living in an isolated context, believes that every language corresponds exactly to the reality that he wants to designate. The same conviction is shared by André Gide, who asserts that often unsophisticated sources formally represent a copy of the copy (A. Gide 1997 [1926-1950]: 572). Gide dispels the misunderstanding of the authenticity of the document of ordinary people. No writing is spontaneous, let alone the authenticity of those who do not practise writing. The codes to which one resorts can be regarded as a passepartout for the legitimization of one’s own narration and conception of truth, which is thus validated (see A. Castillo Gómez 2016 and V. Sierra Blas 2018). Another important observation by Bachtin concerns the diversity in conceiving and observing a life path today and in antiquity. In antiquity, public and private space was conceived of as one and the same thing. In self-representation there was no difference between an internal self and an external one. The topos was the agora (Ibid.: 279-282). This call for papers invites proposals aimed at examining writers’ and authors’ ways, forms and goals of self-expression, and it intends to investigate mutual contaminations and interferences. Besides what has already been said, particular attention is to be paid to how self-narration presents itself as opening towards the future, how it lets its expectations transpire. In writings there is a quid, a void whose contours, whose latencies are difficult to intercept but nonetheless exist. Wishes are not always openly expressed; often they can be glimpsed between the lines of a text. As Binswanger writes, writing about oneself is a way of letting the future come to oneself. (1971: 261). How can this aspect be interpreted, understood? Michail Bachtin 1979 [1975- Mosca 1955]:1975], “La parola nella poesía e la parola nel romanzo”, 83-108, “La biografía e l’autobiografia antica”, 277-293, in Id., Estetica e romanzo, transl. by Clara Strada Janovic, Torino, Einaudi. Beatrice Barbalato (2009), “L’ipersegnicità nelle testimonianze autobiografiche”, 387-400, in Silvia Bonacchi (ed.), Intr. Anna Tylusińska-Kowalska, Le récit du moi: forme, strutture, modello del racconto autobiografico, in Kwartalnik neofilologiczny, Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw 29-30 April 2008. editor: Franciszek Grucza. B. Barbalato-Albert Mingelgrün (eds.) 2012, Télémaque, Archiver et interpréter les témoignages autobiographiques, Louvain-la Neuve, Presses Universitaires de Louvain. Roland Barthes  1998 [“Tel Quel”, 1964], “Écrivains et écrivants”, in Essais critiques, Paris, Seuil. Ludwig Binswanger 1971 [1947], “Le sens anthropologique de la présomption”, 237-245, in Id., Introduction à l’analyse existentielle, translated from the French by Jacqueline Verdeaux and Roland Kuhn, preface by R. Kuhn and Henri Maldiney, Paris, Éd. de Minuit.Rêve et existence 2012 [1930] translation and introduction Françoise Dastur, postface by E. Basso, Paris, Vrin. Antonio Castillo Gómez 2022, “Voix subalternes. Archives et mémoire écrite des classes populaires”, 117-135, in S. Péquignot and Y. Potin (dir.), Les conflits d’archives, France, Espagne, Méditerranée, Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes. Daniele Combierati 2010, Scrivere nella lingua dell’altro, Bruxelles, Peter Lang. William Cooper & John Robert Ross 1975, “World order”, 63–111, in R. E. Grossman et al. (eds.), Papers from the parasession on functionalism, Chicago: Chicago Linguistic Society.

Fabio Dei 2018, Cultura popolare in Italia da Gramsci all’Unesco, Bologna, il Mulino.

Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari 1975, Kafka. Pour une littérature mineure, Paris, Éd. De Minuit. Michel Foucault 1966, “Classer”, 137-176, in Id, Les mots et le choses, Paris, Gallimard. Nathalie Frogneux, “Une phénoménologie de la vie mensongère”, in Le Phénomène humain. Revue Philosophique de Louvain 118(4), 2021, 573-591. doi: 10.2143/RPL.118.4.3290142. André Gide 1997, Journal 1926-1950, Paris, Gallimard, vol. II. Carlo Ginzburg 2006), Il filo e le tracce. Vero falso finto, Feltrinelli, Milano. Louis Hjelmslev 1975, Résumé of a Theory of Language. Travaux du Cercle linguistique de Copenhague, vol. XVI. Copenhague: Nordisk Sprog- og Kulturforlag. –        (2009), Teoria del linguaggio. Résumé, = TLR, Vicenza, Terra Ferma, Vicenza. Antonio Gramsci 1975, Quaderni del carcere, 3, Quaderni 12-29, critical edition of the Istituto Gramsci by Valentino Gerratana, Torino, Einaudi. Georges Lakoff, Mark Johnson, 2003 [1980], Metaphors We Live By, Chicago-London, The University of Chicago Press. Philippe Lejeune 1975, Le pacte autobiographique, Paris, Seuil. – “Je ne suis pas une source”, Entretien de Ph. Artières, 115-137, in Id., Signes de vie – Le pacte autobiographique 2, 2, Seuil 2005. Ronan Le Roux, « De quoi jouit l’archiviste ? Méditation certalienne sur le ‘vol d’âme’ », in Elodie Belkorchia, Georges Cuer, Françoise Hiraux (dir.), Du matériel à l’immatérielLa Gazette des archives n°262 (2021-2). Jurij M. Lotman 1985, “Il diritto alla biografia”, in Id., La semiosfera-L’asimmetria e il dialogo nelle strutture pensanti, edited and translated from the Russian by Simonetta Salvestroni, Venezia, Marsilio. Claudio Magris 1989, Lontano da Dove, Joseph Roth e la tradizione ebraico-orientale, Torino Einaudi. Paula Sibilia 2008, O show do eu: a intimidade como espetáculo, Rio de Janeiro, Nova Fronteira. Verónica Sierra Blas 2016, Cartas presas. La correspondencia carcelaria en la Guerra Civil y el Franquismo, Madrid, Marcial Pons. Jean Starobinski 1961, “Le voile de Poppée”, 7-27, in Id, L’oeil vivant, Gallimard, 1961. – Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Transparency and Obstruction. Trans. by Arthur Goldhammer. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1988. Judging panel: Beatrice Barbalato, Mediapolis.europa ass, cult., Université catholique de Louvain Antonio Castillo Gómez, Universidad de Alcalá Nathalie Frogneux, Université catholique de Louvain Verónica Sierra Blas, Universidad de Alcalá Symposium organized by: Mediapolis.Europa (Irene Meliciani: managing director) Mnemosyne o la costruzione del senso, Presses universitaires de Louvain Grupo de Investigación “Lectura, Escritura, Alfabetización” (LEA), Universidad de Alcalá Seminario Interdisciplinar de Estudios sobre Cultura Escrita (SIECE), Universidad de Alcalá This symposium is part of the research project Vox populi. Espacios, prácticas y estrategias de visibilidad de las escrituras del margen en las épocas Moderna y Contemporánea (PID2019-107881GB-I00), financed by the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación and by the Agencia Estatal de Investigación (Spain). Suggestions for sending proposals   The languages admitted for submission are: Italian, Spanish, French, English, Portuguese. Everyone is allowed to write in one of these languages. There will be no simultaneous translation. A passive understanding of these languages is desirable. A) Deadline for submission: 15 July 2023. The abstract will be composed of 250 words (max), with citation of two reference sources, and a brief CV (max: 100 words), with possible mention of two of one’s own publications, be they articles, books, or videos. The judging panel will read and select every proposal, which is to be sent to beatrice.barbalato@gmail.com, antonio.castillo@uah.es For information: beatrice.barbalato@gmail.com, antonio.castillo@uah.es,  irenemeliciani@gmail.com The authors of the accepted proposals will be notified by 30 July 2023. B) Regarding enrolment in the colloquium, once the proposals are accepted the fees are: Before 30 September 2023: 150.00€ From 1 to 30 October 2023:  180.00€ Enrolment fee cannot be accepted in loco For graduate students: Before 30 September 2023: 100.00€ From 1to 30 October 2023:   90.00€ Enrolment fee cannot be accepted in loco Once the programme is established, no change is allowed. For activities related to this topic at the University and cultural centers in Spain see the sites http://www.siece.es/   http://grafosfera.blogspot.com/ For information on the symposia organized in previous years by the Osservatorio della memoria autobiografica  scritta, orale e iconografica, visit the site: http://mediapoliseuropa.com/ * I am leading a seminar on “Metafiction, Autofiction, and Other Metanarrative Forms of Storytelling” at the MSA conference with invited speakers Brian McHale and Josh Toth. Please consider participating. Registration for the MSA opens soon! Additional details below: Modern Studies Association Conference, New York, October 26-29, 2023 Leader:
    • Lissi Athanasiou-Krikelis, Associate Professor, New York Institute of Technology
Invited Participants:
    • Josh Toth, Professor, MacEwan University,
    • Brian McHale, Emeritus, Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor, Ohio State University
Metafiction, Autofiction, and Other Metanarrative Forms of Storytelling   With three recent publications on metafiction in the last two years—Truth and Metafiction by Josh Toth (2021), Metafiction and the Postwar Novel: Foes, Ghosts, and Faces in the Water by Andrew Dean (2021) and Metafiction by Yaël Schlick (2022)—there is a resurgence of interest in the theory and practice of this literary form, which had fallen from favor after reaching its pinnacle in the eighties. This seminar seeks to explore the various metanarrative facades of fiction, while also expanding perspectives on metanarrative commentary outside verbal storytelling from modernism to postmodernism and beyond. The seminar will attempt to address the following questions. What are the theoretical frameworks that shape metafiction, and what do recent renditions (works by Salvador Plascencia, Hernan Diaz, Susan Choi to name a few) indicate about its development? Is metafiction a self-enclosed hermeneutics, or does it also foreground issues of class, gender, sexuality, or race as seen in novels such as Mat Jason’s Pym? If metafiction is favored by male authorship–as some claim–how do women writers like Margaret Atwood, Clarice Lispector, Amanda Michalopoulou, Rachael Cusk, and others fit in? How is metafiction manifested and what purposes does it serve in specific genres: graphic novels, children’s and young adult fiction, autobiography/memoire/life-writing, poetry, film, or other forms of visual and verbal storytelling? What is the role of metanarrative commentary in popular culture in general? At a time when commercials, documentaries (Netflix: Adams Knows Everything), cartoons (Netflix: A Tale Dark & Grimm), and puppet shows (The Immortal Jellyfish Girl) employ metanarration, it is imperative that we reexamine meta-references across genres. Presenters will have the opportunity to submit their work in a companion on Metafiction, edited by Lissi Athanasiou-Krikelis and Josh Toth, currently under contract with Routledge. Regards, Lissi Athanasiou-Krikelis, Ph.D. Associate Professor of English? Director, Interdisciplinary Studies New York Institute of Technology 16 West 61st Street, Room #608 New York, NY 10023 website: https://lissiathanasioukrikelis.com/ *

The Visual Politics of Borders, Migration and Human Rights in Comics and Graphic Narratives

deadline for submissions:  June 30, 2023 Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Thursday, October 26 through Sunday, October 29, 2023, Portland, Oregon USA This panel aims to explore the ways in which borders intersect with human rights in graphic narratives, whether in fiction or non-fiction. One of the theoretical frameworks for examining borders could be through the lens of border aesthetics, which considers borders as linguistic, cultural, social, political, and spatial entities that can both enable and exclude. The panel will examine how graphic narratives denaturalize and politicize the current global border regime and bordering practices that invariably reproduce the colonial binaries as well as stereotypes about migrants/refugees. The focus will also be on how graphic narratives may reinforce the exclusionary function of borders or reduce the migrants/refugees into mere abject modes of being. The panel is concerned with how these frictions and changes become manifested in graphic narratives and aims to bring together comics studies on migration and human rights. The panel invites submissions that examine any aspect of human rights violations occurring in or enabled by borders, which are understood as both positive interactions and exclusionary practices. Submissions are welcome on any of the following aspects of comics studies and human rights, as well as broader interpretations of the themes that provide a more detailed understanding of border and migration studies:
    1. Comics form and human rights
    1. Graphic representations of survival
    1. Visual-verbal medium and cultural silencing of migrants/refugees
    1. Narrative mediation and narrative violence in graphic representations
    1. Borders, experiential lives and embodied frames
    1. Gender and Child Rights
    1. Queer and Trans migrations in graphic novels
    1. War zones and the politics of violence
    1. Ethics and politics of representing human rights violations in comics and graphic narratives
    1. Comics, affect and the immigrant
    1. Displacement, disability, dystopia in graphic memoirs
    1. Border aesthetics, frames of recognition and empathy
Please submit abstracts of 250-300 words along with a brief bio (not more than 100 words) via the online submission form available on the PAMLA website. You will have to go to https://pamla.ballastacademic.com to login or create an account first. The deadline to submit abstract proposals is June 30, 2023. The web address for this session’s CFP is: https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/18807. For any queries, please reach out to: Leenu Sugathan – leenusugathan@gwu.edu Mohit Abrol – mohitabrol463@gmail.com Important Dates: PAMLA Membership Payment Deadline: Friday, July 1 Abstract Proposal Deadline: Wednesday, June 30, 2023 Late Conference Payment Fee Period: August 21-September 15 (After September 1, those who haven’t paid their membership fees will be removed from the program; after September 15, those who haven’t paid their conference fees will be removed from the program) The Conference (at last!): Thursday, October 26 through Sunday, October 29, 2023 * Deadline for Submissions: June 30, 2023
Diaries in the 20th Century: Testimony, Memory, and Self-Construction University College Dublin, 8-9 December 2023
The diary proved an important form of writing during the 20th century, particularly for its engagement with self-definition and memory. In the early decades of the century, it enabled a new exploration of individual personality influenced by late-nineteenth-centurypsychology and philosophy. It can thus be read as an introspective prism displaying the author’s psychological, moral, and physical evolution in a different light from what would have been conceivable before. Around mid-century, it offered diarists a powerful tool to document and elaborate the trauma of the two wars, the self-threatening policies of totalitarian regimes, and the very physical threat of genocide. This kind of diary is a testimonial object of and against war. In the final decades of the century, diaries were written in an individualistic and expressivist society which increasingly blurred the boundaries between reality and fiction. They could thus become the chosen medium for postmodernist literary experimentation and invite a form of self-construction which is a precursor of (but remains very different from) the instantly public self-accounts of present-day blogs and vlogs.
This two-day conference aims to observe these and other evolutions of the twentieth-century diary, exploring their interplay with traditional assumptions about the diary as a repository of memories, an outlet for feelings, as an embodiment of the self, and a concrete means for its preservation. To this end, we invite scholars working from a wide range of disciplines on diaristic writing from different perspectives, with a particular preference for transnational and comparative approaches. Potential topics for papers include, but are not limited to:
    • Theoretical or historical perspectives on diaristic writing during the 20th century
    • Previously unknown/unpublished twentieth-century diaries
    • Diaries as documents or as literary works
    • Diary as a writing genre: real vs. fictional
    • Diary and affects
    • The body in the diary
    • Diaries as chronicles of introspection/self-talk
    • The diary between personal and collective memory
    • Self-analysis, self-questioning, self-discovery, self-awareness in diaristic writing
    • Communities and mutual influence among diary-writers
    • Comparative studies of twentieth-century diaries
    • Diaries and Cognitive Studies
    • Writing diaries during war periods
    • The diary and the Holocaust
    • The diary as gender writing
The conference will be held in person at UCD to facilitate interaction among panelists, and streamed online to allow for a wider attendance. Four travel grants will be offered for PhD, early-career, and independent researchers who cannot rely on institutional funds. Please send your title, abstract for a 20-minute paper (max 250 words), and short bio (max 100 words) to ucdiaries2023@gmail.com, valeria.taddei@ucd.ie, or m.josi1993@gmail.com, by 30 June. Let us know in your email if you would need to be considered for the travel grant. For any further information please do not hesitate to contact us! All the best, Valeria Taddei and Mara Josi Dr Valeria Taddei (she/her) IRC Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellow School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics University College Dublin Belfield D04 F6X4 Ireland Dr Mara Josi (she/her), Ph.D (Cantab) Lecturer in Italian School of Languages, Arts and Cultures, University of Manchester, UK Oxford Rd. | M13 9PL * The Life Story in Oral History Practice In-person event at the British Library, London, UK Fri 30 June and Sat 1 July, 2023 Bookings are now open for the exciting International Symposium: the Life Story in Oral History Practice at the British Library on Fri 30 June and Sat 1 July. Booking link and full programme here: https://www.bl.uk/events/the-life-story-in-oral-history-practice-a-two-day-international-symposium. Attendance for the whole event is £45, with day passes available too. We promise innovative speakers from across the globe who will reflect on all aspects of life story interviewing, including Alexander Freund, Indira Chowdhury, Alistair Thomson, Doug Boyd, Wendy Rickard, Rob Perks and Don Ritchie. Our special guest on Saturday 1 July is celebrated artist and curator Lubaina Himid, to discuss her life story recording for Artists’ Lives. Join us for cutting edge debate on oral history practice, research and the impact of new technology, lively discussion and the launch of the exciting new website based on oral history: ‘Discovering Science’. The event is open to all, from newcomers to oral history to the most experienced life story practitioners, historians, writers, archivists and curators. We hope to see you there! Mary Stewart Lead Curator, Oral History Director, National Life Stories The British Library 96 Euston Road London NW1 2DB Mary.stewart@bl.uk www.bl.uk/oralhistory www.ohs.org.uk Follow us! @BL_OralHistory * Deadline for submissions: June 19, 2023

Graphic Psychiatry – Exploring Visual Narratives of Mental Health

contact email: rbodol@lsuhsc.edu Call for Papers, panel@ SAMLA 95, taking place on November 9-11, 2023, in Atlanta, GA
Graphic Psychiatry–Exploring Visual Narratives of Mental Health The “Age of Insecurity”  (samla.net/) made mental health a public health concern. From barriers to access to a provider shortage, from soaring suicide rates to supply chain issues that affect the availabilty of ADHD drugs, mental healthcare has become a pervasive topic that affects higher education as well. In this context, the special session sets out to rethink our approaches to ubiquitous visual narratives and iconographies of mental health. For this purpose, we will focus on “Graphic Psychiatry” which here describes a prolific subsection of Graphic Medicine: The term denotes the role that comics/graphic novels can play in healthcare; it is also a shorthand for this area of study and practice. Graphic “Medicine” (“as in the bottled panacea rather than the profession,” I. Williams) is meant to suggest therapeutic potential, both for creators and readers. Comics have been discussed in connection to the history of psychiatry, their graphic pathography or their demonization of psychiatrists, etc. By contrast, graphic novels offer additional types of knowledge. They are book-length narratives, often autobiographical “quest narratives” (A.W. Frank), that depict mental illness, suffering, trauma in their own right. Often, they provide critical insights into treatment, practices, systems and institutions. The first was a wordless novel, Lynd Ward’s The Madman’s Drum, published in 1930, but there has been a proliferation of graphic novels on mental health in the past decade. Examples include Marbles, Rx, Tangles, Lighter Than My Shadow, to name but a few. This special interdisciplinary session invites papers that explore “Graphic Psychiatry” and how it goes beyond “psychiatry as a spectacle” by discussing illness narratives, lived experiences, systemic criticism, as well as pathologies. Additionally, we welcome pedagogy papers on teaching visual narratives of mental health. By June 15, 2023, please submit an abstract of 500 words or less, a brief bio, and any A/V or scheduling requests to Ronja Tripp-Bodola, LSUHSC New Orleans, at rbodol@lsuhsc.edu.
Ronja R. Bodola, Ph.D., M.A. Assistant Professor – Research/Health Humanities Director of Faculty Development, Education and Scholarly Activity Department of Psychiatry School of Medicine, LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans 2021 Perdido St Room 6218 New Orleans, LA 70112 (504) 568 2544

Travel and Tourism Studies (Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Assn)

CONFERENCE TO BE HELD November 9-11, 2023 in Philadelphia, PA, USA deadline for submissions:  June 30, 2023 traveltourismmapaca@ymail.com Travel and Tourism Studies as a discipline continues to gain popularity in academia, in part because of its inter-disciplinary nature. The Travel and Tourism area seeks papers that discuss and explore any aspect of travel and/or tourism. Topics for this area include, but are not limited to, the following: – travel and gender/race/class – travel and religion – travel and war – personal travel narratives – heritage tourism – material culture and tourism ***VIRTURAL Travel and Tourism! How has lockdown affected travel around the globe?*** Please feel free to consider a wide range of materials, texts and experiences. Applicants are encouraged to consider multi-media (or other alternative format) presentations if those formats would better suit their topics, and may also propose 3- or 4-person panels and roundtables. Submit a brief (300 words) abstract at mapaca.net by June 30, ’23. Students (both undergraduate and graduate) and independent scholars are encouraged to apply. Please feel free to send questions to Jennifer Erica Sweda traveltourismmapaca@ymail.com * CALL FOR PAPERS Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics Imprisoned ‘Self’: Narratives of Loss, Guilt, Transformation Guest Editor: Ayan Chakraborty (Jawaharlal Nehru University, India) Deadline for Submissions: June 30, 2023 Prison narratives have, quite recently, emerged as an exciting genre of literary studies in academia. While the concept of imprisonment has always invited a substantial focus within sociological studies, it had marginally to do either with the deeper exploration of the ‘imprisoned self’ or the ‘narratology’ (the logic of the narrative) about the experiences recorded by the prisoner. With life in the prison succeeding in drawing interest from literary critics, different approaches have been proposed to study language and experiences (in terms of wording) to look at the representation of the self and the various expressions of pain, agony, guilt, transformation, and even liberation. Some of them consider looking at these narratives from a more political understanding of the ‘imprisoned self’ about society and power, while a few others explore how language mediates between the author’s ‘reflection’/ ‘realization’ of their self through deeply intense drives like those of melancholia, loss, and suffering or glimpses of transcendental joy that creates a deeper understanding of the ethereal and the personal. The model of the prison has changed over the centuries. While in the European continent, prisons were directly an expression of the ‘will’ of the monarch, it had much to do with the relations of sovereignty and law. However, it is interesting to note that, as Thomas S Freeman points out in his “The Rise of Prison Literature,” prisons of the middle ages and early modernity were structural edifices that symbolized an offense against the divine through a violation of the ‘law’ of the monarch itself (the monarch being a representative of divinity on earth). The prisoner was,  therefore, equivalent to the status of a heretic. Similar ideas can be found within Southern and Central Asiatic regions as well. With the rise of the liberal state, the prisoner was depicted as an ‘outlaw,’ an embodiment of violence and violation of the generic social imagination and to ‘social contract’ in particular. Michel Foucault, in his seminal The Birth of the Prison, delineates how the system of control and incarceration shifted in its objective and technique from the body and the ‘spectacle’ to the ‘mind’ and the need for ‘secrecy.’ Through a system, the prisoner’s self is inevitably a part of political interpellation, marginality, and social gaze. These ideas, though sociological, become an integral part of the prisoner’s self in their understanding of society and their relation to it. Hence, the prisoner, in all personal experiences, is a political being. As much as narratives from political prisoners, revolutionaries, and victims of racial, sexual, colonial, and economic conflicts have recorded intense moments which look at the ‘dissolution’ of the self under psychological crisis, there are instances that constructed a metaphysical idea of the ego of the prisoner that almost absorbed the world into a supernatural unity. These narratives, in their structure and intention, vary radically across symbols and semantics. This issue calls for papers that engage with language, experience, and the self (of the prisoner), study nuances of intention and expression, and explore the relation between a private subject under political scrutiny through prison narratives. To contribute to this special issue, please submit the full manuscript of your article (no less than 4,000 words) with a short author’s bio to the guest editor Ayan Chakraborty at cayan2595@gmail.com, with a copy to jclaindia@gmail.com. You are welcome to ask any questions about submission or the topic you will select. Important Dates: Submission deadline: 30 June 2023; Decision of acceptance: 31 July 2023; Publication of the issue: Autumn 2023/ Winter 2023. ABOUT THE JOURNAL https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journal_of_Comparative_Literature_and_Aesthetics The Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics (ISSN: 0252-8169) is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal published by Vishvanatha Kaviraja Institute of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics, India, since 1977. The Institute was founded by Prof. Ananta Charan Sukla (1942-2020) on 22 August 1977, coinciding with the birth centenary of renowned philosopher, aesthetician, and historian of Indian art Ananda K. Coomaraswamy (1877-1947) to promote interdisciplinary studies and research in comparative literature, literary theory and criticism, aesthetics, philosophy, art history, criticism of the arts, and history of ideas. (Vishvanatha Kaviraja, most widely known for his masterpiece in aesthetics, Sahityadarpana, or the “Mirror of Composition,” was a prolific 14th-century Indian poet, scholar, aesthetician, and rhetorician.) The Journal is committed to comparative and cross-cultural issues in literary understanding and interpretation, aesthetic theories, and conceptual analysis of art. It publishes current research papers, review essays, and special issues of critical interest and contemporary relevance. The Journal has published the finest of essays by authors of global renown like René Wellek, Harold Osborne, John Hospers, John Fisher, Murray Krieger, Martin Bocco, Remo Ceserani, J.B. Vickery, Menachem Brinker, Milton Snoeyenbos, Mary Wiseman, Ronald Roblin, T.R. Martland, S.C. Sengupta, K.R.S. Iyengar, Charles Altieri, Martin Jay, Jonathan Culler, Richard Shusterman, Robert Kraut, Terry Diffey, T.R. Quigley, R.B. Palmer, Keith Keating, and many others. JCLA is indexed and abstracted in the MLA International Bibliography, Master List of Periodicals (USA), Ulrich’s Directory of Periodicals, ERIH PLUS, The Philosopher’s Index (Philosopher’s Information Center), EBSCO, ProQuest (Arts Premium Collection, Art, Design & Architecture Collection, Arts & Humanities Database, Literature Online – Full Text Journals, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Central Essentials), Abstracts of English Studies, WorldCat Directory, ACLA, India Database, Gale (Cengage Learning), Bibliography History of Art (BHA), ArtBibliographies Modern (ABM), Literature Online (LION), Academic Resource Index, Book Review Index Plus, OCLC, Periodicals Index Online (PIO), Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers, CNKI, PhilPapers, Google Scholar, Expanded Academic ASAP, Indian Documentation Service, Publication Forum (JuFo), Summon, J-Gate, United States Library of Congress, New York Public Library, and the British Library. The journal is also indexed in numerous university (central) libraries, state, and public libraries, and scholarly organizations/ learned societies databases. Celebrated scholars of the time like René Wellek, Harold Osborne, Mircea Eliade, Monroe Beardsley, John Hospers, John Fisher, Meyer Abrams, John Boulton, and many renowned foreign and Indian scholars were Members of its Editorial Board. Founding Editor: Ananta Charan Sukla,Vishvanatha Kaviraja Institute, India Email: jclaindia@gmail.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/jclasukla Contact Info: Viraj Shukla Publishing Assistant Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics Contact Email: jclaindia@gmail.com URL: http://jcla.in * Call for Papers ‘Dieu et mon droit (God and my right)’: representations of the British royal family in popular culture deadline for submissions:  June 30, 2023 PopCRN (the UNE Popular Culture Network) are exploring the concept of royalty with a virtual symposium focused on the representations of the British royal family in popular culture to be held online on Thursday 28th & Friday 29th September 2023. The British monarchy has played a leading role in various ways over the last millennium of world history and as such have been frequently depicted in popular culture from the plays of Shakespeare to the extensive coverage in popular magazines. We welcome papers from researchers across the academic spectrum, and encourage papers from postgraduate researchers and early career researchers. Presenters will have the opportunity to publish a refereed book chapter in a book published in 2024. Topics can include, but are not restricted to:
    • We are not amused – Royal reactions to popular events
    • In the words of one of my more sympathetic correspondents, it has turned out to be an annus horribilis – The intersections of the private and public lives of royalty
    • I do not want a husband who honours me as a queen, if he does not love me as a woman – Love and British royalty
    • I’d like to be queen of people’s hearts – The rhetorical power of royal themes
    • The king is dead, Long live the king – British royals past, present and future
    • I think the relations between the monarchy and the press is very much a two-way street. Anthony Holden – Reporting the royals
    • Spencer – Diana and the gothic
    • Diana, The peoples’ princess – Royalty and celebrity
    • The real intelligence in the royal family comes through my parents to Prince Philip and the children. (Lord Mountbatten) – Celebrity royal children
    • The Crown – Royal representations in film and television
    • Princess for a day – Royal wedding dresses and royal wedding culture
    • I myself prefer my New Zealand eggs for breakfast (Queen Elizabeth II) Royal food and wine
    • Fashioning a Queen – Royal fashion, then and now
    • Men fight wars. Women win them – The powerful Queen in the patriarchal institution
    • I know what my job was; it was to go out and meet the people and love them. (Princess Diana) – The working royal
    • The important thing is not what they think of me, but what I think of them – Royal views of the general public
    • I know I have but the body of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart of a king, and of a king of England, too – Representations of royal gender
    • A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse – Shakespearian depictions of royalty
    • All my birds have flown – The ridiculed royal
    • I have as much privacy as a goldfish in a bowl. (Princess Margaret) – The public gaze and celebrity
    • Let not poor Nelly starve – Royal mistresses
    • Alvanley, who’s your fat friend? – Royalty and friends
    • Was ‘arold, with eyeful of arrow,  On ‘is ‘orse, with ‘is ‘awk in ‘is ‘and – Representations of royalty in folktales
    • You have sent me a Flanders mare ­– Royal marriages of convenience in popular culture
    • I find doing speeches nerve wrecking (Kate Middleton) – Performing royalty
    • I have found it impossible to carry the heavy burden of responsibility and to discharge my duties as king as I would wish to do without the help and support of the woman I love – The reluctant royal
    • When I am dead and opened, you shall find ‘Calais’ lying in my heart – Royal concerns of conquest and loss
    • Camelot – The American fixation with the British Royals
    • It is as Queen of Canada that I am here. Queen of Canada and all Canadians, not just one or two ancestral strains (Queen Elizabeth II) – The Royals in the colonies
    • You have to give this much to the Luftwaffe: when it knocked down our buildings it did not replace them with anything more offensive than rubble. We did that. (Prince Charles) – The Royals and war
    • For Portraits to Pop – Queen Elizabeth as a cultural icon
    • Value for money – The Royals and the British economy
    • Royal fever – The Royals and consumer culture
    • They’re changing guards at Buckingham Place – The Royals in children’s literature
    • For a time during the 1980s the Royal Family were not just the most influential family in Britain but probably in Europe and Prince Charles specifically was very much like a defacto Cabinet member and what he said actually had impact on public policy (Andrew Morton) – The Royals and No. 10
    • I should like to be a horse (Queen Elizabeth II) – British royals and animals
    • One day I’m going up in a helicopter and it’ll just blow up. M15 will do away with me. (Princess Diana). Royal conspiracies
    • The state is nothing but an instrument of oppression of one class by another – no less so in a democratic republic than in a monarchy. (Friedrich Engels) – The royals and the British class system
Please email abstracts (200 words) to popcrn@une.edu.au by 31/6/23. Please include your name, affiliation, email address, title of paper and a short biography (100 words). Registration is free. * Deadline for submissions: July 1, 2023 CFP–Global Crises Cultures: Representing Refugees in the 21st Century eds. Dr Katie Brown (Exteter) and Dr Peter Sloane (Buckingham) Although it is only since 2015 that the phenomena of mass forced displacement has warranted the term ‘crisis’, the pre-existing social, cultural, economic, and military conditions for that were exacerbated by the US led War on Terror which begin in 2001, after the attacks on the World Trade Centre. A 2020 report by Brown University’s Cost of War Project estimated ‘that at least 37 million people have fled their homes in the eight most violent wars the U.S. military has launched or participated in since 2001’ (Vine et al. 2020, 1). During the same period, rising instability in Central and South America (notably the Northern Triangle and Venezuela) has led to record numbers of internally and externally displaced persons, while ongoing conflicts in Africa have created over 30 million refugees. Encouraged by the sheer number of people (almost 1% of global population), Guy S. Goodwin-Gill argues that ‘the refugee problem cannot be considered apart from the field of human rights as a whole’ (2014, 43). Indeed, stripped of the legal protections afforded by a nation state, the refugee represents the limit case for human rights precisely because, as Hannah Arendt has it, a refugee is a person who has ‘lost all other qualities and specific relationships – except that they [are] still human’ (1979, 299). The surging volume of displaced persons and their treatment by possible host nations provokes equally vital questions about how human beings conceive of themselves as part of a common humanity, a sense of species as opposed to polity belongingness. Claude Levi-Strauss observedhalf a century ago that‘the notion of humanity, which includes without distinction of race or civilization all the forms of the human species, appeared very late and in a limited way’ (1976, 329). These limitations become starkly apparent in refugee fictions, poetry, film, literary journalism, and life writing of the 21st century, which capture not simply the predictable brutalities of despotic regimes, but the overt border violence and inhumanity of the democratic states which they imagine as places of sanctuary. During the past decade, several important anthologies have addressed the issue of refugeehood in the present. Agnes Woolley’s wonderful Contemporary Asylum Narratives: Representing Refugees in the Twenty-First Century (Palgrave, 2014), Lava Asaad’s edited collection, Literature with A White Helmet: The Textual-Corporeality of Being, Becoming, and Representing Refugees (Routledge, 2019), as well as Mike Classon Frangos and Sheila Ghose’s Refugee Genres: Essays on the Culture of Flight and Refuge (Palgrave, 2022) have drawn attention to cultures of crises in the contemporary period. Working within this context while expanding and advancing the discussions instigated in these works, Cultures of Crises will bring together both established scholars and new critical voices working across the humanities to produce a truly global study of the current period of mass migrations, with essays on movements in Ukraine, Southern and Central America, through the Middle East and Sudan, to Myanmar. While the stories themselves are of key concern, the collection will be formally wide-ranging, exploring refugee’s experiences across fiction, life writing, creative non-fiction, film, poetry, and the visual arts more broadly. Of particular interest are studies that explore multiple texts, multiple themes, and multiple locations, as opposed to single text or single author studies. Given the proliferation of prose fiction studies, preference may also be given to those essays which focus on other forms. The proposed book will be divided into three parts: Prose Fiction and Poetry; Life Writing; Visual Arts. This CFP invites abstracts of 300 words accompanied by a short biography to be submitted to culturesofcrises@gmail.com by July 1st 2023. Final essays of 6-8000 words will be due by September 30th 2024. Eds: Dr Katie Brown is Senior Lecturer in Latin American Studies at the University of Exeter. She is the author of Writing and the Revolution: Venezuelan Metafiction 2004-2012 (2019), and co-editor of Crude Words: Contemporary Writing from Venezuela (2016) and Escribir afuera: Cuentos de intemperies y querencias (2021). Dr Peter Sloane is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Buckingham, UK. He is the author of Narrative Displacement: Refugees in 21st Century Fiction and Life Writing (Liverpool University Press, 2025), Kazuo Ishiguro’s Gestural Poetics (Bloomsbury, 2021), David Foster Wallace and the Body (Routledge, 2019), and editor of ReFocus: The Films of Claire Denis (Edinburgh University Press, 2023), and (with K. Shaw) Kazuo Ishiguro: Twenty-First-Century Perspectives (Manchester University Press, 2023).
*
Deadline for submissions: July 1, 2023 Call for Papers  VERSIONS OF THE AFTERLIFE 7th December 2023 Online Conference Between Matthew’s description of heaven as a wedding (22 1-14) – most memorably delivered by Jesus in Martin Scorsese’s The Last Temptation of Christ – and Jean Paul Sartre’s verdict that “hell is other people,” there is not only a gap of centuries but also cultures and religions.[1] Despite their disparity, however, both conceptualizations render the fundamental human anxiety related to the weighty question of “what comes next?” They point to the necessity of envisaging the unfamiliar through the familiar, thereby taming the terrifying void. Versions of the afterlife, therefore, are not only related to the need to imagine the hereafter in the sense of Heaven, Hell and Purgatory (for the Catholics), but also to the contemporary notions of “post-theory”, such as post-humanism and the ideas of postmodernism, post-feminism, post-colonialism and post-nationalism. The aim of this conference organized by the Faculty of English at Adam Mickiewicz University, in Poznan, Poland – and co-hosted with the Faculty of Philosophy, AMU, and the Poznań Chapter of the Agder Academy of Social Sciences and Letters – is to explore and discuss the literal, the literary and the metaphorical meanings of the notion of “the afterlife”. We welcome papers representing the humanities in their conceptualizations and literary reifications of the religious, medical and political “hereafters”. Literature (in English) / Art
    • Literary narratives on the hereafter across cultures and religions
    • Saints’ lives and visions
    • Theatre and the drama of/on the hereafter
    • Gothic literature and the visions of the afterlife
    • Literary visions and versions of post-apocalyptic reality
    • Artistic representations of the afterlife: Imaging the hereafter
    • The afterlives of theory: post-humanism and the ideas of postmodernism, post-feminism, etc.
    • The afterlives of ideologies, doctrines, political systems as represented in literary works (post-nationalism, post-colonialism, etc.)
    • The afterlives of literary texts and their authors: adaptations, rewritings, etc.
Medical Humanities / Social Sciences (in literary texts in English)
    • The moment of passing
    • The mystery of one’s body shutting down
    • Marketing death and the life after death
    • Out-of-body experience
    • End-of life dreams and visions versus science
Theology / Ethics (in literary texts in English)
    • Versions of the afterlife from the earliest records to contemporary times across cultures and religions
    • Ars moriendi (good endings vs bad endings)
    • Secular / atheist alternatives for life after death
300-400 word abstracts should be sent to BOTH afterlifewaconference@gmail.com and kbronkk@amu.edu.pl by 1st July 2023. Notifications of acceptance will be sent by the end of August 2023. There will be no fees for conference participation, but active and passive participants need to register in advance.

“Narratives of Displacement” International Conference

28-29 October 2023 – London/Online organised by

London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research

Deadline for Submissions 15 June 2023  The conference seeks to explore the narratives of displacement and to demonstrate the validity of a cross-disciplinary approach which brings together the historical, cultural, social and literary expertise in the handling of text. The conference will particularly focus on time and space representations and on treatment of the theme of cultural ambivalence and identity conflict. The subject of displacement will be regarded as both a migration, voluntary or forced, and a sense of being socially or culturally “out of place”. Papers are invited on topics related, but not limited, to:
    • migrations and deportations (expatriation, expulsion, exile, etc.)
    • journeys, pilgrimages, missions
    • mobility and place
    • rootlessness and taking root
    • foreignness and indigeneity
    • (re)settlement and (non)residence
    • nomadism and place attachment
    • hotels, guesthouses, shelters
    • multiculturalism, interculturalism, transculturalism
    • strangerhood and neo-cosmopolitanism
Submissions may be proposed in various formats, including:
    • Individually submitted papers (organised into panels by the committee)
    • Panels (3-4 individual papers)
    • Posters
The conference aims to bring together scholars from different fields. We invite proposals from various disciplines including history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, culture studies, media studies, political science, law, architecture, tourism, religious studies, literature, linguistics, psychology, etc. Proposals up to 250 words should be sent by 15 June 2023 to: displacement@lcir.co.uk. Download Paper proposal form. Registration fee (online participation) – 90 GBP Registration fee (physical participation) – 150 GBP Provisional conference venue: Birkbeck College, University of London * Deadline for submissions: June 15, 2023

Imaginative kin-making. Narrating alternative forms of kinship in survival literature and fiction.

XXXI AIA Conference Rende, Cosenza, 13-16 September 2023 Associazione Italiana di Anglistica Call for proposals for panel Convenors: R. Ciocca (Università di Napoli L’Orientale) and Marta Cariello (Università degli Studi della Campania Luigi Vanvitelli)  In Making Kin in the Chthulucene: Reproducing Multispecies Justice (2018), Donna Haraway engaged in the thorny question of survival for a planet already fast travelling towards its demographic and environmental collapse. She addressed the question from a critical post-human and post-anthropocentric stance, affirming the need to reintroduce the practice of caring for the earth at every scale, and to fight against the current mass extinction of species, from the complex perspective of both ‘the Born and the Disappeared’. She meant, by this, not to disjoint the (apparently opposed) necessities of guaranteeing reproductive justice and safety for peoples subjected to genocides, forced sterilizations, missing generations, and at the same time of finding ways to reverse the general population growth. Since the intersection between reproduction justice and environmental concerns is intimately connected to the human capacity to reverse spoliative policies of natural resources and habitats, in a pro-active sense, the feminist philosopher posed the personal and theoretical question of how to lighten our species footprint by creating innovative and enduring relationships without necessarily ‘making more babies’. Taking the cue from this need to engage scary demographic perspectives, we’d like to explore narrations in which the idea of survival is connected to new forms of ‘becoming-with’, of ‘symbiotic assemblages’, or, also, of making kin, making new families as something other/more than entities tied by genealogy or biological bonds, together with the possibilities of lateral, transversal and exogenous adoption practices. We are especially interested in inviting submissions tackling the role of these alter-families and alter-communities in coping with forced migrancy, ethnic or racial cleansing and climate change induced crises. Proposals are welcome from a number of different genre languages which include, but are not limited to, novels, poetry, drama, personal essays, memoirs, film, tv series, and other storytelling practices. Some References Rosi Braidotti and Simone Bignall ,(eds.) Posthuman Ecologies. Complexity and Process after Deleuze, New York, London, Rowman and Littlefield, 2019. Lawrence Buell, The Future of Environmental Criticism: Environmental Crisis and Literary Imagination, Oxford, Blackwell Publishing, 2005. Adele E. Clarke and Donna Haraway (eds), Making Kin Not Population, Chicago, Prickly Paradigm Press, 2018. Lidia Curti (a cura di) Femminismi futuri. Teorie/Poetiche/Fabulazioni. Roma, Iacobelli, 2019. María Puig de la Bellacasa, Matters of Care: Speculative Ethics in More Than Human Worlds. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2017. Donna J. Haraway, The companion species manifesto: Dogs, people, and significant otherness, Chicago, Prickly Paradigm, 2003. Marco Malvestio, Raccontare la fine del mondo: Fantascienza e Antropocene. Milano, Nottetempo, 2021. Rob Nixon, Slow violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor, Cambridge (MA), Harvard University Press, 2011. Sara Upstone and Peter Ely (eds.), Community in Contemporary British Fiction. From Blair to Brexit London, Bloomsbury Academic, 2022. Deadline for proposals: 15 June 2023 Send abstracts and bio to: rcio *

Borders and Crossings: an interdisciplinary conference on travel writing

5-7 July 2023, Łódź, Poland Deadline for Submissions: May 31, 2023 Due to unforeseen circumstances outside of the organiser’s control, Borders and Crossings 2023 has additional room for presenters and the call for papers has been reopened to allow maximum participation from across the Arts and Humanities. The 2023 edition of Borders and Crossings takes place in the unique context of Łódź: a post-industrial city situated in the wider European political and economic context, and which epitomises ‘borders and crossings’ in several ways. First, Łódź was called ‘the city of four cultures’ and until WWII was inhabited by people of Polish, Jewish, German, and Russian origin, as well as minorities, with their respective languages, religions, processes of assimilation or cultural isolation, and inward and outward migrations. Second, the city’s industrial history and built environment is founded on forms of travel: migration for industrial employment; the movement of ideas, technologies, and capital within trans-European and trans-Atlantic industrial networks; and movements for social change. Third, the city’s dynamic expansion in the 19th century converged with its occupation by foreign powers, engaging discussion on imperialism, shifting borders, political change, and identity. With this in mind, we invite proposals related to the contexts mentioned above, but also, as is customary at Borders and Crossings, contributions concerning other theoretical and practical aspects of travel writing. Proposals can reflect on, but are by no means limited to, the following themes: ●    Travel writing and the industrial city ●    Representations of travel to/from/around Poland ●    Central Europe or Eastern Europe? Geographical and cultural identities in travel writing ●    East-West interactions ●    Imperialism and travel; indigenous voices ‘writing back’ and decolonisation ●    Travel writing and the self/other ●    Travel and conflict ●    Representations of space and place in travel writing ●    Travel and translation ●    Travel and class/gender/sexuality ●    Travel writing and eco-criticism/nature writing ●    Theories of travel and travel writing ●    The history of travel and/versus tourism ●    The craft and practice of travel writing ●    Travel journalism, guidebooks, digital media, social media ●    Travel writing and other media (film, photography, illustrations, etc.) ●    Non-places and spaces of transit ●    Travel rest and stopovers ●    Modes of transport and points of view ●    Travel and pandemics/disease This event is open to academics, postgraduate researchers, and practitioners (inside and outside of academia) interested in travel writing from a broad range of perspectives. The aim of this conference is to showcase the interdisciplinarity of travel writing studies and the event welcomes proposals from but not restricted to literary studies, mobility and tourism studies, history, geography, creative writing, environmental studies, translation theory and practice, among others. Proposals are not restricted to any period of time or geographical context. Further information on the Borders and Crossings conference series can be found at https://bordersandcrossings23.wordpress.com/.  Although we wish for all participants to be able to attend the conference in Łódź, the conference is hybrid so that participants unable to travel can still present their paper. The conference fee is 60 euro for regular participants and 45 euro for PhD researchers. We invite proposals for 20-minute papers and 60-minute panels of three speakers. Proposals of approximately 250 words (up to 500 words for a panel), accompanied by a short biographical note, should be sent to: bordersandcrossings23@gmail.com. Deadline for proposals: 31 May 2023 Organising committee: Joanna Kruczkowska (University of Łódź) and Ross Cameron (University of Glasgow/University of Strathclyde). Contact Email: bordersandcrossings23@gmail.com URL: https://bordersandcrossings23.wordpress.com/ * DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS JUNE 5 Dear IABA List Members, We are working on Biography’s annual annotated bibliography of critical and theoretical works on life writing, the most extensive reference of its kind, and before finalizing it, we want to make sure it is as timely, inclusive, and extensive as possible. If last year (from January to December 2022) you published, edited, or coedited a book; wrote an article for a journal or an essay for an edited collection; or completed your doctoral dissertation, we would appreciate having that information, so that we can incorporate it into the list. (We may have already included it, but this will make sure your work is noted.) We are also interested in lifewriting-focused podcasts or other media, excluding individual presentations or talks. We would request the following information: ·  Full bibliographic information for each text, formatted according to MLA 9 style ·  A one-sentence annotation per text We are especially committed to noting publications in languages other than English. If you could provide an annotation in English, however, that would be helpful. We would appreciate getting the information by Monday, June 5. Please send your information to Caroline Zuckerman (gabiog@hawaii.edu). Thanks in advance. This bibliography usually has between 1,400 and 1,500 entries, and represents the most extensive annual critical survey of the field. We want to make sure your work appears within it. — Caroline Zuckerman Editorial Assistant and Reviews Editor The Center for Biographical Research Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 1960 East-West Road Biomed B104 Honolulu, HI 96822 Tel: (808) 956-3774 Email: gabiog@hawaii.edu * IO website. * Call for Papers for an Edited Volume (eds. Poonam Bala and Russel Viljoen) Travel Writings and Medical Encounters in the Colonial World Deadline for Abstracts–May 31, 2023 While several European naturalists, doctors travelled to tropical colonies to discover indigenous flora and fauna of medicinal value, their movement also enabled the formation of medical nexuses through various trade routes; the latter provided a cogent medium through which the collected knowledge could be re-located within the European metropoles. Placed in the context of medical humanities, these movements have opened an array of possibilities to study, analyse and recover the medical pasts of indigenous and colonial societies. The genre of travel writing preceded by the production and proliferation of travel texts by literate individuals saw the accumulation of data gathered by travellers during the 18th and 19th centuries. These writings, no doubt, revealed ideas of colonial and expansionist policies as well as imperial prowess which could vindicate colonial expansion and territorial acquisitions. Travel writings in the form of various handwritten notes, descriptions, reference to indigenous healers and sketches depicting medical encounters as written texts included reference to indigenous medical practice, cures, medicines, disease and illnesses and various interpretations of indigenous medicine, healers vis-à-vis their western counterpart. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, in particular, these explicated the rhetoric of colonialism and its expanse in the colonised communities. Travel narratives of physicians also reveal their first hand experience with slaves, slavery and the process of enslavement including encounters, resistance, medical inspections, illness, while also including medical treatment provided thereof. The  creation of a new discourse on racism and inequality also opened up issues of power over the discourse of slavery and slave narratives. The proposed volume will examine modalities of disease causation, explanation and their trajectory as a result of interaction with colonial communities in colonized settings around the world. As trained doctors, these male individuals, of European descent often engaged indigenous communities via interpreters or as observers, in order to obtain information about indigenous medical practices, treatment of disease, the relationship between disease and death, sin and sicknesses. We, therefore, seek to produce a collection that traces the “hidden” medical histories of colonized communities derived and gleaned from travel texts, which will enable an understanding of the trajectory of indigenous medical pasts and how they were shaped and re-defined as a result. Understanding the contributions of African and European doctors in the creation of a pharmaceutical industry, natural history and surgical enhancements is an important aspect of this trajectory. Chapter contributions will focus on the following themes, but not limited to these: Historiography, travel writing, medicine and disease studies Travelogues and the social (re)construction of medical pasts Travel scientists, doctors and biographies Indigenous medicine and healing practices in Travelogues Medical travel expeditions Women writers, gender and medicine Travel texts, epidemics/disease and indigenous communities Scientific institutions as sponsors of colonial expeditions Slave narratives and black travel writing Medicine and knowledge in the slave trade Interested scholars may please send an abstract of 250 words with relevant keywords, institutional affiliation and brief biography to Prof. Poonam Bala (p.bala@csuohio.edu)  and  Prof. Russel Viljoen (viljors@unisa.ac.za) by 31 May 2023. Completed draft chapter submissions of 7500 words should be submitted latest by 31 October 2023. Contact Info: Prof. Poonam Bala, Professor Extraordinarius, UNISA (South Africa) and Visiting Scholar, Clevelad State University (Ohio) * Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ACDH-CH) 26-27 September 2023 Life Narrative and the Digital: An Interdisciplinary Conference and Workshop
  • In what ways can digital methods and technologies aid the study and analysis of biographical data?
  • How can the digital help us devise innovative pathways to the representation of historical individuals’ lives? (e.g. digital platforms)
  • To what extent do digital formats of life narration tie in with new trends in auto/biographical scholarship and practice? (e.g. metabiography, relational biography, persona studies, group biography, object biography, etc.)
  • How do we deal with uncertainty and the issue of data quality in the digital representation of biographical data?
The event will feature both a workshop and a conference track. The workshop (26 September) will be dedicated to short presentations of work-in-progress, with a strong focus on tools, technologies, software, and methods, and with an emphasis on feedback and exchange. The conference (27 September) follows a conventional format, with a mix of research papers and panel discussions, and will be open to the public. Participation in both formats is free of charge. We invite proposals of max. 500 words via OpenReview (https://bit.ly/digital-bio-2023) for 15-minute (workshop) OR 20-minute (conference) contributions by 26 May 2023. For more information, please consult our conference website, or contact us at amp@oeaw.ac.at. Timo Frühwirth, Dimitra Grigoriou, Sandra Mayer * Deadline for submissions: May 31, 2023

PAMLA Veterans Studies Panel

contact email:  deborah.daley@uky.edu Veterans Studies is a growing field of research that addresses the significant impact of military personnel transitioning from active duty to civilian life with an emphasis on the veteran experience. This panel invites papers that explore various aspects of military service and/or the veteran experience, including those that reflect the conference theme of “Shifting Perspectives.” This session invites papers that explore the many facets of military life exhibited in literature, theater, film, and poetry written about or by military veterans as well as scholarly explorations of the veteran experience. Some topics of particular interest include but are not limited to: · Transition from military service · Perceptions or conceptualizations of veteran identity · Reintegration · Systems and experiences which shape veterans’ post-military experiences · Interdisciplinary approaches to veterans studies · Commemoration, memorialization, memory The conference will take place from Thursday, October 26 through Sunday, October 29, 2023 in Portland, Oregon. Potential presenters should submit abstract proposals using the online submission form (you will have to go to https://pamla.ballastacademic.com to login or create an account first). The deadline to submit presentation proposals is May 31, 2023. For more information about the PAMLA conference, please go to https://www.pamla.org/conference/. * Call for Papers for Special Focus Section (January 2025) Refugee Voices in Contemporary Literature Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature Deadline for Submissions: June 1, 2023 This special focus section of Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature highlights the ways refugee authors tell stories of displacement, while engaging with issues of representation, authenticity, voice, the politics of refuge and humanitarianism, and the paradigms of victimhood and rescue. In response to the “problem-oriented approach to refugees,” the growing interdisciplinary field of critical refugee studies (CRS) aims to highlight the resilience and creativity of refugee communities: “a humane and ethical site of inquiry that re-conceptualizes refugee lifeworlds not as a problem to be solved by global elites but as a site of social, political and historical critiques that, when carefully traced, make transparent processes of colonization, war, and displacement” (https://criticalrefugeestudies.com/). This framework and others reframe analyses of literature of displacement: to complicate traditional paradigms of victimhood and rescue (critique of humanitarianism), present nontraditional figures of refugee affect (e.g. the “ungrateful refugee,” Dina Nayeri), excavate additional knowledge of refugee experiences, and shift focal points from suffering to resilience. Considering the continued relevance of refugees as those who are both “invisible and hypervisible” (Nguyen 15), this special issue seeks to remedy the imposed “condition of voicelessness” of those who have been displaced by highlighting their narratives (Soguk 294). The contributions to this issue should engage with critical frameworks that center the creative work of refugee authors and artists, while acknowledging the complexity of what it means to be displaced in the contemporary era. The editors welcome articles that explore topics and concepts related to the opening of critical refugee studies in German Studies as well as in Francophone and Hispanic cultural production, and comparative studies. Themes for contributions may include, but are not limited to:
  • figures of displacement and placelessness
  • intertwined histories of flight, colonialism, and imperialism
  • gratitude and the “ungrateful refugee” (Dina Nayeri)
  • the “good” refugee
  • concepts of livability
  • refugee refusal
  • technology and flight
  • the place of the camp
  • statelessness, human rights and refugee rights in literature
  • forced displacement and intersections of Indigenous studies and refugee studies
Please submit an abstract of 350-500 words along with a brief biography to Kathryn Sederberg (ksederbe@kzoo.edu) and Rebekah Slodounik (ras073@bucknell.edu) by June 1, 2023. Notifications of acceptance can be expected by June 15, and complete manuscripts of 6,000-8,000 words, formatted in MLA style (see formatting guidelines), will be due by October 1, 2023. Founded in 1976, the journal Studies in 20th and 20st Century Literature became open access in 2014, and charges authors no fees. Guest Editors:  Kathryn Sederberg, Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Assistant Professor of German Studies, Kalamazoo College Rebekah Slodounik, Assistant Professor of German Studies, Bucknell University Works Cited Espiritu, Yên Lê, Lan Duong, Ma Vang, Victor Bascara, Khatharya Um, Lila Sharif, and Nigel Hatton. Departures: An Introduction to Critical Refugee Studies. Oakland: U of California P, 2022. Nayeri, Dina. The Ungrateful Refugee: What Immigrants Never Tell You. New York: Catapult, 2019. Nguyen, Viet Thanh, ed. “Introduction.” The Displaced: Refugee Writers on Refugee Lives. New York: Abrams Press, 2018, pp. 11-22. Soguk, Nevgat. “Border’s Capture: Insurrectional Politics, Border-Crossing Humans, and the New Political.” In Borderscapes: Hidden Geographies and Politics at Territory’s Edge, edited by Prem Kumar Rajaram and Carl Grundy-Warr, Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2007, pp. 283-308. Contact Info: guest editors: Kathryn Sederberg (ksederbe@kzoo.edu) and Rebekah Slodounik (ras073@bucknell.edu) general inquiries about the journal: Laura Kanost, editor (lakanost@ksu.edu) Contact Email: ksederbe@kzoo.edu URL: https://newprairiepress.org/sttcl/ * Dear colleagues, Please find below the call for 4 PhD positions within the framework of the Horizon-Europe-Project “United in Narrative Diversity? Cultural (Ex-)Change and Mutual Perceptions in Eastern and Western Europe at the threshold of the digital age“ (NARDIV). Most interesting for life writing scholars is PhD position 2: Université Aix-Marseille / University of Amsterdam “East-West Perception in Life Narratives of Women in Post-Communist Europe”. Feel free to circulate this advertisement to your network of colleagues and MA students to identify potential candidates. __ University of Amsterdam Faculty of Humanities Department of History, European Studies and Religious Studies dr. M.J.M. Rensen Senior Lecturer in Modern European Literature Bushuis/Oost-Indisch Huis | kamer D2.08B (Post) PO Box 1619 | 1000 BP Amsterdam (Visit) Kloveniersburgwal 48 | 1012 CX AmsterdamT +31.20.525.2198 New publications : Edited volume AUP: Networks, Narratives and Nations: https://www.aup.nl/en/book/9789463720755/networks-narratives-and-nations Redacteur Armada. Tijdschrift voor wereldliteratuur * Call for application In the framework of the Horizon-Europe-Project “United in Narrative Diversity? Cultural (Ex-)Change and Mutual Perceptions in Eastern and Western Europe at the threshold of the digital age“ (NARDIV) are four PhD-positions available NARDIV Europe experiences a relaunch of cultural and national stereotypes triggered by the migration crisis, Covid-19, democratic backslides and war against Ukraine. Four decades after the fall of the war, Eastern and Western Europe seem increasingly alienated, each having different perceptions on Europe, the EU and its principles. These trends manifest themselves in an alienation between Eastern and Western Europe, as well as in the perception of Europe in general. Intermittently they are, as we suggest, expressions of resilient post-colonial relationships within Europe. With a focus on the (clichéd binary) East-West confrontation, this project explores the future possibilities of building and managing transnational relationships in the fields of culture and heritage, one of the mainstays of customary cultural diplomacy. Taking six European countries as the basis of our exploration – France, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Slovakia and Romania – we critically examine mutual perceptions in Eastern and Western Europe through the prism of intercultural exchange. In the framework of the project, scholars, practitioners from culture-exchange institutes, artists and creative industries players join forces to scrutinise current difficulties, from diverging historical developments, emotional investments, to challenges of the digital media revolution. The objective is to develop new strategies to conceptualise and revitalise cultural encounters and exchange between East and West to discuss mutual perceptions and ideas. The findings of this collaboration aim at a) boosting the culture-diplomacy / exchange sector by strengthening their role as mediators of transnational European values; b) lay bare best and worst practices in order to develop recommendations for new approaches and (media) strategies. Thus, fostering a more inclusive concept of cultural diplomacy to counter populist, identity-based discourses and to promote the European narrative across different cultural heritages. Coordinator: Aix-Marseille Université (Nicole Colin, Catherine Teissier) Partner: Protisvalor Mediterranee SAS FR, Uniwersytet Wroclawski PL, Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaften Hamburg DE, Universitatea Din Bucuresti RO, Uniwersytet Szczecinski PL, Stichting Duitsland Instituut bij de Universiteit van Amsterdam NL, Romanian Cultural Institute RO, Goethe-Institut DE, Institut français de Roumanie RO, Universiteit van Amsterdam NL, EUFRAK-EuroConsults Berlin GmbH DE, GLOBESEC SK PhD position 1: HAW Hamburg / Universiteit van Amsterdam “Inclusive Cultural Policy: Social Media and Hybrid Community Building in European East-West Transfer” – Funding: 3 years – Start: 1 June 2023 (or later) – Employer: HAW Hamburg – PhD-inscription: Universiteit van Amsterdam – Application deadline: 15 May 2023 In the Work Package “Cultural Policy Dialogue in Social Media”, which is coordinated by the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (HAW Hamburg) in cooperation with the Duitsland Institute of the Universiteit van Amsterdam and the Goethe-Institut Bucharest, new forms of cultural transfer with the help of social media and hybrid event formats as well as a participatory self-image of cultural diplomacy and educational institutions are to be developed. The focus is particularly on cultural exchange and community building in contexts that have often been neglected so far, such as work in rural regions or cooperation with young people. Based on existing research results in the field of cultural communication (e.g. for museums), innovative strategies will be developed, especially in the field of social media, but also hybrid formats for cultural events and workshops for institutions of foreign cultural policy. Your profile – Completed Master’s degree in communication, media, cultural studies or a similar discipline – Interest and initial practical experience in the field of social media and digital communication – Interest in applied research – Knowledge of qualitative and quantitative methods such as guided interviews, text and content analysis and field research – Knowledge of cultural communication, cultural transfer and cultural diplomacy – Ability to work independently and systematically and to work in a team – Good knowledge of German, English and Romanian Your tasks – Writing a scientific dissertation – Field research in Amsterdam and Bucharest (6 months each) – Development of communication strategies for social media using the example of the Goethe-Institut Bucharest and the Duitsland Instituuts Amsterdam. – Development of hybrid formats in foreign cultural policy, especially for the intensification of cultural transfer between young people. – Collaboration in the NARDIV project team – Participation in workshops, conferences and cultural events in the framework of the project NARDIV Further information and application: Prof. Dr. Hanna Klimpe (hanna.klimpe@haw-hamburg.de) PhD position 2: Université Aix-Marseille / Universiteit van Amsterdam “East-West Perception in Life Narratives of Women in Post-Communist Europe” – Funding: 3 years – Start: 1 September 2023 – Employer: Aix-Marseille Université – PhD-inscription: Joint PhD Aix-Marseille Université / Universiteit van Amsterdam – Application deadline: 15 June 2023 In the Work Package “Perceptions of East/West in women’s life narratives in post-communist Europe”, coordinated by the Université d’Aix-Marseille (AMU) in cooperation with the University of Amsterdam, the East-West perception in life narratives of women writers will be investigated within the framework of a dissertation. For this purpose, a corpus will be selected, especially from texts of the genre of life narratives, which can include, for examples, fictional texts, autofictions, autosociobiographical writings, autobiographies, memoirs, diaries as well as hybrid forms. Among other things, images, emotions, embodied experiences and affects are to be examined in the texts, which not only represent the different realities of life, weltanschauung and styles in East and West, but also actively influence mutual perceptions. The Phd project can, for example, focus on female authors from the GDR or East Germany from different generations, female authors with migration or exile experience, and female authors from German-speaking minorities in Eastern and Central Europe. Your profile – Master’s degree in German studies, (comparative) literature or cultural studies, European studies, gender studies or a similar discipline – Interest in intercultural questions, cultural transfer, literary circulation – Interest in qualitative methods of social research such as semi-structured interviews and field research in cultural contexts – Knowledge of the East-West debate in Germany and Europe – Ability to work independently and systematically and to work in a team – Very good knowledge of German, French and English Your tasks – Writing a scientific dissertation – Field research (in Germany, the Netherlands, Romania, etc.): Interviews with authors – Transcription and analysis of interviews – Support in the creation of short video films – Participation in the NARDIV project team – Participation in workshops, conferences and cultural events in the framework of the NARDIV project Further information and application: Dr. Catherine Teissier (catherine.teissier@univ-amu.fr), Dr. Marleen Rensen (m.j.m.rensen@uva.nl) PhD position 3: Université Aix-Marseille / Universitatea din București “The Impact of Cultural Diplomacy as Soft Power in Times of Crises I” – Start: 1 September 2023 – Funding: 3 years – Employer: Aix-Marseille Université – PhD-inscription: Joint PhD Aix-Marseille Université / University of Bucharest – Application deadline: 15 June 2023 As part of the Work Package “Shaping perceptions by cultural diplomacy as soft power”, coordinated by the Universitatea din București and the University of Aix-Marseille in collaboration with the Goethe-Institut Bucharest, this PhD will investigate the activities and programmes of German-speaking institutions and their influence on Romanian society and its cultural actors between 1968 and 2007. Your profile – Master’s degree in German studies, cultural studies, history, political science, cultural sociology or a similar discipline – Interest in cultural diplomacy and theories of cultural transfer – Interest in Romanian and German cultural history and the exchange between the two countries – Interest in field research in France and Romania – Ability to work independently and systematically and to work in a team – Very good knowledge of German and Romanian, good knowledge of English, knowledge of French Your tasks – Writing a scientific dissertation in German – Archival research to identify the strategies of the Goethe-Institut and other German-speaking institutions in Romania during the last two decades of communism and in the period between the fall of Ceaușescu and Romania’s accession to the European Union – Analysis of the impact of these strategies on cultural and academic actors and their networks, as well as on civil society – Field research: interviews with cultural and academic actors in Romania, Germany, Austria, etc. – Transcription and analysis of the interviews – Work in the team of the NARDIV project, in particular in cooperation with the PhD student of the Universitatea din București (PhD position 4) – Participation in research workshops, conferences and cultural events organised in the framework of the NARDIV project Further information and application: Prof. Dr. Nicole Colin (nicole.colin-umlauf@univ-amu.fr), Prof. Dr. Horatiu Decuble (horatiu.decuble@lls.unibuc.ro) PhD position 4: Universitatea din București / Université Aix-Marseille “The Impact of Cultural Diplomacy as Soft Power in Times of Crises II” – Funding: 3 years – Start: 1 September 2023 – Employer: Universitatea din București – PhD-inscription: Joint PhD Universitatea din București / Aix-Marseille Université – Applications review and selection of candidates: 1-15 September 2023, Universitatea din București As part of the Work Package “Shaping perceptions by cultural diplomacy as soft power”, coordinated by the Universitatea din București in collaboration with the University of Aix-Marseille and the Institut Français de Bucarest, this PhD will investigate the activities and programmes of the Institut Français de Roumanie and their impact on Romanian society and its cultural actors between 1968 and 2007. Your profile – Master’s degree in political science, history, Romance studies, international relations, sociology of culture or a comparable discipline – Interest in the history of cultural diplomacy and theories of cultural transfer – Knowledge of Romanian and French cultural history and the exchange relations between the two countries – Interest in field research in France and Romania – Ability to work independently and systematically and to work in a team – Very good knowledge of Romanian and French as well as good knowledge of English required; knowledge of German desirable Your tasks – Writing a scientific dissertation in French – Archival research to identify the strategies of the Institut français during the last two decades of communism and in the period between the fall of Ceaușescu and Romania’s accession to the European Union – Analysis of the impact of these strategies on cultural and academic actors and their networks, as well as on civil society – Field research: interviews with cultural, cultural policy and academic actors in Romania, France, etc. – Transcription and analysis of the interviews – Work in the team of the NARDIV project, especially with the PhD student of the Université d’Aix-Marseille (PhD position 3) – Participation in research workshops, conferences and cultural events organised in the framework of the NARDIV project Further information: Prof. Dr. Cristian Preda (cristian.preda@unibuc.ro), Prof. Dr. Nicole Colin (nicole.colin-umlauf@univ-amu.fr) How to apply? We look forward to receiving your online application with the usual application documents (letter of motivation, curriculum vitae, diplomas, recommendations) in one PDF file to the contact persons indicated. Application deadline: see the respective offer *

CfP. Decolonizing the Self: How Do We Perceive Others When We Practice Autotheory?

Special Issue (winter 2024) of The February Journal, edited by Shura Dogadaeva and Andrei Zavadski Deadline for Submissions: May 15, 2023 Andrei: So much is currently being said about decolonization. The term is being used—and, as we currently see in Eastern Europe—also abused a lot. But what does decolonization mean in practice? How does one engage in decolonizing the self? In the next special issue of The February Journal, I would like to focus on approaches to practical self-decolonization. Shura: I agree. But when I think about this, I cannot help but wonder whether I have the right to engage in a self-decolonizing practice. Shouldn’t I, a citizen of Russia and, in one way or another, a product of its imperialist culture, shut up and listen? Shouldn’t I limit my own agency in this regard? Andrei: Decolonizing the self is, in my opinion, one of those tasks that require our immediate and active attention. As somebody who was born and grew up in Belarus, I ‘belong’ to both the colonized and—in a way, especially if we consider Lukashenka’s current politics—the colonizing sides, I think we consciously have to challenge this ‘belonging.’ Ultimately, such work should result in redefining our own subjectivity and thus altering the way we perceive others. It is our primary task, I feel. Shura: But how does one deconstruct one’s ‘belonging’? It is a very abstract term. Belonging to something often means substituting my own experience with a ‘collective,’ ‘universal’ one. Unless you are a white heterosexual male, which is likely to make your personal experience close to ‘the universal one.’ But does it mean, then, that closely listening to myself might lead to a change in how I relate to others? Andrei: If we consider belonging—but also theory, knowledge, and so on—to be a construct imposed by a historical white-male-heterosexual instance and by—more-often-than-not imperialist—thinking, then it is exactly what colonizes, corrupts us, resulting in a colonizing gaze (as well as discourse and behavior) that we exercise upon others. By decolonizing the self—for instance, by dissecting our own experience—we question our belonging and other similar constructs, challenge and deconstruct them, and thus decolonize our relationship to others. Shura: Personal experience allows one to think outside the box, giving this idiomatic cliché a literal meaning. If ‘culture,’ ‘knowledge,’ et cetera are constructs, they confine us within boxed realities. Reflecting on your own experience makes you realize that this box has walls, but they are not as strong as it might seem and can in fact be brought down. Utilizing one’s personal experience for this purpose might seem like a narcissistic trap, but I don’t think it is. Rather, it is about the fact that any personal experience is always much more than ‘universal,’ ‘universalized’ experience. I think autotheory (Fournier 2022; Vaneycken 2020; Wiegman 2020) is a great method to free the self from such imposed colonizing constructs. Andrei: How do you understand autotheory? For me, it is not simply about reflecting on your personal experience and sharing it with others: this would make one part of the identity politics discourse. Moreover, a person engaging in an autotheoretical practice of self-decolonization might, as our editor Isabel Bredenbröker points out, have to resist negative identity politics, that is, outside efforts to keep this person within the confines of one prescribed identity. Shura: Definitely. You know, I love this phrase from Preciado (2021), who writes in Can the Monster Speak? that ‘[t]o be branded with an identity means simply that one does not have the power to designate one’s identity as universal.’ Authotheory isn’t about branding oneself with an identity, it is about deconstructing the ‘universal,’ of which Preciado speaks. Andrei: So, autotheory is about relating your personal experience to the one declared as ‘universal,’ but not with the aim of making the former fit in, but rather, of loosening and shattering the very structure of the universal. Once these epistemological structures are in ruins, voices and experiences that did not fit in become much more audible. By decolonizing the self we are able to listen, hear, and perceive others and their unique experiences. I think my own practice of decolonizing the self started when I realized, some time ago, that I was queer. Luckily, this realization did not make me doubt my own sanity (which sadly happens to a lot of LGBTQIA+ people), but prompted closer attention to my personal experience. Analyzing it against the ‘universal norm’ into which I was supposed to fit, I grew skeptical of ‘the universal’ rather than my own experience. Which, in line with intersectionality thinking, made me more attentive to other marginalized voices around me. Shura: My practice originates in reading groups that I conducted with young adults at a Moscow museum. We read texts on Stalinisim, genocide, World War Two, and similar topics. I soon realized that my pupils did not have the language to talk about traumatic past events. I understood this as a consequence of the (post-)Soviet education system, which saw little transformation, if at all. It made me reevaluate my own education and reexamine, among other things, historical science as a practice of colonization. I started listening to these kids very carefully, and this act of listening made them try hard to formulate their own thoughts, rather than simply reproduce school-taught narratives. Andrei: This reminds me of how Maggie Nelson’s (2015) The Argonauts opens. On the novel’s very first page, she invokes Wittgenstein’s idea that the inexpressible is contained, albeit inexpressibly, within the expressed. By listening to what your students express you are able to get a sense of what they cannot express. Shura: Yes, listening is actually an essential practice for a teacher: it allows her to challenge constructions like ‘knowledge’ or ‘belonging,’ which, in turn, challenges and transforms the types of relationships with others that are imposed by these constructions. Andrei: So, it would be interesting to learn how individuals engage in self-decolonizing autotheoretical practices and what manifestations these practices acquire in artistic, pedagogical, activist, academic, and other fields of life. Shura: Yes! And not only discursive practices: we need to consider what is beyond discourse. (Even though Judith Butler would crucify us for suggesting there is anything non-discursive.) Perhaps there are artistic, performative practices out there that work with affects, emotions, and bodies, aiming at self-decolonization. The question here is: What would this inquiry add to what we know about decolonization already? Andrei: Ana Fabíola Maurício (2023), in her chapter in the book on silence that was reviewed in The February Journal’s Issue 01–02 (Veselov 2023), critiques the discourse of postcolonialism and postcolonial theory for imposing on an individual from an oppressed group a kind of responsibility to be that group’s voice and representative. In other words, the individual’s personal experience is seen as secondary to the collective experience of the group. I believe that engaging in autotheoretical self-decolonizing practices would be a way to emphasize individual experiences and challenge established theoretical approaches. Shura: It would be great to invite authors who are developing autotheoretical self-decolonizing practices in their academic, artistic, activist, pedagogical, and other activities. It would also be great to receive submissions that use different genres and forms of presentation, as well as ones that stem from different geographical, epistemological, and other contexts. References 
    1. Fournier L (2022) Autotheory as Feminist Practice in Art, Writing, and Criticism. Cambridge, MA, MIT Press.
    1. Maurício AF (2023) Un-silencing bodies, un-silencing lives: Artistic (self-)decoloniality and artistic (self-) empowerment. In: Santos L (ed), Cultures of Silence: The Power of Untold Narratives. London and New York, Routledge: 9–27.
    1. Nelson M (2015) The Argonauts. Minneapolis, MN, Graywolf Press.
    1. Preciado P (2021) Can the Monster Speak. Cambridge, MA, MIT Press.
    1. Vaneycken A (2020) Collectiveness as a form of autotheory. Parse, 12, https://parsejournal.com/article/collectiveness-as-a-form-of-autotheory/ (03/04/23).
    1. Veselov A (2023) Book review. Santos L (ed) (2023) Cultures of Silence: The Power of Untold Narratives. London and New York, Routledge. The February Journal, 01–02: 161–170.
    1. Wiegman R (2020) Introduction: Autotheory theory. Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory, 1(76): 1–14.
To submit a proposal, please provide the following information in English:  • contribution type (e.g., article, visual essay, reflexive essay, data essay, etc.); • language of contribution; • title of contribution; • abstract (300 words); • keywords that indicate the focus of the contribution; • biographical information, including a short biographical statement of maximum 100 words stating research interests and relevant professional experience. Proposals for contributions are due on May 15, 2023. Send all the information requested above—as a single PDF document—to the