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ETS1: Engineering design

Core Idea

ETS1: Engineering Design

ETS1.A: Defining and Delimiting an Engineering Problem
ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions
ETS1.C: Optimizing the Design Solution

Content aligned with middle school ETS1

Content aligned with high school ETS1

 

In middle school, students develop an understanding of disciplinary core ideas in the engineering design domain. The middle school performance expectations build on the elementary performance expectations. In ETS1: Engineering Design, performance expectations are designed for students to engage in the engineering design process in a way that is personally relevant and on an appropriate scale.

 

High school performance expectations in engineering design build on middle school experiences and understandings. Through the performance expectations in high school ETS1: Engineering Design, students are called on to engage in the engineering design process to address complex real-world problems that account for societal needs and wants and use practical criteria. Students are also expected to use computers to model engineering solutions. In doing so, students must integrate practices of science and engineering, as well as crosscutting concepts and core ideas.

 

ETS1: Engineering design

MS-ETS1-1

MS-ETS1-2 Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

MS-ETS1-3 Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.

 

ETS1: Engineering design

HS-ETS1-2 Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

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Exploring Our Fluid Earth, a product of the Curriculum Research & Development Group (CRDG), College of Education. University of Hawaii, 2011. This document may be freely reproduced and distributed for non-profit educational purposes.