Unit: History
Program: History (BA)
Degree: Bachelor's
Date: Fri Jan 08, 2021 - 9:26:45 am

1) Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) and Institutional Learning Objectives (ILOs)

1. Students can explain historical change and continuity.

(1a. General education, 1b. Specialized study in an academic field, 1c. Understand Hawaiian culture and history, 2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research, 2c. Communicate and report, 3a. Continuous learning and personal growth, 3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture, 3c. Stewardship of the natural environment, 3d. Civic participation)

2. Students can write clear expository prose and present their ideas orally according to disciplinary conventions.

(1a. General education, 1b. Specialized study in an academic field, 1c. Understand Hawaiian culture and history, 2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research, 2c. Communicate and report, 3a. Continuous learning and personal growth, 3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture, 3d. Civic participation)

3. Students can identify, interpret, and evaluate primary sources and other relevant information.

(1a. General education, 1b. Specialized study in an academic field, 1c. Understand Hawaiian culture and history, 2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research, 2c. Communicate and report, 3a. Continuous learning and personal growth, 3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture, 3d. Civic participation)

4. Students can identify the main historiographical issues in a specific area of concentration.

(1b. Specialized study in an academic field, 1c. Understand Hawaiian culture and history, 2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research, 2c. Communicate and report, 3a. Continuous learning and personal growth, 3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture, 3d. Civic participation)

2) Your program's SLOs are published as follows. Please update as needed.

Department Website URL: http://manoa.hawaii.edu/history/
Student Handbook. URL, if available online: manoa.hawaii.edu/history/undergraduate-program/program-overview
Information Sheet, Flyer, or Brochure URL, if available online:
UHM Catalog. Page Number: www.catalog.hawaii.edu/courses/departments/hist.htm
Course Syllabi. URL, if available online:
Other: Course descriptions for the past three semesters, http://manoa.hawaii.edu/history/courses/course-descriptions-schedules/

3) Please review, add, replace, or delete the existing curriculum map.

Curriculum Map File(s) from 2020:

4) For your program, the percentage of courses that have course SLOs explicitly stated on the syllabus, a website, or other publicly available document is as follows. Please update as needed.

0%
1-50%
51-80%
81-99%
100%

5) Does the program have learning achievement results for its program SLOs? (Example of achievement results: "80% of students met expectations on SLO 1.")(check one):

No
Yes, on some(1-50%) of the program SLOs
Yes, on most(51-99%) of the program SLOs
Yes, on all(100%) of the program SLOs

6) Did your program engage in any program learning assessment activities between November 1, 2018 and October 31, 2020?

Yes
No (skip to question 17)

7) What best describes the program-level learning assessment activities that took place for the period November 1, 2018 and October 31, 2020? (Check all that apply.)

SKIP

8) Briefly explain the assessment activities that took place since November 2018.

SKIP

9) What types of evidence did the program use as part of the assessment activities checked in question 7? (Check all that apply.)

SKIP

10) State the number of students (or persons) who submitted evidence that was evaluated. If applicable, please include the sampling technique used.

SKIP

11) Who interpreted or analyzed the evidence that was collected? (Check all that apply.)

SKIP

12) How did they evaluate, analyze, or interpret the evidence? (Check all that apply.)

SKIP

13) Summarize the results from the evaluation, analysis, interpretation of evidence (checked in question 12). For example, report the percentage of students who achieved each SLO.

SKIP

14) What best describes how the program used the results? (Check all that apply.)

SKIP

15) Please briefly describe how the program used its findings/results.

SKIP

16) Beyond the results, were there additional conclusions or discoveries? This can include insights about assessment procedures, teaching and learning, and great achievements regarding program assessment in this reporting period.

SKIP

17) If the program did not engage in assessment activities, please justify.

 

 

Assessment Report for the History BA 2020

 

On November 16, 2020, the Assessment Committee met to discuss the results of the Assessment for SLO #3. Two-thirds of the papers were determined to be competent.

The other third of the papers fell below the level of expected competence.

 

In 2018-2019, the History Assessment Committee collected 14 student papers for the purpose of assessing SLO #3, “Students can identify, interpret and evaluate primary sources and other relevant information.” We created a Scoring Guide to use for assessing SLO #3.

 

Level                                 Interpretation and Use for SLO #3

4--Accomplished

Organizes, critically analyzes, and synthesizes multiple primary historical sources to develop a coherent argument

3--Competent

Able to utilize and evaluate primary sources in an effective way.

2--Developing

Incorporates primary sources as evidence and attempts to contextualize and evaluate primary sources

1--Beginning

Fails to identify and use primary sources

 

Student papers were anonymized and each paper was read and scored by two members of the Assessment Committee.

 

Four student papers were assessed as Accomplished

Eight student papers were assessed as Competent

Eight student papers were assessed as Developing

Seven student papers were assessed as Beginning

 

In our meeting, we recognized that we could do better. The Department Chair, Shana Brown, joined the meeting. In our conversation, we discussed remedies for clarifying expectations among instructors as well as students. We spent a fair amount of time discussing the connection between HIST 396 and HIST 496, since the sample papers came from both HIST 396 and HIST 496. Most students are eager to begin writing their senior theses; however, HIST 396 needs to be better articulated and easily understood by our undergraduate students. Another issue that the committee discussed was the importance of emphasizing primary sources, particularly at both the 396 and 496 levels. This may be a broader discussion among the History faculty to create a common consensus of  how we might rethink or strengthen the connection between 396 and 496. On November 18, 2020 at the meeting of the History Faculty, Department Chair Shana Brown will plan a retreat in the beginning of 2021 to bring together instructors who teach 396 and 496 and other faculty who have an investment in bringing clarity to the connection between 396 and 496.

Respectfully,

Saundra Schwartz, History Assessment Committee Chair.