Unit: Public Health Studies
Program: Public Health (BA)
Degree: Bachelor's
Date: Tue Oct 07, 2014 - 10:25:32 pm

1) Institutional Learning Objectives (ILOs) and Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

1. Review the history and philosophy of public health

(1a. General education, 1b. Specialized study in an academic field)

2. Identify and explain the core functions of public health

(1a. General education, 1b. Specialized study in an academic field)

3. Articulate the differences in public health priorities in various regions of the world

(1b. Specialized study in an academic field, 2a. Think critically and creatively, 3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture, 3d. Civic participation)

4. Identify the basic concepts, methods, and be able to apply qualitative and quantitative tools of public health data collection, use, and analysis in elementary research analyses

(1b. Specialized study in an academic field, 2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research)

5. Explain the basic principles of epidemiology

(1b. Specialized study in an academic field)

6. Review fundamental statistical concepts and apply them in elementary research analyses

(1a. General education, 2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research)

7. Apply core concepts of public health, grounded in an ecological perspective to assessing public health issues

(1b. Specialized study in an academic field, 3c. Stewardship of the natural environment)

8. Articulate the natural and social determinants of health status in communities, and the dynamic interplay among these factors in various populations

(1c. Understand Hawaiian culture and history, 3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture, 3c. Stewardship of the natural environment)

9. Identify current public health topics including an analysis of the societal attitudes that generate differential impacts to various communities

(1c. Understand Hawaiian culture and history, 3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture, 3d. Civic participation)

10. Describe Indigenous Peoples health in a historical context, and discuss the impacts of colonial processes and social determinants on health outcomes

(1a. General education, 1c. Understand Hawaiian culture and history, 3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture)

11. Describe the major human diseases and their underlying etiologies

(1a. General education)

12. Show proficiency in sub-disciplines including biological aspects of public health; epidemiology, genetics, and health informatics; environmental and global health sciences; and infectious and chronic diseases

(1a. General education, 3c. Stewardship of the natural environment)

13. Identify the impact of the environment, social disparities, and both communicable and non-communicable diseases on health

(3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture, 3c. Stewardship of the natural environment)

14. Explore the fundamental concepts and features of a public health-related project

(2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research)

15. Use information literacy skills such as locating and evaluating pertinent public health information

(2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research)

16. Generate research questions, analyze and present data, and interpret and discuss findings

(2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research, 3a. Continuous learning and personal growth)

17. Exhibit critical thinking and analytical abilities, including the capacities to engage in inductive and deductive thinking, quantitative reason, and to construct sound arguments

(2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research, 3a. Continuous learning and personal growth)

18. Distinguish the fundamental characteristics and organizational structures of the U.S. health system, as well as to the differences in systems abroad

(3d. Civic participation)

19. Explain the role that public health plays in disaster prevention and management and evaluate public policy issues with respect to access, quality and cost, when understanding health disparities within vulnerable populations

(1c. Understand Hawaiian culture and history, 3c. Stewardship of the natural environment)

20. Discuss basic concepts of legal, ethical, economic, and regulatory dimensions of health care and public health policy

(1b. Specialized study in an academic field, 3d. Civic participation)

21. Articulate the impact of public health policies on vulnerable populations, including Indigenous Peoples

(1c. Understand Hawaiian culture and history, 3b. Respect for people and cultures, in particular Hawaiian culture)

22. Apply abstract reasoning and critical thinking skills to communicate public health research and practice to public and professional audiences

(2a. Think critically and creatively, 2b. Conduct research, 2c. Communicate and report, 3a. Continuous learning and personal growth)

23. Demonstrate effective written communication skills

(2c. Communicate and report)

24. Demonstrate effective public speaking skills during classroom discussions and presentations

(2c. Communicate and report)

2) Your program's SLOs are published as follows. Please update as needed.

Department Website URL: http://manoa.hawaii.edu/publichealth/node/580
Student Handbook. URL, if available online:
Information Sheet, Flyer, or Brochure URL, if available online: Not Online
UHM Catalog. Page Number:
Course Syllabi. URL, if available online: http://manoa.hawaii.edu/publichealth/courses
Other:
Other:

3) Select one option:

Curriculum Map File(s) from 2014:

4) For your program, the percentage of courses that have course SLOs explicitly stated on the syllabus, a website, or other publicly available document is as follows. Please update as needed.

0%
1-50%
51-80%
81-99%
100%

5) Did your program engage in any program assessment activities between June 1, 2013 and September 30, 2014? (e.g., establishing/revising outcomes, aligning the curriculum to outcomes, collecting evidence, interpreting evidence, using results, revising the assessment plan, creating surveys or tests, etc.)

Yes
No (skip to question 14)

6) For the period between June 1, 2013 and September 30, 2014: State the assessment question(s) and/or assessment goals. Include the SLOs that were targeted, if applicable.

SKIP

7) State the type(s) of evidence gathered to answer the assessment question and/or meet the assessment goals that were given in Question #6.

SKIP

8) State how many persons submitted evidence that was evaluated. If applicable, please include the sampling technique used.

SKIP

9) Who interpreted or analyzed the evidence that was collected? (Check all that apply.)

SKIP

10) How did they evaluate, analyze, or interpret the evidence? (Check all that apply.)

SKIP

11) For the assessment question(s) and/or assessment goal(s) stated in Question #6:
Summarize the actual results.

SKIP

12) State how the program used the results or plans to use the results. Please be specific.

SKIP

13) Beyond the results, were there additional conclusions or discoveries?
This can include insights about assessment procedures, teaching and learning, program aspects and so on.

SKIP

14) If the program did not engage in assessment activities, please explain.
Or, if the program did engage in assessment activities, please add any other important information here.

This program has not engaged in assessment activities because our program has just opened.

The B.A. Public Health Program was approved by the Board of Regents in the Fall of 2013 and began accepting students in January of 2014. Our first student officially declared Public Health as a major in April 2014, and our program has grown from there.  Our program has a designated chair, Dr. Denise Nelson-Hurwitz, a dedicated undergraduate student advisor, Michelle Tagorda, and oversight from an Undergraduate Education Committee (which includes 5 Public Health Faculty members and 2 support staff) and the OPHS Director/Chair.

We are currently collecting student evaluations and feedback regarding courses, course offerings, and the program overall, but we intend to start our assessment activities after December 2014, once we have two semesters of data to evaluate for assessment purposes.