Public Health Pulse (news, events, announcements)

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Events Calendar

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Announcements (recent)

  • Please join us on Wednesday (4/29) and Thursday (4/30) to support our students at the Spring 2020 Summit offered via Zoom. Contact Dr. Nelson-Hurwitz via email for complete schedule and Zoom links.

    - Posted 1 year ago

  • The Hawai‛i Chapter of Delta Omega invites all interested OPHS graduate and undergraduate students to submit an abstract for the National Delta Omega Poster Contest Display.  It will take place at the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) annual meeting, scheduled for October 23rd through 27th, 2021 (“hybrid” this year, so both in Denver, Colorado, and virtually).  Each chapter is able to select no more than 2 abstracts for the graduate student competition, and 1 for the undergraduate competition.

    Students whose work is selected by Delta Omega’s national committee will receive a $350 cash prize from the national Delta Omega Honor Society, which the OPHS will match, for a total of $700.  National awards will be presented during the Delta Omega Social Hour at APHA.  In addition, students will have the opportunity to present their poster during the APHA scientific poster sessions, and abstracts will be published on the National Delta Omega webpage.

    All abstracts must be submitted via email for consideration to jsugimot@hawaii.edu by 4/30/2021, 5:00 p.m.  Submissions must use the attached form.  No late or incomplete submissions will be accepted or considered.

    Students from our department have been national Delta Omega student poster contest award winners for 11 of the past 13 years.  We look forward to your submissions.

    Please contact Dr. Sugimoto-Matsuda if you have any questions.

    - Posted 3 months ago

  • The Healthy Hawaiʻi Initiative Evaluation Team, in collaboration with leadership from the Hawaiʻi Department of Health, the Hawaiʻi Public Health Institute, and the Hawaiʻi Community Foundation, are pleased to announce a Special Issue addressing the intersections between chronic diseases and Covid-19 in our state. 

    The Special Issue, entitled “Roadmap to a healthier and more equitable Hawaiʻi: Solutions to root causes at the intersections of chronic disease and Covid-19” seeks article submissions that make contributions toward systems, environmental, and policy changes, as well as those that discuss or target root causes of health disparities in chronic disease. We are looking for all types of articles, including original articles, reviews, viewpoints, and editorials. Students are also highly encouraged to contribute. 

    To be considered for the Special Issue, please send an unstructured 350-word, or less, abstract to chroniccondCovid@gmail.com by midnight, October 9, 2020. We aim to publish the Special Issue next summer. 

    Full details available in this PDF.

    - Posted 11 months ago

  • Our public health ‘ohana lost an amazing person recently. Mary was a stellar student, researcher, and person. She earned her Master of Public Health from OPHS in 2013 where she was active in the Hui and in community service. She was research faculty in our department and later worked as a GRA as she pursued her nursing degree. A UH scholarship fund has been created to honor her legacy in public health and nursing: www.uhfoundation.org/MaryGuoScholarship. Gifts in memory of Mary Guo can also be made payable to “UH Foundation” with a note or cover letter indicating “Mary Guo Scholarship” which can be sent to UH Foundation, P.O. Box 11270, Honolulu, HI 96828-0270. Some of her research publications can be found here: https://www.cdc.gov/PCD/ISSUES/2015/15_0092.htmhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10995-018-2597-8, and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6401201/.

    - Posted 11 months ago

  • Public health is more important than ever during the global COVID-19 pandemic. We are pleased to announce that we have opened applications for Spring 2021 for all of our graduate programs. We will be holding a Graduate Program Information Sessions via Zoom on June 17, July 15, and August 12. It is important that those who plan to apply for Spring 2021 attend one of the information sessions prior to submitting an application.  Please visit our Admissions page for information on how to apply. We look forward to receiving your application!

    - Posted 1 year ago

Events (upcoming)

News (recent)

  • New Policy Brief Makes the Case for Deeper Investments in Chronic Disease Prevention in Hawai‘i

    As Hawaiʻi emerges from the Covid-19 pandemic, it is critical that funding is maintained and expanded for chronic disease prevention to improve health, address disparities, and reduce costs. This policy brief provides evidence and arguments for why chronic disease prevention investments are more critical than ever in Hawaiʻi. 

    - Posted Friday, July 9

  • Mosquito-breeding potential campus areas revealed in study

    The highest number of potential mosquito breeding sites on campus are located in the student residential areas of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, according to research out of the Thompson School of Social Work & Public Health. The study, published in the Hawaiʻi Journal of Health & Social Welfare (PDF), advised practical strategies to reduce mosquito breeding.

    - Posted Thursday, June 17

  • UH Regent Michelle Tagorda honored for years of service, advocacy

    University of Hawaiʻi Regent Michelle Tagorda was honored by the Board of Regents for her seven years of service to the university with a proclamation of appreciation. Tagorda’s term ends June 30, 2021.

    - Posted Thursday, June 10

  • Suicide-prevention effort targets 60K underserved Hawai‘i youth

    Rural, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander youth and communities have greater needs with respect to suicide prevention and mental health support. Now, with a new $3.5-million grant, University of Hawaiʻiat Mānoa researchers in public health and psychiatry will aim to reach at least 60,000 of these young people in Hawaiʻi with suicide prevention efforts.

    Researchers Jeanelle Sugimoto-Matsuda of the Office of Public Health Studies in the Thompson School of Social Work & Public Health and Deborah Goebert of the John A. Burns School of Medicine, along with their colleagues, were awarded the federal grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The grant will fund the Hawaiʻi‘s Caring Systems Initiative for Youth Suicide Prevention.

    “Our approach is to offer hope, help and healing to youth in Hawaiʻi‘s rural and underserved areas,” Sugimoto-Matsuda said. “This grant will fund our efforts to reach youth in their schools, communities and health care facilities, and to also improve the effectiveness of these systems.”

    This effort is an example of UH Mānoa’s goal of Excellence in Research: Advancing the Research and Creative Work Enterprise (PDF), one of four goals identified in the 2015–25 Strategic Plan (PDF), updated in December 2020. 

    Fostering collaboration across systems

    The initiative uses a strengths-based approach, meaning it will work to enhance existing programs and tap into the resiliency and relationships in Hawaiʻi families and communities. The researchers selected four best practice programs that will be involved: 

    • The Connect Suicide Prevention and Postvention Curriculum
    • Sources of Strength
    • The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s Suicide Bereavement Support Group Facilitator Training 
    • Zero Suicide (including Continuity of Care)

    Sugimoto-Matsuda and Goebert’s initiative will foster collaboration across these various systems and communities, and integrate their work so that more youth can be reached. The initiative will impact teens, young adults, parents and families, healthcare and education providers, community members and professionals who work with youth.

    “We want to work across all of the systems that serve the youth in our state—education, health care, and other social services systems—in partnership with our communities,” Goebert said.

    Despite the adversity faced by today’s youth, most do not develop suicidality or self-harm behaviors, she noted. The team’s long-term partnerships with community organizations, including the Prevent Suicide Hawaiʻi Taskforce, will help them to strengthen the capacity of the systems and improve prevention of youth suicide deaths and attempts.

    “When we strengthen the systems that serve our youth to better prevent suicide and build resiliency, we strengthen all of Hawaiʻi,” Sugimoto-Matsuda said.

    Help is available

    If you are having thoughts of suicide, or you are worried about a friend or loved one, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK), or text “ALOHA” to the national Crisis Text Line at 741-741. Additional resources are available online.

    Story originally posted at UH News.

    - Posted Tuesday, April 13

  • Prestigious national maternal, child health award for UH professor emerita

    A University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa public health professor emerita has won a national award for her lifelong work in maternal and child health. Gigliola Baruffi was awarded the Maternal and Child Health Lifetime Achievement Award by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration for her impact in the field.

    Baruffi joined UH in 1984 and became lead of the maternal and child health training grant at the School of Public Health. She served as a professor, researcher, mentor and role model for 21 years at the university.

    - Posted Tuesday, April 13