Month: February 2020

Feb. 26, 2020 K-Pop Culture and Korean Diaspora

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The Center for Korean Studies, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa Presents:

 

K-Pop Culture and Korean Diaspora -- A Critical Studies on K-pop culture and Korean diaspora in Chile, Brazil, and the U.S.

Wed, Feb 26, 2020 at 2 - 4 Pm

The Center for Korean Studies Auditorium

 

Moderator - R. Anderson Sutton - Dean, School of Pacific and Asian Studies, UH at Mānoa

 

Speakers:

 

"K-Pop Fandom Culture in Latin America" - Dr. Wonjung Min (Prof., Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) will map out how fans of K-pop in Latin America, with a focus on Chile, share an imaginary bond created by an unfamiliar culture and develop imaginary cultural intimacy.

 

"Samukera: A Korean-Brazilian Rapper" - Dr. Paul Michael Sneed (Prof., Seoul National University) will talk about a São Paulo's rapper Samukera using hip hop to represent the immigrant experience in Brazil.

 

"K-Pop and Asian America: How Asian America Has Affected K-Pop and How K-Pop Affected Asian America" - Dr. Jayson Chun (Prof., University of Hawaiʻi - West Oahu) will examine the historical influences of Asian America on K-pop, and also how in return K-pop has influenced Asian-American fans in the United States.

 

The Center for Korean Studies events are free and open to the public. For further information, telephone the CKS at 808-956-7041. This conference is supported by the Core University Program for Korean Studies through the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the Korean Studies Promotion Service of the Academy of Korean Studies. (AKS-2015-OLU-2250005) The University of Hawai‘i is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution.

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Feb. 22, 2020 Piano at Light Side

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The Center for Korean Studies co-sponsors an event with Music Department at the University of Hawaii at Manoa:

Piano at Light Side: Arrangements of Korean songs and popular classical tunes.

Saturday, February 22, 2020 at 7:30pm
Orvis Auditorium at UH Manoa

Performer: Prof. So Hyung Kim (Dong-Eui University, Busan, Korea).

Free Admission; Parking $6.

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Feb 19, 2020 Stories of Korean Immigrants in Hawai’i

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The Center for Korean Studies presents two exciting events: Stories of Korean Immigrants in Hawai’i on February 19, 2020 and Exhibition of Selected Collections at CKS Archive from February 19 - February 25, 2020. These events were prepared by the CKS Outreach Committee and supporters. This is part of the Center’s efforts to promote its Archives and Collections and it is also an opportunity to appreciate the great donations that have been made to the Center by so many generous supporters.

"Stories of Korean Immigrants in Hawai'i -- Presentation on Selected Collections of the Center for Korean Studies"

on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 at 12:00 - 2:30 pm, CKS Auditorium.

The first large group of Korean immigrants arrived in Hawaii on January 13, 1903. The purpose of this symposium is to illuminate significant stories from the history of Korean immigration in Hawai'i through the collections donated to CKS by many generous individuals. By charting the rich history and lessons of Korean immigration, the speakers in this symposium uncover the values and
spirit of Korean immigrants in Hawai'i and how the struggle to survive and thrive, then and now, is reinterpreted by each succeeding generation, including acculturation and the role of Korean-Americans in the United States. This symposium will present a panoramic tour of Korean immigrants in Hawai'i desiring to belong within the American milieu while retaining their Korean heritage, and shed new light on the future prospects of the Korean-American community.

The symposium on Korean Immigrants in Hawai'i will be held on Feb. 19,2020 from 12:00pm to 2:30pm at the CKS Auditorium, and an exhibition  will be available at the lobby from 2/19/2020 to 2/25/2020.

Symposium speakers includes:

Min-Sun Kim-Moderator (Professor, Communicology, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa)

Michael Bruno-Welcoming remarks (Provost, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa)

Young Taik Chun Collection ..................... Sherrie L. T. Seki (Daughter, Juris Doctor, Richardson School of Law, UHM)

Donald Young Gak Kang Collection ........... Susan Kang (Daughter, Journalist)

Susan Chun Lee Collection ....................... Timothy Y. C. Choy (Grandson, Emeritus. Prof., State Univ. of Minnesota at Moorhead)

Sun Il Lee Collection and Chun, Yun Hee Collection ........................ Duk Hee Lee Murabayashi (President, Korean Immigration Research Institute in Hawai'i)

Edward Shultz- Commentator (Emeritus Professor, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa)

Tae-Ung Baik-Concluding Remarks (Director, Center for Korean Studies)

Exhibition of Selected Collections at CKS Archive: February 19 - February 25, 2020

This event is supported by the Core University Program for Korean Studies through the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the Korean Studies Promotion Service of the Academy of Korean Studies (AKS-2015-OLU-2250005). The University of Hawai‘i is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

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Feb. 11, 2020 Is Jury Trial Vanishing in Korea? by Jae-Hyup Lee

 

The Center for Korean Studies and the PALS Program at the William S. Richardson School of Law present

Is Jury Trial Vanishing in Korea-- Asia Law Talk by Jae-Hyup Lee, Seoul National University

When: Tuesday, February 11 at 12:00-1:30pm.

Where: William S. Richard School of Law Room 254
Light lunch provided if RSVP received by February 7.

Jae-Hyup Lee is a Professor at the Seoul National University College of Law. A former Fulbright Visiting Scholar for the William S. Richardson School of Law, Professor Lee holds a BA in Anthropology, magna cum laude, from Seoul National University, a PhD in American Civilization from the University of Pennsylvania, a Certificate on European Law from Vrije Universiteit Faculty of Law in the Netherlands, and a JD from Northwestern University School of Law. He is also a member of the New York State Bar Association.

Feb. 7, 2020 Colloquium by Prof. Hagen Koo

Privilege and Anxiety: The Upper Middle Class in the Neoliberal Era
By Hagen Koo

Friday, February 7, 2020
3:00pm–4:00pm; Saunders 244
Free and open to the public; Refreshments to follow

Despite so much talk on economic polarization and shrinking middle class, another important reality is the rise of the affluent segment of the middle class and its gradual separation from the rest of the middle class. The members of this upper middle class enjoy rising income, good quality of life, better healthcare, and better education for children. They claim themselves as a meritocratic class and are anxious to pass their privilege on to their children. This is the phenomenon commonly observed in the United States and many other societies today. In the book he is completing, Professor Koo investigates this phenomenon in the context of South Korea, with special attention to the impact of neoliberal globalization and a tremendous amount of anxieties
generated by this new class inequality.

Co-sponsored by the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Department of Sociology and the Center for Korean Studies Core University Program.

For more information, email socdept@hawaii.edu or call (808) 956-7693.

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