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Ocean & Earth Sciences

HIMB research experience program builds science and environmental literacy

The Research Experiences in Marine Science (REMS) summer program, an advanced, inquiry-driven and experiential marine biology summer course hosted at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB), completed its fifth year. The course builds science and environmental literacy skills for Hawaiʻi high school students and recent graduates. The 2017 cohort of 18 students completed the program and presented their team research projects to family, …

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Loko Iʻa app puts a Native Hawaiian fishpond in the palm of your hand

A National Science Foundation innovation grant to has spawned a second generation Hawaiian fishpond mobile app. The newly released Loko Iʻa 2.0 iPhone app allows users to explore Heʻeia fishpond on Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi through guided on-site and virtual tours, photos, narration, natural history, culture and science. The app was created by Judith Lemusof the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, Marion Ano of Purple Maiʻa Foundation, the staff of Paepae o Heʻeia and in collaboration with Brian Glazer of the UH Mānoa School of …

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As Guatemala’s Volcano of Fire belches, PDC helps with new tools to reduce risk

Guatemala is one of the most populous and economically developed countries in Central America, yet despite its economic strength it remains one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world, home to three dangerous volcanoes, frequent earthquakes, hurricanes, floods and landslides. Densely populated urban areas as well as hard-to-access rural communities are both exposed to extreme hazards—making communities throughout the …

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Enhancing coastal resilience in West Maui goal of new PacIOOS grant

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) will develop a high-resolution, real-time wave run-up forecast and notification system for West Maui’s coastline with a $500,000 award from NOAA’s Regional Coastal Resilience Grants Program. PacIOOS will also model a suite of inundation planning scenarios that take rising sea levels and increasing wave energies into account. Site-specific, short- and long-term forecasts, will strengthen …

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New research uses satellites to predict end of volcanic eruptions

Researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) recently discovered that infrared satellite data could be used to predict when lava flow-forming eruptions will end. Using NASA satellite data, Estelle Bonny, a graduate student in the SOEST Department of Geology and Geophysics, and her mentor, HawaiʻiInstitute for Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) researcher Robert Wright, tested a hypothesis first published in 1981 that detailed how lava …

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Hundreds of species of fungi in deep coral ecosystems discovered by UH Mānoa botanists

Researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Department of Botany have discovered hundreds of potentially new species of fungi in the deep coral ecosystem in the ʻAuʻau channel off Maui, Hawaiʻi. Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCE) are generally found at depths between 130–500 feet and possess abundant plant (algal) life as well as new fish species. The mysteries of these reefs are only recently being revealed through technological advances …

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Giant sea spiders use their legs as gills and their guts as hearts

Sea spiders, a bizarre and ancient group of marine arthropods in the class Pycnogonida, breathe in a way not previously known to science, according to a study involving University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa researcher Amy Moran and zoology PhD student Caitlin Shishido. The study, published in the July 10 issue of Current Biology, was performed at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, while Moran and her team were there in the fall …

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CTAHR Cooperative Extension Service convenes the Hawai‘i Extension Climate Forum

Pacific islands contribute less that 0.03 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, yet they suffer some of the greatest threats of climate change. This was a central point made at the Hawaiʻi Extension Climate Forum, an event organized last month by faculty and staff of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR). The forum brought together other university and community partners addressing …

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World’s oldest continuously monitored coral reef transect celebrates 100 years

In 1917, Alfred Mayor from the Carnegie Institute began what is now the world’s oldest continuously monitored coral reef transect in the world. The Aua transect on Tutuila island in the remote island territory of American Samoa celebrated its 100th anniversary, and scientists from throughout the region traveled to the island for a week-long celebration and to conduct the 100th …

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Biodiversity loss from deep-sea mining will be unavoidable

Biodiversity losses from deep-sea mining are unavoidable and possibly irrevocable, an international team of 15 marine scientists, resource economists and legal scholars argue in a letter published recently in the journal Nature Geoscience. The experts, including Craig Smith, oceanography professor at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), say the International Seabed …

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