4 servings |
Cabbage

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound pork tenderloin (or other lean meat)
  • 1 medium (approximately 1 ½ lbs) head green
    cabbage
  • 1/2 tbsp oil
    Sauce:
  • 1/8 tsp garlic or 1 clove garlic, crushed with knife
  • (optional) 1 thumb size piece ginger, crushed with
    knife
  • 1 tbsp Aloha brand Shoyu, low-sodium
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
    Serve on the side to compliment meal:
  • 4 cups of cooked rice (brown or hapa)

Directions: 

Remember to practice food safety when cooking!

  1. Slice meat into thin 1 ½” strips. Set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, Combine sauce ingredients: garlic,
    ginger (if using), soy sauce, cornstarch, and sugar.
  3. Marinate meat in sauce mixture for about 15-20
    minutes.
  4. Cut cabbage into 1-2 inch lengths. Set aside.
  5. Add oil to a large pan or wok on medium-high heat.
  6. Once oil is heated, add the marinated pork and cook
    until browned, stirring every so often.
  7. Once meat is browned, add the cabbage and stir-fry
    for a few minutes. Add 2 – 3 tbsp warm water to pan
    and cover with a lid to cook cabbage quicker.
  8. Serve with a side of rice.

Nutrition Facts:

Serving Size (488g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories: 430

Check serving size first – how many servings are in one container? The nutrients listed on the label are only for one serving.

Total Fat: 8g (10% Daily Value)
Saturated Fat: 1.5g (8% Daily Value)
Trans Fat: 0g

Limit saturated fats and trans fats.

Cholesterol: 75mg (25% Daily Value)
Sodium: 250mg (11% Daily Value)


Total Carbohydrate: 60g (22% Daily Value)
Dietary Fiber: 7g (25% Daily Value)
Total Sugars: 7g
Includes 1g Added Sugars 2% Daily Value)

Opt for whole grain carbohydrates and reduce added sugars.

Protein: 31g

Choose higher protein products.

Vitamin D: 0%
Calcium: 8%
Iron: 20%
Potassium: 20%

The % Daily Values tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Developed in collaboration with CTAHR’s Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences, its Dietetics Program and nutrition students.