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Nov
19
Mon
GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR FALL 2018: Contemporary Art and the Chinese City @ Art Building 214
Nov 19 @ 1:30 pm – 4:15 pm

The following course welcomes student enrollments.

Art 688: Contemporary Art and the Chinese City
Fall term 2018
Monday 1.30-4.15
Art Building 214
Prof. Kate Lingley lingley@hawaii.edu
This course is a cooperative graduate seminar in art history, in which we will explore the relationship between contemporary art and the increasingly urbanized cities of Sinophone Asia. The course is divided into four sections focusing on Beijing, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Singapore. Although this is an art history seminar, we welcome students from other departments.
Graffiti art by Zhang Dali, Beijing, 2009

Graffiti art by Zhang Dali, Beijing, 2009

This course is a cooperative graduate seminar in which we will explore the relationship between contemporary art and the increasingly urbanized cities of Sinophone Asia. The course is divided into four sections focusing on Beijing, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Singapore.

Although this is an art history course, the instructor welcomes students from related fields including Asian Studies, history, urban planning, etc. Enrollment is by instructor permission: please contact Dr. Lingley at lingley@hawaii.edu

Nov
26
Mon
GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR FALL 2018: Contemporary Art and the Chinese City @ Art Building 214
Nov 26 @ 1:30 pm – 4:15 pm

The following course welcomes student enrollments.

Art 688: Contemporary Art and the Chinese City
Fall term 2018
Monday 1.30-4.15
Art Building 214
Prof. Kate Lingley lingley@hawaii.edu
This course is a cooperative graduate seminar in art history, in which we will explore the relationship between contemporary art and the increasingly urbanized cities of Sinophone Asia. The course is divided into four sections focusing on Beijing, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Singapore. Although this is an art history seminar, we welcome students from other departments.
Graffiti art by Zhang Dali, Beijing, 2009

Graffiti art by Zhang Dali, Beijing, 2009

This course is a cooperative graduate seminar in which we will explore the relationship between contemporary art and the increasingly urbanized cities of Sinophone Asia. The course is divided into four sections focusing on Beijing, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Singapore.

Although this is an art history course, the instructor welcomes students from related fields including Asian Studies, history, urban planning, etc. Enrollment is by instructor permission: please contact Dr. Lingley at lingley@hawaii.edu

Dec
3
Mon
GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR FALL 2018: Contemporary Art and the Chinese City @ Art Building 214
Dec 3 @ 1:30 pm – 4:15 pm

The following course welcomes student enrollments.

Art 688: Contemporary Art and the Chinese City
Fall term 2018
Monday 1.30-4.15
Art Building 214
Prof. Kate Lingley lingley@hawaii.edu
This course is a cooperative graduate seminar in art history, in which we will explore the relationship between contemporary art and the increasingly urbanized cities of Sinophone Asia. The course is divided into four sections focusing on Beijing, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Singapore. Although this is an art history seminar, we welcome students from other departments.
Graffiti art by Zhang Dali, Beijing, 2009

Graffiti art by Zhang Dali, Beijing, 2009

This course is a cooperative graduate seminar in which we will explore the relationship between contemporary art and the increasingly urbanized cities of Sinophone Asia. The course is divided into four sections focusing on Beijing, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Singapore.

Although this is an art history course, the instructor welcomes students from related fields including Asian Studies, history, urban planning, etc. Enrollment is by instructor permission: please contact Dr. Lingley at lingley@hawaii.edu

Dec
5
Wed
Chinese Studies Research Seminar: “Tradition and Modernity: The Current and Future Situation of Chinese Buddhist Temples in Hawaii” @ Moore Hall 109, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Dec 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Announcing the following public talk, part of the Center for Chinese Studies at UHM’s China Research Seminars series:
Date: Wednesday, December 5, 12:00 noon
Place: Moore Hall 109, University of Hawaii at Manoa
1890 East-West Rd, Honolulu, HI 96822
The talk will be given in Chinese with English interpretation.
“Tradition and Modernity: The Current and Future Situation of Chinese Buddhist Temples in Hawaii”
by Guanghui Yu, Associate Professor, Guizhou Minzu University; and visiting scholar, UH Mānoa

Abstract: After Buddhism was transmitted from India to China, after a period of spread and adaptation, Indian Buddhism was gradually integrated into Chinese culture. Subsequently, after its complete development and the establishment of various schools, Chinese Buddhism succeeded in spreading into the neighboring countries and regions, and this led to the establishment of Japanese Buddhism, Korean Buddhism, and Vietnamese Buddhism. What about today’s Chinese Buddhism? Does Chinese Buddhism still have such cultural tension and dynamic that it can continue to develop to other areas? To explore the current situation, I look at Chinese temples in Hawaii and how they are developing. In Hawaii, where Asians have a higher proportion of the population than in other states of the U. S., the study of Japanese Buddhism began relatively early and has been relatively thorough. However, the study of Chinese Buddhism has not been so systemic. To attempt to redress this lack, my presentation will discuss the current situation and problems of Chinese Buddhist temples in Hawaii and their future development using the results of my field survey and interviews, and after conducting a literature review.

About the speaker: Guanghui Yu is an associate professor in the College of Communication, Guizhou Minzu University, China. Her research interests include Chinese Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhism and ethnic culture. Her PhD thesis is about the Tibetan Buddhist temples in Chengdu. She is currently participating in research projects on the history and development of Tantric Buddhism in Guizhou, an the introduction to Tibetan Buddhism in Chengdu, and the 13th Five-Year Plan of Guizhou Religion Development. She is currently a visiting scholar in UHM’s Department of Religion.


The public is cordially invited to attend. Free admission. Please put this date on your calendar and plan to attend!
Dec
10
Mon
GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR FALL 2018: Contemporary Art and the Chinese City @ Art Building 214
Dec 10 @ 1:30 pm – 4:15 pm

The following course welcomes student enrollments.

Art 688: Contemporary Art and the Chinese City
Fall term 2018
Monday 1.30-4.15
Art Building 214
Prof. Kate Lingley lingley@hawaii.edu
This course is a cooperative graduate seminar in art history, in which we will explore the relationship between contemporary art and the increasingly urbanized cities of Sinophone Asia. The course is divided into four sections focusing on Beijing, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Singapore. Although this is an art history seminar, we welcome students from other departments.
Graffiti art by Zhang Dali, Beijing, 2009

Graffiti art by Zhang Dali, Beijing, 2009

This course is a cooperative graduate seminar in which we will explore the relationship between contemporary art and the increasingly urbanized cities of Sinophone Asia. The course is divided into four sections focusing on Beijing, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Singapore.

Although this is an art history course, the instructor welcomes students from related fields including Asian Studies, history, urban planning, etc. Enrollment is by instructor permission: please contact Dr. Lingley at lingley@hawaii.edu

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