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College of Social Sciences

ANTH 151 Emerging Humanity (3)

Introduction to human biological evolution and the archaeology of culture in the world prior to AD 1500. Open to nonmajors, recommended for majors.

ANTH 151A Emerging Humanity (3)

Introduction to human biological evolution and the archaeology of culture in the world prior to AD 1500. Restricted to students in the Honors Program.

ANTH 152 Culture and Humanity (3)

Introduction to cultural anthropology. How humans create, understand, order and modify their natural, social, supernatural and physical environments, and make meaning and order. Open to non-majors, required for ANTH majors. A-F only.

ANTH 152A Culture and Humanity (3)

Introduction to cultural anthropology. How humans create, understand, order and modify their natural, social, supernatural and physical environments, and make meaning and order. Restricted to students in the Honors Program.

ANTH 175 Polynesian Surf Culture (3)

Examines environmental and cultural factors in the development of Polynesian surf culture, surfing’s decline due to Western influence, and its revitalization as a modern recreational activity. Business practices of the surfing industry are critically analyzed. A-F only. Co-requisite: 175L. (Fall only)

ANTH 175L Polynesian Surf Culture Field Lab (1)

175 co-requisite lab. Surfing sites are visited, ancient and modern Polynesian surfing practices and surfboard design and technology are discussed. Shoreline assessments emphasize ocean safety. Social issues surrounding surfing sites in Hawai‘i are analyzed. A-F only. Co-requisite: 175. (Fall only)

ANTH 210 Archaeology (3)

Introduction to prehistoric archaeology; methods and techniques of excavation and laboratory analysis; brief survey of theory in relation to change and diversity in prehistoric human groups.

ANTH 215 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)

Human evolution, primatology, human genetics, biological variation, human adaptability, growth and development. Co-requisite: 215L.

ANTH 215L Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1)

Laboratory to accompany 215. Co-requisite: 215.

ANTH 220 Quantitative Reasoning for Anthropologists (3)

Achieve basic quantitative literacy and to familiarize them with statistical reasoning so that they are prepared to carry out anthropological (and other social science) research. A-F only.

ANTH 300 Study of Contemporary Problems (3)

Significance of anthropology for contemporary affairs, particularly American ethnic and minority group relations. Relevance to various professions, governmental policy, political action, and accomplishment of change. Pre: 152 (or concurrent).

ANTH 301 Culture and Health (3)

Social and cultural aspects of medicine; the relationship of medicine to the beliefs, social systems, ecological adaptations, and cultural changes of human groups.

ANTH 310 Human Origins (3)

Theory of evolution, evolutionary systematics, and taxonomy; evolutionary biology of primates; fossil records for primate and human evolution. Laboratory included. Pre: 215, ZOOL 101; or consent.

ANTH 313 Visual Anthropology (3)

Historical development of documentary films of non-Western peoples; critical examination of ways in which ethnographic films represent different cultures. Pre: 152 (or concurrent).

ANTH 315 Sex and Gender (3)

Cross-cultural theories and perceptions of sexual differences; linkage between biology and cultural constructions of gender; relationship of gender ideology to women’s status. Pre: 152 (or concurrent). (Cross-listed as WS 315)

ANTH 316 Anthropology of Tourism (3)

Anthropological perspectives on the subject of the global phenomenon of tourism. Includes issues of cultural performance, identity, and commoditization. Open to nonmajors.

ANTH 323 Pacific Islands Archaeology (3)

Origins of Pacific peoples; chronology of settlement; sequences of culture in Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Pre: sophomore standing or consent.

ANTH 325 Origins of Cities (3)

Combined lecture/ discussion on the emergence and development of ancient cities in comparative perspective and the dynamics of (pre)modern urban life. Examples are drawn from the Near East, Mediterranean, Africa, India, China, and the Americas. A-F only. Pre: sophomore standing or consent.

ANTH 326 American Folklore and Folklife (3)

Examination of the history and ethics of folklore studies and the dynamics and social functions of traditional culture in diverse communities through topics such as ritual, storytelling, games, gossip, belief, music, and cultural tourism. Junior standing or higher. (Cross-listed as AMST 326)

ANTH 327 Ethnohistory (3)

Review of ethnohistory, i.e., the interdisciplinary, holistic and inclusive investigation of the histories of native peoples drawing not only on documented sources, but also on ethnography, linguistics, archaeology, ecology and other disciplines as an alternative to conventional Eurocolonial history. A-F only. Pre: HIST 152, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as IS 322)

ANTH 328 Food Origins, Food Culture (3)

Lectures and discussion offer an anthropological introduction to how humans created and transformed food through time. Sophomore standing or higher. (Spring only)

ANTH 332 Anthropology of Surfing (3)

Applies cultural anthropology to assess surfing as an indigenous Hawaiian and modern globalized activity. Discusses the history of surfing, surfing culture, and the impacts of surfing tourism on coastal development, reef ecology, and ocean safety. A-F only. (Fall only)

ANTH 333 Climate Change and Cultural Response: Past, Present, and Future (3)

Climate change is a reality, yet there is much uncertainty about how it will affect our lives. Investigates cultural response to climate change, using studies of the past to plan for the future. (Alt. years: spring) (Cross-listed as SUST 333)

ANTH 341 Anthropology of Virtual Worlds (3)

Anthropological study of computer mediated interaction. Focus on the ethnography of massively multiplayer online games, text-based chat rooms, and blogs. Pre: 152 or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 345 Aggression, War, and Peace (3)

Biocultural, evolutionary, and cross-cultural perspectives on the conditions, patterns, and processes of violence, war, nonviolence, and peace. Pre: 152. (Cross-listed as PACE 345)

ANTH 350 Pacific Island Cultures (3)

Introduction to cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia from time of first settlement to emergence of modern nation states. Pre: sophomore standing or consent.

ANTH 368 Households in Cross-cultural Perspective (3)

Study of cross-cultural patterns in household and community level organizations in Latin America and elsewhere. Topics may include gender relations, kinship structures, political economy, impacts of colonialism, modernization, and globalization on households. Sophomore standing or higher. (Cross-listed as LAIS 368)

ANTH 370 Ethnographic Field Techniques (V)

Problems and techniques of social-cultural anthropological fieldwork; ethnographic literature; work with informants. Repeatable one time. Pre: 152.

ANTH 372 (Alpha) Indigenous Peoples of Latin America (3)

Survey of the history and culture of the indigenous peoples of Latin America through a study of their literature, texts and practices. (B) Mesoamerica; (C) Andean South America. Repeatable one time for different alphas. Pre: sophomore standing or consent. (Cross-listed as LAIS 372 (Alpha))

ANTH 375 Race and Human Variation (3)

Human genetic and physical variation; latitudinal, longitudinal, and altitudinal variation across human populations; history of racism; contemporary issues in race and racism. Pre: sophomore standing, recommend 152 and 215; or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 379 Archaeology Practicum (V)

Students will gain practical archaeological experience (e.g., materials processing, analysis, documentation, conservation) under the direction of practicing archaeological professionals in the local community and in collaboration with supervising archaeological faculty. Repeatable two times, up to 6 credits. ANTH majors or minors only. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 210 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 380 Archaeological Lab Techniques (4)

Laboratory analysis and evaluation of field data; preservation and restoration of artifacts. Preparation for publication. Repeatable two times. Pre: 210 or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 381 Archaeological Field Techniques (V)

Archaeological survey and excavations; field trips, mapping, photography. May focus on terrestrial or underwater. May be taught entirely in the field at a national or international archaeological site. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 210.

ANTH 382 How Archaeology Works (3)

Uses archaeological examples to illustrate social science research techniques. Students learn how to create, analyze, and evaluate data through lab-based exercises, and examine ethical issues inherent in anthropological practice. Repeatable one time. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: 210 or instructor consent.

ANTH 384 Skeletal Biology (3)

Introduction to the human skeleton and methods for analyzing archaeological human remains including age, sex, ethnicity, paleodemography, skeletal and dental variation, paleopathology, population studies. Corequisite: 384L.

ANTH 384L Skeletal Biology Laboratory (1)

Laboratory to accompany 384. Co-requisite: 384.

ANTH 385 (Alpha) Undergraduate Seminar (3)

Selected problems in current research. (B) archaeology; (C) ethnography; (D) social anthropology; (E) applied; (F) psychological; (G) biological. Repeatable nine times. Pre: consent.

ANTH 399 Directed Reading or Research (V)

Repeatable nine times. Pre: major or minor in Anthropology.

ANTH 410 Ethics in Anthropology (3)

Seminar surveying ethical cases, problems, issues and questions from the inception of anthropology to the present. Junior standing or higher or consent.

ANTH 411 Museum Anthropology (3)

Anthropological study of museums and related sites of cultural production (historic sites, memorials, theme parks). Junior standing or higher. (Alt. years)

ANTH 412 Evolutionary Anthropology (3)

Lecture discussion providing an overview of evolutionary theory in anthropology: focus on the evolution of culture, behavioral ecology, and cultural diversity; emphasis on archaeological and ethnographic research and explanatory models. Pre: 210 or 215, or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 413 Language and Gender (3)

The role of language in the construction of gender and in the maintenance of the gender order. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No previous knowledge of linguistics required. A-F only. (Cross-listed as LING 415)

ANTH 414 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3)

Introduction to the ethnographic study of speech and language. Pre: 152. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as LING 414 and IS 414)

ANTH 415 Ecological Anthropology (3)

Relationship of humans with natural environment; role of culture in ecological systems. Pre: 152.

ANTH 416 Economic Anthropology (3)

Analysis of economic activities in non-Western, non-industrial societies; production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services in a variety of cultures. Pre: 152.

ANTH 417 Political Anthropology (3)

Character of political institutions and their development in nonWestern and non industrial societies. Pre: 152.

ANTH 419 Indigenous Anthropology (3)

Exploration of how anthropology studies indigenous groups throughout the world. An examination of the changing contexts of anthropological practice as calls for reflexivity lead anthropology of all backgrounds to bring insights from their “homes.” Issues include
the question of objectivity, the emicetic distinction, and the ethics of different kinds of anthropological research and the role of anthropologists in indigenous self-determination. Repeatable one time. Pre: 152.

ANTH 420 Communication and Culture (3)

Anthropological introduction to communication; intercultural and interspecies comparisons; verbal and nonverbal. Ethnography of communication, discourse and structural analyses, ethnomethodology. Pre: 152.

ANTH 422 Anthropology of Religion (3)

Cults, legends, millennial movements, myths, possession, rituals, sacred healing, shamanism, sorcery, spirits, symbolism, witchcraft, and other forms of religious and symbolic expression and experience, from small scale to highly urban societies. Pre: 152. (Cross-listed as REL 422)

ANTH 423 Social and Cultural Change (3)

Various approaches to examples of social and cultural change in non-literate societies; evolution, diffusion, acculturation, revolution, etc. Historical features and social processes of colonialism. Pre: 152.

ANTH 426 The Anthropology of Sexuality (3)

Explores the intersection of sexuality research and queer theory with other anthropological concerns such as identity, race, gender, religion, economy, politics, and globalization. A-F only. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 426)

ANTH 427 Food, Health, and Society (3)

How human groups identify, collect, create, and transform foods; how they shape those into dietary behaviors, and the influence of those behaviors on health. Pre: junior standing or higher or consent.

ANTH 428 Anthropology of the Body (3)

Exploration of the history and development of theories of the body via topics such as
phenomenology, perception, bodily rituals, gender, sex, race, colonialism, power, pain, medicalization, immunology, reproductive health and cyborgs. Pre: 152.

ANTH 429 Anthropology of Consumer Cultures (3)

Examines the practices and meanings of consumption in the contemporary world. Topics include social class, branding, fandom, global-local nexus. A-F only. Pre: 152 or consent. (Alt. years)

ANTH 431 Indigenous Crops/Food Systems (1)

Schemes for managing sequences and combinations of crops and crop production activities. Ecosystem and social determinants. Multiple cropping. Analysis of alternative cropping systems. Repeatable unlimited times, but credit earned one time only. Junior standing or higher.

ANTH 440 The Agriculture of Identity: Food and Farming in Anthropological Perspective (3)

Exploration of agriculture from the perspective of anthropology, with a focus on alternatives to industrial agriculture, especially in the context of Hawai‘i. Readings include academic writing and also literary non-fiction and journalism. A-F only. Pre: 152. (Alt. years)

ANTH 442 Globalization and Identity in the Himalayas (3)

Examines the influence of local culture and global flows on identity formation in
the Himalayan region. Topics include: Hindu caste and gender, constructions of ethnicity, Tibetans and tourists, Sherpas and mountaineers, development ideologies, and consumerism. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: 152 or 301 or ASAN 202 or consent. (Alt. years: fall) (Cross-listed as ASAN 442)

ANTH 443 Anthropology of Buddhism (3)

Selected aspects of national, regional and local manifestations of Buddhism are explored through the perspective of anthropology with an emphasis on the daily lives of monks, nuns and lay persons in their socio-cultural contexts. Pre: 422, REL 207, REL 475, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as REL 443)

ANTH 444 Spiritual Ecology (3)

Lectures and seminars provide a cross-cultural survey of the relationships between religions, environment and environmentalism. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as REL 444)

ANTH 445 Sacred Places (3)

Lectures and seminars provide a cross-cultural survey of sites which societies recognize as sacred and their cultural, ecological and conservation aspects. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as REL 445)

ANTH 446 Southeast Asian Cultures (3)

Cultures of Southeast Asia from hunting and gathering groups to high civilizations; kinship, economic, political, and religious systems; recent developments. Pre: junior standing or consent.

ANTH 447 Polynesian Cultures (3)

Analysis of Polynesian cultures from their origins to contemporary states. Pre: junior standing or consent.

ANTH 449 Anthropology of Melanesia (3)

Close study of cultures of Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, and Fiji through anthropological ethnography. Pre: 152 or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 458 Forensic Anthropology (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Application of physical anthropology to problems in human identification. Determination of age, sex, ancestry, etc., of the skeleton and preparation of reports for legal medicine. Pre: 384 (or concurrent).

ANTH 459 Extinctions (3)

An extraordinary number of plants and animals have gone extinct. Delves deeply into the primary literature that focuses on extinction and conservation from the beginning of the earth to the present day. Pre: 215 or consent. (Alt. yrs: fall)

ANTH 460 Asian Paleoanthropology (3)

Neogene-Quaternary paleoenvironmental reconstructions; human evolution in East Asia during the Pleistocene; Out of Africa I; modern human origins. Pre: sophomore standing, recommend 310, or consent. (Alt. years)

ANTH 461 Southeast Asian Archaeology (3)

Prehistory and protohistory of Southeast Asia and of Southeast Asian contacts with East Asia, India, Australia, and Oceania. Pre: junior standing or consent

ANTH 462 East Asian Archaeology (3)

Prehistory and protohistory of China, Japan, and Korea from earliest human occupation to historic times. Geographical emphasis may vary between China and Japan/Korea. Pre: junior standing or consent.

ANTH 463 Anthropology of Global Health and Development (3)

Seminar explores the definitions and histories of development and global health initiatives in developing countries from an anthropological perspective. Reading materials include scholarly and popular texts that propose and critique solutions to global poverty. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 152 or 301. (Alt. years: spring)

ANTH 464 Hawaiian Archaeology (3)

Archaeological perspective in Hawai‘i’s past; origins of Hawaiians; early settlement and culture change; settlement patterns and material culture; historic sites preservation. Pre: junior standing and consent.

ANTH 465 Science, Sex, and Reproduction (3)

Explores anthropology’s critical analysis of approaches to reproductive health and procreation, primarily in developing countries. Examines sex and reproduction as sites of intervention from public health, development, and biomedical specialists, while also considering local strategies. A-F only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 152 or 301 or WS 151. (Alt. years: Fall) (Cross-listed as WS 465)

ANTH 466 Quantitative Archaeology (4)

Combined lecture/lab. Introduction to the basic principles of statistics as applied to the analysis of archaeological data. Exploratory data analysis approach. A-F only. ANTH majors only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 210. (Alt. years)

ANTH 467 Biomedicine and Culture (3)

Examination of the social and cultural foundations of, and responses to, the values, technologies and practices of modern medicine. Pre: junior standing or higher, 152, or consent. (Alt. years)

ANTH 471 Field Mapping (3)

Techniques for field measurement and recording of cultural and physical data. Field sketching, Brunton surveying, plane table mapping, oblique photo compilation, topographic mapping, and representation of field data. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as GEOG 472)

ANTH 472 Ceramic Analysis in Archaeology (3)

Concepts, methods, and approaches used in the analysis of ancient pottery. Emphasis placed on ceramic technology, stylistic analysis. Pre: 210.

ANTH 473 Lithic Artifact Assemblage Analysis (4)

Combined lecture/lab on the manufacture and analysis of stone tools. Students work with experimental collections and engage in stone tool production. The ways in which lithics enlighten us about past human behavior are discussed. Pre: 210 and 380, or consent.

ANTH 475 Faunal Analysis in Archaeology (3)

Analysis of archaeologically recovered faunal collections with emphasis on identification and interpretation of nonhuman vertebrate remains. Pre: 210.

ANTH 477 Spatial Analysis in Archaeology (3)

Lecture/lab. Introduction to the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and spatial statistics in archaeological research. Topics include: map creation; spatial database management; spatial analysis; image processing, data reporting; and data display. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 466. (Alt. years)

ANTH 478 New World Rituals and Ideologies (3)

Study of cross-cultural patterns in ritual behaviors and creolization of African, indigenous, and Iberian ideological frameworks in the Americas. Topics may include syncretic religions (voodoo, candomble), Andean Christianity, spiritual conquest, conceptions of death, etc. Sophomore standing or higher. Minimum C- required grade for prerequisites. Pre: LAIS 360, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as LAIS 478 and REL 478)

ANTH 481 Applied Anthropology (3)

The application of anthropological methods and concepts to solving practical human problems such as homelessness, domestic violence, maternal morbidity, conflict over resources, and the loss of indigenous languages. Includes a significant service-learning component. Pre: 152.

ANTH 482 Anthropology and the Environment: Culture, Power, and Politics (3)

Investigates environmental problems from an anthropological perspective, and examines the cultural politics of contestations over resources, rights, and the meanings of nature. Pre: 152 or 415 or consent. (Alt. years)

ANTH 483 Japanese Culture and Behavior (3)

Sociocultural factors in Japanese behavior. Social structure; traditional institutions

ANTH 484 Japanese Popular Culture (3)

Explores contemporary Japanese popular culture through themes such as gender, consumerism, globalization and nostalgia. Rather than a survey of popular culture genres, the course is organized thematically around issues and problematics.

ANTH 485 Pre-European Hawai‘i (3)

Pre-European society and culture from an anthropological viewpoint. Pre: junior standing or consent.

ANTH 486 Peoples of Hawai‘i (3)

Critically examines the historical and contemporary experiences of various people of Hawai‘i and utilizes anthropological and ethnic studies approaches to study identity, race, ethnicity, culture, language, gender, sex, class, land, and residence. Pre: junior standing or
consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ES 486)

ANTH 487 Anthropology of Okinawa and Its Diaspora (3)

Explores the ties of identity that exist within and between Okinawa and its diasporic populations. Pre: 152. (Alt. years)

ANTH 488 Chinese Culture: Ethnography (3)

Critical interpretations of ethnographic and biographic texts depicting individual and family lives in different socioeconomic circumstances, geographical regions, and historical periods of modern China.

ANTH 490 History of Anthropology (3)

Development of anthropological ideas, focusing on theoretical issues concerning culture, society, and human nature. Required of majors. Pre: 152.

ANTH 491 Special Topics in Southeast Asian Art History: Monuments and Nationalism in Southeast Asia (3)

Focused study of particular periods, regions and critical themes in Southeast Asian art and architectural history. Monuments and nationalism in Southeast Asia. A-F only. Pre: ART 175, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ART 490D)

ANTH 493 Oral History: Theory and Practice (3)

Literature and methodology; project design. Students develop and execute an oral history project. Junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 493)

ANTH 495 Senior Thesis I (3)

Preparation of a major paper in anthropology with a committee of one chairperson and one other. First semester of a two-semester sequence with 496. May be taken concurrently with 496. Optional for majors. Pre: 490 and senior standing.

ANTH 496 Senior Thesis II (3)

Preparation of a major paper in anthropology with a committee of one chairperson and one other. Second semester of a two-semester sequence with 495. May be taken concurrently with 495. Optional for majors. Pre: 490 and senior standing.

ANTH 500 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1)

ANTH 601 Ethnology (3)

Survey, in historical perspective, of theory in social and cultural anthropology, from the origin of anthropology to 1976. A course in the graduate core of anthropology. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 602 Linguistic Anthropology (3)

Investigation of mutual influences of linguistic theory and methodology and anthropological theory and methodology. A course in the graduate core of anthropology. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 603 Archaeology (3)

Development of critical and analytical skills in assessment of archaeological literature; emphasis on the science, theory, explanation, and paradigms that comprise archaeology. A course in the graduate core of anthropology. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 604 Biological Anthropology Core (3)

Human evolution and human variability in extant and previously existing populations; emphasis on history of physical anthropology, evolutionary systematics, primate biology and behavior, paleontology, anthropological genetics, climatic adaptation, growth, and nutrition. A course in the graduate core of anthropology. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 605 Discursive Practices (3)

Emphasizes linguistic, semantic, and interactional aspects of culture, exploring ways that discourse constructs social action and social realities, examining processes by which culture is produced as meaningful behavior in actual situations. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 606 Anthropology of Infectious Disease (3)

The role of human behavior, including its social and cultural determinants, in understanding the distribution of infectious diseases and in shaping preventive and therapeutic strategies. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 607 The Media and Discursive Practice (3)

Role of the mass media in constructing meaning in social cultural processes such as nationalism, ritual, identity, and collective memory. Attention to interactional and post-structural theories of discourse that link the mass media to discursive practice. A-F only.

ANTH 608 History and Memory (3)

History and collective memory as culturally formed and politically contested realities. The role of narrative, ritual, and media technologies in shaping representations of the past. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 610 Cultural Geographies of Tourism (3)

Social and cultural analysis of tourism practices, with emphasis on Hawai‘i, Asia and the Pacific. Tourism in relation to consumer culture, transnational flows of people and images, post-colonial politics, performance and identity formation. (Cross-listed as GEOG 610)

ANTH 611 Contemporary Anthropological Theory (3)

Graduate seminar that examines the history of theory in sociocultural anthropology from 1960 to present. Designed to be taken in sequence after 601. Pre: 601 or concurrent. (Once a year)

ANTH 620 (Alpha) Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3)

Major theoretical problems in (B) kinship; (C) cognitive systems; (D) religion; (E) political institutions; (F) law and social control; (G) economics; (H) ecology; (I) other to be announced. Repeatable nine times. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 623 Advanced Pacific Islands Archaeology (3)

Advanced theoretical and methodological examination of archaeological research in Oceania, a region including the islands of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. (Fall only)

ANTH 640 (Alpha) Methods and Theory in Archaeology (3)

Focused seminars pertaining to distinct areas of archaeological method and theory. (B) analytical; (C) environment/landscape; (D) applied archaeology; (E) economic/resources; (F) survey/locational. Repeatable two times. Pre: 603.

ANTH 645 Historic Preservation (3)

Federal, state, and local laws and regulations that regulate and provide protection to significant archaeological and historical resources in Hawai‘i and the region. (Alt. years: spring only) (Cross-listed as AMST 645).

ANTH 659 Advances in Extinctions (3)

To delve deeply into the primary literature that focuses on the subjects of extinction and conservation broadly speaking, with particular emphasis on the 6 mass extinction events, including the Anthropocene. (Alt. years)

ANTH 660 Paleoanthropology of Asia (3)

Survey of the Asian paleoanthropological record, particularly in its paleoenvironmental setting; Out of Africa I; modern human origins. Pre: graduate standing and relevant background in anthropology or related field. (Alt. years)

ANTH 661 Archaeological Perspectives on Southeast Asia (3)

Prehistory and protohistory of Southeast Asia, and of Southeast Asian contacts with East Asia, india, Australia, and Oceania. Pre: background in archaeology or Southeast Asian history or consent.

ANTH 663 Anthropology of Global Aid (3)

Examines ideologies of development, humanitarian, and global health interventions from an anthropological perspective. Explores the disjuncture between discourses that portrays global aid as easing suffering and those that accuse it of maintaining relationships of domination. A-F only. (Alt. years: spring)

ANTH 666 Archaeological Data Analysis (4)

Advanced introduction to the fundamental principles of statistics as applied to the analysis of archaeological data. (Alt. years)

ANTH 667 Biomedicine and Culture (3)

Examination of the social and cultural foundations of, and responses to, the values, technologies, and practices of modern medicine. Pre: graduate standing. (Alt. years)

ANTH 668 Archaeology Field Methods (V)

(5 7-hr Lab) Laboratory and field training in the principles and practice of methods of archaeology—survey, mapping, excavation, conservation. Repeatable one time, up to 12 credits. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 670 Applied Archaeology Practicum (V)

Applies course work in archaeology to handson activities under the direction of practicing professionals and university faculty. MA track in Applied Archaeology students only. Repeatable one time, up to 12 credits. Pre: consent.

ANTH 671 Applied Method and Theory in Hawaiian Archaeology (3)

Graduate seminar focused on method and theory in the practice of applied archaeology in Hawai‘i. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Alt. years)

ANTH 676 Recording Historic and Cultural Resources (3)

Techniques in recording and evaluation of historic buildings and other resources, with an emphasis on field recordings and state and federal registration procedures. (Cross-listed as AMST 676 and PLAN 676)

ANTH 681 Applied Cultural Anthropology (3)

Theory, methods, and results of application of cultural anthropological concepts to practical problems. Graduate students only.

ANTH 682 Applied Cultural Anthropology Practicum (3)

Applies course work in cultural anthropology to hands-on activities under the direction of practicing professionals and university faculty. Repeatable one time. ANTH majors only. Graduate students only. Pre: 681.

ANTH 695 Professional Skills Develop in Anthropology (3)

Seminar prepares graduate students for entry into profession, including employment
opportunities, research, presentations, ethics and outreach. Required of all Plan B students. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 699 Directed Reading or Research (V)

Repeatable nine times, up to 12 credits. Pre: graduate standing and consent.

ANTH 700 Thesis Research (V)

Research for master’s thesis. Repeatable nine times, up to 12 credits.

ANTH 710 Seminar in Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology (3)

Ethnographic research methods. Introduction to the approaches and techniques of participatory research, including the collection, analysis, and interpretation of social and
cultural data. Politics and ethics of research practice. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing in anthropology or consent.

ANTH 711 Seminar in Research Design and Proposal Writing (3)

Research design and proposal writing. For students preparing for advanced research. Pre: graduate standing and consent.

ANTH 720 Anthropology of Japan (3)

Japan examined through three dimensions of cultural anthropology: cultural/symbolic, social/organizational, and individual/psychological. Selected topics analyzed and interpreted in terms of conjunctions of these dimensions. Pre: 483 or 484.

ANTH 750 (Alpha) Research Seminar (3)

Selected problems in current research. (B) archaeology; (C) medical; (D) ethnography; (E) social; (G) biological. Repeatable nine times. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Research for doctoral dissertation. Repeatable nine times.

COM 201 Introduction to Communication (3)

An overview of communication emphasizing intercultural, organizational and international communication and media arts with introduction to multimedia, ICTs, and public relations perspectives.

COM 310 Media Arts (3)

Combined lecture discussion on theories and criticism of visual media, covering aesthetic development and delivery through multimedia and cinematic principles. A-F only. Pre: 201 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 320 Communication and Communities (3)

Combined lecture-discussion on communication within organizational communities and between organizations and their communities with attention to intercultural issues in local, global, and online interactions. Pre: 201 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 325 Communicating Sustainability (3)

Application of scientific communication theory, strategic communication, and multimedia techniques to select issues of environmental sustainability. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 201 or consent. (Crosslisted as SUST 325)

COM 330 Information and Communication Technology Concepts (3)

Combined lecture discussion on basic technical concepts related to ICTs embedded in sociocultural context. Pre: 201 (or concurrent) or consent

COM 331 Techniques of Video and Digital Cinema (3)

Orientation to techniques of production. Emphasis on history, language, and theory of the creative process and application to video productions and multimedia. Pre: 310 or consent.

COM 337 Techniques of Multimedia (3)

Combined lecture-lab providing an orientation to, and examination of, procedures and techniques of multimedia. Emphasis on new media literacy, human computer interaction, and basic design of electronic multimedia. Pre: 310 or consent.

COM 339 Public Relations Writing (3)

Enhance students’ professional writing skills in the contemporary public relations field and equip students with the foundations of essential techniques for persuasive communication. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 201 (with a minimum grade of B).

COM 340 Intercultural Communication (3)

Problems and opportunities of communication in a variety of intercultural contexts. Focus on theory, research, and managing intercultural effectiveness. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 350 Mediated Interpersonal Communication (3)

Theory and practice of interpersonal communication from a social science perspective. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 355 Digital Cultures (3)

Introduction to the social, cultural, and ethical implications of information and communication technologies by studying new and emerging media including games, interactive media, and virtual worlds. COM majors or consent. Pre: 330.

COM 390 (Alpha) Journalism/Communications Workshops (V)

Short-term intensive workshops in journalism and mass communication skills and projects. (B) workshop in new media; (C) workshop in reporting; (D) workshop in editing; (E) workshop in broadcast journalism; (F) workshop in public relations. Repeatable in different alphas up to 6 credits. COM or JOUR majors only. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as JOUR 390)

COM 392 Emerging Topics in Communication (3)

Emerging communication topics of interest to faculty and students. Repeatable one time on different topics, up to six credits. COM majors only. A-F only.

COM 401 Survey of Inquiry Methods in Communication (3)

Exploration of quantitative and qualitative research methods commonly used in communication studies and related professional work. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 420 Communication in Multicultural Organizations (3)

Cultural diversity in multicultural and multinational organizations is examined regarding communication-related aspects of working life. Pre: 320 and 340, or consent.

COM 421 Public Relations Strategies (3)

Practice and effects of public relations. Strategic management, techniques, new communication technologies, diverse publics, ethics, and social responsibility will be emphasized. A-F only. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 422 Public Relations Campaigns (3)

Synthesizing and applying the principles and techniques of public relations to create comprehensive campaigns. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 421 or consent.

COM 425 Filming Social Change (3)

Introduction to visual documentary theory and methods. Basic instruction in using digital video technology and hands-on production to tell visual stories and examine social issues related to diverse peoples, cultures, and communities through video projects. A-F only. Pre: one DH or DS course, or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 425)

COM 431 Studio Production (3)

Studio production ranging from three-camera studio production to broadcast and magazine show formats to on-line web production. Fundamental knowledge of lighting, sound, blocking, and equipment competency. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 432 Social Media (3)

Combined lecturediscussion on situated use of ICTs in various personal and institutional settings. A-F only. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 433 Video Scriptwriting (3)

Application of communication theory to creating and revising commercial and dramatic script material for video production. Pre: 331 or consent.

COM 436 Media Effects (3)

Social, political, economic, and cultural effects of broadcast media are examined to understand their impact on human behavior. Pre: COM major and junior standing, or consent.

COM 438 Telecommunication in the Pacific Hemisphere (3)

Development of international telecommunication, with special emphasis on the evolution of wireless communication and the internet. A-F only. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 444 Communication and Gender (3)

Theories, myths, and the missing links in gendered communication. Application of established and emerging theories of gender and communication to interpersonal, organizational, intercultural, and mass communication. Pre: COM major and junior standing, or consent.

COM 451 Communication and Law (3)

Role of communication in the legal process; impact of law on communication processes. Pre: COM/JOUR major and junior standing, or consent. (Cross-listed as JOUR 365)

COM 452 Building Communication Theory (3)

Major theories of communication in terms of requirements for a theory, theory development, associated research, and application. Pre: COM major and junior standing, or consent.

COM 459 Special Topics (3)

Topics of interest to faculty and students; taught by regular and visiting faculty. Repeatable on different topics to six credit hours. COM majors only. Pre: COM/JOUR major and junior standing, or consent. (Cross-listed as JOUR 459)

COM 460 Media Ethics (3)

Ethics and social responsibility for media professionals. Application of ethical theories and principles to case studies and research projects. COM and JOUR majors only. (Cross-listed as JOUR 460)

COM 465 Political Communication in the Digital Era (3)

An examination of how various aspects of digital media platforms, such as affordances and communication processes impact political outcomes. COM majors or consent. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: 201. (Fall only)

COM 475 Global Communication (3)

Problems and opportunities of communication in a variety of international contexts. Focus on commerce, diplomacy, and mass communication. COM majors only. Pre: COM/JOUR major or consent. (Cross-listed as JOUR 475)

COM 476 Capstone in Digital Cinema Production (3)

Creating, scripting, and producing complex programs. Media aesthetics and professional production, preparation, and execution are emphasized. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 and 320 and 330 and 331, or consent.

COM 477 Capstone in Interactive Multimedia Design and Development (3)

Design, development, and evaluation of interactive computer-based multimedia communication. Emphasizes authoring and production of such multimedia elements as fullmotion images, audio, and graphics. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 and 320 and 330 and 337, or consent.

COM 478 Capstone in Communication in Communities (3)

Synthesize knowledge, apply research findings in service to community, and develop proposal for intervention or campaign. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 and 320 and 330; and 340 or 421; or consent.

COM 479 Capstone Project in ICTs and Policy (3)

Focus on specific ICT and policy problems related to Hawai‘i and the Asia-Pacific region. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 and 320 and 330; and 432 or 438; or consent.

COM 480 Communication Seminar (3)

Application of theoretic and methodological criteria to researchable questions. Topics will vary. Pre: 201 and senior standing, or consent.

COM 489 Communicating Creativity (3)

The role of communication in fostering or inhibiting creativity. Exploration of theoretical bases for shared scientific or artistic creativity in communication research. COM major or consent. Pre: 201 and senior standing, or consent. (Once a year)

COM 490 Senior Thesis Project (3)

Completion of the thesis project appropriate to the selected area of concentration within the context of a seminar. Emphasis on ongoing process of writing, editing, review, and revision. Pre: COM major and senior standing, or consent.

COM 495 (Alpha) Communication Internship (V)

Application of communication skills and knowledge. (B) community setting; (C) School of Communications activity. Under faculty supervision, interns participate in operations of an organization and analyze communication processes and effects. Maximum of three credits per semester; six credits total toward major; each alpha repeatable up to three credits. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 499 Special Problems (V)

Independent study of selected topics under faculty supervision. Repeatable up to three credits. Pre: COM major and junior standing, or consent.

COM 500 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1)

COM 611 Communication Theories (3)

Systematic study of major theories of communication and current status of communication research.

COM 612 Communication Inquiry (3)

Introduction to inquiry and the array of quantitative and qualitative research methods commonly used in communication.

COM 623 Strategic Organizational Communication (3)

Theories, concepts, and applications of strategic communication and public relations to achieve organizational goals. Pre: 611 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 633 Information and Communication Technologies (3)

Information and communication technologies, structures, processes, and networks as an area of research and study in the social sciences. Pre: 611 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 634 Social Media (3)

Systematic study from a social science perspective of current and emerging social media. Attention to user needs and impact. Pre: 612 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 643 Intercultural Communication (3)

Problems and opportunities of intercultural communication from theory and research, consulting and training, and policy and program perspectives. Pre: 611 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 644 Global Communication and Journalism (3)

Analysis of the emerging global media landscape as digital technologies enable the sharing of news, information, and commentary across geographical and cultural borders. Focuses on causes, characteristics, and consequences. Pre: 612 (or concurrent).

COM 646 Intervention in Multicultural Organizations (3)

Describes the array of communication-related intervention programs designed to enhance effectiveness in multicultural organizations at home and abroad. A-F only. Pre: 623 or 643 or consent.

COM 660 ICT Policy and Planning (3)

Processes and methods of planning appropriate to the information and communication sectors, including future economic, social, political, technical, and environmental perspectives. Pre: 611 (or concurrent) or consent. (Cross-listed as PUBA 628)

COM 691 Communication Topics (3)

Coverage in depth of some area of theory and research. Repeatable one time. Pre: 611 or consent.

COM 692 Communication Research Seminar (3)

General research seminar in communication. In-depth coverage of specific research methods to develop, refine, or interpret graduate students’ thesis or dissertation projects. COM, CIS majors only. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: 611 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

COM 695 Communication Practicum (V)

Supervised work experience, study of an organization, and career planning. Required of Plan B students in the main communication program. Repeatable up to six credits. CR/NC only. Pre: 611 and 612, or consent.

COM 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Individual reading and/or research. Repeatable up to six credits. Pre: consent.

COM 700 Thesis (V)

Repeatable up to six credits. Pre: 611 and 612, or consent.

CUL 609 Faculty Seminar Series (1)

Seminar consists of a series of presentations by certificate faculty on topics of ongoing research. Presentations will open current debates about theory and method in cultural studies. Repeatable one time. A-F only.

CUL 610 International Cultural Studies: History and Theory (3)

Seminar on the history and theory of interdisciplinary cultural studies. The politics of culture are examined in comparative perspective, focusing on their significance for identity formation, intercultural relations, and global flows of images, people and capital. Approaches to the study of media and popular culture are taken up in terms of their relevance for contemporary issues, especially in Hawai‘i and the Asia/Pacific/U.S. region. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Fall only)

CUL 750 International Cultural Studies: Research Project (3)

Directed reading and research culminating in a project that engages issues in international cultural studies. Types of projects include scholarly essays, community-based projects, performances or exhibitions. Written statement of purpose and selfevaluation required. A-F only. Pre: 609 and 610.

ECON 120 Introduction to Economics (3)

One semester survey of the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics to enable students in all disciplines to understand current economic events.

ECON 130 Principles of Microeconomics (3)

Examination of the decision-making process of both households and firms. Analysis of the functioning of a competitive market system, using supply and demand models and the role of government in cases where the market system fails. Additional topics include the effects of international rate on the welfare of a nation and the effects of different competitive market structures on society.

ECON 130A Principles of Microeconomics (3)

Examination of the decision-making process of both households and firms. Analysis of the functioning of a competitive market system, using supply and demand models and the role of government in cases where the market system fails. Additional topics include the effects of international rate on the welfare of a nation and the effects of different competitive market structures on society.

ECON 131 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

An introduction to macroeconomics–the study of the overall economy. Topics include the determination of national income, causes and effects of inflation, unemployment, and income inequality; causes and consequences of international differences in economic growth; sources of business cycle expansions and contractions; role of government policy in stabilizing the economy and promoting long-term growth; financial markets and monetary policy; taxes, spending, consequences of budget deficits, determination of trade imbalances, exchange rate fluctuations, and balance of payment crises.

ECON 131A Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

An introduction to macroeconomics–the study of the overall economy. Topics include the determination of national income, causes and effects of inflation, unemployment, and income inequality; causes and consequences of international differences in economic growth; sources of business cycle expansions and contractions; role of government policy in stabilizing the economy and promoting long-term growth; financial markets and monetary policy; taxes, spending, consequences of budget deficits, determination of trade imbalances, exchange rate fluctuations, and balance of payment crises.

ECON 256 Data Analysis and Visualization (3)

Develops basic techniques of data analysis and visualization. Introduces sources of economic data; methods of preparing data from various file/data formats for analysis; methods of visualization: bubble plots, scatterplot matrices, heatmaps, hexbins, rug plots, etc. A-F only.

ECON 300 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)

Develops basic techniques and fundamental concepts used to study the overall macroeconomy and policies that affect it. Study the determinants of national income and long-run growth; causes and consequences of unemployment, inflation, and business cycle fluctuations; determination of foreign exchange rates and current account imbalances, and the role of government policy in various settings. Pre: 131 or consent.

ECON 300A Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)

Develops basic techniques and fundamental concepts used to study the overall macroeconomy and policies that affect it. Study the determinants of national income and long-run growth; causes and consequences of unemployment, inflation, and business cycle fluctuations; determination of foreign exchange rates and current account imbalances, and the role of government policy in various settings. Pre: 131 or consent.

ECON 301 Intermediate Microeconomics (3)

Develops basic techniques and fundamental concepts of microeconomic theory. Learn to use economic reasoning to understand the social consequences of decisions made by individual consumers, producers, and governments. Analyze the nature of market outcomes under alternative market structures, and further discuss possible welfare-improving government policies when markets fail to be efficient. Special attention is paid to the analysis of strategic behavior and markets with public goods and externalities. Pre: 130 or consent.

ECON 301A Intermediate Microeconomics (3)

Develops basic techniques and fundamental concepts of microeconomic theory. Learn to use economic reasoning to understand the social consequences of decisions made by individual consumers, producers, and governments. Analyze the nature of market outcomes under alternative market structures, and further discuss possible welfare-improving government policies when markets fail to be efficient. Special attention is paid to the analysis of strategic behavior and markets with public goods and externalities. Pre: 130 or consent.

ECON 311 The Economy of Hawai‘i (3)

History of development of Hawaiian economy; current economic problems. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 317 The Japanese Economy (3)

Analysis of Japan’s growth past and present. Does Japan’s economy look different in terms of its international trade structure, industrial structure, labor market, savings patterns, government policies, etc.? Does it matter? Pre: 120 or 130, or consent.

ECON 317A The Japanese Economy (3)

Analysis of Japan’s growth past and present. Does Japan’s economy look different in terms of its international trade structure, industrial structure, labor market, savings patterns, government policies, etc.? Does it matter? Pre: 120 or 130, or consent.

ECON 320 Introduction to Tourism Economics (3)

Examines tourism from an economic perspective. Topics include: the determinants of consumer demand for leisure travel, structure of competition among suppliers of tourism services, benefits and costs of tourism development to the host community, government’s role in the taxation, subsidy, regulation and protection of the tourism industry, tourism’s impact on the environment, and sustainable tourism development. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131; consent. (Cross-listed as TIM 320)

ECON 321 Introduction to Statistics (3)

Basic elements; descriptive statistics, probability, inference, distributions, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation analysis.

ECON 332 Economics of Global Climate Change (3)

Nature and causes of global climate change and economic solutions. Topics include valuing climate change impacts, energy solutions, environmental implications, societal adaptation, and international cooperation. A-F only. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as SUST 332)

ECON 336 Energy Economics (3)

Analysis of economic and policy aspects of energy use, and interactions of markets for various nonrenewable and renewable energy options. Evaluations of policies to develop alternative energy sources. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131. (Cross-listed as PPC 336 and SUST 336)

ECON 340 Financial Markets and Institutions (3)

The determination of asset prices; the risk and term structure of interest rates; efficient markets hypothesis; risk management and financial derivatives, asymmetric information models of financial market structure, innovation, regulation and deregulation; and financial crises. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 341 Comparative Economic History (3)

Comparative historical study of economic ideas and change since around 1700. Considers the histories of capitalism, poverty, industrialization and labor in Europe, Asia, the U.S., and other regions. (Cross-listed as HIST 340)

ECON 342 The History of Economic Thought (3)

Introduces major western economic theorists and ideas since around 1700. Considers the history of views on work, poverty, the market and government, and the relationship of those doctrines to society, philosophy, and public policy. Pre: 130, 131, or HIST 151, or HIST 152; or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as HIST 342)

ECON 350 Sustainable Development (3)

Transdisciplinary introduction to sustainable development. Interactions between environment, economy, and public policy, especially in Hawai‘i. Topics include: curse of paradise, global warming, energy use, health, poverty, population, water resources, traffic congestion, biodiversity, pollution controls. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as SUST 350)

ECON 355 Network Economics (3)

Fundamental questions about the connections in the social, economic, and technological worlds. Topics include: matching markets, traffic, financial and social networks; and the political and economic consequences of the internet and other large networks. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131.

ECON 356 Games and Economic Behavior (3)

Introduces students to the study of strategic behavior with applications to economics, business, and public policy. Simple economic models of strategic decision making are used to analyze provision of public goods; competition, cooperation, and coordination among firms; bargaining between employers and labor unions; international trade negotiations; reputation as a competitive advantage, and others. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 358 Environmental Economics (3)

Nature and causes of environmental degradation/economic solutions, with emphasis on relevant ethical issues and decision-making. Topics include air and water pollution, toxic waste, deforestation, soil erosion, biodiversity, global warming, and sustainable development. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 361 Seminar: Women and International Development (3)

Women’s role, status, work and treatment in the Third World; economic development, changing work/family roles, and improvement/deterioration in gender equity across the Third World; global feminization of poverty; efforts to promote gender equity. Open to non-majors. Pre: a 100 level economics course or any women’s studies course; or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 361)

ECON 362 Trade Policy and Globalization (3)

Political economy of the world trading system. Case studies of trade cooperation and conflict under the World Trade Organization and other institutions. Future challenges, including investment policies, environmental and labor standards. Pre: 120, 130 or 131; or consent.

ECON 362A Trade Policy and Globalization (3)

Political economy of the world trading system. Case studies of trade cooperation and conflict under the World Trade Organization and other institutions. Future challenges, including investment policies, environmental and labor standards. Pre: 120, 130 or 131; or consent.

ECON 390 Internship for Economics (V)

Economics majors and minors work at paid positions with public agencies, private companies, and campus organizations. Students combine academic work with practical experience. Repeatable two times. Pre: consent.

ECON 391 Cooperative Education (V)

Economics majors and minors, under the supervision of faculty members, work at paid positions with public agencies, private companies, and campus organizations. The Econ Co-op integrates academics with practical work experience. Repeatable two times. Pre: consent.

ECON 396 Contemporary Topics in Economics (3)

Economic analysis of current events. Topics announced each semester. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131.

ECON 399 Directed Reading (V)

Economics majors and minors participate in faculty supervised reading of economic literature. Enables students to self-study topics not covered in the department’s scheduled course offerings. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent.

ECON 409 The Ocean Economy (3)

Examination of society’s interaction with the ocean. Topics include: ocean recreation, shipping, boat building, ports, offshore energy production, aquaculture, fishing, coastal construction, and coral reef protection. Pre: 120 or 130, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as SUST 412)

ECON 412 Economic History of the United States (3)

U.S. economy from colonial times: government policies, institutions, industries, financial markets, economic growth, economic crises. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 414 Global Economic Crisis and Recovery (3)

Causes and consequences of financial and economic crises: crisis origins and global transmission; macroeconomic and regulatory policy responses; recovery challenges. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 415 Asian Economic Development (3)

History and economic development. Resources, population, and income, saving, investment, and consumption patterns. Role of government and private enterprise. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 416 The Chinese Economy (3)

The Chinese economy during the imperial and republican periods, under Mao, and into the present reform era, with a brief comparison to Taiwan and Hong Kong. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 418 Pacific Island Economies (3)

Historical and current economic development of the Pacific islands (excluding Hawai‘i). Analysis of selected economic issues such as tourism, population growth, etc. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 420 Mathematical Economics (3)

Mathematical techniques applied to theories of the consumer, the firm, markets. Linear programming, input-output analysis. Pre: 300, 301; MATH 203, MATH 215, MATH 241, or MATH 251A.

ECON 425 Introduction to Econometrics (3)

Regression analysis, analysis of variance, hypothesis testing, problems in estimation of single equation models, simultaneous equation models, problems and methods of estimation. A-F only. Pre: 321 or MATH 241 or BUS 310 or NREM 310 or (MATH 251A and NREM 203) or (MATH 371 and MATH 373) or (MATH 471 and MATH 472); or consent.

ECON 427 Economic Forecasting (3)

Forecasting methods for business and economics with applications to the U.S., Asian, and Hawai‘i economies. Topics include time series modeling of trend, seasonal, and cyclical components, multivariate regression modeling, and forecast evaluation. A-F only. Pre: 321 or BUS 310 or NREM 310 or (MATH 251A and NREM 203) or (MATH 371 and MATH 373) or (MATH 471 and MATH 472); or consent.

ECON 429 Spreadsheet Modeling for Business and Economic Analysis (3)

Introduction to quantitative decision-making methods for effective agribusiness management in resource allocation, scheduling, logistics, risk analysis, inventory, and forecasting. Emphasis on problem identification, model formulation and solution, and interpretation and presentation of results. Pre: 130 or NREM/SUST 220, and 321 or NREM 310; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as NREM 429)

ECON 430 Economics of Human Resources (3)

Economic analysis of labor market. Investment in human capital, education, health, migration, etc. Pre: 301 or consent.

ECON 432 Economics of Population (3)

Determinants and consequences of growth and structure of human populations. Relationships between economic factors and fertility, population growth and economic growth. Pre: 301 (or concurrent). (Cross-listed as GHPS 432)

ECON 434 Health Economics (3)

Private and public demand for health, health insurance, and medical care; efficient production and utilization of services; models of hospital and physician behavior; optimal public policy. Pre: 301 or consent.

ECON 440 Monetary Theory and Policy (3)

Micro-foundations and critical analysis of monetary and macroeconomic theory and policy. Topics include the causes and consequences of inflation, optimal monetary policy and international monetary systems, bank risk and insurance, and national debt and taxation. Pre: 300 or 301 or consent.

ECON 442 Development Economics (3)

Theoretical foundation and empirical evidence for analyzing key issues facing today’s developing world. Topics include characteristics of underdeveloped economies, economic growth, structural change, poverty, inequality, education, population growth, foreign aid and financial sector. Pre: 300 or 301, or consent.

ECON 450 Public Economics (3)

Welfare economics, public expenditure and policy evaluation, public finance by debt and taxes. Pre: 301.

ECON 452 State and Local Finance (3)

Fiscal institutions, operations, and policy questions within state and local governments in U.S. grant programs and other links with central government. Pre: 301.

ECON 458 Project Evaluation and Resource Management (3)

Principles of project evaluation and policy analysis. Shadow pricing, economic cost of taxes and tariffs; public policy for exhaustible, renewable, and environmental resources. Pre: 301. (Cross-listed as SUST 458)

ECON 460 International Trade and Welfare (3)

Theory of international specialization and exchange; general equilibrium, tariffs, quotas, common markets. Pre: 301.

ECON 461 International Macroeconomics (3)

The determination of output, price levels, exchange rates and the balance of payments for economies that are integrated with the global economy; theory and application to historical and/or contemporary policy issues. Pre: 300.

ECON 470 Industrial Organization (3)

Theoretical and empirical analysis of contemporary topics in industrial organization. Uses economic theory to analyze important issues facing firms, and examines the practical challenges of empirical applications of theory. Pre: 301.

ECON 476 Law and Economics (3)

Legal issues of property rights, contracts, torts, and crime. Efficiency of U.S. legal process. Economics of law enforcement, juries, prosecutors; evolution of legal rules. Pre: 301.

ECON 495 Land and Housing Economics (3)

Microeconomics explains urban land and housing phenomena, and analyzes selected land and housing issues relevant to Honolulu. Pre: 301 or consent.

ECON 496 Contemporary Economic Issues (3)

Economic analysis of current events. Topics announced each semester, e.g., environmental pollution, crime control, racial discrimination, traffic congestion. Pre: 300 or 301 or consent

ECON 499 Advanced Directed Research (V)

Economics majors and minors conduct research, under faculty supervision, on a topic of their choice. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: minimum GPA of 3.0 in economics and consent.

ECON 500 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1)

Repeatable unlimited times.

ECON 604 Microeconomics and Policy Analysis (3)

Theory of the consumer, firm, and market. Role of governments and analysis of public policy. Applications to both industrialized and developing countries. Pre: consent.

ECON 606 Microeconomic Theory I (3)

Theory of the firm: production, costs, duality; theory of the market: competition, monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition; theory of the consumer: preferences, expenditures, duality; expected utility theory.

ECON 607 Macroeconomic Theory I (3)

Neoclassical theory of real and monetary equilibrium, economics of J. M. Keynes, standard IS/LM models and aggregate demand/supply analysis in the closed and open economy, theory of rational expectations.

ECON 608 Microeconomic Theory II (3)

General equilibrium analysis: production, consumption and Walrasian equilibria; Pareto efficiency, fundamental theorems of welfare economics; externalities; public goods; game theory; information theory. Pre: 606 or consent.

ECON 609 Macroeconomic Theory II (3)

Models of economic growth and fluctuations; stochastic and dynamic macroeconomic models; econometric testing of rational expectations models; theory of public debt; current topics in macroeconomic theory. Pre: 607 or consent.

ECON 610 Economic Development (3)

Nature and causes of economic growth and structural change. Roles of macroeconomic policy and foreign trade. Pre: 606 and 607, or consent.

ECON 611 Economic Development Policy (3)

Analysis of policies for the promotion of industrial and agricultural development. Project evaluation, industrial regulation, public administration, investment and capital market policies, land-use policies, trade policies, pricing, and stabilization. Pre: 604 or 606; or consent.

ECON 614 Economic Development of Japan (3)

Analysis of growth from Meiji period to present. Problems of population change, capital formation, income distribution, industrial structure. Pre: 610 or consent.

ECON 620 Microeconomic Theory III (3)

Game theory and strategic behavior. Economics of information and incentives principal-agent theory. Economic design. Applications include: theory of contracts; incentive compatible mechanism for provision of public goods; auction theory. Pre: 608 or consent.

ECON 627 Mathematics for Economics (3)

Sets, functions, limits, convexity, continuity; constrained and unconstrained optimization; difference and differential equations; matrix algebra; simultaneous equations; comparative statics; Kuhn-Tucker theory; game theory; mathematical programming.

ECON 628 Econometrics I (3)

Review of probability, estimation, small sample and asymptotic properties. Bivariate and multiple regression and matrix algebra formulation. Regression diagnostics. Introduction to heteroskedastidity, autocorrelation, simultaneity, dichotomous variables, advanced topics.

ECON 629 Econometrics II (3)

Specification, statistical estimation, inference and forecasting of econometric models. Includes advanced topics for single-equation models, pooled models, qualitative dependent variables, simultaneous systems, distributed lags, and time series. Pre: 628, AREC 626, or consent. (Cross-listed as AREC 634)

ECON 635 Disasters and Economic Policy (3)

Economic analysis of disasters. The economics of prevention and mitigation, as well as post-disaster economic consequences and policy, will be examined. Graduate students only.

ECON 636 Renewable Energy Economics and Policy (3)

Analysis of economic and policy aspects of renewable energy use, and interactions of markets for renewable energy and other energy options. Evaluations of policies to develop renewable energy options. Pre: college calculus and principles of microeconomics; or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 636)

ECON 637 Resource Economics (3)

Analysis of problems of development and management of natural resources with emphasis on resources in agriculture and role in economic development. Pre: 608 and 629. (Cross-listed as NREM 637 and SUST 637)

ECON 638 Environmental Resource Economics (3)

Principles of policy design and evaluation for environmental resources management, forestry and watershed conservation, and sustainable economic development. Pre: 604 or 606; or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 638)

ECON 639 Marine Resource Economics (3)

Seminar on the economics of the marine environment. Topics include fisheries management, ocean recreation, shipping, and coral reef protection. Pre: 606 or consent. (Once a year)

ECON 650 Foundations of Public Policy (3)

Microeconomic principles for expenditure and tax policies. Externalities, public goods, non-convexities, regulation; cost-benefit analysis, general equilibrium, shadow-pricing; rent-seeking, corruption; optimal taxation, incidence, excess burden; dynamic public finance, national debt, social security. Pre: 604 or 606; or consent.

ECON 651 Public Economics (3)

Theoretical and empirical analysis of public-sector allocation. Adverse selection, moral hazard, networks, auctions, public choice and political mechanisms; tax and mandate incidence; economics of education and local public goods; social insurance programs. Pre: 606 or consent.

ECON 660 International Trade and Welfare (3)

Classical and new theories of international trade: why nations trade, gains from trade, patterns of trade, and trade policy effects under perfect and imperfect competition. Empirical trade and other special topics. Pre: 606 or consent.

ECON 661 Advanced International Trade and Investment (3)

Surveys theoretical and empirical research on topics such as regionalism and multilateralism, trade and wages, foreign direct investment and multinational firms, trade and the environment, and trade and economic growth. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: 660 or consent.

ECON 662 International Macroeconomics (3)

Advanced international monetary and macroeconomic theory: balance of payments, output, price and exchange rate determination, international aspects of growth and economic fluctuations, alternative exchange rate regimes, international capital flows. Pre: 607 or consent.

ECON 664 Applied International Finance (3)

Surveys empirical research in international macroeconomics, finance and econometric methods: including balance of payments adjustment, international equilibrium, international prices, interest rates and exchange rates, models of exchange rate determination, capital flows, balance of payments crises. Pre: 607 and 629 (or concurrent), or consent. (Fall only)

ECON 670 Labor Economics I (3)

Supply of and demand for labor; implications for labor markets and unemployment level. Pre: 606 or consent.

ECON 672 Economics of Population (3)

Economic determinants and consequences of population change. Pre: consent.

ECON 674 Health Economics and Policy (3)

Economic analysis of health-care policy; efficient design of health-care financing schemes; private and public demand for health, health insurance, and medical care; provider behavior. Pre: 604 (or concurrent) or 606 (or concurrent), or consent.

ECON 686 Strategic Behavior and Experimental Economics (3)

Experimental economics: methodology. Experimental game theory. Market experiments. Applications include: topics in industrial organization, provision of public goods, asset markets, auctions. Repeatable one time. Pre: 606 and 608, or consent.

ECON 696 Advanced Topics in Economics (V)

Reflects interests of visiting and permanent faculty, focusing on specialized methods or topics in economics. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: 606 or 607, or consent.

ECON 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent of department chair

ECON 700 Thesis Research (V)

Research for master’s thesis. Repeatable unlimited times.

ECON 730 Research Seminar (3)

Selected issues emphasizing research techniques. Required for students who have passed the two theory qualifying exams and have not passed the comprehensive exam. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

ECON 732 MA Capstone Research (3)

Student applies theoretical and quantitative techniques, critical thinking, and communicative skills to prepare a written and oral presentation of original research on a topic of his or her choice. A-F only. Pre: 606, 607, 627, 628, and consent of graduate chair.

ECON 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Research for doctoral dissertation. Repeatable unlimited times.

ES 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3)

Basic concepts and theories for analyzing dynamics of ethnic group experiences, particularly those represented in Hawai‘i, and their relation to colonization, immigration, problems of identity, racism, and social class.

ES 101A Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3)

Basic concepts and theories for analyzing dynamics of ethnic group experiences, particularly those represented in Hawai‘i, and their relation to colonization, immigration, problems of identity, racism, and social class.

ES 213 Race, Class, Gender in Popular Culture (3)

Contemporary issues of race, class, and gender in popular culture (film, television, music, social media, sports, etc.). Introduction to critical media analysis and social science theories and methods.

ES 214 Introduction to Race and Ethnic Relations (3)

Race and ethnic relations in world perspective; social, economic, and political problems associated with perception, existence, and accommodation of these groups within the wider society. (Cross-listed as SOC 214)

ES 221 Hawaiians (3)

The sustainable social system, culture, spirituality, language, land stewardship, and governance of Native Hawaiians. Transformation of the sustainable Hawaiian social system by a capitalist economy. Resiliency, land issues, and Native Hawaiian quest for sovereign governance. (Cross-listed as SUST 222)

ES 301 Ethnic Identity (3)

Individual and group problems of identity, identity conflict, culture conflict, inter-ethnic relations. Critical review of available material on Hawai‘i. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 305 African American Experience I (3)

Afrocentric perspective. Analysis of the black political/cultural diaspora, including ancient African kingdoms, the slavery experience, organized resistance, emancipation struggles, the Civil War and Reconstruction. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 306 African American Experience II (3)

Afrocentric sociopolitical analysis. The struggle for freedom: Reconstruction period, reign of terror, intellectual and cultural awakenings, civil rights movements, contemporary issues. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 308 Race, Indigeneity, and Environmental Justice (3)

Introduction to environmental justice, explores the premise that all people have a right to a life-affirming environment. Will examine environmental racism, and the geographical dimensions of race and indigeneity. Pre: one DS or DH course, or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 318)

ES 310 Ethnicity and Community: Hawai‘i (3)

Site visits to museums, social welfare units, etc., as well as guest lecturers from the community including police, health, education. Pre: one DS or DH course. (Summer only)

ES 318 Asian America (3)

History of selected Asian immigrant groups from the 19th century to the present. Topics include: immigration and labor history, Asian American movements, literature and cultural productions, community adaptations and identity formation. Pre: junior standing or higher. (Cross-listed as AMST 318)

ES 320 Hawai‘i and the Pacific (3)

Hawai‘i as part of the Pacific community: selected historical and contemporary problems of Pacific areas; cultural and economic imperialism, land alienation, and the impact of development on Pacific peoples. Pre: one DS or DH course. (Cross-listed as SUST 321)

ES 330 Japanese in Hawai‘i (3)

Issei roots in Japan; the role of Japanese in labor, politics, and business; sansei and perspectives on local identity and culture. The Japanese in light of changing economic, social, and political conditions in Hawai‘i today. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 331 Chinese America: History, Politics, and Representation (3)

Ethnohistorical and contemporary view of the experiences of the Chinese in Hawai‘i and the U.S. mainland; specific roles and contributions; immigration, social organization, and identity. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 333 Filipinos in Hawai‘i (3)

Historical and contemporary experiences; immigration; traditional culture and values; plantation experience; labor organizing; development of Filipino community; racism; discrimination; and ethnic identity. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 338 American Indian Experience (3)

Provides a comprehensive look at the indigenous foundation of life and society in the Americas and elaborates on historical and contemporary importance of American Indian rights issues. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 339 South Asian Migrants: Culture and Politics (3)

Historical and contemporary experiences of South Asian migrants in North America, Pacific, Caribbean, and/or African diasporas; causes and patterns of migration, inter-ethnic relations policies; role of race, gender, culture in community, identity formation. A-F only. Pre one ES or WS course in the 100, 200 or 300 level; or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as WS 339)

ES 340 Land Tenure and Use in Hawai‘i (3)

Dynamics of change: indigenous Hawaiian land tenure; Great Mahele and Kuleana Act; ethnic succession of land ownership; concentration of ownership today; effects of land development on ethnic communities. Pre: one DS or DH course. (Cross-listed as SUST 341)

ES 350 Economic Change and Hawai‘i’s People (3)

Hawai‘i’s economic transformation from sustainable communal subsistence through mercantile capitalism, plantation capitalism, and global finance capital and impact on its people. Alternative sustainable enterprises for a self-sufficient island economy. Pre: one DS or DH course. (Cross-listed as SUST 351)

ES 360 Immigration to Hawai‘i and U.S. (3)

Historical overview: “push and pull factors”; effect of changing economy; experiences of various ethnic groups; problems of recent immigrants; immigration policies in the U.S. and Hawai‘i. Pre: one DS course.

ES 365 Pacific/Asian Women in Hawai‘i (3)

Adaptive strategies of Hawaiian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Samoan, and Southeast Asian women in Hawai‘i; feminist anthropological and historical analysis. Pre: one ANTH, SOC, or WS course. (Cross-listed as WS 360)

ES 370 Literatures of Hawai‘i (3)

Writings of various ethnic groups in Hawai‘i, ancient to contemporary. Songs, stories, poetry, fiction, essays that illustrate the social history of Hawai‘i. Pre: one ENG DL course or consent. (Cross-listed as ENG 370)

ES 372 Asian American Literature (3)

Basic concepts and representative texts for the study of Asian American literature by writers from a variety of backgrounds. Pre: one ENG DL course or consent. (Cross-listed as ENG 372)

ES 373 Filipino Americans: History, Culture and Politics (3)

An introduction to the study of Filipino Americans in the U.S. and the diaspora. The course pays special attention to labor migration, cultural production and community politics. Pre: sophomore standing. (Cross-listed as AMST 373)

ES 375 Issues of Diversity in Higher Education (3)

Examines issues of diversity within higher education. Examines different dimensions of diversity including ethnicity, gender, national origin, age, and sexual orientation. Will utilize national and local case studies. Junior class standing or higher. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 380 Fieldwork in Ethnic Studies (V)

Specialized supervision of individual student research projects in historical, oral history, or contemporary problems. Repeatable to total of 6 credit hours. Pre: consent.

ES 381 Social Movements in Hawai‘i (3)

Role of various contemporary movements for social change in Hawai‘i: community, ethnic, labor, student, etc. Theories of social movements and social change. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 390 Gender and Race in U.S. Society (3)

Historical and sociological studies of race and gender in U.S. society; grassroots feminist and racial/justice activism on the continent and in Hawai‘i. A-F only. Pre: 101 or WS 151 or junior standing. (Cross-listed as WS 390)

ES 391 Oceanic Gender, Sexual, and Kinship Identities (3)

Oceania-centric perspective. Analysis of imperialism, colonialism, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and queer(ed) relations and identities in Hawai‘i and the Pacific. Junior standing or higher. Pre: one DS or DH course, or consent.

ES 392 Change in the Pacific—Polynesia (3)

Impact of cultural and physical change and their interrelationship. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 395 Multiethnic Popular Culture: Hip Hop (3)

Historical, social, cultural, and political aspects of the formation and development of Hip Hop culture in Hawai‘i and other Pacific islands. Special attention to the significance of Hip Hop in facilitating cultural interactions. Junior standing or higher. Pre: one DS or DH course or consent.

ES 399 Directed Reading/Research (V)

Repeatable up to 6 credits. Pre: consent only.

ES 410 Race, Class, and the Law (3)

Historical context and implications of landmark court decisions and legal issues affecting social change in ethnic communities in Hawai‘i and the continental U.S. Pre: one DS or DH course or consent.

ES 418 Women and Work (3)

Gender and racial division of labor nationally and internationally; racial and gender differentials in wages, training, working conditions and unemployment; historical trends and future directions. Pre: one 300-level ES or WS course, or SOC 300; or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 418 and WS 418)

ES 420 American Ethnic and Race Relations (3)

Surveys ethnic and race relations in the U.S. Focus on historical conflicts and critical issues such as racism, immigration, affirmative action, changing economic structures, and the role of government. Pre: one DS or DH course.

ES 422 Mixed Race Identities, Multiracial Experiences (3)

Critically examines historical and contemporary issues surrounding mixed race identities and experiences through themes that resonate in localized contexts within the continental U.S. and Oceania. Pre: one DH or DS course, or consent.

ES 425 Filming Social Change (3)

Introduction to visual documentary theory and methods. Basic instruction in using digital video technology and hands-on production to tell visual stories and examine social issues related to diverse peoples, cultures, and communities through video projects. A-F only. Pre: one DH or DS course, or consent. (Cross-listed as COM 425)

ES 440 Contemporary Diasporas in Comparative Perspective (3)

Compares the circumstances under which contemporary Asian, Pacific Islander, or African migrants form diasporas across the globe; focus on a particular ethnic group to examine its site-specific experiences. A-F only.

ES 443 Filipino Americans: Research Topics (3)

A research seminar on the study of Filipino Americans. Special themes in film/video/media, the performing arts, or literature may be offered. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 401)

ES 455 (Alpha) Topics in Comparative Ethnic Conflict (3)

Causes and dynamics of ethnic conflicts with attention to problem resolution; (B) Middle East; (C) Hawaiian sovereignty in Pacific context. Pre: one DS or DH course, or consent for (C). ((C) Cross-listed as SUST 455)

ES 456 Racism and Ethnicity in Hawai‘i (3)

The historical and contemporary social processes involved in inter-ethnic relations in Hawai‘i. Pre: SOC 300 or one ES 300 level course, or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 456)

ES 460 Global Ethnic Conflict (3)

Ethnic conflicts cause most wars on our globe today. Examines causes of ethnic conflict, including climate change. Will evaluate approaches to building peaceful relations between groups and developing sustainable relationships with the environment. Junior standing or higher. Pre: one DS or DH course or consent. (Crosslisted as SUST 461)

ES 470 Latinx Experience in Hawai‘i (3)

Examines historical, socio-cultural, and contemporary Latinx presence; relations among Latinx, other immigrant, and Indigenous communities; causes and patterns of immigration; racism and discrimination; ethnicity and identity issues; struggles for justice. Pre: one DH or DS course, or consent.

ES 480 Oceanic Ethnic Studies: Theories and Methods (3)

Engagement with theoretical elements and qualitative and quantitative research methods of Oceanic Ethnic Studies: theories of class, race, indignity, migrancy, diaspora and political economy; community-based and participatory research methods. A-F only. Pre: one upper division ES or SOCS course or consent.

ES 486 Peoples of Hawai‘i (3)

Critically examines the historical and contemporary experiences of various people of Hawai‘i and utilizes anthropological and ethnic studies approaches to study identity, race, ethnicity, culture, language, gender, sex, class, land, and residence. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ANTH 486)

ES 492 Politics of Multiculturalism (3)

The development of ethnic relations and political approaches to multiculturalism in two multiethnic nations: Canada and the U.S. A-F only. Pre: SOC 300 or one 300 level ES course, or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 492)

ES 493 Oral History: Theory and Practice (3)

Literature and methodology; project design. Students develop and execute an oral history project. Junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ANTH 493)

ES 495 Hawai‘i’s Labor History (3)

Conditions of work under varying political, social, and economic transformations in Hawai‘i; anthropological, sociological, and historic data. Pre: one DS or DH course or consent.

ES 496 Special Topics in Ethnic Studies (3)

Selected themes in ethnic studies exploring current issues and new topics; taught by regular and visiting faculty. Repeatable two times. Pre: one 300-level DS or DH course.

GEOG 101 The Natural Environment (3)

Introduction to physical geography including weather, climate, vegetation, soils, geology, and landforms. Environmental issues and natural hazards.

GEOG 101L The Natural Environment Lab (1)

A survey of field and laboratory methods commonly used by physical geographers. Pre: 101 (or concurrent).

GEOG 102 World Regional Geography (3)

World’s major cultural regions; geographic aspects of contemporary economic, social, political conditions.

GEOG 104 Digital Earth (3)

Cartographic representation and meaning in a digital age. Earth models, map projections, coordinate systems, scale, distance, and direction. Data types and transformations in graphic and digital representation. Manual, automated, and web-based map making and analysis.

GEOG 151 Geography and Contemporary Society (3)

Elements of economic geography and resource management, population and urban geography; application to current problems of developed and underdeveloped worlds.

GEOG 300 Introduction to Climatology (3)

Elements and controls of climate. World patterns of insolation, temperature, evaporation, precipitation, atmospheric circulation. Climatic classifications. Pre: 101 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200, or consent.

GEOG 302 Global Environmental Issues (3)

Use and abuse of natural resources and humanity’s progress toward developing a sustainable relationship with its supporting environment. A-F only. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as SUST 314)

GEOG 303 General Geomorphology (3)

Introduction to geomorphological concepts, process mechanics, and relationships between forms and processes. Emphasis on various subdisciplines of geomorphology: coastal hillslopes, fluvial, aeolean, and glacial. Pre: 101 and 101L, or GG/ERTH 101 and GG/ERTH 101L.

GEOG 305 Water and Society (3)

Interaction of people with water at household, community, regional, national, and international scales, from cultural, political, economic, and biophysical perspectives. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 315)

GEOG 309 Introduction to Biogeography (3)

Introduction to ecosystem concept; environmental adaptations for energy and nutrient transfer; characteristics, dynamics, productivity, and distribution of principal vegetation communities. Human dominance. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

GEOG 310 Introduction to Planning (3)

Perspectives on planning; planning tools and methods; specific Hawai‘i planning–research problems from a multidisciplinary approach. Pre: junior standing or consent.

GEOG 314 Tropical Agrarian Systems (3)

Analysis of environmental potential and constraints and of spatial organization of economy and society of tropical agrarian systems. Emphasis on change through colonial and post-colonial periods.

GEOG 320 Economic Geography (3)

Examines how factors of production like land, labor and capital; economic activities like consumption, trade, production, and investments; and institutions like state, markets, and corporations alter economic space. A-F only. Pre: 102 or 151. (Fall only)

GEOG 322 Globalization and Environment (3)

Debates on globalization and development, population and resources; root causes of environmental degradation; impacts of globalization on environmentalism and environmental change; social approaches to managing environmental change. Pre: 102, 151, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as SUST 322)

GEOG 324 Geography of Global Tourism (3)

Tourist landscape in relation to resources, spatial patterns of supply and demand, impacts of tourism development, and models of tourist space. Flows between major world regions. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as TIM 324)

GEOG 325 Geography, Environment, and Society (3)

Examines the geography of resources and environmental change with a holistic and multi-scale perspective. Social approaches to resolving environmental problems. (Cross-listed as SUST 326)

GEOG 330 Culture and Environment (3)

Introduction to cultural geography, the cultural landscape, and perceptions of the environment across different cultures. Pre: 102 or 151, or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 330)

GEOG 335 Politics, Nations, and States (3)

Examines the political organization of space in the sovereign state system. Contemporary and historical analyses of boundaries, geopolitics, homelands, nations, nationalism, and territory. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

GEOG 340 Geography of North America (3)

Overview of the physical and cultural geography. Regions and characters. Patterns of population, natural resources, industry, agriculture, and transportation/ communication networks. Pre: 101 or 102 or 151, or consent.

GEOG 352 Geography of Japan (3)

Regional synthesis of physical and cultural features; economic, social, political geography; origins and development of cities.

GEOG 353 Geography of China (3)

Topics: environmental parameters and resource base, ecological control and resource management, institutional and technological transformation of agriculture, industrial potential and industrial location, settlement patterns and rural urban symbiosis.

GEOG 355 Geography of South Asia (3)

Introduction to physical and human geography of India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Himalayan kingdoms. Environmental, economic, social, cultural, and political factors in development.

GEOG 356 Geography of Southeast Asia (3)

An investigation of the development context of Southeast Asia including socioeconomic, cultural, and environmental resources. Problems and prospects for change. (Cross-listed as ASAN 356)

GEOG 365 Geography of the Pacific (3)

Physical character of the Pacific; cultural, political, economic geography of Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia (except Hawai‘i).

GEOG 366 Geography of Honolulu (3)

Development of Honolulu and O‘ahu from 1778. Evolution of function, land use, and social patterns. Contemporary planning and environmental issues arising from urban growth.

GEOG 368 Geography of Hawai‘i (3)

Regional, physical, cultural geography. Detailed study of people and resources.

GEOG 370 UAV and Aerial Photography (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle systems) and the measurement, interpretation, analysis, and use of photography acquired by UAV and other aerial systems.

GEOG 375 Introduction to Cartography and Air Photo (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of cartography: compilation and measurement from aerial photographs, alternate forms of data presentation, symbolism, design, and map projection.

GEOG 376 Map Design and Production (3)

(3 2-hr Lab) Compilation, design and production of maps for presentations, research, and illustration using artists and mapping software. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent.

GEOG 380 Statistical Methods in Geography (3)

Quantitative statistical methods will be explored for describing and interpreting geographic/environmental phenomena. Topics will include data display, measurement, sampling, spatial statistics, dimensional analysis, nonparametric and parametric models. Pre: 101 or 102 or 151 (or concurrent) or consent.

GEOG 388 Introduction to GIS (3)

Design, implementation, and use. Database construction and documentation. Techniques for spatial data manipulation and display. Evaluation of existing systems. Student research projects.

GEOG 389 Geospatial Data Analytics (3)

Display techniques for statistical and terrain data. Cartographic communication models, data models, algorithms and symbol conventions. Techniques for assessing map design. Pre: 380 or SOCS 225 or ECON 321, or consent.

GEOG 399 Directed Reading (V)

Limited to senior majors with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 or a minimum GPA of 3.0 in geography.

GEOG 400 Vegetation and the Climate System (3)

Role of vegetation in the climate system; links to hydrology and biogeochemical cycling; vegetation and climate history; evolution of terrestrial ecosystems; effects of global warming. Pre: 101 or 300 or 401 or 402 or 405 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200 or ATMO 302 or ATMO 303 or ATMO 310, or consent.

GEOG 401 Climate Change (3)

Approaches to the study of past and future climate change. Pre: 101 or 300 or 401 or 402 or 405 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200 or ATMO 302 or ATMO 303 or ATMO 310, or consent.

GEOG 402 Agricultural Climatology (3)

Analyzing climatic data; relation to photosynthesis, phenological development, and crop yields. Crop-weather models as guides to improved land-use planning and agronomic practices. Pre: 101 or 300 or 400 or 401 or 405 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200 or ATMO 302 or ATMO 303 or ATMO 310, or consent.

GEOG 403 Fluvial Geomorphology (3)

Introduction to the single most important geomorphic agent shaping the terrestrial environment. Focus on fluvial process, fluvial dynamics, fluvial landforms, and sediment transport. Pre: 101/101L or 303 or GG/ ERTH 101/101L.

GEOG 404 Atmospheric Pollution (3)

Examination of air quality problems from scientific and policy perspectives. Includes case studies that explore economic, political, technical, and legal aspects of pollution control. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent.

GEOG 405 Water in the Environment (3)

Water fluxes in the environment. Occurrence and movement of water; methods of quantification. Water balance of soil-plant system: precipitation, interception, infiltration, runoff, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. Pre: 101 or 300 or 400 or 401 or 402 or ATMO 101 or ATMO 200 or ATMO 302 or ATMO 303 or ATMO 310, or consent.

GEOG 408 Conservation and Evolutionary Biogeography (3)

Theories and techniques for the analysis of spatial microevolutionary patterns, taught from an interdisciplinary perspective. Examples and readings emphasize Hawai‘i and the Pacific region. Pre: either 309, BIOL 265 or ZOOL 485, or consent. (Alt. years)

GEOG 409 Cultural Biogeography (3)

Coevolution of human societies and plants over the last 10,000 years. Foraging, farming and urban societies economies; spread and modification of selected plants; issues of preservation of genetic resources and traditional plant knowledge. The form and function of gardens. A-F only. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent.

GEOG 410 Human Role in Environmental Change (3)

Human impacts through time on vegetation, animals, landforms, soils, climate, and atmosphere. Special reference to Asian/Pacific region. Implications of long-term environmental change for human habitability. Pre: with a minimum grade of B, one of 101, BIOL 101, BIOL 123 and either 322 or BIOL 310; or consent. (Cross-listed as BIOL 410)

GEOG 411 Past Global Change and the Human Era (3)

Study of past environments to understand present and future global change. Focus on terrestrial Quaternary environments and global processes. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 413)

GEOG 412 Environmental Impact Assessment (3)

Introduction to analytical methods for identifying, measuring, and quantifying the impacts of changes or interventions in resource, human-environment, and other geographic systems. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Alt. years)

GEOG 413 Resource Management (3)

Management of land, water resources, coastal fisheries, forests and agriculture. Focus on problems facing Hawai‘i and the Pacific. A-F only. Pre: junior standing or higher.

GEOG 414 Environmental Hazards and Community Resilience (3)

Investigation of the forces behind natural and technological hazards, and human actions that reduce or increase vulnerability to natural disasters. Junior standing or higher.

GEOG 415 Nature-Based Tourism Management (3)

Principles of nature-based tourism, including a survey of impacts, objectives, planning, and management systems. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 324/TIM 324 or TIM 101. (Cross-listed as TIM 415 and SUST 415)

GEOG 421 Urban Geography (3)

Origins, functions, and internal structure of cities. Problems of urban settlement, growth, decay, adaptation, and planning in different cultural and historical settings. Dynamics of urban land use and role of policies and perceptions in shaping towns and cities. Pre: 102 or 151 or 330, or consent. (Cross-listed as PLAN 421)

GEOG 422 Agriculture, Food and Society (3)

Examines historical and contemporary development of the global agro-food systems. The impacts of technological, political and economic changes to food security, environment and development. Open to non-majors. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 423)

GEOG 423 Marine Policy (3)

Introduction to the law and policies concerning the marine environment, commerce and security. Role of science, law and politics in historical and current policies for maritime trades, navigation safety, marine resources, and marine exploration. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent.

GEOG 424 Regional Analysis (3)

Spatial dynamics and environmental implications of urban and rural development. Concepts of regions, process of regional development, patterns of spatial interaction, and theoretical bases for development strategies; emphasis on Hawai‘i. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent.

GEOG 425 Geographies of Popular Culture (3)

Examines contemporary geographical debates related to concepts of discourse, identity, space/place, power, representation, and popular culture. Considers various landscapes of popular culture and how popular culture mediate a sense of place, geopolitics, and identity formation. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent.

GEOG 426 Environment, Resources and Society (3)

Human interaction with the environment. How market, property institution, and technological change affect the environment. Epistemological basis of environmental policies. Debates on controversial environmental issues. Pre: 102, 151, or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 426)

GEOG 432 Tea and Culture (3)

Examines cultural practices of tea in different parts of the world, focusing on history and culture of tea in China, Japan, and England. Also includes changing technologies and economies of tea worldwide. Junior standing or higher.

GEOG 435 Political Geography of Oceans (3)

The geopolitics of the oceans and the law of the sea as applied to regions of conflict and cooperation in marine resource development and preservation. Focus on Indo-West Pacific, South China Sea, Arctic Ocean. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent.

GEOG 436 Geography of Peace and War (3)

Geographical factors underlying conflict in the world. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as PACE 436)

GEOG 453 Environment and Society in China (3)

Explores the relationship between environment and society in the Chinese society, including both traditional nature-culture connections and modern human-environmental issues. Examines China’s long-range cultural change, environmental transformations, and modern development challenges. Pre: 102 or 151, or consent.

GEOG 468 Topics in Geography (3)

Selected topics in geography not offered in the regular geography curriculum. Pre: 101 or 102 or 151, or consent.

GEOG 470 Remote Sensing (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to the principles of remote sensing and image processing skills. Topics include electromagnetic spectrum, sensors, aerial photo and satellite imagery interpretation, geometric and radiometric correction, digital image processing. Research project, lab. Pre: 370 or consent.

GEOG 471 3D Mapping and Analysis (3)

Environmental mapping and analysis using 3-dimensional geographical data acquired from high resolution remote sensing systems. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Spring only)

GEOG 472 Field Mapping (3)

Techniques for field measurement and recording of cultural and physical data. Field sketching, Brunton surveying, plane table mapping, oblique photo compilation, topographic mapping, and representation of field data. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as ANTH 471)

GEOG 476 Web Mapping (3)

(3 2-hr Lab) Special topics: computer mapping, relief representation, map reproduction methods, use of color, analytic map interpretation, experimental cartography. Pre: consent.

GEOG 489 Advanced GIS Applications (3)

(2 Lec, 1 2-hr lab) Application of GIS technologies to various problems or issues in social, natural, and environmental sciences. Research project, lab. Pre: 388 or consent. (Once a year)

GEOG 490 Senior Thesis (3)

Preparation of research paper under individual faculty supervision. Recommended for admission to graduate program. Pre: senior GEOG major and consent.

GEOG 492 Practicum in Geography (V)

Internship in applied geography under professional and faculty supervision. Field placement integrated with academic study. Repeatable up to six credit hours maximum. Pre: senior major and consent.

GEOG 493 Capstone Undergraduate Seminar (3)

Current and historical geographic literature provides a background for local and global issues. Through discussion, written reviews, and research reports, the geographic perspective in modern life will be explored. Pre: senior GEOG major.

GEOG 499 Directed Research (V)

Geography majors conduct research under faculty supervision on a topic of their choice. Minimum GPA of 3.0 and consent. Repeatable two times, up to six credits. GEOG majors only. Senior standing only.

GEOG 600 Seminar in Climatology (3)

Methods of determining energy budget and water balance; applications in agriculture, hydrology, climatic classifications. Theory of climatic change. Bibliography. Pre: 300 or 400 or 401 or 402 or 405 or ATMO 303 or ATMO 310 or ATMO 320; or consent.

GEOG 610 Cultural Geographies of Tourism (3)

Social and cultural analysis of tourism practices, with emphasis on Hawai‘i, Asia and the Pacific. Tourism in relation to consumer culture, transnational flows of people and images, post-colonial politics, performance and identity formation. (Cross-listed as ANTH 610)

GEOG 618 Human Environment Systems (3)

Role and potential of systems science in analysis of human environment interaction, especially resource management. Framework and methodology for problem structuring; overview of techniques. Pre: graduate standing or advanced undergraduate standing with consent.

GEOG 620 Theories and Policies of Development (3)

Will critically examine what constitutes progress, advancement, or betterment in this highly uneven world, where inter-regional, inter-class, inter-group, and inter-gender differences in development are expanding. Graduate standing only. A-F only. (Fall only)

GEOG 621 Human Geographies of the Ocean (3)

Core course in the ocean studies specialization in human geography introduces graduate students to themes and methods of human geography and cognate fields as applied to the oceans. Repeatable one time with consent.

GEOG 622 Advanced Environmental Impact Assessment (3)

Theory and practice of environmental impact assessment. Policy and planning frameworks supporting environmental assessment in the U.S. and abroad. Cumulative environmental effects and strategic environmental assessment. (Cross-listed as PLAN 622)

GEOG 628 (Alpha) Resource Systems (3)

Resource development and use in a time perspective. Ecological and socioeconomic impacts, concepts, definitions, and methodology. (B) renewable; (C) nonrenewable. Pre: consent.

GEOG 630 Urban and Regional Planning in Asia (3)

Key issues and policies in urban planning, rural-urban relations, rural regional planning, and frontier settlement in Asia and the Pacific. Repeatable one time. (Cross-listed as PLAN 630)

GEOG 633 Seafood in Southeast Asia (3)

Seafood production in Southeast Asia, including both regional fisheries and aquaculture. Case studies used to illustrate challenges to the implementation of sustainable seafood production and emerging approaches, such as community supported seafood. (Cross-listed as ASAN 633)

GEOG 637 Environment and Development (3)

Theories and practice of development; how changing development paradigms shape different ideas concerning the environment and the management of natural resources; emerging debates in development and environment in post-modern era. (Cross-listed as PLAN 637)

GEOG 638 Asian Development and Urbanization (3)

Theories of globalization and sustainability in development, impacts of globalization and sustainability on development planning and policy formation, selected case studies of Asia-Pacific development. Pre: (ASAN 600 or PLAN 630) with a grade of B or above. (Cross-listed as ASAN 638 and PLAN 638)

GEOG 639 Community-based Natural Resource Management (3)

Concepts and theories of community, resource access, and governance. Practical challenges to CBNRM in contemporary political economy. Pre: graduate standing. (Cross-listed as PLAN 639)

GEOG 652 Contemporary Japan Seminar (3)

Selected physical and human features that represent economic, social, and political life of modern Japan. Repeatable with consent of instructor. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 652)

GEOG 654 Seminar in Geography of Southeast Asia (3)

Repeatable with consent of instructor. Pre: consent.

GEOG 665 Seminar in Geography of the Pacific (3)

Investigation of geographic problems of Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia. Repeatable with consent of instructor. Pre: consent

GEOG 680 Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resource Data (3)

The application of geostatistics to estimate spatial dependence to improve soil and regional sampling; provide insight into underlying soil, geographic, and geologic process, and to provide quantitative scaling up of point measurements to fields, regions, and watersheds. State-space modeling also will be included. A-F only. Pre: 388 or ZOOL 631; or consent. (Cross-listed as TPSS 680)

GEOG 692 Faculty Seminar Series (1)

Graduate seminar required of all MA students and recommended for PhD students. Single credit course in which faculty present ongoing research in their fields. Pre: consent. Co-requisite: 695.

GEOG 693 Technology and Natural Risks Methods of Analysis (3)

Survey of tools for evaluating risks to human health from technological and natural hazards. Historical and international context of methods.

GEOG 695 Concepts and Theories in Geography (3)

Concepts, theory, models. Geographic approaches to spatial and environmental problems. Required of entering graduate students unless waived by department. Pre: consent.

GEOG 696 Research Design/Methods in Geography (3)

Elements of research design, practical field experience, exposure to research and ideologies, broad exposure to heritage and ethos of the discipline. Pre: 695.

GEOG 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

GEOG 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

GEOG 703 Geomorphology (3)

Current understanding of geomorphological concepts, processes, and the dynamic relationship between human landscape modification and system response. Pre: consent.

GEOG 710 (Alpha) Special Topics (V)

Study and discussion of significant topics, problems. (B) regional and locational analysis; (C) geography, environment, and culture; (H) Multi-objective decision analysis. Repeatable two times. Pre: 455.

GEOG 720 Critical Resource Geography (3)

Graduate seminar to provide geography students a roadmap through the important literature and research on political economic theories of population, natural, and critical resources. Graduate standing only. A-F only. (Fall only)

GEOG 728 Seminar: Resource Management in Asia-Pacific (3)

Examination of resource management problems in Asia and the Pacific. Problems of resource use—agriculture, forestry, energy, minerals, ocean, air quality. Pre: graduate status.

GEOG 735 Seminar: Political Geography (3)

Topics vary; may include borders, boundaries, geopolitics, homelands, identity politics, nations and nationalism, social categorization, the sovereign state system, territoriality. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Once a year)

GEOG 736 Environmentalism and War in the Pacific (3)

Two forces shape the Pacific: Imperial geopolitical efforts and indigenous environmental knowledge and practices. Analyzes how the ongoing history of war and environmental struggles make and remake the region and the world.

GEOG 750 Research Seminar: Biogeography (3)

GEOG 752 Research Seminar: Resource Management (3)

GEOG 757 Research Seminar: Cultural Geography (3)

GEOG 758 Research Seminar: Conservation (3)

GEOG 761 Research Seminar: Cartography (3)

GEOG 762 Research Seminar: Remote Sensing (3)

GEOG 763 Research Seminar: Agricultural Geography (3)

(Cross-listed as SUST 763)

GEOG 764 Research Seminar: Social Geography (3)

GEOG 766 Society and Space (3)

Advanced seminar on social production of space. Topics include spatial metaphor in social theory; western spatiality from the renaissance through the enlightenment, modernity and post modernity; and geography of the body, home, landscape, and nation. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

GEOG 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

JOUR 150 Journalism and Society (3)

News literacy, and the role of journalism in society–its influence, rights and responsibilities; issues and trends.

JOUR 200 Introduction to Multimedia Journalism (3)

Fundamentals of multimedia reporting: finding and developing story ideas, photojournalism, audio storytelling, design, infographics, and cross-platform digital convergence. A-F only.

JOUR 250 Media Writing (3)

Fundamentals of writing for various news media and public relations; ethics. A-F only.

JOUR 300 Reporting (3)

Theory and practice of information gathering using a variety of primary and secondary sources, finding information online, use of databases and interviews for news stories, with emphasis on writing. JOUR majors only, or consent. A-F only.

JOUR 307 Photojournalism (3)

Production, selection, and use of digital photographs for publications. Storytelling action and feature photography with digital cameras, worked up through Adobe Photoshop and InDesign programs. Students must have a digital camera. A-F only.

JOUR 316 Advanced Editing (3)

Intensive training in editing, planning, and organizing stories and visual elements for publication; news judgment; managing projects. JOUR majors only, or consent.

JOUR 320 Visual Journalism: Multimedia (3)

Fundamentals of visual journalism; visual theory, principles, and tools to create multimedia journalism projects for online, emerging media, and print platforms. JOUR majors only, or consent. A-F only.

JOUR 325 Magazine Writing (3)

Writing nonfiction articles for magazines, newspapers, and newsletters; preparing material for specific audience; marketing articles.

JOUR 327 Interpretive Journalism (3)

Writing articles of news analysis, editorials, and critical reviews. Pre: consent.

JOUR 330 Video Journalism (3)

Fundamentals of video journalism using digital video cameras for writing, reporting, editing, and producing news stories. JOUR majors only, or consent. A-F only.

JOUR 360 Journalism History and Trends (3)

Development of the news media and trends that may affect the future of journalism. Pre: upper division standing.

JOUR 365 Communication and Law (3)

Role of communication in the legal process; impact of law on communication processes. Pre: COM/JOUR major and junior standing, or consent. (Cross-listed as COM 451)

JOUR 385 Practicum (1)

Working on campus student or quasi-professional publications under professional and faculty supervision. CR/NC only. Repeatable up to three credits. Pre: consent.

JOUR 390 (Alpha) Journalism/Communications Workshops (V)

Short-term intensive workshops in journalism and mass communication skills and projects. (B) workshop in new media; (C) workshop in reporting; (D) workshop in editing; (E) workshop in broadcast journalism; (F) workshop in public relations. Repeatable in different alphas up to 6 credits. JOUR or COM majors only. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as COM 390)

JOUR 407 Advanced Photojournalism (3)

Computer experience in the creation, manipulation, and editing of color news, feature, sports, and documentary images. Study of the ethical and legal dimensions of electronic imaging. Pre: 307 or consent.

JOUR 425 Publication Layout and Design (3)

Visual display concepts and procedures for newsletters, brochures, newspapers, magazines. Pre: upper division standing.

JOUR 459 Special Topics (3)

Topics of interest to faculty and students; taught by regular and visiting faculty. Repeatable on different topics to six credit hours. JOUR majors only. Pre: COM/JOUR major and junior standing, or consent. (Cross-listed as COM 459)

JOUR 460 Media Ethics (3)

Ethics and social responsibility for media professionals. Application of ethical theories and principles to case studies and research projects. COM and JOUR majors only. (Cross-listed as COM 460)

JOUR 470 Broadcast Projects/Production (3)

Applied, problem-based application of skills and knowledge of visual story telling to the production of broadcast newscasts. JOUR majors only. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 250, 300, 330; and ICS 101 or ICS 110 or ICS 111 or LTEC 112.

JOUR 471 Advanced Multimedia Journalism (3)

Advanced fundamentals of multimedia reporting, including finding and developing journalistic story ideas, photojournalism, audio storytelling, design, infographics, and cross-platform digital convergence. JOUR majors only. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 250, 300, 330; and ICS 101 or ICS 110 or ICS 111 or LTEC 112. Co-requisite: 470.

JOUR 475 Global Communication (3)

Problems and opportunities of communication in a variety of international contexts. Focus on commerce, diplomacy, and mass communication. JOUR majors only. Pre: COM/JOUR major or consent. (Cross-listed as COM 475)

JOUR 480 Advanced Broadcast News (3)

Intensive experience in field and studio production of television news programs; preparation of form and content; theory, practice and ethical dimensions of planning and producing broadcast news materials. JOUR majors only. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 470. Co-requisite: 481.

JOUR 481 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Journalism (3)

Exploration of the leading edge of the journalistic ideology today as well as a projection of future forms, styles, and strategies. JOUR majors only. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 471. Co-requisite: 480.

JOUR 485 Internship (3)

Internship in media or PR operations under professional and faculty supervision. Repeatable two times. JOUR majors only. CR/NC only. Pre: 300 and 330, or consent.

JOUR 499 Directed Research (V)

Individual research projects. Pre: senior standing and consent of department chair.

PACE 247 Survey of Conflict Management (3)

Survey of contemporary conflict management and resolution: negotiation, mediation, conciliation, ombuds, fact-finding, facilitation techniques, arbitration, and litigation. Pre: any social science 100- or 200-level course or consent.

PACE 280 The Meaning of War (3)

Exploration of ethical questions related to the many facets of war–e.g., patriotism, tribalism, holy war, self-sacrifice, cowardice, media coverage, propaganda, torture, genocide, pillage, suicide tactics, battlefield immunity. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as PHIL 280)

PACE 310 Survey Peace and Conflict Studies (3)

Survey of basic concepts, relationships, methods, and debates in modern peace research and conflict resolution studies. Pre: any social science 100- or 200-level course or consent.

PACE 315 Personal Peace: Stories of Hope (3)

Interviewing, writing, and publishing stories of those who have overcome great difficulties to find personal peace. Pre: grade of B or better in ENG 100 or consent.

PACE 345 Aggression, War, and Peace (3)

Biocultural, evolutionary, and cross-cultural perspectives on the conditions, patterns, and processes of violence, war, nonviolence, and peace. Pre: ANTH 152. (Cross-listed as ANTH 345)

PACE 373 Nonviolent Political Alternatives (3)

Exploration of scientific and cultural resources for nonviolent alternatives in politics. Pre: any 100- or 200-level POLS course; or consent. (Cross-listed as POLS 396)

PACE 399 Directed Reading (V)

Directed reading in peace and conflict resolution. Repeatable three times. Pre: consent.

PACE 407 Peace Processes in Philippines and Hawai‘i (3)

History of Philippine Islam and the Moro struggle, the peace process in Mindanao and sovereignty movement for Hawaiian nation. 75 min. Lec, 75-min. joint online discussion with Philippine students. Junior standing only. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as ASAN 407)

PACE 410 History of Peace Movements (3)

Examination of two centuries of U.S., European, Australian, and Hawaiian peace, thought, and action. Also surveys early Christian and secular attitudes to war. Open to nonmajors. Pre: any DS course, or consent.

PACE 412 Gandhi, King, and Nonviolence (3)

Life and thought of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. Pre: any Social Science 100 or 200 level course, or consent.

PACE 413 Terrorism (3)

Multidisciplinary approach to the origins, dynamics, and consequences of international terrorism, including the psychological, legal, ethical and operational concerns of counterterrorism. Pre: any 200-level DS course, or consent.

PACE 420 Introduction to Human Rights: International and Comparative Perspectives (3)

Introduction to international, regional, and domestic human rights law; comparative perspectives on the theoretical origins of human rights and policy debates on the protection of human rights, dispute resolution, and enforcement mechanisms. Pre: any 100 or 200 level social sciences course, or consent.

PACE 429 Negotiation (3)

Negotiation theory, negotiation skills and application of negotiation in conflict prevention, conflict management and conflict resolution. Pre: any Social Science 100 or 200 level course, or consent.

PACE 430 Leadership for Social Change (3)

In-depth study of current models and emerging theories of ethical leadership in community service; development of tangible leadership skills, including communication, conflict resolution, team-building, and management skills. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: any 200-level DS course.

PACE 436 Geography of Peace and War (3)

Geographical factors underlying conflict in the world. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as GEOG 436)

PACE 447 Introduction to Mediation (3)

Learn the core components of the mediation process and the tools for empowering mediation participants to reach customized resolutions. Emphasis on learning and applying the skills through exercises and mock mediation sessions.

PACE 450 Protest Under Occupation (3)

Explore nonviolent protests when one Independent State controls the territory of another Independent State (or international organization, such as the United Nations), without the transfer of sovereign title. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: any 200-level DS course.

PACE 460 Indigenous Nonviolent Action in the Asia-Pacific (3)

Study of nonviolent methods (i.e., United Nations structures, international law, boycotts, and peaceful protest) used to gain political goals and examines their successes, failures, and the prospects for those that remain ongoing. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: any 200-level DS course.

PACE 468 Introduction to Facilitating Organizational Change (3)

Explores the characteristics of organizations from different perspectives including structural, political, ethical, and cultural frames from organizational theory and practice. Focuses on how to design organizational change strategies and facilitate their implementation. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: any 200-level DS course (with a minimum grade of C+).

PACE 470 Advocating for Children: Rights and Welfare (3)

Multi-disciplinary advocacy for children’s rights and welfare in various social and political systems; the role of families, justice, economics, media, race, culture, environment on policy-making for children. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: any 200-level DS course.

PACE 477 Culture and Conflict Resolution (3)

Conflict resolution techniques for major world culture. Emphasis on cultures of the Pacific Basin, Pacific Islands, and Asia. Pre: any DS course, or consent.

PACE 478 International Law and Disputes (3)

Management, prevention, resolution of international disputes and the role of international law. Pre: any Social Science 100 or 200 level course, or consent.

PACE 480 Managing Human Conflict (3)

Introduction into the field of conflict analysis and resolution through the examination of theory and role-play. Major theories of conflict studies are considered and the forms of conflict resolution, such as negotiation, mediation, and arbitration. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: any 200-level DS course.

PACE 485 Topics in Peace and Conflict Resolution (3)

Recent issues, practices in peace and conflict resolution. Repeatable one time. Pre: any DS course, or consent.

PACE 489 Hiroshima & Peace (3)

10-day intensive course at Hiroshima City University, Japan, in the 2-weeks before the annual August 6 commemoration of the atomic bombing. Home-stay with Japanese family. Sophomore standing. A-F only. Pre: any 200 level social science course, or consent.

PACE 495 Practicum and Internship (3)

The practicum and internship in Peace and Conflict Resolution provides an opportunity for students to apply the skills and concepts learned in earlier courses. Pre: any two other PACE courses or consent. (Cross-listed as PUBA 495)

PACE 621 Environmental Conflict Resolution (3)

Explore how environmental conflicts emerge and the efforts to find common ground for resolution. Examine the issues, debates, and theoretical aspects that help to explain and frame environmental conflict. Graduate students only. (Cross-listed as PLAN 621)

PACE 629 Negotiation & Conflict Resolution (3)

Negotiation as a foundational skill of conflict resolution; mastery of negotiation skills for strategic dispute resolution; non-routine problem-solving, creating partnerships and alliances; crafting optimal agreements. Students participate in simulations and acquire vital leadership skills. Graduate standing only. Pre: one of the following courses: 429, 447, 477, 647, 652, or 668; or PLAN 627; or COMG 455 or SOC 730; or LAW 508; or MGT 660. (Cross-listed as PLAN 629)

PACE 637 Gender: Law and Conflicts (V)

Examines how international law and domestic legal systems address and resolve conflicts regarding women’s rights, gender roles, and gender identity. Takes a comparative approach with emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region. (Cross-listed as LAW 547 and WS 647)

PACE 640 Seminar: Social Studies (3)

Study in trends, research, and problems of implementation in teaching field. Repeatable two times. Pre: teaching experience or consent.(Cross-listed as EDCS 640K)

PACE 647 Mediation: Theory and Practice (3)

Combined lecture, discussion, and mediation simulations. Theory of ADR field. Theory of major different models of mediation, both in the U.S. and internationally. Application of mediation process to categories of disputes, family, workplace, and international. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing, or departmental approval. (Once a year)

PACE 650 Dispute Resolution System Design (3)

Conflict prevention, management and resolution in the workplace. Design and implementation of effective systems integrating ADR and recent advances in dispute resolution methodology to government, health, nonprofit, educational, private sector and other institutions. Pre: graduate standing, or departmental approval.

PACE 652 Conflict Management for Educators (3)

Conflict resolution theory and practice for administrators, faculty and staff in educational organizations. K-12, community colleges and universities. Application and theory of negotiation, mediation, facilitation and hybrid ADR processes. Pre: EDEA 601 or EDEA 650, or consent. (Cross-listed as EDEA 652)

PACE 660 Family Mediation (3)

Theory and skills for practicing divorce and custody mediation. Negotiation and conflict intervention skills used by social workers, lawyers, and other intervenors in family conflict. Focus on Hawai‘i’s divorce and custody laws and practices. Repeatable one time. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: consent.

PACE 668 Facilitation: Facilitating Community and Organizational Change (3)

Advanced conflict resolution course. Covers key issues in the prevention, management and resolution of multiparty conflicts. Combined lecture, discussion, and simulations. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing, or departmental approval. (Once a year)

PACE 690 Topics: Conflict Theory (V)

Recent issues of policy and practice in peace and conflict management theory. Repeatable up to 12 credits. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

PACE 695 Conflict Resolution Practicum (V)

Practice in conflict resolution skills. Open to candidates for Certificate in Conflict Resolution. Repeatable one time or up to three credits. A-F only. Pre: consent.

PACE 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Repeatable up to 9 credits. A-F only. Pre: departmental approval or consent.

PACE 790 Advanced Topics: Conflict Theory (3)

Advanced seminar covering issues of policy and practice in peace and conflict management theory. Repeatable one time. Graduate standing only. Pre: consent.

PLAN 101 Sustainable Cities (3)

How do we plan and design cities to meet our long-term economic and environmental needs? Students will learn how sustainability applies to key urban issues like energy, transportation, land, and food. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 114)

PLAN 301 Survey of Urban Sociology (3)

Urban processes and social problems, such as poverty, crime, racial segregation, homelessness, housing policy, urbanization, and neighborhood ethnic diversity. How places shape identity and opportunity. Research methods applied to communities, places, and neighborhoods of Hawai‘i. Pre: SOC 100 or a 200-level SOC course, or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 301)

PLAN 310 Introduction to Planning (3)

Perspectives on planning; planning tools and methods; specific Hawai‘i planning–research problems from a multidisciplinary approach. Pre: junior standing or consent.

PLAN 399 Directed Reading in Planning (V)

Independent research on topics in urban and regional planning. Pre: 310.

PLAN 412 Environmental Impact Assessment (3)

Introduction to analytical methods for identifying, measuring, and quantifying the impacts of changes or interventions in resource, human-environment, and other geographic systems. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Alt. years)

PLAN 414 Environmental Hazards and Community Resilience (3)

Investigation of the forces behind natural and technological hazards, and human actions that reduce or increase vulnerability to natural disasters. Junior standing or higher.

PLAN 421 Urban Geography (3)

Origins, functions, and internal structure of cities. Problems of urban settlement, growth, decay, adaptation, and planning in different cultural and historical settings. Dynamics of urban land use and role of policies and perceptions in shaping towns and cities. Pre: GEOG 102 or GEOG 151 or GEOG 330, or consent. (Cross-listed as GEOG 421)

PLAN 438 Sustainable Asian Development: Impact of Globalization (3)

Investigates the impact of globalization on sustainable development in Asia. Globalization and sustainability often contradict, raising serious planning issues. Examines how these issues affect Asian development policies and urban planning. Pre: 310 or ASAN 310 or ASAN 312, or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 438)

PLAN 442 Principles of Environmental Management Systems (3)

Introduction to the process of developing Environmental Management Systems that address the principles outlined in ISO14001:2015. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as OCN 442 and TIM 462)

PLAN 449 Asian Cities: Evolution of Urban Space (3)

Reviews the evolution of Asian urban space. Political history, migration, culture, and production are the determinants of urban changes. Uses visual material to illustrate the change in Asian cityscape. Pre: 310 or ASAN 310 or ASAN 312, or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 449)

PLAN 473 GIS for Community Planning (3)

Exploration of geographic information systems (GIS) area analysis techniques for spatial information management in community planning. Students will learn the basic concepts and principles, and practical skills of GIS through lectures, discussions, and labs. Repeatable one time. Junior standing or higher.

PLAN 495 Housing, Land, and Community (3)

Analyzes availability for housing, particularly affordable housing, and its relationship to use of land and building of community. Examines public policies impacting housing, land use, and community development and ways they can be improved.

PLAN 500 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1)

PLAN 600 Public Policy and Planning Theory (3)

Designed to a) impart a historic and comparative perspective on the evolution of urban and regional planning in public policy; b) explore the spatial and built environment dimensions of society, planning and policy; c) assess the justifications for planning and differing processes of planning in the U.S. and AsiaPacific with a focus on the role of the planner in policy formulation and implementation. Graduate students only or with permission. A-F only. Repeatable two times.

PLAN 601 Planning Methods (3)

Introduction of the basic methods in planning, including problem definition, research design, hypothesis testing, statistical reasoning, forecasting and fundamental data analysis techniques required by the planning program and the planning profession. Repeatable one time. PLAN and ARCH majors only. Pre: one of ECON 321, GEOG 380, or SOC 476.

PLAN 602 Advanced Planning Theory (3)

Advanced planning theory for PhD students (others by petition) to prepare for careers in planning education and/or high level professional practice. Covers key contemporary planning policy issues and themes from the perspective of values, explanations of the real world, policy alternatives and implementation. Students must have passed 600 or equivalent (by petition) with a B or better. Repeatable one time. PhD students only or by consent. A-F only. Pre: 600 or consent.

PLAN 603 Urban Economics (3)

Reviews and builds skills in applying basic theories and principles of urban and regional economics in contemporary U.S., Hawai‘i and Asia-Pacific. Repeatable one time. PLAN majors only.

PLAN 604 Qualitative Methods in Planning (3)

Provides a general introduction to qualitative research methods for planning and planning research. Includes data collection methods (focus groups, interviews, ethnography, participant observation, and participatory action research) and various analytic methods and approaches. Graduate standing only.

PLAN 605 Planning Models (3)

Allocation, decision, derivation, and forecasting models used in the analysis of demographic, economic, land use, and transportation phenomena in urban and regional planning. Repeatable one time. PLAN majors only.

PLAN 606 Comparative Planning Histories (3)

Provides students with an overview of the history of urban and regional planning in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, and the role that planning has played in shaping contemporary urban settlements. Graduate standing only. A-F only.

PLAN 607 Introduction to Public Policy (3)

Perspectives on policy analysis; basic approaches to the study of public policy, political economy, and policy evaluation. (Cross-listed as POLS 670)

PLAN 608 Politics and Development: China (3)

Consists of three parts: key theories for socialist transition as basis for seminar discussion, policy evolution to illustrate the radical changes, and emerging and prominent current development and practice. (Cross-listed as ASAN 608 and POLS 645C)

PLAN 610 Community Planning and Social Policy (3)

Social issues and conditions; consequences of social policies experienced by different groups; community social plans and programs organized by various kinds of agencies and organizations. Repeatable one time.

PLAN 615 Housing (3)

Housing delivery systems as an aspect of urban and regional planning.

PLAN 616 Community-Based Planning (3)

Planning and programmatic aspects of community-based development projects. East-West and local planning perspectives on participatory development and intentional communities.

PLAN 618 Community Economic Development (3)

Community-based economic development approaches and methods explored with an emphasis on low income communities. Repeatable one time.

PLAN 619 Multiculturalism in Planning and Policy (3)

Graduate seminar focuses on issues of governance, policy and planning in diverse multicultural societies. Differences in backgrounds, languages, privilege, preferences and values are often expressed in planning and policy controversies such as affirmative action and land use planning. Will examine these controversies and explore theories of governance in a multicultural setting.

PLAN 620 Environmental Planning and Policy (3)

Overview of urbanization and environmental change. An examination of environmental laws, policies, planning and urban design strategies designed to minimize and mitigate urban impacts. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 620)

PLAN 621 Environmental Conflict Resolution (3)

Explore how environmental conflicts emerge and the efforts to find common ground for resolution. Examine the issues, debates, and theoretical aspects that help to explain and frame environmental conflict. Graduate students only. (Cross-listed as PACE 621)

PLAN 622 Advanced Environmental Impact Assessment (3)

Theory and practice of environmental impact assessment. Policy and planning frameworks supporting environmental assessment in the U.S. and abroad. Cumulative environmental effects and strategic environmental assessment. (Cross-listed as GEOG 622)

PLAN 624 Environmental Valuation and Policy (3)

Build valuation skills to assess best use, conservation, and policies relating to environmental amenities. Provides an overview of policy solutions to environmental degradation used by planners.

PLAN 625 Climate Change, Energy and Food Security in the Asia/Pacific Region (3)

Analysis of planning responses to human-induced climate change and related environmental problems. Part of the Asia/Pacific Initiative taught in collaboration with universities throughout the region via videoconferencing. (Cross-listed as SUST 625)

PLAN 626 Topics in Resource Management (3)

for different resource systems including land, water, energy, coastal resources, forests and fisheries. Course focus varies from year to year. Repeatable one time. A-F only.

PLAN 627 Negotiation and Mediation in Planning (3)

Applicability and limitations of selected approaches; role of planners; impact on planning.

PLAN 628 Urban Environmental Problems (3)

Seminar that examines environmental problems associated with urbanization. Reviews strategic approaches and collaboration among key actors to address such problems. (Cross-listed as SUST 628)

PLAN 629 Negotiation & Conflict Resolution (3)

Negotiation as a foundational skill of conflict resolution; mastery of negotiation skills for strategic dispute resolution; non-routine problem-solving, creating partnerships and alliances; crafting optimal agreements. Students participate in simulations and acquire vital leadership skills. Graduate standing only. Pre: one of the following courses: 627; or PACE 429, PACE 447, PACE 477, PACE 647, PACE 652, or PACE 668; or COMG 455 or SOC 730; or LAW 508; or MGT 660. (Cross-listed as PACE 629)

PLAN 630 Urban and Regional Planning in Asia (3)

Key issues and policies in urban planning, rural-urban relations, rural regional planning, and frontier settlement in Asia and the Pacific. Repeatable one time. (Cross-listed as GEOG 630)

PLAN 632 Planning in Hawai‘i and Pacific Islands (3)

Urban and regional planning in island settings. Experiences in Hawai‘i, Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. Pre: graduate standing. (Cross-listed as SUST 632)

PLAN 633 Globalization and Urban Policy (3)

Urbanization and urban policies in the Asia and Pacific region with focus on the international dimension of national and local spatial restructuring.

PLAN 634 Shelter and Services in Asia (3)

Examines government and non-government organizations’ responses to urban and rural shelter issues and services in Asia.

PLAN 636 Culture & Urban Form in Asia (3)

Cultural and historical impact on urban form, contention of tradition and modernity in urban space, spatial expression of state and society, perception and utilization of urban design, evolution of urban form in selected Asian capitals. Pre: 310, 600, or ASAN 312. (Cross-listed as ARCH 687 and ASAN 636)

PLAN 637 Environment and Development (3)

Theories and practice of development; how changing development paradigms shape different ideas concerning the environment and the management of natural resources; emerging debates in development and environment in post-modern era. (Cross-listed as GEOG 637)

PLAN 638 Asian Development and Urbanization (3)

Theories of globalization and sustainability in development, impacts of globalization and sustainability on development planning and policy formation, selected case studies of Asia-Pacific development. Pre: (630 or ASAN 600) with a grade of B or above. (Cross-listed as ASAN 638 and GEOG 638)

PLAN 639 Community-based Natural Resource Management (3)

Concepts and theories of community, resource access, and governance. Practical challenges to CBNRM in contemporary political economy. Pre: graduate standing. (Cross-listed as GEOG 639)

PLAN 640 Land Use Policies and Programs (3)

Land use public policy planning in urban and regional settings. Growth management and land use guidance systems. A-F only.

PLAN 641 Neighborhood and Community Land Use Planning (3)

Land use planning for urban neighborhoods and small towns. Theory and practice of neighborhood planning. Neighborhood and community dynamics, reinvestment, and stabilization.

PLAN 642 Planning Urban Infrastructure (3)

Introduction to the planning of various urban infrastructures. Explores approaches and tools to plan, evaluate, and regulate urban infrastructure systems in support of sustainable and resilient cities and communities.

PLAN 643 Project Planning and Management (3)

Examines project management in theory and practice and the roles and responsibilities of the project manager. Focuses on planning, organizing, and controlling the efforts of projects. A-F only.

PLAN 645 Land Use Planning (3)

Issues and methods of urban land use planning practice and plan making. A-F only. (Cross-listed as ARCH 641)

PLAN 647 Urban and Regional Planning for Sustainability (3)

Focus on ideology, conceptual models, accounting frameworks, appropriate technologies, and indicators of planning for sustainability. Central and local policies, plans, and best practices in various countries and settings will be covered. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 647)

PLAN 648 Urban Transportation Policy and Planning (3)

Theory and practice of urban transportation planning in developed and developing countries with an emphasis on the U.S., Asia, and Pacific region. A-F only.

PLAN 649 Asian Cities: Historical Evolution of Urban Form (3)

Examination of the impact of economy, society, and history on urban form; case studies of the evolution of Asian urban form. Pre: 310 or ASAN 312. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ASAN 649)

PLAN 650 Research Design Seminar (3)

Research design and preparation of thesis proposal. Normally taken after admission to candidacy in MURP. Pre: (600, 601, 603) with a minimum grade of B, or consent.

PLAN 652 Policy Implementation and Program Evaluation (3)

Implementation and evaluation in public policy analysis; philosophical and methodological issues; impact of policies and plans; use of evaluation research in program implementation. (Cross-listed as PUBA 614)

PLAN 654 Applied Geographic Information Systems: Public Policy and Spatial Analysis (3)

Use of advanced and specialized spatial methods and models in urban and regional planning. Uses GIS software and builds upon 601. Skills are useful applied to planning, economic development, and environmental planning and resource management. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

PLAN 655 Planning Research Methods (3)

Advanced methods and deterministic and stochastic models used in urban and regional planning.

PLAN 661 Collaboration Between Sectors (3)

Examine theories and practices of multisector collaboration (public, private, nonprofit). The use of collaboration as an alternative way of solving public problems.

PLAN 670 Interdisciplinary Seminar in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (3)

Overview to the field of disaster management and humanitarian assistance with a specific focus on risk reduction. Includes background knowledge and skills for preparedness, response, recovery, mitigation, and adaptation to hazards and threats. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Once a year)

PLAN 671 Disaster Management: Understanding the Nature of Hazards (3)

Combined lecture/ discussion in disaster management focusing on the scientific understanding of the forces and processes underlying natural hazards; and human attempts to respond to these through mitigation and planning activities. Pre: 670 or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as GG/ERTH 604)

PLAN 672 Humanitarian Assistance: Principles, Practices and Politics (3)

Combined lecture/ discussion aimed at understanding the theoretical basis and working structure of humanitarian assistance programs and international responses to natural and human-induced disasters. Pre: 670 or consent. (Once a year)

PLAN 673 Information Systems for Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (3)

Combined lecture/laboratory in disaster management focusing on essential methodological and practical issues that are involved in spatial analyses using GIS and other information technologies to inform decision making related to natural hazards, disasters, and human attempts to respond to these through mitigation and planning activities. Pre: 473 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

PLAN 674 Disaster Recovery: Theory and Practice (3)

How do communities recover from disaster? Provides students with an overview of recovery theory and an understanding of how planners, policy makers, and ordinary citizens rebuild communities, cities, and nations following catastrophic events. A-F only. Graduate standing only.

PLAN 675 Preservation: Theory and Practice (3)

History and philosophy of historic preservation movement. Analysis of values and assumptions, methodologies and tactics, implications for society and public policy. (Cross-listed as AMST 675 and ARCH 628)

PLAN 676 Recording Historic and Cultural Resources (3)

Techniques in recording and evaluation of historic buildings and other resources, with an emphasis on field recordings and state and federal registration procedures. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 676 and ANTH 676)

PLAN 677 Historic Preservation Planning (3)

Local-level historic preservation, with an emphasis on historic districts, design guidelines, regulatory controls, and community consensus-building. (Cross-listed as AMST 677)

PLAN 678 Site Planning (3)

Fundamental principles that guide site planning, including planning and design determinants of the site taking into account its regional context, site-specific characteristics and applicable codes, ordinances, and standards. PLAN and ARCH majors only. (Fall only)

PLAN 680 Land Use Management and Control (V)

Survey course of public land use management. (Cross-listed as LAW 580)

PLAN 683 Housing and Community Development Practicum (V)

Laboratory and field testing of selected topics related to housing design and technology; site development and infrastructure; social, health and economic community development; and housing implementation strategies. Repeatable one time. PLAN and ARCH majors only. Pre: 600.

PLAN 686 Housing and Community Services in Asia and Pacific (3)

Application of analysis and construction technology to problems associated with physical development of suburban and neighborhood communities. Development of design and construction programs. Emphasis on low and intermediate technology solutions. Open to nonmajors. (Cross-listed as ARCH 681)

PLAN 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent of instructor and department chair.

PLAN 700 Thesis Research (V)

Limited to MURP students under Plan A. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

PLAN 721 Homeland Security: Terrorism (3)

Combined lecture/discussion in disaster management and humanitarian assistance track focusing on developing a multidisciplinary understanding of international terrorism and anti-terrorism planning and response. Pre: 670 or consent. (Once a year)

PLAN 740 Seminar in Planning Theory (3)

Special topics in theory, history, analysis. Pre: 600 or consent.

PLAN 741 Seminar in Planning Practice (3)

Project planning, programming, and similar topics. Pre: 600 and 601, or consent.

PLAN 751 Planning Practicum (6)

Team experience in defining and addressing a current planning problem; identification, substantive review, research design, preparation and presentation of analysis. Topic varies. Limited to 10 students. Pre: 600, 601; and consent.

PLAN 752 Directed Project (V)

Individual project in analysis, plan preparation and evaluation, and policy/ program evaluation. PLAN majors only. Pre: 600, 601; and consent.

PLAN 754 Urban Design Studio (6)

Group experience in defining urban and regional design problems and potentials, developing and evaluating alternatives, formulating strategies for implementation. PLAN and ARCH majors only. A-F only. Pre: (600 and 601) with a minimum grade of B, or consent.

PLAN 800 Dissertation Research (1)

Research for doctoral dissertation. Repeatable unlimited times. S/U only. PhD student only. Pre: consent.

POLS 110 Introduction to Political Science (3)

Discussion of politics as an activity and of political problems, systems, ideologies, processes.

POLS 110A Introduction to Political Science (3)

Discussion of politics as an activity and of political problems, systems, ideologies, processes.

POLS 120 Introduction to World Politics (3)

Power and contemporary world politics since 1945 with emphasis on the U.S. role.

POLS 130 Introduction to American Politics (3)

American political processes and institutions, as seen through alternative interpretations. Emphasis on opportunities and limitations for practical political participation.

POLS 140 Introduction to Indigenous Politics (3)

Foundations in Indigenous politics from diverse cultural perspectives and across regions. Addresses political issues facing Indigenous peoples at global and local levels, with attention to Indigenous epistemologies, languages, movements, and institutions. A-F only.

POLS 150 Introduction to Global Politics (3)

Foundations in global politics from political, historical, and multicultural perspectives. A-F only.

POLS 160 Introduction to International and Global Studies (3)

Introduces undergraduate students to the major political, social, economic, cultural, technological, and historical dimensions of globalization. Special attention will be paid to globalization process that have impacted Hawai‘i and the Asia-Pacific region. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SOCS 180)

POLS 170 Politics and Public Policy (3)

Perspectives on the role of government in guiding economies and civil societies with particular emphasis on the recent U.S.

POLS 171 Introduction to Political Futures (3)

Introduction to political future studies. Using science fact and fiction, shows how past and present images of the future influence people’s actions.

POLS 190 Media and Politics (3)

Influences and effects of media on politics. Setting public agendas, interpreting events, manipulating the political process, political learning through popular culture.

POLS 200 Reading and Writing Politics (3)

Develop skills needed to read and write political texts. Weigh competing views; read and analyze texts for what they do and do not say; craft and defend evidence-based arguments; practice writing mechanics and style. POLS majors only or consent. A-F only.

POLS 201 Problems of War and Peace (3)

Introduction to the problems individuals and political communities currently face with respect to war, peace, and international conflict. Includes questions of human nature, economy, morality, nuclear deterrence, arms control and disarmament, and alternatives to war.

POLS 241 Political Design and Futuristics (3)

Possible social and political alternatives for the future. Conditions likely if present trends continue, formulation of visions of better futures, means for their achievement.

POLS 271 Race and Politics (3)

Racial inequality in the U.S.; mechanisms of institutional racism in employment, education, criminal justice, electoral politics.

POLS 301 Hawai‘i Politics (3)

Introduction to and critical study of institutions, governments, and political processes in Hawai‘i. Attends to race, class, gender, sexuality, indigeneity and nationality. Grounded in Native Hawaiian perspectives, with an emphasis on comparative study and dialogue. Pre: any 100- or 200-level POLS course, or consent.

POLS 302 Native Hawaiian Politics (3)

Critical study of issues in contemporary Native Hawaiian politics, with an emphasis on application and active engagement. Pre: any 100- or 200-level POLS course or consent.

POLS 303 (Alpha) Topics in Hawai‘i Politics (3)

Intensive examination of particular institutions, processes, and issues. (B) the military in Hawai‘i; (C) political thought in Hawaiian; Taught in Hawaiian; (D) politics of food. A-F only for (D). Pre: HAW 302 (or concurrent) for (C) only, sophomore standing or higher or consent. ((C) Cross-listed as HAW 428) DS for (B) and (D), DH for (C)

POLS 304 Indigenous Politics (3)

Conceptualizing politics from the perspective of indigenous epistemologies, philosophies, language, and social and political movement. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 305 Global Politics/Comparative (3)

Introduction to global politics with emphasis on concepts and theories developed from a comparative politics perspective. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 306 Comparative Politics of Developing Countries (3)

Political, economic, and social development in the Third World. Repeatable one time. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 307 (Alpha) Topics in Comparative Politics: Country/Regional (3)

Political, social, and economic processes in specific countries/regions. (B) Southeast Asia; (C) Pacific Islands; (F) Middle East; (G) Philippines; (H) Japan; (I) Europe; (J) India; (K) East Asia. Repeatable one time. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 308 Chinese Political Economy (3)

Interdisciplinary review and analysis of the social and political issues in contemporary China, the interchange between state and society in national policies, the relationship between cultural tradition and technological modernization in the social transformation process. A-F only. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 308).

POLS 309 Politics of Indigenous Language Revitalization (3)

Study of the importance and processes of language revitalization for indigenous peoples in Hawai‘i, the Pacific, Asia, and North America. Pre: any 100 level POLS course. (Alt. years)

POLS 315 Global Politics/International Relations (3)

Introduction to global politics with emphasis on concepts and theories developed from an international relations perspective. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 316 International Relations (3)

Decision-making behavior of international actors; strategies of peacemaking. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 317 International Law (3)

Nature and function of international law in international politics. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 318 Current Issues in International Law, Organization, and Culture (3)

Principles, norms, cases, and their interaction with culture and organization in international politics. Pre: any 100 level POLS course or consent.

POLS 319 International Organization (3)

International relations of governmental and nongovernmental organizations. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 321 International Migration (3)

Political-cultural economy of international migration: postcolonial populations, refugees, and immigrants. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 322 American Foreign Policy (3)

Purposes, methods, strengths, obstacles, prospects; factors affecting American foreign policy; impact abroad and at home. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 323 Model United Nations (1)

Simulation of United Nations organizations, especially General Assembly. Repeatable 4 times. Pre: 315 (or concurrent) or 319 (or concurrent), or instructor consent.

POLS 324 Global Environmental Politics (3)

Evolution of international politics, law and decision-making on a variety of environmental concerns; from endangered species to pollution to climate change. Interaction of population, development, and environment in global governance. (Cross-listed as SUST 324)

POLS 325 Religion and Law in the U.S. (3)

Surveys church-state jurisprudence since the 1940s, with special attention to difficulty of defining religion, and applies the religion clauses to current issues. A-F only. Pre: sophomore or higher standing, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as AMST 325)

POLS 333 Advanced Topics in Global Politics (3)

Studies of political development in the context of increasingly integrated and globalized political economies. Repeatable one time. Pre: any 100 level POLS course or consent.

POLS 335 History of Political Thought (3)

Theories, approaches, concepts, and issues developed or raised in history of political philosophy and thought. Pre: any 100- or 200-level POLS course, or consent.

POLS 335A History of Political Thought (3)

Theories, approaches, concepts, and issues developed or raised in history of political philosophy and thought. Pre: any 100- or 200-level POLS course, or consent.

POLS 337 American Political Theory (3)

Origins and development of American political thought. Pre: any 100 level POLS course or consent.

POLS 338 (Alpha) Topics in Political Theory (3)

Significant works, historical continuities, themes, and issues in political theory. (B) classical political philosophy; (F) revolution and utopia; (G) contemporary political theory; (I) Marxist philosophy. Pre: any 100- or 200- level POLS course; or consent.

POLS 339 Feminist Theory (3)

Contemporary debates in feminist theory concerning gender, race, and class; subjectivity and representation; gender and colonialism; bodies, sexualities and “nature.” Pre: any 300 level POLS or WS course; or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 439)

POLS 340 Korean Politics and Society Through Film (3)

Examines modern Korean politics and society through films. Through movies and documentaries, students will learn major sociopolitical issues including military dictatorship, democratization, and globalization that Korea underwent for the last several decades. Repeatable one time. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only.

POLS 341 The Politics of Media (3)

Study of the political manipulation of aural and verbal images. Exercises to increase media literacy. Pre: any 100 level POLS course, or consent.

POLS 342 Political Design and Futuristics (3)

Alternative future social and political possibilities; design of means of realization of desirable futures. Pre: any 100 level POLS course, or consent.

POLS 343 The Politics of Film (3)

Political, philosophical, and artistic dimensions of film; cross-cultural film genres; representational practices in films. Pre: any 100 level POLS course, or consent.

POLS 344 Nâ Politika ma ka Nûhou Hawai‘i – Politics in Hawaiian Language Media (3)

Study of Hawaiian news media with emphasis on political content. Taught in Hawaiian. Pre: HAW 302 (or concurrent) and one of 110, 120, 130, 170, or 171; or consent. (Cross-listed as HAW 445)

POLS 366 Advanced Topics in Theory, Media, and Method (3)

Studies in political theory, media, and methods that analyze their interrelations in a globalized world. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 367 Disability Law and Politics (3)

Introduction to the history and politics of U.S. disability law and activism. An analysis of disability politics as the result of the interaction between disability movement activism and the development of policy and law. A-F only. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Fall only)

POLS 368 Gender, Justice and Law (3)

Exploration of landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases related to sex and gender. Topics may include sex discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, privacy, and reproductive freedom. A-F only. Pre: one of WS 151, WS 175, WS 176, WS 202, WS 360, WS 381, or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 436 and WS 436)

POLS 372 Women and Globalization in Asia (3)

History, culture, and contemporary reality of Asian women in Asia and the U.S. Includes critical analysis of American feminist methodology and theory. Pre: one of 339, AMST 310, AMST 316, AMST 318, AMST 373, AMST 455, WS 360, WS 361, WS 439; or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 438 and WS 462)

POLS 373 American Politics (Elections) (3)

Examination of voters and voting processes (participation, apathy, socialization, symbolic process, media, etc.); ideologies and belief systems. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 374 Law, Politics and Society (3)

Relationships between law, politics, and society will be explored. Emphasis is placed on several dimensions of legality: legal “indeterminacy” and some of the many things that law does for us and to us; law’s response to violence; the connections between law and social change; access to the law and its sociological dimensions; how/why law fails and what happens when it does. A-F only. Pre: a 100 level or 200 level POLS course or SOC 100 or any 200 level SOC course, or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 374)

POLS 375 Constitutional Law I: Institutional Power (3)

Provides students with methods for interpreting U.S. Supreme Court decisions and analyzes the U.S. Supreme Court’s jurisprudence on institutional authority, including the Judiciary, Executive, and Legislative branches and their relationships to power. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 376 Constitutional Law II: Rights and Liberties (3)

Analyzes the U.S. Supreme Court’s jurisprudence on civil rights and liberties. Sophomore standing or higher.

POLS 377 Topics in Law and Politics (3)

Current issues; recent research findings; practical research undertaken by student. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 378 Topics in American Politics (3)

Specific institutions and processes of the American governmental system. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 379 Power in America (3)

Analysis of sources of political, economic, and social power in the U.S. and the institutions through which it is exercised. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 380 Environmental Law and Politics (3)

Focuses on theories, laws, policies, ethics, and sustainable futures of Hawai‘i and the U.S. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: any 100 or 200 level POLS course, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as SUST 380)

POLS 381 Administration and Society (3)

Historical emergence of modern bureaucracy; mutual impact of administrative forms on social life; relation of bureaucracy to capitalism and patriarchy; constitution of the administered individual. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 382 Political Leadership (3)

Exploration of concepts and theories of political leadership, partly through biography, as preparation for public service or advanced scholarly inquiry. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

POLS 383 Politics and Public Policy II (3)

Overview of the policy-making process in various political arenas (families, cities, nations, etc.); emphasis on conceptual and empirical analysis. Pre: any 100 level POLS course or consent.

POLS 384 Women and Politics (3)

Women’s role in political institutions and processes in the U.S. and other countries. Female and male approaches to power; feminist political goals and actions. Pre: any 100 level POLS course (or concurrent), WS 151 (or concurrent), or WS 362 (or concurrent); or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 384)

POLS 385 American Politics (3)

Institutions (parties, interest groups, legislatures, executives, local government); policies (national defense, poverty, energy, etc.), politics (symbolism, inequality, race, and gender).

POLS 386 Public Policy-Making (3)

Students develop understanding of theory, practice, and ethical issues of public policy-making. Combines lecture/ discussion and field-trips. Students develop policy analysis and strategic plans that identify issues, interests, and methods of influence. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: HON 101 or HON 291, or departmental approval. (Cross-listed as HON 301)

POLS 387 Politics of the Ocean (3)

Study of the ocean as a political place. Engagement with theories, policies, and lived-experiences of the ocean through a political lens, including literature and experiential learning. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: any 100 or 200-level POLS course, or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 387)

POLS 389 Health Politics (3)

Examines the politics of health care. Focus on institutional models to health care, the politics of health care reform, and contemporary health care issues and controversies. Repeatable one time. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: any 100-level POLS course or consent.

POLS 390 Political Inquiry and Analysis (3)

Introductory survey and analysis of methods used in empirical research, policy analysis, and social criticism.

POLS 393 Advanced Topics in Law, Policy, and Society (3)

Studies integrating concerns of public law, public policy, public administration, and social movements. Pre: any 100- or 200-level POLS course, or consent.

POLS 394 Co-ops, Communes, Collectives (3)

Theory and practice of democratic organizations: women’s and feminist organizations; co-ops, communes, and collectives; indigenous people’s organizations; workplace democracy and social change. A-F only. Pre: any 100- or 200-level POLS course or 390 (or concurrent) or WS 151, or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 394)

POLS 396 Nonviolent Political Alternatives (3)

Exploration of scientific and cultural resources for nonviolent alternatives in politics. Pre: any 100- or 200-level POLS course, or consent. (Cross-listed as PACE 373)

POLS 399 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Pre: consent.

POLS 401 Teaching Political Science (6)

Practicum for majors who serve as undergraduate teaching assistants. Repeatable one time. Pre: 390 (or concurrent), senior standing; and consent.

POLS 402 Legislative Internship (V)

Field placement at the Hawai‘i Legislature integrated with academic study of political institutions and practices. A-F only. Pre: consent. Recommended: 390. (Spring only)

POLS 403 Community Internship (V)

Field placement integrated with academic study of political institutions and community organizations. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent. Recommended: 390.

POLS 404 Senior Thesis (3)

Independent research and thesis writing with supervision of senior advisor. Pre: 390 (or concurrent) and consent.

POLS 405 Executive Internship (V)

Open to students awarded a Manoa Undergraduate Political Fellowship for placement in the Governor’s or Lt. Governor’s Office, Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, or Public Defender’s Office. Field placement, integrated with academic study. A-F only. Recommended: 385, 390.

POLS 406 Senior Seminar in Political Science (3)

Discussion of issues and questions of concern to graduating seniors in political science, including substantial research project. Pre: 390 (or concurrent) or senior standing or consent.

POLS 408 Mânoa Undergraduate Congressional Fellowship Internship Seminar (6)

Hawai‘i Undergraduate Political Internship’s Congressional Fellowship. Award includes stipend and internship experience in a Hawai‘i congressional office. Students review policy processes, House and Senate procedures and produce a final paper. Restricted to fellowship awardees only. Junior and senior standing only. A-F only. Co-requisite: 386.

POLS 500 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1)

Enrollment for degree completion. Pre: master’s Plan B or C candidate and consent.

POLS 600 Scope and Methods of Political Science (3)

Main concepts delineating boundaries of discipline; approaches to knowledge employed by political scientists; empirical and normative theory; problems in theory-building; validity and reliability in research design; philosophy of science applied to political science.

POLS 601 Political Analysis and Theory Building (3)

Survey of theory-building, approaches and validation techniques.

POLS 602 Research Techniques and Analytic Methods (3)

Quantitative models and statistical inference techniques.

POLS 605 Topics in Methodology (3)

Specific methodological techniques and practices introduced in 601 and 602. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

POLS 610 Political Theory and Analysis (3)

Major contemporary approaches and styles in political theory, philosophy, and analysis.

POLS 611 Tradition of Political Philosophy (3)

Discussion of texts and themes in the Western political tradition from Plato to Nietzsche. Repeatable one time.

POLS 612 Hawaiian Political Thought: Theory and Method/Na Mana‘o Politika Hawai‘i (3)

Study of Hawaiian political thought in writing from ca. 1825 to the present, with emphasis on theory and research methods. Pre: 303, HAW 402 and HAW 428; or consent. (Cross-listed as HAW 612)

POLS 615 (Alpha) Topics in Political Thought (3)

Specific traditions and individuals, or particular issues and problems. (C) feminist theory. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent. ((C) Cross-listed as WS 615)

POLS 620 Introduction to Indigenous Politics (3)

Historical treatment of the contact between state and indigenous peoples and a survey of contemporary indigenous political initiatives: social movements, media, indigenous studies programs, and events.

POLS 621 Politics of Indigenous Representation (3)

Politics of indigenous representations in media, literature, and academic scholarship.

POLS 630 International Relations (3)

Analysis of theories: actors, decisions, systems, conflict, integration, alternative approaches to validation. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

POLS 633 International Conflict Resolution (3)

Analysis of international conflict and conflict resolution. Theory and practice of negotiation, mediation, conciliation, facilitation, and other “third-party” methods of peaceful settlement. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

POLS 634 Teaching Model United Nations (1)

Substantive and pedagogical approaches to using Model United Nations simulation for teaching and conflict resolution. Repeatable two times. Graduate students only. (Fall only)

POLS 635 (Alpha) Topics in International Relations (3)

(B) international relations and war; (E) international organization; (F) modeling international systems. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

POLS 640 Comparative Politics (3)

Emphasis on Asia, theories of development, and comparative methods. At least one section a semester.

POLS 642 Indigenous Peoples and Western Imperialism (3)

Historical examination of U.S. and European imperialisms, including national narratives, politics, and impacts upon indigenous peoples in the Americas, Pacific, and Asia. Repeatable one time.

POLS 645 (Alpha) Politics and Development: Regional (3)

Politics of particular regions; particular development processes. (C) China. ((C) cross-listed as ASAN 608 and PLAN 608)

POLS 646 (Alpha) Politics and Development: Topical (3)

(F) political ecology and development.

POLS 647 American Political Institutions in Comparative Perspective (3)

Consideration of American political institutions and development relative to American philosophical foundations and non-American political forms. Federalism as an expansive devise will be emphasized, as will American influence and penetration abroad. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Once a year)

POLS 650 Public Administrative Theory (3)

Focus varies among theoretical, comparative and developmental approaches to study of administration. One section each semester.

POLS 651 Political Leadership (3)

Exploration of political leadership as a focus for research, teaching, and applied political science.

POLS 652 Comparative Public Administration (3)

Detailed examination of implementation of governmental policy in different countries. Pre: graduate standing.

POLS 660 Public Law and Judicial Systems (3)

Law, courts, and rights as a political resource; analyses of public law (including court decisions), other forms of dispute management, and judicial behavior and policy-making. Pre: 110.

POLS 665 (Alpha) Topics in Public Law and Judicial System (3)

Recent issues and practices in public law; particular judicial systems. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

POLS 670 Introduction to Public Policy (3)

Perspectives on policy analysis; basic approaches to the study of public policy, political economy, and policy evaluation. (Cross-listed as PLAN 607)

POLS 672 Politics of the Future (3)

Introduction to political futures studies; images of future, theories of social change, methods of social forecasting and designing preferred futures. Pre: graduate standing.

POLS 673 The Future of Political Systems (3)

Normative and descriptive forecasts of political institutions, systems, subsystems, and behaviors. Design of preferred systems.

POLS 675 Topics in Public Policy (3)

Particular political processes, specific political institutions, or particular policy area. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

POLS 676 Nonviolent Political Alternatives (3)

Exploration of nonviolent, non-killing alternatives in political science research, teaching, and public service.

POLS 680 Asian and/or Pacific Politics (3)

Political development, international relations, decision-making processes, and systems of political thought in all or part of Asia and/or the Pacific.

POLS 684 Contemporary Native Hawaiian Politics (3)

Study of political and social movements, political status, national and cultural identities, and issues of representation of Native Hawaiians.

POLS 685 (Alpha) Topics in Asian and/or Pacific Politics (3)

(C) Korean politics. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

POLS 686 Politics of Hawai‘i (3)

Examinations from several perspectives of the political, economic, and cultural forces that historically formed Hawai‘i and contemporary political themes, issues, and processes. Pre: graduate standing.

POLS 692 Teaching Initiative in Political Science (3)

Combines the study of the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching political science with supervised classroom teaching of POLS 110. Repeatable one time. A-F only.

POLS 695 Colloquium (3)

Specialized subjects in political science.

POLS 696 Graduate Intern Seminar (3)

Seminar for those seeking internship experience. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 672 and 673 or consent for the alternative futures option; 620 or consent for the indigenous politics option; consent of advisor for all other options.

POLS 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

POLS 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

POLS 702 Seminar: Research Methods (3)

Conceptual strategies, data collection approaches, and data analysis techniques appropriate to political inquiries. Repeatable unlimited times.

POLS 703 Writing Politics (3)

Seminar on the politics of writing, grammar, translation, argument, genre, and style with significant content on indigenous issues of oral traditions, alternative modes of writing and argument, and language continuance.

POLS 710 Seminar: Political Thought (3)

Pre-announced topics. Repeatable unlimited times. At least one section a year.

POLS 720 Seminar: Indigenous Theory (3)

Pre-announced topics may include gender and sexuality studies, postcolonial theory, colonial discourse analysis, globalization, historiography; emphasis on indigenous epistemologies and the work of native scholars. Repeatable one time.

POLS 730 Seminar: International Relations (3)

Pre-announced problems of both international organization and politics. Repeatable unlimited times. At least one section a semester.

POLS 740 Seminar: Comparative Government and Politics (3)

Pre-announced topics. Repeatable unlimited times. At least one section a semester.

POLS 750 Seminar: Public Administration (3)

Pre-announced administrative theory, comparative and development administration, and functional aspects. Repeatable unlimited times.

POLS 770 Seminar: Public Policy (3)

Pre-announced topics. Repeatable three times. Pre: consent of instructor. At least one section a year.

POLS 776 Indigenous Nations and the Problems of Sovereignty (3)

Examines intersections of sovereignty and indigenity from comparative and critical perspectives. Engages indigenous studies of sovereignty and of alternative political frameworks. Repeatable one time. (Alt. years)

POLS 777 Decolonial Futures (3)

Topic engages probable and preferable futures of indigenous struggles and resistances. Emphasis placed on the ethics and responsibilities used to move towards those futures.

POLS 780 Seminar: Politics of Regions (3)

Analysis of political development, international relations, decision-making processes, and systems of political thought in regions and subregions of the world. Repeatable.

POLS 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PPC 301 Governing, Politics, and Public Policy (3)

Analysis of the major processes that translate citizen preferences into public policy. A-F only. (Cross-listed as PUBA 304)

PPC 330 Survey of Public Policy and Analysis (3)

Students will learn about the policy making process, the results of policy decisions and how public policy is assessed, analyzed, and responded to. Also discusses important policy issues that currently fill the political landscape. Junior standing or higher. A-F only.

PPC 336 Energy Economics (3)

Analysis of economic and policy aspects of energy use, and interactions of markets for various nonrenewable and renewable energy options. Evaluations of policies to develop alternative energy sources. Pre: ECON 120 or ECON 130 or ECON 131. (Cross-listed as ECON 336 and SUST 336)

PPC 340 Applied Principles of Environmental & Energy Policy (3)

Introduction to the methods and techniques of environmental and energy policy in relation to energy systems. Analysis of enacted policies from case studies to understanding the effectiveness, challenges, contradictions, and limitations of each. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: any 100 or 200 level OCN course, or consent. (Cross-listed as OCN 321 and SUST 323)

PPC 340 Energy Technologies for Addressing Climate Change, Economic, Policy and Security Issues (3)

Interdisciplinary course designed to describe the inter-relationships and dynamic interactions between energy systems, the environment (climate), policy, security, and economics. Repeatable one time. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only.

PPC 495 Topics in Public Policy (3)

Seminar on current issues in U.S. or international government policy. Topics vary and may include energy, long-term care, sustainability, etc. Repeatable unlimited times. Junior standing or higher. A-F only.

PPC 499 Directed Readings or Research (V)

Requires the sponsorship of a faculty member. Together they will agree on the study topic and the work to be accomplished. Depending on the scope of the project, credits range from 1-3. Needs instructor consent. Repeatable two times up to six credits. Senior standing or higher. A-F only.

PPC 695 Topics in Public Policy (3)

Seminar on current issues in U.S. or international government policy. Topics vary and may include energy, long-term care, sustainability, etc. Repeatable unlimited times. A-F only.

PPC 699 Directed Readings or Research (V)

Requires the sponsorship of a faculty member. Together they will agree on the study topic and the work to be accomplished. Depending on the scope of the project, credits may range from 1-3. Repeatable up to 9 credits. Instructor consent only. A-F only. Graduate standing only.

PSY 100 Survey of Psychology (3)

An overview of the field: psychophysiology, perception, learning, cognition, stress, personality, social psychology.

PSY 100A Survey of Psychology (3)

An overview of the field: psychophysiology, perception, learning, cognition, stress, personality, social psychology.

PSY 170 Personal Development (3)

The application of psychology to the understanding, management, and enhancement of one’s life.

PSY 202 Psychology of Gender (3)

Survey of topics in psychology relevant to gender and its impact on the lives of women and men: socialization of gender, mental health, racial identity, majority-minority status, sexual orientation, life-span issues and violence. A-F only. Pre: 100 or WS 151. (Cross-listed as WS 202)

PSY 212 Survey of Research Methods (4)

(3 Lec, 1 2-hr Lab) Survey of standard methods and related conceptual issues employed in psychological research. Both experimental and non-experimental methods will be reviewed. Pre: 100.

PSY 220 Introduction to Behavioral Psychology (3)

Outline of basic learning principles. A general, unified approach to study of human personality and behavior. Based upon a learning conception; various areas of psychology and the other social sciences are treated. Pre: 100.

PSY 225 Statistical Techniques (3)

Frequency distributions; graphic methods; central tendency; variability; correlation; reliability; tests of significance. Pre: 100.

PSY 230 Introduction to Psychobiology (3)

Survey of study of behavior from a natural sciences viewpoint. Evolution, ethological analysis of behavior genetics, neural mechanisms, drugs and behavior, biological development. Pre: 100.

PSY 240 Developmental Psychology (3)

Emotional, mental, physical, social development from infancy to adulthood; interests and abilities at different age levels. Pre: 100.

PSY 250 Social Psychology (3)

Cognitive, behavioral, and emotional effects of people: interpersonal relations, attribution, attitudes, group behavior, stereotypes, social roles, aggression, helping, self-concept; applications. Pre: 100.

PSY 260 Psychology of Personality (3)

Scientific study of personality, its meaning, assessment, development, relation to cultural-social determinants. Pre: 100.

PSY 270 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3)

History, theories, types of psychological problems, methods of assessment, forms of intervention, current developments. Pre: 100.

PSY 280 Introduction to Community Psychology (3)

Examination of human functioning in social and ecological context. Topics include stress, health, intergroup relations, culture, ethnicity, social competence, and community empowerment. Pre: 100.

PSY 322 Learning and Motivation (3)

Theoretical interpretations; survey of major theorists and contemporary controversial issues; major influences in classical and instrumental conditioning. Pre: 100. Recommended: 220.

PSY 324 Psychology of Emotion (3)

Survey of traditional views and leading theories, and research in related topics. Pre: 100. Recommended: 220 or 322.

PSY 325 Cognitive Psychology (3)

Mental processes of humans and other organisms. Survey of major theories and findings in cognitive psychology. Pre: 100 or consent.

PSY 331 Behavioral Neuroscience (3)

Coverage of the neural, developmental and mechanistic bases of learning, memory and cognition, motivated and regulatory behavior and mental disorders. A-F only. Pre: 230 or BIOL 172, or consent.

PSY 333 Psychopharmacology (3)

Coverage of the basic principles of pharmacology as they apply to the brain and specific brain disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis, memory, and drug abuse. A-F only. Pre: 230 or consent. (Once a year)

PSY 336 Sensation and Perception (3)

In-depth coverage of the basic principles involved in sensing and perceiving our environment. A-F only. Pre: 100.

PSY 341 Social Development of Children (3)

Survey of socialization process and acquisition of social behavior. Pre: 240 or HDFS 230.

PSY 342 Adult Development and Aging (3)

Overview from a multidisciplinary, life-span perspective. Includes research techniques, personality development, family relationships, occupational attainment, death. Pre: 100. Recommended: 240.

PSY 351 Cross-Cultural Psychology (3)

Psychological theories and cultural systems; understanding of own and other cultures; psychological and cultural perception of social motivation; cultural similarities and differences in interpersonal relations. Pre: 100.

PSY 352 Psychology of Human Sexuality (3)

Psychosocial aspects of human sexual relationships. Social psychology of emotional and physiological arousal, interpersonal attraction, and societal regulation of intimate relationships. Pre: 100.

PSY 371 Abnormal Psychology (3)

Nature and causes of psychoses; abnormalities of intelligence; psychotherapy. Pre: 100. Recommended: 270.

PSY 371A Abnormal Psychology (3)

Nature and causes of psychoses; abnormalities of intelligence; psychotherapy. Pre: 100. Recommended: 270.

PSY 385 Consumer Behavior (3)

Analysis of consumer behavior and motivation; principles of learning, personality, perception, and group influence, with emphasis upon mass communication effects. Pre: BUS 312 or consent. (Cross-listed as MKT 311)

PSY 402 History of Psychology (3)

Origin and development of contemporary points of view. Pre: 100. Recommended: 9 credit hours in psychology.

PSY 403 Seminar on the Psychology of Knowledge (3)

Selected topics in the psychology of knowledge and mind from Western and/or non-Western perspectives. Repeatable in different topics up to 9 credit hours. Pre: 100 and written consent.

PSY 407 Practicum in Psychology (V)

Supervised psychological experience in school, clinic, hospital, industry, social welfare, government, etc. Pre: 100 and consent.

PSY 408 Teaching General Psychology (V)

Supervised experience. Pre: 100, at least 12 additional credit hours in psychology, and written consent. Repeatable one time. A-F only.

PSY 409 General Psychology: Advanced Topics (3)

In-depth coverage of some area of theory and research. Repeatable to 6 credit hours. Pre: 100.

PSY 419 Psychometrics: Advanced Topics (3)

In-depth coverage of some area of theory, research, or methodology relevant to individual differences, measurement, or aspects of psychometrics. Repeatable to six credit hours. Pre: 100.

PSY 429 Experimental Psychology: Advanced Topics (3)

Coverage in-depth of some area of theory and research. Repeatable to six credit hours. Pre: 100.

PSY 439 Psychobiology: Advanced Topics (3)

Coverage in-depth of some area of theory and research in psychobiology, physiological psychology, or sensory processes. Repeatable to six credit hours. Pre: 100.

PSY 442 The Exceptional Child (3)

Evaluation of physical, emotional, and intellectual deviations; effects on growth and development of children. Pre: 100. Recommended: 240.

PSY 449 Development Psychology: Advanced Topics (3)

Coverage in-depth of some area of theory and research. Repeatable to six credit hours. Pre: 240, 341, or consent.

PSY 459 Social Psychology: Advanced Topics (3)

Coverage in-depth of some area of theory and research. Repeatable to six credit hours.

PSY 476 Health Psychology (3)

Psychological principles for understanding and dealing with wellness and illness. Theories and research on stress-related disorders; prevention of stress through lifestyle and healthy behaviors. Pre: 100 or consent. Recommended: 220 or 322.

PSY 477 Communication in Helping Relationships (3)

Theory and application of personal and interpersonal elements affecting communication of human-service professionals. Supervised practice. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits. (Cross-listed as COMG 490)

PSY 478 Teaching Personal Development (6)

Supervised experience in leading a seminar in personal development. Pre: 170 and 12 additional credits in PSY and written consent.

PSY 479 Advanced Topics in Adjustment/ Treatment/Prevention (3)

Coverage in-depth of some area of theory and research. Repeatable to six credit hours. Pre: 270, 371 or consent.

PSY 489 Applied Psychology: Advanced Topics (3)

Coverage in-depth of some areas of theory and research. Repeatable to six credit hours. Pre: 100.

PSY 496 Special Topics in Psychology (3)

Covers topics of current or special interest not covered in regular course offerings or advanced topics seminars. Repeatable two times. Pre: 100.

PSY 499 Directed Reading or Research (V)

Repeatable. Pre: 100 and consent of instructor and department chair.

PSY 600 Methodologic Foundations of Psychology (3)

Methods used in psychological research; observational, correlational, and experimental types of design.

PSY 610 Introduction to Regression (3)

Introduction to quantitative methods in behavioral sciences and the general linear model with a focus on regression. Topics include correlation, bivariate and multiple regression, mediation, and moderation. Requires basic statistics. (Meets PhD common inquiry methods requirement or elective.)

PSY 611 Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Related Methods (3)

Introduction to ANOVA and its extensions from both traditional and general linear model approaches. Topics include single and multi-factor ANOVA, multiple comparisons, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and repeated-measures ANOVA.

PSY 613 Factor Analysis and Structural Equation Models (SEM) (3)

Theories and applications to latent variables models. Topics include path analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation models (SEM), multi-sample SEM, mean structure, latent growth curve models, and multilevel SEM. Requires basic knowledge of regression.

PSY 614 Multivariate Analysis (3)

Analysis of multiple dependent variables. Topics include multivariate normal distribution, Hotelling’s 72, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, canonical correlation, and principal components analysis (PCA). Pre: 610, EDEP 604, or consent.

PSY 616 Measurement in Education and Social Sciences (3)

Test theories and applications in education and social sciences. Topics include the true score model; reliability; generalizability theory; validity; item response theory; and applications in research. Class requires knowledge in ANOVA and regression.

PSY 617 Advanced Psychometrics (3)

Theories and applications of modern psychometrics. Topics include unidimensional and multidimensional models of item response theory, detecting biased items, measurement invariance, scaling methods, and current issues in psychometrics. Pre: 616, EDEP 616, or consent.

PSY 618 Categorical Data Analysis (3)

Theories and methods for data analysis with categorical and discrete variables. Topics include contingency tables; logistic regression; log-linear models; and introduction to generalized linear models. Pre: 610, EDEP 604, or consent. (Cross-listed as EDEP 618)

PSY 619 Analysis of Multilevel Models and Longitudinal Data (3)

Theories and applications of analysis of nested (clustered) data. Topics include fixed and random effects, intra-class correlation, cross-sectional multilevel models, and multilevel models, and multilevel models with repeated measures and longitudinal data. Requires basic knowledge of regression.

PSY 622 Principles of Learning (3)

Survey of the principles of learning, including important discoveries in the development of the study of learning, major theories, and both basic and applied research in contemporary literature.

PSY 626 Cognitive Psychology (3)

In-depth survey of the computational and representational structures and processes of cognition. Special attention devoted to consideration of the relationship between brain, mind, and computation. Pre: 325 or consent.

PSY 627 Thinking (3)

Provides an introduction to higher cognition (thinking and reasoning) and its foundations, particularly as they relate to the larger field of cognitive science. A-F only. (Alt. years)

PSY 631 Comparative Cognition (3)

Survey of the historical and contemporary study of cognition across species, including learning, memory, attention, navigation, reasoning, social interaction, and communication.

PSY 632 Selected Topics in Comparative Psychology (3)

Intensive review of comparative, communicative, sensory, or learning mechanisms in animals. Pre: 631.

PSY 633 Psychopharmacology (3)

Basic principles of pharmacology as they apply to the brain and specific psychological disorders such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorders, schizophrenia, psychosis, memory, and drug use. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Once a year)

PSY 634 Behavioral Neuroscience (3)

Relation of central and peripheral nervous systems to behavior.

PSY 640 Developmental Foundations (3)

Historical, theoretical, and methodological foundations of developmental psychology.

PSY 642 Cognitive Development (3)

Familiarizes students with current research and theory in cognitive development through readings of original journal articles and monographs. Pre: 640 (or concurrent) or consent.

PSY 650 Social Psychology (3)

Theories and research in social cognition and behavior.

PSY 653 Cross-Cultural Psychology (3)

Application of psychological theories to cross-cultural phenomena; assessment of cross-cultural processes and social motivations; culture and personality; research evaluation and design.

PSY 654 Psychology and Social Issues (3)

Conflict, dissent, community issues, problems; social change and its relation to mental disorder.

PSY 655 Applied Social Psychology (3)

Problems in use of social psychology principles in human affairs; multidisciplinary considerations.

PSY 656 Social Psychology of Love and Sex (3)

Seminar in psychosocial aspects of human sexual relationships. Social psychology of cognitive, emotional and physiological arousal, interpersonal attraction, mate selection, and antecedents and consequences of intimate relationships. Pre: consent. A-F only. (Spring only)

PSY 670 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3)

Preparation for becoming a clinical psychologist with emphasis on scientist-practitioner model, professional ethics, diversity and professional development. Pre: graduate student in psychology or consent of instructor.

PSY 671 Introduction to Assessment I (3)

Psychometric theory; ethics; diversity issues; principles and methods of cognitive-intellectual, neuropsychological, and personality assessment. A-F only. Co-requisite: 670 or consent.

PSY 672 Introduction to Assessment II (3)

Administration and interpretation of cognitive-intellectual and personality assessment devices. A-F only. Pre: 670 and 671 or consent and enrollment in Clinical Studies Program.

PSY 673 Advanced Assessment (3)

Conceptual and methodological foundations of clinical applications of assessment. PSY majors only. A-F only. Pre: 671 and 672 and enrollment in Clinical Studies Program, or consent. (Once a year)

PSY 675 Treatment Research (3)

Idiographic and nomothetic approaches to clinical treatment research methods and findings. Pre: 670 (or concurrent) and 671, or consent.

PSY 676 Psychopathology (3)

Comprehensive study of the mental disorders across the lifespan. A-F only. (Once a year)

PSY 677 Child Practicum (3)

Supervised clinical assessment and treatment of children and adolescents. Repeatable ten times. Pre: consent.

PSY 678 Adult Practicum (3)

Supervised clinical assessment and treatment of adults. Repeatable ten times. Pre: consent.

PSY 679 Practicum in Clinical Psychology (V)

Repeatable ten times. Pre: consent.

PSY 680 Cultural Community Psychology (3)

Graduate seminar on cultural considerations and issues in the history, methods, theories, interventions, and professional roles in community psychology. Small class size (up to 10). Open to graduate students.

PSY 682 Practicum: Behavioral Change and Community (3)

Supervised experience in educational, mental health, correctional, consulting, or community action agencies. Pre: consent.

PSY 699 Directed Reading or Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

PSY 700 Thesis Research (V)

Research for master’s thesis. Maximum of 6 credit hours. Not repeatable for credit toward master’s degree.

PSY 701 Seminar in General Psychology (3)

PSY 702 Seminar in History and Theory of Psychology (3)

PSY 711 Seminar in Quantitative Psychology (3)

Specific and newly emerging topics in statistics, including casual inference, analysis of missing data, and statistical machine learning. Content varies and focuses on advanced topics not covered in other PSY methods and statistics courses. Repeatable two times. PSY majors only. A-F only. Pre: 610 (with a minimum grade of B) or instructor consent.

PSY 719 Research in Psychometrics (3)

Supervised reading, discussion, research projects in areas of special interest. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

PSY 721 Seminar in Experimental Psychology (3)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 722 Seminar in Learning (3)

PSY 729 Research in Experimental Psychology (3)

Supervised reading, discussion, research projects in areas of special interest. Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 731 Seminar in Physiological Psychology (3)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 732 Seminar in Comparative Psychology (3)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 739 Research in Psychology (3)

Supervised reading, discussion, research projects in areas of special interest. Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 741 Seminar in Developmental Psychology (3)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 749 Research in Developmental Psychology (3)

Supervised reading, discussion, research projects in areas of special interest. Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 751 Seminar in Social Psychology (3)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 759 Research in Social Psychology (3)

Supervised reading, discussion, research projects in areas of special interest. Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 771 Child Treatment (3)

Psychological interventions for youth, as well as parent training. Repeatable two times. Pre: 670 or consent.

PSY 772 Adult Treatment: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (3)

Training in cognitive-behavioral strategies for treating adults. Repeatable one time. Enrolled in Clinical Studies Program only. PSY major only. Pre: 670 or consent.

PSY 773 Seminar in Psychopathology (3)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 774 Seminar in Clinical Psychology (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 775 Seminar in Psychological Therapies (3)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 776 Health Psychology: Behavioral and Biological Bases (3)

Psychological and biological bases of health psychology and behavioral medicine. Overview of cognitive, behavioral, and psychophysiological mechanisms; theories and methods of prevention in physical disease. Pre: 670 or consent.

PSY 778 Internship in Clinical Psychology (1)

Pre: consent of instructor and department chair.

PSY 779 Research in Clinical Psychology (3)

Supervised reading, discussion, research projects in areas of special interest. Repeatable 30 times. Pre: consent.

PSY 781 Community Psychology Seminar (3)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 789 Community Psychology Research (3)

Supervised reading, discussion, research projects in areas of special interest. Repeatable unlimited times.

PSY 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Research for doctoral dissertation. Repeatable unlimited times.

PUBA 304 Governing, Politics, and Public Policy (3)

Analysis of the major processes that translate citizen preferences into public policy. A-F only. (Cross-listed as PPC 301)

PUBA 350 Research Methods for Policy Evaluation (3)

Explores methodological approaches to the evaluation of public policies and strengths and weaknesses of various social science research methods. Students will learn how to employ them to determine the effectiveness of various public policies. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 304, PLAN 310, or PPC 330.

PUBA 360 Foundations of Nonprofit Management (3)

Broad overview of nonprofit organizations, including what it means to be a nonprofit, strategies of nonprofit organizations, and the management of nonprofits. Topics include advocacy, leadership, and evaluating success. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only.

PUBA 424 Multicultural Leadership in Public Service (3)

Develop students’ culturally agile leadership to allow them effectively lead in work on international, regional, and local projects and problems of compelling public interest that cross cultures. Junior standing or higher. A-F only.

PUBA 495 Practicum and Internship (3)

The practicum and internship in Peace and Conflict Resolution provides an opportunity for students to apply the skills and concepts learned in earlier courses. Pre: any two other PACE courses or consent. (Cross-listed as PACE 495)

PUBA 499 Directed Reading and Research in Public Administration (V)

Independent research and reading on topics in public administration, public service, and community development. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent.

PUBA 500 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1)

Enrollment for degree completion. Pre: master’s Plan B or C candidate and consent.

PUBA 602 Introduction to Public Administration (3)

Develop a comprehension of the history and foundation of public administration. Topics include economic, political, and social dynamics; decision-making and leadership theories, management challenges, human resources, budgeting, program evaluation, policy, and technology. PUBA and PUBA Cert. majors only. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Fall only)

PUBA 603 Organizations: Theory and Change (3)

Explores characteristics and structural, human resources, political, and cultural frames of organizational theory. Focus on organizational change strategies and theories. Discusses how to use these frames and theories in everyday management of public service organizations. PUBA and PUBA Cert. majors only. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as CEE 620)

PUBA 604 Leadership and Ethics (3)

Applies leadership and ethical theories to public and non-profit sectors, focusing on ethical leadership; emphasizes critical thinking to address value conflicts; and teaches moral reasoning as a practical professional skill. PUBA and PUBA Cert. majors only. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Fall only)

PUBA 605 Effective Communication in Public Administration (3)

Knowledge and skills to effectively communicate in the public sector. Focus on communication foundations and skills, levels and contexts of public sector communication, and handling challenges such as diverse and multi-cultural settings. PUBA and PUBA Cert. majors only. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Spring only)

PUBA 606 Public Administration Personnel Management (3)

Understand the pivotal role that effective human resource management (also known as personnel management) plays in improving organizational effectiveness. Topics include managing diversity, employment law and discrimination, performance appraisal, and labor-management relations. PUBA and PUBA Cert. majors only. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Spring only)

PUBA 607 Public Administration Research Methods (3)

Introduction to research methods for public administrators to understand the principles and methods used to conduct and analyze valid research. Examples are oriented to the field; theory and hands-on practice utilized. PUBA and PUBA Cert. majors only. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Spring only)

PUBA 608 Public Budgeting (3)

Institutions and issues related to public-sector budgeting at federal, state, and local levels. Process of developing public budgets and constraints on public policy reflected in budgets. PUBA majors only. A-F only. (Fall only)

PUBA 609 Policy Analysis and Implementation (3)

Explore contemporary policy issues relating to public administration practice. Develop analytic techniques and models of public policy-making processes, administrative rules, and policy implementation strategies. Learn how social forces, political, and economic pressures influence policy orientation. PUBA majors only. A-F only. (Spring only)

PUBA 614 Policy Implementation and Program Evaluation (3)

Implementation and evaluation in public policy analysis; philosophical and methodological issues; impact of policies and plans; use of evaluation research in program implementation. (Cross-listed as PLAN 654)

PUBA 620 Reforming Public Organizations (3)

Looks at the challenges and opportunities for changing public organizations so that they may be more successful in meeting their public responsibilities and better places for people to work. Focus is on the creation of positive images of organization and effective change strategies. A-F only.

PUBA 621 The Political Environment of Public Organizations (3)

Seminar on the role of public managers in shaping public opinion and public policy. Using evidence from theory and practice presents students with tools for understanding management roles within a political context. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

PUBA 622 Strategies of Change: Leaders and Leadership (3)

Explores the key elements of leadership in public settings by examining what leaders actually do, looking at popular media portrayals of leadership, and talking together with guests about the challenges of leadership, effective followership, and positive change. A-F only.

PUBA 623 Organizational Communication (3)

Communication theory/research applied to formal organizations; assessments of strengths and weaknesses of organizational communications systems.

PUBA 624 Intercultural Challenges in the Public Sector (3)

Seminar on the dimensions of cultural variability and how they affect government operations from macro to micro levels, from international policy transfer to major intercultural task interaction processes such as negotiation, planning, and relationship management. Graduate standing only. A-F only.

PUBA 625 Law, Economics, and Public Administration (3)

Explore U.S. law as applied to public institutions using economic lens. Rationale of property, contract, and tort law; evolution of administrative law, economic efficiency of common law system, effects of legal rules on economic behavior. A-F only.

PUBA 626 Collaborative Public Management (3)

Theories, skills, and tools needed to effectively manage networks in government and nonprofit organizations; explores how to administer, assess performance, and evaluate success in these dynamic new partnerships. Graduate students only or consent. A-F only.

PUBA 627 Managing Workplace Diversity and Inclusion (3)

Examines rationales, impacts, and various dimensions of diversity and inclusion beyond race and gender. Students learn and apply public management tools used to foster workplace diversity and inclusion. A-F only. Pre: 606 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

PUBA 628 ICT Policy and Planning (3)

Processes and methods of planning appropriate to the information and communication sectors, including future economic, social, political, technical, and environmental perspectives. Pre: COM 611 (or concurrent) or consent. (Cross-listed as COM 660)

PUBA 630 Nonprofit Management (3)

Fundamental aspects of managing a nonprofit organization: overview of the nonprofit sector; mission and scope of nonprofit organizations; organizational structures and functions; resource and volunteer development; major management issues. A-F only Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Fall only)

PUBA 631 Nonprofit Management Practices and Tools (3)

Skills and tools needed by nonprofit managers. Topics include but are not limited to grantwriting, strategic planning, business practices, program evaluation, and advocacy. A-F only. Pre: 630 or consent. (Spring only)

PUBA 640 International Perspectives on Public Administration (3)

Key dimensions of public administration systems on a global scale; historic and contemporary forces shaping national systems; the dimensions that distinguish them, the opportunities and constraints for comparison and the transfer of knowledge and experience. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or departmental approval.

PUBA 641 Indigenous Governance (3)

Overview of indigenous governing systems, particularly in the Americas and the Pacific. Students will learn the legal frameworks and principles of these systems, and how services are provided to citizens. A-F only.

PUBA 667 Special Topics (3)

Topics of current interest in the field of public service and public administration, taught by regular and visiting faculty. Repeatable for different topics up to six credit hours. A-F only. Pre: consent.

PUBA 690 MPA Practicum (3)

Placement in public, private, and nonprofit organizations to observe and analyze organizational functions and processes while undertaking projects of use to the host agency. Repeatable one time. PUBA majors only. A-F only. Pre: with a minimum grade of B: 602, 603, and 604.

PUBA 691 Certificate Practicum (3)

Students in the nonprofit management track of the certificate will learn by doing and observing in a nonprofit organization selected in consultation with the student’s advisor. PUBA graduate certificate students only. A-F only.

PUBA 695 Capstone Planning Seminar (3)

Develops topics, methods, objectives, and resources to guide work of capstone seminar. A-F only. Pre: 602, 603, 605, 607.

PUBA 696 Capstone Seminar (3)

Culminates public administration core courses by incorporating theoretical, analytical, and practicum observations into examination of public issues of importance to Hawai‘i and the region. A-F only. Pre: 602, 603, 605, 607.

PUBA 699 Directed Reading (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

PUBA 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology (3)

Basic social relationships, social structures, and processes.

SOC 100A Introduction to Sociology (3)

Basic social relationships, social structures, and processes.

SOC 214 Introduction to Race and Ethnic Relations (3)

Race and ethnic relations in world perspective; social, economic, and political problems associated with perception, existence, and accommodation of these groups within the wider society. (Cross-listed as ES 214)

SOC 218 Introduction to Social Problems (3)

Theoretical and substantive survey of the nature and causes of social problems; selected types: poverty, inequality, deviance, etc

SOC 231 Introduction to Juvenile Delinquency (3)

Forms of juvenile deviance; conditions and processes that result in alienation and deviance of youth. Juvenile corrections as institutionalized societal responses.

SOC 251 Introduction to Sociology of the Family (3)

Family patterns, mate selection, parent-child interaction, socialization of roles, legal sanctions, trends in organization, functions.

SOC 300 Principles of Sociological Inquiry (4)

(3 Lec, 2 50-min Lab) Basic methods of sociology for production and analysis of data. Foundations for understanding research and for advanced courses in methods and statistics.

SOC 300A Principles of Sociological Inquiry (4)

(3 Lec, 2 50-min Lab) Basic methods of sociology for production and analysis of data. Foundations for understanding research and for advanced courses in methods and statistics. Restricted to students in the honors program and required for students taking the honors track in sociology. A-F only.

SOC 301 Survey of Urban Sociology (3)

Urban processes and social problems, such as poverty, crime, racial segregation, homelessness, housing policy, urbanization, and neighborhood ethnic diversity. How places shape identity and opportunity. Research methods applied to communities, places, and neighborhoods of Hawai‘i. (Cross-listed as PLAN 301)

SOC 305 Women and Health (3)

Explores current issues in the conceptualization and delivery of health care for women. Pre: 100 or any 200-level SOC course, or WS 151 or WS 202, or POLS 110; or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 305)

SOC 311 Survey of Social Inequality and Stratification (3)

Introduction to social stratification theory and research; definition and measurement of socioeconomic status; racial, ethnic and gender inequality; differences in lifestyles and life chances; social mobility.

SOC 313 Survey of Sociology of Work (3)

Work from viewpoint of individuals; meaningfulness versus productivity; how work, economics, and the industrial system affect individual goals.

SOC 316 Survey of Social Change (3)

Causes, processes, and effects of social change, using single and multi-cause models in simple and complex industrialized societies.

SOC 318 Women and Social Policy (3)

Social and economic policies affecting women in families, education, social services, government, health care, the economy; public policy implementation and development; policy impact on women. Pre: 100 or any 200-level SOC course, or WS 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course; or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 318)

SOC 321 Survey of Sociological Theory (3)

Major theorists and their influences, from Comte to today.

SOC 332 Survey of Sociology Law (3)

Law as a political enforcement of the social order; how it is organized and operates; determinants of effectiveness; ways it adapts to and facilitates changing social conditions.

SOC 333 Survey of Criminology (3)

Concepts used in crime, law enforcement, criminal justice, and corrections. Types of criminal behavior; costs and effects of control.

SOC 335 Survey of Drugs and Society (3)

Use of mood- and mind-altering drugs in America among adults, youth, and cross-culturally. Illicit drug culture, psychedelics, and perception; social norms and deviant behavior.

SOC 336 Deviant Behavior and Social Control (3)

Interrelations of deviance, criminology, juvenile delinquency, corrections, social control, sociology of law. Key concepts, theories.

SOC 341 Survey of Social Psychology (3)

Major principles; social attitudes, theories of conformity and change, person perception and attribution theory, social role, role conflict and role behavior, group structure, and behavior.

SOC 352 Survey of Sociology of Education (3)

Formal education as one aspect of socialization. Emphasis on American system; business, military, and religious institutions.

SOC 353 Survey of Sociology of Aging (3)

Aging as a social phenomenon, including social impacts of growing elderly population and emerging social patterns among the elderly. Important theoretical perspectives and cross-national research.

SOC 354 Survey of Medical Sociology (3)

Social factors in disease and treatment; illness behavior, roles of patients and healers; nature of healing professions; use of medical services; alternative systems of medical organization.

SOC 356 Chinese Society and Culture (3)

Social institutions, family, community, education, stratification, government, economy; impact of modernization and revolution on their contemporary transformation. A-F only.

SOC 357 Japanese Society and Culture (3)

Persistence and change in economy, policy, religion, education, family, and other institutions of modern Japan.

SOC 358 Sociology of Korea (3)

Social institutions, family, education, religion, cultural values, social classes, economic development, social movements, gender relations, North-South relations, and unification issues. A-F only. Pre: 100 or any 200-level SOC course, or consent.

SOC 362 Sociology of Gender (3)

Effect of sex and gender roles (both traditional and nontraditional) on attitudes and behavior within the family and educational, economic, and governmental systems. Recommended: at least one WS course. Pre: 100 or any 200-level SOC course, WS 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course; or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 362)

SOC 367 Sustainability, Technoscience, and Social Justice (3)

Examines politics of sustainability and technoscience with an explicit attention to social justice and power relations in society. A-F only. Pre: 100 or any 200-level SOC course, or WS 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SUST 367 and WS 367)

SOC 374 Law, Politics and Society (3)

Relationships between law, politics, and society will be explored. Emphasis is placed on several dimensions of legality: legal “indeterminacy” and some of the many things that law does for us and to us; law’s response to violence; the connections between law and social change; access to the law and its sociological dimensions; how/why law fails and what happens when it does. A-F only. Pre: 100 or any 200 level SOC course, or a 100 level or 200 level POLS course, or consent. (Cross-listed as POLS 374)

SOC 400 Food, Body, and Women: Analysis of Biopolitics (3)

Explores how food, body, and other “matter of life” are imbedded in biopolitics from the feminist perspectives. A-F only. Pre: WS 151 or three credits of upper division WS courses, or consent. (Spring only). (Cross-listed as WS 400)

SOC 401 Analysis in Urban Sociology (3)

Urbanization in developed and developing countries, the rural-urban continuum, structure and process of metropolitan regions, theories of urban location and growth, housing and urban renewal.

SOC 411 Analysis in Social Stratification (3)

Approaches to research in social inequality: community studies; historical and cross-cultural analyses of poverty, working class, middle class, power structure, social mobility, etc.

SOC 412 Analysis in Population and Society (3)

Global and U.S. patterns of population growth; composition and distribution, elementary demographic techniques; development issues and population policy. Pre: 300 or consent. (Cross-listed as GHPS 412)

SOC 413 Economy and Society (3)

Study of the dominant trend of economic change and its impact on society; globalization of economic activities and transformation of industrial society to postindustrial one; corporate restructuring and downsizing and their impact on employment and income distribution; gender relations in workplaces; the impact of globalization on the newly industrializing countries. Pre: 300 or consent.

SOC 415 Technology and Society (3)

Nature of technology, social forces that affect its adoption; impact on society; innovation.

SOC 418 Women and Work (3)

Gender and racial division of labor nationally and internationally; racial and gender differentials in wages, training, working conditions and unemployment; historical trends and future directions. Pre: 300, or one 300-level WS or ES course; or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 418 and WS 418)

SOC 419 Organizations and Society (3)

Schools, hospitals, industries, prisons, and government agencies analyzed in terms of self-actualization, alienation, human relations, communication, leadership, organizational conflicts.

SOC 431 Analysis in Criminology/Juvenile Delinquency (3)

Research in systematic social deviation. Scaling and measurement of delinquents/ criminals, official data, gangs, identification and measurement of delinquent/criminal value orientations, etc.

SOC 432 Analysis in Corrections (3)

Behavioral assumptions of various correctional practices and modes of organization; current “in-community” approaches.

SOC 433 Analysis in Law and Social Change (3)

Interrelationships between legal orders and other social institutions; use of “law” to change major status relationships, e.g., boss-worker, woman-man, child-adult.

SOC 435 Women and Crime (3)

Women’s relations with the criminal justice system; types of women’s offenses; responses to women’s crime; women as victims; women as workers in the criminal justice system. Recommended: at least one WS course. Pre: 300, or WS 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course; or consent. ((Cross-listed as WS 435)

SOC 441 Social Structure and the Individual (3)

Effects of social institutions on individuals. Role of socioeconomic status, cultural background, family structure, peer group, schools, and occupational roles in socialization.

SOC 445 Analysis in Gender Violence (3)

Historical and structural theories of gender-based violence, including domestic and sexual abuse, prostitution, trafficking, cross-cultural perspectives, social policy and practices. Junior standing or graduate standing only. Pre: 300 or consent. (Once a year)

SOC 446 Gender Violence Over the Lifecycle (3)

Examines the problem of violence, particularly sexual violence, over the life cycle. Offers gendered perspective in activities aimed at prevention and treatment of violence, and cross cultural perspectives. Pre: 300, WS 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course; or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 446)

SOC 451 Analysis in Marriage and the Family (3)

Theory and methods of studying social interaction in marriage and the family; examination of marriage, mating, love, and choice. Empirical research emphasizing Hawai‘i.

SOC 452 Marriage and Family: A Feminist Perspective (3)

Sex-role socialization, motherhood, work-family conflicts. Alternative family structures in U.S. and other countries. Recommended: at least one WS course. Pre: 300, or WS 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course; or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 452)

SOC 453 Analysis in Sociology of Aging (3)

Social and research issues significant to delivery of long-term care services to the elderly; cost, quality, availability of services, evaluation of programs, role of family, formal and informal care services.

SOC 454 Analysis in Medical Sociology (3)

Application of sociological theories and concepts to medical social situations and behavior; problems of obtaining data for research.

SOC 455 Sociology of Religion (3)

Seminar in research on sociological aspects of religious sectarianism; attention to Hawai‘i. Pre: 300 or consent. (Cross-listed as REL 452)

SOC 456 Racism and Ethnicity in Hawai‘i (3)

The historical and contemporary social processes involved in inter-ethnic relations in Hawai‘i. Pre: 300 or one ES 300 level course, or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 456)

SOC 457 Sociology of the Arts (3)

Relation of art to society; role of artist, audience, critic, patron, museum; Western and other societies; attitudes toward new styles.

SOC 458 Analysis in Sports and Society (3)

Critical perspectives on sports and society. Topics include power and inequality; mobility, status, and economics; youth development; globalization; gender; and violence in sports and the wider society. Pre: 300 and 321. (Spring only)

SOC 459 Popular Culture (3)

Popular culture as manifested in film, sports, TV, comics, magazines, etc.; relation to sociological theories and studies.

SOC 475 Analysis in Survey Research (3)

Survey research design and analysis, including theory selection instrument construction, sampling techniques, data collection, computerized data analysis, and writing up research reports of the findings.

SOC 476 Social Statistics (3)

Common statistical procedures emphasizing univariate and bivariate description; some attention to multivariate techniques and statistical inference, within context of research procedures. Pre: 300 or consent. Co-requisite: 476L.

SOC 476L Social Statistics Laboratory (1)

Required lab for computer applications for analysis of sociological data. CR/NC only. Co-requisite: 476.

SOC 478 Analysis in Field Research Methods (3)

Techniques for collecting and analyzing qualitative data. Participant observation; small groups in natural settings; community studies. Grounded theory; theories of everyday life; reality construction.

SOC 491 Discussion Group Leader–Freshman Seminar (6)

Students lead a freshman seminar section of sociology and meet weekly with instructor for substantive background.

SOC 492 Politics of Multiculturalism (3)

The development of ethnic relations and political approaches to multiculturalism in two multiethnic nations: Canada and the U.S. A-F only. Pre: 300 or one 300 level ES course, or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 492)

SOC 494 Social Sciences Internship (V)

Internship in public, private, or non-profit organizations providing opportunity for practical experience and application of social sciences concepts and theories. Three to six credits per semester; repeatable two times, up to 12 credits. Consent of instructor. (Cross-listed as SOCS 489)

SOC 495 Topics in Sociology (3)

Topics course that explore current issues and try new ideas. Repeatable two times. Pre: 300 or consent.

SOC 496 Topics in Sociology: Student Projects (V)

Students create their own study group and solicit an advisor from faculty. Consult department for assistance.

SOC 499 Directed Reading or Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: 300 and consent of instructor.

SOC 500 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1)

Enrollment for degree completion. Pre: master’s Plan B or C candidate and consent.

SOC 605 Statistics for Regression Analysis (3)

Dealing with the multiple linear regression and logistic regression models, focusing on modeling, i.e., specification of the explanatory variables to answer different research questions. Emphasis on applications using statistical package programs. SOC 605L is required.

SOC 605L Regression Analysis Laboratory (1)

Lab for computer analysis skills is required for students taking 605. CR/NC only. Co-requisite: 605.

SOC 606 Research Methods and Design (3)

Emphasis on theory selection, theory construction, and choice of research strategies.

SOC 607 Seminar in Methods of Content Analysis (3)

Content analysis combines quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze text systematically. Covers sampling and case selection; manual and computer-assisted methods of coding and analyzing textual data; writing reports using content analysis data. Repeatable one time. (Once a year)

SOC 608 Survey Research Design and Analysis (3)

Survey study designs, survey sampling, questionnaire construction, interviewing, pre-tests, pilot studies, logic of measurement and association, table construction, and elaboration models. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as EDEA 608 and EDEP 602)

SOC 609 Seminar Qualitative Research (3)

Advanced seminar on conducting fieldwork in natural social settings with emphasis on qualitative techniques, political and ethical considerations, data management and assessment, interpretation and reflexive writing. Repeatable one time.

SOC 611 Classical Sociological Theory (3)

Seminar offers a critical overview of major perspectives and representative works in sociological theory from 19thcentury to the 1960s, including intellectual contexts and historical development. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing. (Fall only)

SOC 612 Contemporary Sociological Theory (3)

Seminar offers a critical overview of major perspectives and representative works in sociology theory from the 1960s to the present, including intellectual contexts and historical development. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing. (Spring only)

SOC 613 Organizational Analysis (3)

Theoretical approaches to organizations; organizational structure and process; organizational pathologies and effectiveness; the organization and its environment.

SOC 615 Medical Sociology (3)

Covers the major paradigms in medical sociology for analyzing social epidemiology, the political economy of health systems, health service organizations, health and wellness behaviors illness perception and help-seeking, doctor-patient interaction, and adaptations to illness. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

SOC 616 Seminar in Stress and Health (3)

Analysis of current theory and empirical research on relationship of stress and health; sociological, psychological, and community psychiatry models and current issues.

SOC 617 Sociology of Mental Health and Illness (3)

Examines sociological research and theories about mental health and illness. A key question in medical sociology will be addressed: What is the relationship between society and mental health? Repeatable one time.

SOC 620 Seminar in Social Stratification (3)

Classical theories of social class, contemporary developments; crucial research issues, appropriate methodologies. Repeatable one time only. Pre: classified graduate standing or consent.

SOC 625 Feminist Criminology (3)

Key themes in feminist criminology are explored including focus on masculinities and crime, race and intersectionality, global criminology, and the ways in which the criminal justice system controls women and girls. A-F only. (Cross-listed as WS 625)

SOC 631 Seminar in Criminology (3)

Major current theories, history of their development, elaborations of typologies, implications for treatment modalities.

SOC 632 Criminal Justice System (3)

Examination of the criminal justice system; the exercise of discretion and limits placed upon it. Pre: consent.

SOC 638 American Punishment (3)

Examines the history of American criminal punishment, from the birth of the penitentiary to the rise of the prison industrial complex. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing. (Cross-listed as AMST 638)

SOC 651 Introduction to Human Population (3)

Comparative analysis of quantitative and qualitative aspects of population; factors affecting size, distribution, and composition; impact of population size and composition on society.

SOC 659 Methods of Demographic Analysis (3)

Statistical evaluation and analysis of population data; data sources; population growth; composition; standardization of rates; mortality and the life table; nuptiality and fertility; distribution, migration, urbanization; projections and stable population theory. (Cross-listed as GHPS 659 and PH 659)

SOC 660 Teaching Seminar (3)

Examines research on teaching, learning, and ethics, as well as practical skills for teaching at the university level. Syllabi and teaching philosophies are developed, which are useful for the academic job market. Graduate standing only.

SOC 670 Sociology of Sustainability (3)

Analyses of sustainability, environmental, and technoscience issues from sociological perspectives. Graduate students only. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SUST 670)

SOC 699 Directed Reading/Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

SOC 700 Thesis Research (V)

Research for master’s thesis. Repeatable unlimited times.

SOC 701 Seminar in Evaluation Research (3)

Research design, data collection, field problems and analysis in the evaluation of social programs. Examples from criminal justice, corrections, drug treatment, mental health, and public health.

SOC 705 Advanced Statistics (3)

Dealing with advanced statistical methods beyond multiple linear regression, such as logit, event history analysis, and multi-level analysis. Emphasis is on applications of the techniques to social science research. Repeatable one time only.

SOC 706 Cultural Analysis (3)

Contemporary issues in cultural sociology, covering key theoretical perspectives, analytic methods and substantive areas for empirical research. A-F only.

SOC 711 Seminar in Sociology of Knowledge (3)

Sociological theory applied to bases of knowledge in everyday life, professional communities, and the sciences. Research and theory-building activities of sociologists; ethnomethodology; construction of social structure, culture, and consciousness. Repeatable one time only.

SOC 715 Seminar in Current Issues in Sociology (3)

Substantive areas that are of current interest and the focus of research, but not addressed in other courses. Repeatable two times.

SOC 716 Advanced Medical Sociology (3)

Application of theoretical paradigms and methodologies to the examination of selected research topics in the field of medical sociology. Repeatable one time. Pre: 615 or consent.

SOC 718 Seminar in Aging, Culture, and Health (3)

Overview of the major theories, perspectives, and empirical findings relating to aging in various cultural contexts. SOC, PSY, NURS, SW, PH majors only. Pre: 606 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

SOC 719 Comparative Family and Gender (3)

Discusses the major perspectives on family and gender relations and examines related empirical research. Emphasis is on the cross-cultural comparisons across the U.S. and Asia in the context of globalizing economies and cultures. A-F only. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as GHPS 719)

SOC 720 Comparative Study of East Asia (3)

Comparative analysis of social organization, social processes, and change of both capitalist and communist countries of East Asia, with each other and other areas of the world. Repeatable one time. Pre: 611 or consent.

SOC 721 Social Change–Pacific Islands (3)

Analysis of social change; transformation from subsistence societies to commodified, wage-labor societies with participation in world economy.

SOC 722 Modern Japanese Society (3)

Social and behavioral studies of Japanese values, social organization, and personality development. Problems of value conflict, political protest, world role, tradition, and social change. Repeatable one time only.

SOC 723 Seminar in Modern Chinese Society (3)

Developmental policies, social change, and impact on modern Chinese social institutions. Includes China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. May include social and demographic change, population, social stratification, gender, and family problems. Repeatable one time.

SOC 725 (Alpha) Seminar in Race and Ethnicity (3)

An examination of how ideas of “race” and “ethnicity” are constructed, and how this reflects and shapes social structures and relationships: (B) antiracism studies; (C) ethnic identity and nationalism: cooperation and conflict; (D) race, place, and inequality. Repeatable up to two times in different alphas. Graduate students only. (Alt. years)

SOC 730 Conflict Analysis/Resolution (3)

Seminar on the analysis of conflict resolution. Faculty from law, planning, political science and guest practitioners will present multidisciplinary analysis and intervention strategies on contemporary conflicts. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

SOC 741 Seminar in Social Structure and the Individual (3)

Intensive study and individual research projects in a selected topic. Theoretical and methodological issues in relating social and individual levels of analysis. Recommended: 612.

SOC 750 Seminar in Social Movements (3)

Study of sociology of social movements, plus independent student research. Repeatable one time.

SOC 751 Development in Asia (3)

Theories and available research methods examined for applicability to developing areas; specific examples from Asia. A-F only. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

SOC 753 Urban Sociology (3)

Demographic trends in urban growth: nature and dimensions of urbanization and urbanism; ancient, American, and Third World cities; ecological theories of urban growth; lifestyles.

SOC 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Research for doctoral dissertation. Repeatable unlimited times.

SOCS 124 Leadership and Social Issues (3)

Fosters understanding of key societal and community issues, social science perspectives on them, the qualities of effective leadership, and invites examination of personal responsibilities, intentions, and abilities to make a difference on those issues. A-F only.

SOCS 150 Street Science: Evaluating and Applying Evidence in Daily Life (3)

Develops necessary tools for effective reasoning and problem-solving through use and application of analytic techniques, including question formation, understanding/interpreting data presented in the public sphere, and evaluating the validity of sources. A-F only.

SOCS 150A Street Science: Evaluating and Applying Evidence in Daily Life (3)

Develops necessary tools for effective reasoning and problem-solving through use and application of analytic techniques, including question formation, understanding/interpreting data presented in the public sphere, and evaluating the validity of sources. A-F only.

SOCS 180 Introduction to International and Global Studies (3)

Introduces undergraduate students to the major political, social, economic, cultural, technological, and historical dimensions of globalization. Special attention will be paid to globalization process that have impacted Hawai‘i and the Asia-Pacific region. A-F only. (Cross-listed as POLS 160)

SOCS 225 Statistical Analysis for Social Sciences (3)

Statistical reasoning in the analysis of social science data, including descriptive statistics, exploratory data analysis, inference measures of association, decomposition of variance, and regression analysis. Lab required. Pre: any 100 level social science course or consent.

SOCS 250 Introduction to Sustainability from Social Science Perspectives (3)

Introduction to key concepts and theories in social sciences in relation to sustainability issues. (Cross-listed as SUST 250 and TAHR 250)

SOCS 251 Scientific Principles of Sustainability (3)

Introduction to the scientific principles of sustainability, including the ecology of managed and natural ecosystems, global change biology, ecological principles of natural resource management, renewable energy technologies, and the environmental impacts of humans. (Cross-listed as NREM 251 and TPSS 251)

SOCS 385 Service Learning (1)

Intended for students undertaking the service learning option in another course in the College of Social Sciences. Discussions on student’s experiences, types of learning occurring, and issues encountered in service learning activities in the community. Repeatable two times. CR/NC only.

SOCS 489 Social Sciences Internship (V)

Internship in public, private, or non-profit organizations providing opportunity for practical experience and application of social sciences concepts and theories. Three to six credits per semester; repeatable two times, up to 12 credits. Consent of instructor. (Cross-listed as SOC 494)

SOCS 601 Topics in Teaching Innovations (3)

Examination and critical analysis of contemporary curriculum and instruction issues in social sciences. Concepts, theories, principles underlying active learning, critical thinking, values inquiry, assessment, and multidisciplinary approaches to integration of knowledge.

SOCS 735 Ocean Policy and Management (3)

Interdisciplinary approach to problems relating to humans and their interactions with the world’s oceans and coasts. Focus includes institutions for governing the world’s oceans and coasts at all scales and on the role of scientific knowledge in managing marine and coastal resources. Repeatable one time. Pre: OCN 331, GEOG 435, or consent. (Cross-listed as. (Cross-listed as OEST 735)

WS 149 Introduction to the World’s Goddesses (3)

Cross-cultural analysis of the religious narratives, beliefs, practices, iconography, and sacred sites related to female deities in the Americas, Polynesia, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Europe from prehistory to 1500 C.E. (Cross-listed as REL 149)

WS 151 Introduction to Women’s Studies (3)

Introduction to feminist interdisciplinary analysis from global and critical perspectives; relationships between women and men from Asia-Pacific, Hawaiian, and other cultures, with a focus on gender, race, class, and sexual dynamics; exploration of women’s negotiations with institutional dynamics.

WS 151A Introduction to Women’s Studies (3)

Introduction to feminist interdisciplinary analysis from global and critical perspectives; relationships between women and men from Asia-Pacific, Hawaiian, and other cultures. Focus on gender, race, class, sexual dynamics, and women’s negotiations with institutional dynamics. Honors students only. A-F only. Pre: departmental approval.

WS 175 History of Gender, Sex, and Sexuality in Global Perspectives to 1500 CE (3)

Explores how gender, sex, and sexuality become key elements in human society from prehistory to 1500 CE. Examines ancient world civilizations from multiple perspectives stressing issues and forces still influential today. A-F only. (Fall only)

WS 176 History of Gender, Sex and Sexuality in Global Perspective, 1500 CE to the Present (3)

Explores how gender, sex, and sexuality become key elements in human society from 1500 CE to present. Examines world cultures from multiple perspectives, stressing issues and forces of continuing influence. A-F only.

WS 200 Culture, Gender, and Appearance (3)

Social construction of gender within culture and its visual expression through appearance. Analysis of role, identity, conformity, and deviance in human appearance. Repeatable one time. Open to nonmajors. (Cross-listed as FDM 200)

WS 202 Psychology of Gender (3)

Survey of topics in psychology relevant to women’s lives: socialization of gender, mental health, violence against women, achievement motivation, lifespan issues, domestic violence. A-F only. Pre: 151 or PSY 100. (Cross-listed as PSY 202)

WS 230 Gender and Sport (3)

Explores the influence of gender in sport from cultural, psychosocial, and political perspectives. Examines women’s and men’s role as participants, spectators, and employees of sport and sports organizations. A-F only. Pre: one DS course.

WS 245 Women Writers of World Literature (3)

Major women writers of world literature examined in context of female literary tradition. Pre: one of ENG 100A, 101, or ELI 100; or consent.

WS 304 Women, War, and the Military (3)

The military as it includes and excludes women as soldiers, nurses, wives, prostitutes, and victims. Women and war economics; feminism, war, and peace. Pre: one of 151, 362, 375 or SOC 362; or consent

WS 305 Women and Health (3)

Explores current issues in the conceptualization and delivery of health care for women. Pre: 151 or 202, or SOC 100 or any 200-level SOC course, or POLS 110; or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 305)

WS 306 Indigenous Women’s Health (3)

Examines issues of indigenous women’s health pre and post colonial in Hawai‘i, Asia, and the Pacific regions. A-F only. Pre: one of 151, 202, 305; or HWST 107, HWST 270 or HWST 285; or consent.

WS 310 U.S. Women’s History to 1890s (3)

A survey of history of U.S. women and gender relations up to 1890s. Emphasis on women’s labor, women’s involvement in social movement, development of suffrage movement, women’s literary and popular culture. Pre: AMST 201 (or concurrent), or AMST 202 (or concurrent), or WS 151 or WS 151A (or concurrent), or consent.

WS 311 U.S. Women’s History (3)

History of U.S. women and gender relations. Topics include women’s work in and outside the household, women’s involvement in social movements, changing norms about gender and sexuality, and shared and divergent experiences among women. (Cross-listed as AMST 316 and HIST 361)

WS 315 Sex and Gender (3)

Cross-cultural theories and perceptions of sexual difference; linkage between biology and cultural constructions of gender; relationship of gender ideology to women’s status. Pre: ANTH 152 (or concurrent). (Cross-listed as ANTH 315)

WS 318 Women and Social Policy (3)

Social and economic policies affecting women in families, education, social services, government, health care, the economy; public policy implementation and development; policy impact on women. Pre: 151 or any 200- or 300-level course, or SOC 100 or any 200-level SOC course; or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 318)

WS 339 South Asian Migrants: Culture and Politics (3)

Historical and contemporary experiences of South Asian migrants in North America, Pacific, Caribbean, and/or African diasporas; causes and patterns of migration, inter-ethnic relations policies; role of race, gender, culture in community, identity formation. A-F only. Pre one ES or WS course in the 100, 200 or 300 level; or consent. (Once a year (Cross-listed as ES 339)

WS 345 20th-Century Literature by Women (3)

Twentieth-century women writers and their works; novels, short stories, poems, autobiographies. Interrelations of gender and literature. Pre: one of 151, 175, 176, and 245; or consent.

WS 346 20th-Century Chinese Women Writers (3)

A survey and critical examination of contemporary Chinese women writers from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Traces a genealogy of women’s writing from the early 1920s up until now through novels, poetry, drama, and film. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 364 and EALL 364)

WS 350 Sex Differences in the Life Cycle (3)

Human sex differences, their biological basis and significance; genetic, hormonal, and behavioral determinants of sexual differentiation; biology of gender, sexuality, menopause, and aging. Pre: one semester of biological sciences. (Cross-listed as BIOL 350)

WS 351 Women, Ideas, and Society (3)

Status of women in American society today in light of the cultural, historical, and philosophical forces that have produced it. Pre: HIST 151 and HIST 152; or consent.

WS 356 Women and Religion (3)

Examining roles of, and attitudes toward, women in major religious traditions through autobiographies, films, and primary texts. Pre: 151 or ANTH 152 or REL 150. (Crosslisted as REL 356)

WS 360 Pacific/Asian Women in Hawai‘i (3)

Adaptive strategies of Hawaiian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Samoan, and Southeast Asian women in Hawai‘i; feminist anthropological and historical analysis. Pre: any ANTH, SOC, or WS course. (Cross-listed as ES 365)

WS 361 Seminar: Women and International Development (3)

Topics: Women’s role, status, work and treatment in the Third World; economic development, changing work/family roles, agriculture and business, improvement/deterioration in gender equity across the Third World global feminization of poverty. Open to nonmajors. Pre: a 100 level economics course or any women’s studies course; or consent. (Cross-listed as ECON 361)

WS 362 Sociology of Gender (3)

Effect of sex and gender roles (both traditional and nontraditional) on attitudes and behavior within the family and educational, economic, and governmental systems. Recommended: at least one WS course. Pre: 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course, or SOC 100 or any 200-level SOC course; or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 362)

WS 367 Sustainability, Technoscience, and Social Justice (3)

Examines politics of sustainability and technoscience with an explicit attention to social justice and power relations in society. A-F only. Pre: 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course, or 100 or any 200-level SOC course, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as SOC 367 and SUST 367)

WS 375 Women and the Media (3)

Media
portrayal of women and men; role of the media in
reproducing gender inequality. Women as producers
and consumers of media. Feminist alternatives to
mainstream media. Pre: one of 151, 362, SOC 362.

WS 381 Gender, Sexuality and Literature (3)

Basic concepts and representative texts for the study of literary constructions of gender and sexuality. Pre: one ENG DL course or consent. (Cross-listed as ENG 382)

WS 382 Island Feminisms: Art, Literature, and Culture (3)

Examines island feminisms and explores ways women have engaged in various forms of cultural production (art, literature, film). Interdisciplinary, intersectional, and transnational. Key themes discussed: settler-colonialism, race, gender, and sexuality.

WS 384 Women and Politics (3)

Women’s role in political institutions and processes in the U.S. and other countries; female and male approaches to power; feminist political goals and actions. Pre: 151 (or concurrent) or 362 (or concurrent) or any 100 level POLS course (or concurrent); or consent. (Cross-listed as POLS 384)

WS 390 Gender and Race in U.S. Society (3)

Historical and sociological studies of race and gender in U.S. society; grassroots feminist and racial/justice activism on the continent and in Hawai‘i. A-F only. Pre: 151 or ES 101 or junior standing. (Cross-listed as ES 390)

WS 392 Sexualities (3)

Multi-disciplinary course draws from psychology, sociology, biology, history, cultural anthropology, law, Hawaiian, ethnic, feminist, gender, and queer studies to explore human sexualities with emphasis on the U.S., Hawai‘i and the AsiaPacific regions. A-F only. Pre: one of 151, 202, 315 or 350; or consent.

WS 394 Co-ops, Communes, Collectives (3)

Theory and practice of democratic organizations: women’s and feminist organizations; co-ops, communes, and collectives; indigenous people’s organizations; workplace democracy and social change. A-F only. Pre: any 100- or 200-level POLS course or 390 (or concurrent) or WS 151, or consent. (Cross-listed as POLS 394)

WS 399 Directed Reading (V)

Pre: consent. Repeatable eight times, up to 45 credits.

WS 400 Food, Body, and Women: Analysis of Biopolitics (3)

Explores how food, body, and other “matter of life” are imbedded in biopolitics from the feminist perspectives. A-F only. Pre: 151 or three credits of upper division WS courses, or consent. (Spring only). (Cross-listed as SOC 400)

WS 410 Gender and Politics in U.S.-Okinawa Relations (3)

Examines gender in Okinawa in relation to historical dynamics in the Asia-Pacific region with attention to issues such as militarism and violence, colonialism and memory, and tourism and commodification of indigenous culture. A-F only. Pre: 151 or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 410)

WS 414 Women in Drama and Theater (3)

The role of women and their representation in the theater from ancient Greece to the present; focus on the sociopolitical status of women. Pre: THEA 311 or consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 414)

WS 418 Women and Work (3)

Gender and racial division of labor nationally and internationally; racial and gender differentials in wages, training, working conditions and unemployment; historical trends and future directions. Pre: one 300-level WS or ES course, or SOC 300; or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 418 and SOC 418)

WS 419 Feminist Issues in Philosophy (3)

Examination of basic feminist issues in philosophy, and of responses to them. Pre: any course 200 or above in PHIL or WS, or consent. (Cross-listed as PHIL 418)

WS 424 Gender, Sexuality, and Cyberspace (3)

Students learn how gender and sexuality are constructed online and produce a website to post their analysis and contribute to knowledge production about gender and sexuality in cyberspace. A-F only.

WS 426 The Anthropology of Sexuality (3)

Explores the intersection of sexuality research and queer theory with other anthropological concerns such as identity, race, gender, religion, economy, politics, and globalization. A-F only. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ANTH 426)

WS 430 Seminar in the Biology of Women (3)

Embryological, anatomical, and physiological development of human female; hormonal, neural, and behavioral determinants of female sexual behavior; psychobiology of pregnancy, ovariectomy, and menopause. Pre: 350 or BIOL 172 or BIOL 350, or
consent.

WS 434 Women and Madness (3)

Interdisciplinary critical examination of the relationship between gender and mental health. Psychological research, feminist theory, autobiography, literature, and cinema. Pre: one of 202, 245, PSY 202; or consent.

WS 435 Women and Crime (3)

Women’s relations with the criminal justice system; types of women’s offenses; responses to women’s crime; women as victims; women as workers in the criminal justice system. Recommended: at least one WS course. Pre: 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course, or SOC 300; or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 435)

WS 436 Gender, Justice and Law (3)

Exploration of landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases related to sex and gender. Topics may include sex discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, privacy, and reproductive freedom. A-F only. Pre: one of 151, 175, 176, 202, 360, 381, or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 436 and POLS 368)

WS 437 Gender and Violence (3)

Interdisciplinary course will examine western constructs of gender
violence on its correlates with ethnicity, class, sexuality, nation, and empire. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: one of 151, 202, 360, 361, 439, 460, 462, or consent

WS 438 Gender and Environmental Philosophy (3)

Interdisciplinary approach to women’s perspectives and roles on ecological and environmental issues; critical analysis of eco-feminism as a social and political movement; cross-cultural comparison of women’s roles in human ecology. Pre: any course 200 or above in PHIL or WS or any course 200 or above with a DB or DP designation, or consent. (Crosslisted as PHIL 438)

WS 439 Feminist Theory (3)

Contemporary debates in feminist theory concerning gender, race, and class; subjectivity and representation; gender and colonialism; bodies, sexualities and “nature.” Pre: any 300 level WS or POLS course, or consent. (Crosslisted as POLS 339)

WS 440 Feminist Methods and Research (3)

Overview of feminist issues with dominant theories of knowledge and major methodologies employed in the social sciences; and exploration of role of gender theory and feminist politics in feminist research. Pre: 151 or consent.

WS 444 Gender and Consumption in a Global World (3)

Students learn theories of the global economy, histories of consumerism, constructions
of gendered public spaces, and how the cultural production of consumers and consumer culture functions in the process of globalization. A-F only.

WS 445 U.S. Women’s Literature and Culture (3)

Reading of selected works of U.S. women’s literature and cultural texts (such as art and film). Emphasis on historical and cultural context and diverse expressions of women’s gendered identities. (Cross-listed as AMST 455 and ENG 455)

WS 446 Gender Violence Over the Lifecycle (3)

Examines the problem of violence, particularly sexual violence, over the life cycle. Offers gendered perspective in activities aimed at prevention and treatment of violence, and cross cultural perspectives. Pre: 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course, SOC 300; or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 446)

WS 452 Marriage and Family: Feminist Perspective (3)

Sex-role socialization, motherhood, work-family conflicts. Alternative family structures in U.S. and other countries. Recommended: at least one WS course. Pre: 151 or any 200- or 300-level WS course, or SOC 300; or consent. (Cross-listed as SOC 452)

WS 453 Gender Issues in Education (3)

Examination of current and historical issues in education and how they are impacted upon by gender, with particular reference to gender as it intersects with ethnicity and class, locally and globally. Pre: 151 or consent. (Cross-listed as EDCS 453 and EDEF 453)

WS 454 Gender, Sexuality, and Global Popular Culture (3)

A study of gender, race, and sexuality as constructed in contemporary global popular culture, including music, films, novels, television shows, and internet culture. A-F only. Junior standing or higher.

WS 456 Politics of Men and Masculinity in U.S. Culture (3)

Examines American understandings of man, manhood, and masculinity, at the intersection of gender, race, class, and sexuality in the context of American nation and empire building in the 19th and 20th centuries. A-F only. Pre: one of 151, 175, 176, or 202; or consent.

WS 460 Feminism, Nation and Empire (3)

Examines U.S. feminist movements in the 19th and 20th century by exploring how U.S. racism, nationalism and imperialism have provided the context from which feminism emerged. A-F only. Pre: 151, 360; or consent.

WS 462 Women and Globalization in Asia (3)

History, culture, and contemporary reality of Asian women in Asia and the U.S. Includes critical analysis of American feminist methodology and theory. Pre: 360, 361, or 439 or AMST 310, AMST 316, AMST 318, AMST 373, AMST 455, or POLS 339; or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 438 and POLS 372)

WS 463 Gender Issues in Asian Society (3)

Construction of gender identities in contemporary Asia. How these interface with other aspects of social difference and inequality (e.g. with class, religion, ethnicity). (Cross-listed as ASAN 463)

WS 465 Science, Sex, and Reproduction (3)

Explores anthropology’s critical analysis of approaches to reproductive health and procreation, primarily in developing countries. Examines sex and reproduction as sites of intervention from public health, development, and biomedical specialists, while also considering local strategies. A-F only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 151 or ANTH 152 or ANTH 301. (Alt. years: Fall) (Cross-listed as ANTH 465)

WS 481 Women and Film (3)

Exploration of film as a philosophical and artistic form in the context of gender, race, and sexuality. Pre: one of 151, 175, 176, and THEA 201; or consent.

WS 483 Studies in Literature and Sexuality and Gender (3)

Intensive study of selected problems and issues in the construction and representation of sexuality and gender in specific genres, social and cultural contexts, thematic or figurative clusters. Repeatable one time. Pre: ENG 320 and one other 300-level ENG course; or consent. (Cross-listed as ENG 482)

WS 489 Social Sciences Internship (V)

Internship in public, private, or non-profit organizations providing opportunity for practical experience and application of social sciences concepts and theories. Three to six credits per semester; repeatable two times, up to 12 credits. Consent of instructor.

WS 492 Women and Revolution (3)

Conditions under which women’s activism and participation in protest and revolutionary movements developed in the 19th- and 20th-centuries. Cross-cultural comparisons. (Cross-listed as ASAN 492 and HIST 492)

WS 493 Trans* Studies: Trans(feminine/masculine/ gender nonconforming/sexual) (3)

Focus on various aspects of Trans* identities, biographies, cultural productions, and communities. It also addresses issues on racism, medical intervention, dating, societal condemnation, mental health, and incarceration. Junior standing or higher.

WS 495 Selected Topics (3)

Problems and issues for reading and research: feminist theory, criticism, affirmative action, etc. Repeatable two times. Pre: any WS course in appropriate area.

WS 496 Teaching Women’s Studies (3)

Strategies for teaching women’s studies; addressing complex issues of gender, race, nation, class, sexuality and culture in a contemporary multiethnic campus environment. Emphasis on classroom techniques, teaching pedagogies, and hands-on experience. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 151 and one or more WS course with a grade of B or better in all relevant courses, instructor recommendation; or consent.

WS 499 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Repeatable one time, up to six credits. WS students only. Pre: consent.

WS 602 Transnational Feminist Teaching and Research (3)

Introductory graduate seminar designed to develop common vocabulary and explore the core debates in transnational feminist teaching and research to encourage critical reflection about teaching assumptions, approaches, and techniques in the contemporary college or university environment. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing and no waiver.

WS 610 Faculty Seminar Series (1)

Seminar/ discussion to introduce students pursuing the Graduate Certificate to the Woman’s Studies faculty and their areas of research, and to initiate student’s graduate studies in a woman’s studies field. Repeatable one time. Pre: classified graduate status (or status pending) and consent.

WS 612 Women in American Culture (3)

Historical/contemporary status of women in the U.S.; women’s roles as defined by legal, educational, political, economic, and social institutions; implications for social science method. (Cross-listed as AMST 612)

WS 613 Feminist Research and Methods of Inquiry (3)

Examination of an emergent body of literature about how to shape questions concerning gender, sex, race, class, colonialism, and other vectors of power. Includes methods from social sciences and humanities and debates in the philosophy of science. Repeatable one time. Pre: classified graduate status and consent.

WS 615 Feminist Theory (3)

Selected ideas from contemporary feminist theory concerning power, knowledge, and self; articulating women’s voice; deconstructing gender. Repeatable one time. (Cross-listed as POLS 615C)

WS 618 Writing and Publishing in an Interdisciplinary Field (3)

Writing-intensive and publishing-focused class, students learn how to publish in an interdisciplinary field. Readings and assignments are designed to help students succeed in academic publishing. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: consent.

WS 620 Feminism and Its “Others” (3)

Relationship between feminist and other sites of critical insight and scholarship that have contributed to creating anticolonial, antiracist, antihomophobic theory, method and action. Questions the legacy of feminist coalition practices and engages the ongoing transformations that have begun to produce new alliances and coalitions that disrupt traditional boundaries of identity and power. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing, no waiver.

WS 623 Topics in Feminist Social Policy Research (3

Feminist social scientists from a variety of fields have explored issues of gender, social change and social justice. Draws from their work to critically examine strategies for conducting social policy research that is feminist in values and impact. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing, no waiver.

WS 625 Feminist Criminology (3)

Key themes in feminist criminology are explored including focus on masculinities and crime, race and intersectionality, global criminology, and the ways in which the criminal justice system controls women and girls. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SOC 625)

WS 647 Gender: Law and Conflicts (V)

Examines how international law and domestic legal systems address and resolve conflicts regarding women’s rights, gender roles, and gender identity. Takes a comparative approach with emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region. (Cross-listed as LAW 547 and PACE 637)

WS 650 Research in Feminist Studies: Capstone Experience (2)

Provide women’s studies graduate certificate students with an opportunity to design, develop and complete a research project culminating in a publishable quality work and a professional quality seminar presentation. A-F only. Pre: classified graduate status and consent.

WS 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Pre: classified graduate standing and consent of chair.

WS 753 (Alpha) Research Seminar in Chinese Literature (3)

Study of authors, a genre, a period, or a problem. (M) modern; (T) traditional. Repeatable one time for (M). A-F only for (M). Pre: 613, 615, 650, or EALL 611; or consent for (M); CHN 612 or consent for (T). (Cross-listed as CHN 753 (Alpha))