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Colleges of Arts & Sciences

ACM 210 Introduction to Cinematic Digital Production (3)

Introduction to the basic techniques of cinematic digital production and allows them to explore their personal voice in this process. A-F only.

ACM 215 Introduction to 3D Computer Animation (3)

A basic overview of the 3D animation production process, including modeling, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting, and rendering. A-F only. Pre: 255.

ACM 216 Fundamentals of Animation (3)

Introduction to traditional styles and methods of hand drawn 2D, digital, and stop motion animation through theory and practice. A-F only. Pre: 255 and ART 113, or consent.

ACM 255 Introduction to Cinema and Digital Media (3)

Introduction to the study of cinema: history, aesthetics, and cultural impact. A-F only.

ACM 310 Cinematic Narrative Production (3)

Production-intensive course with collaborative as well as individual projects. Theories and application of basic digital cinema productions, including camera, lighting, sound, and editing. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 255 (or concurrent).

ACM 312 Cinematography (3)

Comprehensive course in visual styles supporting screen narratives through a study of principles of camera elements, operations, lighting, color and composition. Professional role and responsibilities of cinematographer. Project-oriented. Must have access to manually controlled still camera. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310.

ACM 314 Experimental Art and Animation (3)

Provides students an opportunity to experiment with new mediums while collaborating with artists from different backgrounds, such as art, theatre, dance, film, and animation. ACM, ART, THEA, DNCE majors only. Pre: 216 (or concurrent) or ART 113 or THEA 353 (or concurrent) or THEA 356 (or concurrent), or consent. (Cross-listed as ART 315 and THEA 314)

ACM 315 Narrative Game Design (3)

Storytelling through computer games. Effect of interactivity on narrative. Interactive plot structures, conceptual design, artwork, audio, cinematography, two- and three dimensional computer graphics. Design and programming of game narrative using scripting languages. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 215 and 216 and B or better in 255, or consent.

ACM 316 3D Character Animation (3)

Creating the illusion of life through the principles of animation. Application of theory to practical scene work with emphasis on acting and personality in animated characters. ACM majors only. Sophomore standing or higher for (C). A-F only. Pre: 215 and 216 and B or better in 255 and ART 113 for (B); 216 (with a C or better) for (C), or consent.

ACM 317 3D Cinematography and Dynamics (3)

Computer animation directing and cinematography for the design and creation of visual effects. Using particles and dynamics systems to simulate natural phenomena. Compositing of visual layers. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 215, 216, and 255; or 215, 310, and 255; or consent.

ACM 318 Classical 2D Full Animation (3)

Hand drawn full animation techniques; rough animation, inbetweening, clean up animation and digital color processes. Digital line testing, sync dialog and other advanced skills for classical 2D full animation. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 216 and 255 and ART 113, or consent.

ACM 320 Animation Production I (3)

Students work independently to produce a short, animated film. Emphasis on visual storytelling and character animation. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 316B, and 350 or 355.

ACM 321 Storyboarding and Animatics (3)

Exposes students to the history, application, format, styles, and methods of creating storyboards and animatics. Visual storytelling will be analyzed by examining the foundational components of the visual language of a film. ACM majors only. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent.

ACM 325 Visual Effects (3)

Introduction to the history, theory, design and execution of visual effects for the screen. Project-based learning in traditional photographic and digitally-generated special effects. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 215 and 216, or 310, or consent.

ACM 330 Independent Producing (3)

Fundamentals of producing for independent filmmaking, focusing on business acumen and role of the producer through various stages of production. Topics include proposal writing, script breakdowns, budgeting, scheduling, legal issues, festival strategy, and distribution. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 (or concurrent), or 316B (or
concurrent).

ACM 350 Screenwriting (3)

Introduction to the basics of writing a short narrative screenplay for film or television. Students learn the fundamentals and format of screenwriting as well as basic elements of
storytelling and character development. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 255, 310 (or concurrent) or 215 (or concurrent); or consent.

ACM 352 Screening Asian Americans (3)

Survey of Asian and Asian American representations in American film and television from the silent era to the present, with an emphasis on Orientalism and multiculturalism, as well as performance and spectatorship. ACM majors: A-F only. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 352)

ACM 355 Oral Tradition to Screenplay (3)

Adapting the stories, styles, and cultural values of oral tradition storytelling to cinematic narratives. A-F only. Pre: 255, and 310 (or concurrent) or 215 (or concurrent); or consent.

ACM 360 Indigenous Aesthetics (3)

Aesthetic theories and practices of indigenous cultures of the Pacific and their adaptation to the screen in cinematic storytelling. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent.

ACM 370 Directing the Actor on Screen (3)

Introduction of the screen-director to the craft of acting for the camera. Students will develop collaborative communication skills and learn practical techniques to elicit spontaneous and relaxed performances from actors. A-F only. Pre: 255 (or concurrent) and consent.

ACM 372 Editing for Cinema (3)

Advanced course examining the theory, techniques, and practices of motion picture editing; use of non-linear digital editing systems; and practical experience in digital
editing projects. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 (or concurrent) or 316B (or concurrent), or consent.

ACM 374 Post Production Sound (3)

Practical course on the theory, art, and techniques of sound recording, editing, and design for cinema. Students work on projects involving dialogue and sound effects in post production. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 or 316B, and 372.

ACM 375 Directing the Camera for the Screen (3)

Detailed analysis of cinematic grammar, placement, movement, focus, and effects of the camera to create the mise en scene. Practical exercises and projects to apply theory to individual creative work. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310, and 350 (or concurrent) or 355 (or concurrent).

ACM 380 Genre and Narrative Theory in Creative Media (3)

Focus on the concept of genre, genre films, genre film criticism and popular genres such as
Western, film noir, documentary, and Chinese martial arts. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent.

ACM 382 Authors in Creative Media (3)

In-depth study of the auteur theory and specific application to authors in creative media, such as film directors, animators, screenwriters or game designers. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent.

ACM 384 Study Abroad (3)

Intensive study of selected topics, genres, filmmakers, or digital media production in the host country in a UH Mânoa approved study abroad location. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 255 and consent.

ACM 385 Topics in Creative Media (3)

Topics of interest to faculty and students; taught by regular and visiting faculty. Repeatable one time on different topics. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent.

ACM 386 Techniques in Creative Media (3)

Specialized techniques in the creation of digital media: taught by regular and visiting faculty. Repeatable one time in different topics. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 (or concurrent) or 316B (or concurrent), or consent.

ACM 390 Workshop in Creative Media (V)

Short-term intensive workshop in focused area of media production. Repeatable up to six credits. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent.

ACM 399 Independent Group Project (V)

Participation in a group research or creative project under supervision of ACM faculty member. Only six credits of 399/499 in any combination can be applied to meet requirements for the major. A-F only. Repeatable up to six credits. ACM majors only. Pre: 310 or 316B, and 350, and consent.

ACM 405 Documentary Production (3)

Analysis and practical knowledge of the documentary process including, but not limited to, research, organization and story structure, shooting, camera coverage, and editing. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310, and 350 or 355; or consent.

ACM 410 Advanced Cinematic Production (4)

Production of a major cinematic/digital narrative project. Working in groups, each student takes on creative and technical role and responsibilities of a principle crew position. Emphasis on artistic form in narrative development; timely execution from pre- to post-production. Repeatable one time with instructor approval. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310, and 350 or 355; or consent.

ACM 412 Advanced Cinematography (3)

Applies the basic foundations, techniques, and theory of cinematography (covered in ACM 312) to a more informed and crafted practice with Camera and Lighting Scene study workshops, and research exercises and film projects. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 and 312.

ACM 415 Computer Game Production (3)

Students will work as a team to produce to design and produce a computer game: 2D and 3D elements, animation, story, music, audio, and project software. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 315 or ICS 313, or consent.

ACM 419 Virtual and Augmented Reality Programming (3)

Students will learn to develop virtual reality and augmented reality applications with
turnkey tools as well as through programming. Prior programming experience is not required for this course. Pre: any 110(Alpha) or 111 or ACM 215. (Cross-listed as ICS 486).

ACM 420 Animation Production II (3)

Student teams produce a short, animated film. Prior knowledge of 2D and 3D media authoring tools and animation techniques is necessary. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 320 or consent.

ACM 450 Advanced Screenwriting (3)

Application of narrative principles of character development, story structure and thematic spine to students’ short and feature-length screenplays. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 350 or 355.

ACM 452 (Alpha) History and Film (3)

Explores the many relationships between history and film including how film has reflected and shaped society in the past and our relationship to the past. (C) Europe; (E) world/ comparative. Repeatable one time for different alphas. Pre: junior standing or consent. (C Cross-listed as HIST 452C); (E Cross-listed as HIST 452E)

ACM 455 Indigenous Filmmaking (3)

Theories and studies of indigenous films and creation of a cinematic project based in indigenous cultural and value systems. Students must complete a certification workshop in camera and editing processes to be enrolled in this course. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310, and 350 or 355; or consent.

ACM 460 Ethics and Film (3)

Ethical theory and dilemmas as reflected in film and filmmaking. Social responsibility for filmmakers. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: junior standing and 255.

ACM 470 Directing the Motion Picture (3)

Students direct a narrative live-action short film from prethrough post-production, learning how to develop a directorial vision and how to implement it through storyboarding, scheduling, and collaborative skill sets. ACM majors only. Pre: 310, and 350 or 355, and 370 (or concurrent); or consent.

ACM 480 Oceanic Media and Culture (3)

Involves close textual analysis of film, TV and multimedia content. The course includes cinematic and television screenings. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent.

ACM 482 The American Documentary (3)

In-depth study of the nature and impact of documentary filmmaking in America, focusing on the interplay between filmmaker, subject, and audience. Will critically examine documentaries for their use of rhetoric, ethics, and narrative voice. Junior standing only. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent.

ACM 484 Data Visualization (3)

Introduction to data visualization through practical techniques for turning data into images to produce insight. Topics include: information visualization, geospatial visualization, scientific visualization, social network visualization, and medical visualization. Junior standing or higher. Pre: any 215 or ICS 110(Alpha) or ICS 111. (Cross-listed as ICS 484)

ACM 485 Seminar in Creative Media (3)

Intellectual issues in creative media. Conducted by regular and visiting faculty with extensive student participation and scholarly presentation. Repeatable one time on different topics. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 255 and junior standing, or consent.

ACM 486 Capstone Creative Production (3)

Emphasis on advanced production skills in creating a capstone film project to deepen understanding of cinematic storytelling with individuals taking on the role and responsibilities of key crew positions in collaboration. ACM majors only. Pre: 405 or 410 or 420 or 455.

ACM 487 Video Game Design and Development (3)

Students will team design, build, and demonstrate video games or related interactive entertainment environments and applications. Topics will include emerging computer science techniques relevant to the development of these types of environments. Junior
standing or higher. Pre: any 215 or ICS 110(Alpha) or ICS 111. (Cross-listed as ICS 485)

ACM 490 Global Media (3)

Involves close textual analysis and strategic analysis of the globalism phenomenon, with an emphasis on transnational media corporations. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 255 or consent. (Fall only)

ACM 495 Creative Media Internship (V)

Internship in professional cinematic, television, animation and/or digital media production company under professional and faculty supervision. Repeatable up to six credits. ACM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 or 315 or 316B, and 350 or 355; and consent.

ACM 499 Directed Study (V)

Independent research or creative project under supervision of ACM faculty member. Only six credits of 399/499 in any combination can be applied to meet requirements for the major. Repeatable up to six credits. ACM majors only. Pre: 310 or 315 or 316B, and 350 or 355, and consent.

AMST 110 Introduction to American Studies (3)

Introduction to different types of college-level writing through analyses of contemporary American culture and to the main themes and approaches used in American studies and the humanities.

AMST 111 Introduction to American Studies Writing (3)

Introduction to different types of college level writing and information literacy with a focus on American culture and society. A-F only.

AMST 150 America and the World (3)

Examines America’s role in world history and the influence of world affairs on U.S. culture and society. Focuses on U.S. interdependence with African, European, Native American, Asian, and Polynesian civilizations, from 1492 to present.

AMST 150A America and the World (3)

Examines America’s role in world history and the influence of world affairs on U.S. culture and society. Focuses on U.S. interdependence with African, European, Native American, Asian, and Polynesian civilizations, from 1492 to present.

AMST 201 American Experience: Institutions and Movements (3)

Interdisciplinary course that examines diversity and changes in American values and institutions–political, economic, legal, and social.

AMST 202 American Experience: Culture and the Arts (3)

Interdisciplinary course that examines diversity and changes in American values and culture-literature, film, visual arts, and architecture.

AMST 202A American Experience: Culture and the Arts (3)

Interdisciplinary course that examines diversity and changes in American values and culture– literature, film, visual arts, and architecture.

AMST 211 Contemporary American Domestic Issues (3)

Interdisciplinary exploration of such current American domestic issues; topics such as politics, economics, civil rights, family life, the justice system, and the environment.

AMST 212 Contemporary American Global Issues (3)

Interdisciplinary exploration of such current global issues as international diplomacy, economic development, national security, demographic change, and environmental protection.

AMST 220 Introduction to Indigenous Studies (3)

Interdisciplinary survey that examines the histories, politics, popular representations, self-representations, and contemporary issues of the indigenous peoples of the U.S. and its territories, including Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Kanaka Maoli, Chamorro, and Samoans.

AMST 220A Introduction to Indigenous Studies (3)

Interdisciplinary survey that examines the histories, politics, popular representations, self-representations, and contemporary issues of the indigenous peoples of the U.S. and its territories, including Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Kanaka Maoli, Chamorro, and Samoans.

AMST 225 Art and Social Change (3)

Will analyze examples from the visual and performing arts, including murals, digital art, film, poetry, and music, paying particular attention to the connections and influence upon social and political movements, both historically and today. A-F only

AMST 301 Hip-Hop and American Culture (3)

Survey tracing hip-hop from its Afro-Carribean musical beginnings to contemporary adaptations and interpretations. Students will analyze various materials and will pay attention to the relationships between hip-hop and contemporary social forms. Pre: sophomore standing or consent.

AMST 308 Justice and Asian America: Social Movements and the Law in American History (3)

Examination of demands for and the changing nature of justice, historical and contemporary, through court cases, legislation, presidential orders, and social movements that address legal, social, and political definitions of Asian America. Sophomore standing or higher

AMST 310 Japanese Americans: History, Culture, Lifestyles (3)

Explores the experiences of Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i and the U.S. at large: historical and cultural heritage, biographical portraits, changing family ties, ethnic lifeways, gender relations, local identity, and the future of island living.

AMST 313 African Americans: Issues, Culture, History (3)

Traces the history and culture of African Americans and outlines contemporary issues. Topics include: slavery and racism, community formation and resistance, cultural expression, African American diversity, civil rights, gender and class relations.

AMST 316 U.S. Women’s History (3)

History of U.S. women and gender relations. Topics include women’s work in and outside the household, women’s involvement in social movements, changing norms about gender and sexuality, and shared and divergent experiences among women. (Cross-listed as HIST 361 and WS 311)

AMST 317 American Music and Culture (3)

Analysis of a variety of American musical genres and histories through focused writing assignments (record and performance reviews, personal narratives, interviews, research proposals, research papers). Pre: second year standing or consent. (Alt. years)

AMST 318 Asian America (3)

History of selected Asian immigrant groups from the 19th century to the present. Topics include: immigration and labor history, Asian American movements, literature and cultural productions, community adaptations and identity formation. Pre: junior standing or higher. (Cross-listed as ES 318)

AMST 319 America, Hawai‘i and World War II (3)

Examines WWII as a watershed in American and Hawai‘i history and culture. Topics  include: Pearl Harbor, Japanese American internment, sex and racial tensions, Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, and the dawn of the Atomic Age.

AMST 320 American Environments: Survey (3)

Survey of social, political, and cultural relations in diverse, contemporary American environments, including: island societies, urban centers, suburbs, Indian reservations, farming communities, and national parks. Special emphasis on contemporary environmental issues in Hawai‘i.

AMST 325 Religion and Law in the U.S. (3)

Surveys church-state jurisprudence since the 1940s, with special attention to difficulty of defining religion, and applies the religion clauses to current issues. A-F only. Pre: sophomore or higher standing, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as POLS 325)

AMST 326 American Folklore and Folklife (3)

Examination of the history and ethics of folklore studies and the dynamics and social functions of traditional culture in diverse communities through topics such as ritual, storytelling, games, gossip, belief, music, and cultural tourism. Junior standing or higher.
(Cross-listed as ANTH 326)

AMST 334 Digital America: Online Communities and Virtual Worlds (3)

Seminar on the impact of the digital revolution and virtual communities on American culture and society, with an emphasis on questions of identity and participatory democracy. Open to non majors. Pre: one DH, DA, or DL course, sophomore standing, or consent.

AMST 339 Religions in America (3)

Examination of American religious traditions, both historical and contemporary, with an emphasis on the principles of religious liberty, non-establishment, and pluralism. Pre: sophomore standing or consent.

AMST 340 War and Media (3)

Examination of a range of media, including photography, film, print journalism, television, video games, and the internet, as they have shaped popular representations and
experiences of war in America from the Civil War through the present. A-F only. (Alt. years)

AMST 343 American Thought and Culture: To 20th Century (3)

Politics, family, philosophy, technology, etc.; their interrelationship with the total society. Pre-Colonial to end of Reconstruction. (Cross-listed as HIST 373)

AMST 344 American Thought and Culture: 20th Century (3)

Continuation of 343: 20th century. Pre: 150 or 201 or 202 or 211 or 212 or HIST 151 or HIST 152; or consent. (Cross-listed as HIST 374)

AMST 345 Religion and Conflict in American History (3)

Analyzes selected historical examples of religious conflicts in America, discerning characteristic patterns of American religious discourse, and identifying the social structures, interests, and ethical principles at stake in conflicts about religion.
Sophomore standing or higher. (Fall only) (Crosslisted as REL 345)

AMST 348 American Design: An Historical Survey (3)

Examination of design in American culture over the last century. Readings in industrial, graphic, interior, architectural, landscape, and user interface design used to study issues of gender, race, and class in the U.S. Open to all class standings. A-F only. (Alt. years)

AMST 349 Contemporary American Design (3)

Investigates design in contemporary American culture. Graphic, industrial, urban, and user-interface design practices are situated within broader social and economic forces. Modes of design practice, production, and consumption studied as reflection of American society today. Open to all class standings. A-F only. (Alt. years)

AMST 350 Culture and the Arts in America (3)

Study of the role of the arts in American society and diverse cultural practices in historical and contemporary contexts.

AMST 352 Screening Asian Americans (3)

Survey of Asian and Asian American representations in American film and television from the silent era to the present, with an emphasis on Orientalism and multiculturalism, as well as performance and spectatorship. ACM majors: A-F only. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ACM 352)

AMST 353 Indigenous Lands and Waters (3)

Examines indigenous practices born of and located in Indigenous places. Analyzes how indigenous knowledge of place informs Indigenous cultural, linguistic, intellectual, and political survivance and sovereignty, and resistance.

AMST 354 American Travel Writing (3)

Survey examines the roles that travel writing plays in American identity- and nation-formation, from early colonial history to the present. A-F only. Pre: 110, 150, 201, 202, 211, or 212. (Alt. years)

AMST 360 American Cinema (3)

Introductory history of American cinema from the silent to the digital era, with an emphasis on criticism, genre and style, as well as cultural and sociopolitical context.

AMST 365 American Empire (3)

Examines the interplay between an “American culture of empire” and the rise of the U.S. as a superpower. Topics: imperialism and political culture, social movements and international affairs, race, gender and class relations. (Cross-listed as HIST 379)

AMST 373 Filipino Americans: History, Culture and Politics (3)

An introduction to the study of Filipino Americans in the U.S. and the diaspora. The course pays special attention to labor migration, cultural production and community politics. Pre: sophomore standing. (Cross-listed as ES 373)

AMST 383 American Studies Approach (3)

Materials and methods for the study of American life and thought. AMST majors only.

AMST 401 Filipino Americans: Research Topics (3)

A research seminar on the study of Filipino Americans. Special themes in film/video/media, the performing arts, or literature may be offered. Pre: junior standing
or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 443)

AMST 405 Indigenous Literature and Film (3)

Interdisciplinary, comparative course examining native literary texts (novels, short fiction, poetry), films, etc. that address issues of representation and how native peoples actively resist colonial ideology.

AMST 410 Asian American Music Cultures (3)

An exploration of how Asian American music making is related to community formation, labor migration, and cultural sensibilities throughout the 20th century.

AMST 411 Japanese Americans: Research Topics (3)

Research and thematic seminar on Japanese American culture, issues, and history. Pre: junior standing or consent.

AMST 413 Regionalism: The South (3)

Definition of a Southern identity and its relation to the larger U.S. culture, using literary and polemical works of 19th- and 20th-century.

AMST 418 Hawai‘i’s Multiculturalism (3)

A multidisciplinary examination of the dynamics of the Hawaiian Islands’ racial and cultural diversity from the perspectives of historical trends, social processes, and contemporary political, social, and economic issues as they impact interracial relations.

AMST 420 American Ideas of Nature (3)

The natural world in American thought from Native Americans to modern ecologists.

AMST 423 History of American Architecture (3)

History of American architecture in terms of style, techniques, and symbolic meaning. (Cross-listed as ARCH 473)

AMST 425 American Environmental History (3)

Survey history of the complex relations between American societies and diverse U.S. ecosystems, from European contact and colonization to the present. (Cross-listed as HIST 480 and SUST 481)

AMST 431 History of American Workers (3)

Conditions of labor in major phases of American development; response of labor and community to changing work environment. Capitalism, unionism, race, gender, law, etc. Emphasis on 20th century. (Cross-listed as HIST 477)

AMST 432 Slavery and Freedom (3)

Examines the history of slavery, race, and abolition in the Americas from a comparative, global perspective, and traces the legacy of slavery in the post-emancipation societies of the New World. (Cross-listed as HIST 473)

AMST 433 Islands, Empires, and the Arts (3)

Histories of colonialism, neocolonialism, and cultures of resistance in literature, film, and arts of the Caribbean and American diaspora. Role of arts in political dissent; historical memory; nation building; construction of race, class, gender. Junior standing or higher. A-F only.

AMST 434 Politics in Hawai‘i (3)

Discussion of modern politics against the background of recent history and major contemporary issues.

AMST 435 History of Crime and Punishment (3)

History of American crime and punishment from 18th century to the present. Topics: changing crime patterns, evolving punishment methods, penal reform movements, convict resistance, growth of prison industrial complex, racism, class, and gender. Pre: junior standing or consent.

AMST 436 Gender, Justice and Law (3)

Exploration of landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases related to sex and gender. Topics may include sex discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, privacy, and reproductive freedom. A-F only. Pre: one of WS 151, WS 175, WS 176, WS 202, WS 360, WS 381, or consent. (Cross-listed as POLS 368 and WS 436)

AMST 437 Trans* Studies: Trans(feminine/ masculine/gender nonconforming/sexual) (3)

Focus on various aspects of Trans* identities, biographies, cultural productions, and communities. It also addresses issues on racism, medical intervention, dating, societal condemnation, mental health, and incarceration. Junior standing or higher. (Cross-listed as WS 493)

AMST 438 Women and Globalization in Asia (3)

History, culture, and contemporary reality of Asian women in Asia and the U.S. Includes critical analysis of American feminist methodology and theory. Pre: one of 310, 316, 318, 373, 455, POLS 339, WS 360, WS 361, WS 439; or consent. (Cross-listed as POLS 372 and WS 462)

AMST 440 Race and Racism in America (3)

Racial ideas and ideologies, and their effects throughout American history. (Cross-listed as HIST 476)

AMST 442 Social Movements (3)

Examination of mass mobilization in U.S. history from the Revolution forward, including abolitionism, feminism, civil rights, labor, and more. Concludes with analysis of various community organizing efforts today.

AMST 445 Racism, American Culture and Film/ Media (3)

An exploration of the critique of racial ideologies in American film. The course also examines how aggrieved communities develop cultural sensibilities, aesthetic choices and politicized identities through film, video and media work.

AMST 446 Gender in Action Cinema (3)

Investigates gender representation in the evolving genre of American action cinema through combined stylistic and cultural analysis, with special attention to the relationship of gendered action to categories of morality, race, class, and nation. Junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 466)

AMST 450 Victims, Virtue, and Violence (3)

Examination of the history and significance of melodrama as a dominant mode of American cultural production from the early republic to the present, with a focus on issues of race, gender, and national identity.

AMST 451 Popular Culture (3)

Major themes, modes, and media of popular or mass culture in the U.S.; emphasis on cultural trends and social implications.

AMST 452 The ’20s and ’30s (3)

Novelists, painters, poets, jazz musicians as examples of culture of the 1920s and 1930s in America.

AMST 453 Culture, Society, and Literature (3)

Literary and non-fictive exploration of the intellectual and moral response of Americans to institutions and culture of 20th-century marketplace economy.

AMST 454 Fashioning America (3)

Examines linkages between American identity, representation, labor and capital through fashion theory, clothing discourses and other practices of textile production over history. Pre: junior standing or consent.

AMST 455 U.S. Women’s Literature and Culture (3)

Reading of selected works of U.S. women’s literature and cultural texts (such as art and film). Emphasis on historical and cultural context and diverse expressions of women’s gendered identities. (Cross-listed as ENG 455 and WS 445)

AMST 456 Art of the United States (3)

Emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries. Pre: 202 or ART 176, or consent. (Cross-listed as ART 472)

AMST 457 Museum Interpretations (3)

Studies the interpretive strategies and methods used by museums to communicate with visitors in museums, art galleries, historic sites, parks, and related places. Considers how interpretations contribute to cultural knowledge. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent. (Crosslisted as ART 481)

AMST 458 Film in American Culture (3)

Comprehensive survey of varieties of film experience from historical and contemporary points of view.

AMST 459 Sports in America (3)

Sports as reflected in literature, films, and TV.

AMST 460 Early 20th Century American Art (3)

American art in the first half of the 20th century and its impact on American culture. Junior standing or higher. Pre: ART 176 or consent. (Alt. years: fall) (Cross-listed as ART 460)

AMST 461 America’s World Role (3)

Examination of America’s role in modern world affairs, against the background of history, perceptions, and values.

AMST 464 America and Africa (3)

American attitudes toward Africa, as well as how Africa has functioned within the dynamics of American culture and history.

AMST 465 American Experience in Asia (3)

Comparison of American experiences in Japan, China, and Southeast Asia within historical and perceptual framework.

AMST 469 Religion, Sex, and Gender in the U.S. (3)

Examines religious and ethical conflicts about sexuality and gender nonconformity in contemporary America. Students gain knowledge, practical wisdom, and communication skills to negotiate moral disagreement in a pluralistic society. Pre: junior standing or consent.

AMST 474 Preservation: Hawai‘i, Asia, and the Pacific (3)

Lectures and discussions on historic preservation issues in Hawai‘i, Asia, and the Pacific. Emphasis on indigenous and national expressions. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ARCH 474)

AMST 475 Documentation of Historic Architecture (V)

Study and documentation of existing buildings, structures, sites of historic and/or cultural significance, including field measurements and drawings, historical research, photo documentation, and preparation of archival drawings to be deposited in the Library of Congress. Documentation conducted according to standards of the Historic American Buildings Survey/ Historic American Engineering Record (HABS/ HAER). Repeatable three times, up to 24 credits. AMST, ARCH, and HIS majors only. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as ARCH 472)

AMST 483 Elements of Research (3)

Required research seminar in American Studies in preparation for the senior capstone project. AMST majors only. A-F only. Pre: 383 (Fall only)

AMST 484 Senior Capstone Project (3)

Capstone course for American studies students to undertake a major research-based project. AMST majors only. Pre: 483 and consent.

AMST 489 World Maritime History (3)

Survey of world maritime history from earliest times to the present, with emphasis on the evolution of nautical technology, motives from maritime enterprises, and the impact of cross-cultural encounters between oceanic peoples. (Cross-listed as HIST 489)

AMST 490 (Alpha) Topics in American Studies (3)

Themes, problems, and issues not addressed in other American studies undergraduate courses, focused within these areas: (B) social structure and interaction; (D) arts and environment. Repeatable one time. Pre: junior standing or consent for (D).

AMST 499 Readings in American Studies (V)

Directed readings and research for majors. Pre: consent.

AMST 600 Approaches to American Studies (3)

Introductory survey of methodological issues underlying research in American studies.

AMST 601 Patterns of American Cultures (3)

American cultural origins and development.

AMST 603 Advanced Research and Professional Development (3)

Prepares advanced graduate students to present original research findings to colleagues, write for peer review, design undergraduate classes in their areas of expertise, and participate actively in their fields. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: (600 and 601) with a minimum grade of B-.

AMST 610 Early America (3)

Interdisciplinary approach to understanding early American culture and history. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as HIST 632B)

AMST 611 Asian America (3)

The Asian American experience from an interdisciplinary and humanities perspective. Asian American history, literature, media, and theater arts. Comparative study of Hawai‘i and the Continental U.S.

AMST 612 Women in American Culture (3)

Historical/contemporary status of women in the U.S.; women’s roles as defined by legal, educational, political, economic, and social institutions; implications for social science method. (Cross-listed as WS 612)

AMST 614 Advanced Topics: American West (3)

Examination of the U.S. colonization of the American West. Topics include: European-indigenous relations, migration and labor, regional literature, frontier ideology, ethnic conflict, and new community formation. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing and consent. (Cross-listed as HIST 639F)

AMST 615 Performance, Culture, and Theory (3)

Survey of major critical works in fields of performing arts and public culture (e.g., dance, theater, music, commemoration). Topics include: theoretical application for the discipline of American studies, and the impact of social movements and labor migration on the performing arts.

AMST 616 Gender and the African Diaspora in the Americas (3)

Explores the impact of the African Diaspora on the cultures and histories of the Americas  through interdisciplinary and feminist scholarship and cultural sources including fiction, foodways, film, poetry, religion, music, and dance. A-F only. Graduate standing only.

AMST 617 Social and Cultural Diversity in America (3)

Examination of selected subcultures in America.

AMST 618 American Sexualities (3)

Aspects of sexual identity within the context of American culture.

AMST 619 Slavery and the Modern Memory (3)

Exploration of contemporary resonances of slavery in the Americas through literature, historical scholarship, memory and trauma studies, and the visual and performing arts. Graduate students only. A-F only.

AMST 620 Indigenous Identity (3)

Interdisciplinary and comparative focus on how Indigenous identity is constructed, negotiated, asserted, ascribed, and deconstructed within and without Indigenous communities with attention to the U.S. Graduate students only. Pre: graduate level standing or higher.

AMST 623 American Architecture (3)

Cultural analysis of the evolution of American architecture from the Colonial period to the present involving sociopolitical and economic, as well as aesthetic, considerations.

AMST 624 Wilderness in America (3)

American wilderness as both physical setting and social construction. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent

AMST 625 Material Culture (3)

Physical artifacts considered as documents of American cultural and regional development.

AMST 626 Environment and Society (3)

Technological development in cultural perspective; its relation to the American environment, science, capitalism, public policy, and values.

AMST 632 Mass Media (3)

Appraisal of major media of communications in American society with attention to political, educational, cultural, and ethical implications.

AMST 634 Technologies of War and Media (3)

Critical examination of the relationship between war and media with particular attention to the overlapping histories of technologies of perception and destruction in the modern era and to the military-entertainment complex today. Graduate students only or consent.

AMST 635 Public History and Commemoration (3)

Approaches to public presentations of history and examination of various ways in which historic memory is constructed in sites such as museums, memorials, and theme parks.

AMST 638 American Punishment (3)

Examines the history of American criminal punishment, from the birth of the penitentiary to the rise of the prisonindustrial complex. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing. (Cross-listed as SOC 638)

AMST 640 Writing for Publication (3)

Advanced seminar designed to convert graduate research projects into publishable scholarly articles. Repeatable one time. A-F only.

AMST 643 Revolutions and Social Movements (3)

Examines the role of social movements in transforming American society and culture.

AMST 645 Historic Preservation (3)

Federal, state, and local laws and regulations that regulate and provide protection to significant archaeological and historical resources in Hawai‘i and the region. (Alt. years: spring only) (Cross-listed as ANTH 645)

AMST 646 Advanced Topics: Social/Cultural/ Intellectual (3)

Readings and research on American social and intellectual history. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing and consent. (Cross-listed as HIST 639B)

AMST 647 Advanced Topics: Business/Labor/ Technology (3)

Readings and research on American business, labor, and technological history. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing and consent. (Crosslisted as HIST 639K)

AMST 649 American Intellectual Traditions (3)

Examination of intellectual figures and movements in American history.

AMST 650 Field Mastery (3)

Prepares students to achieve specialization in an American Studies-related academic field. Repeatable two times with different contents. Graduate students only. A-F only.

AMST 656 Film in America (3)

Examination of various roles of motion picture film in America with particular respect to art form, cultural artifact, document, and myth.

AMST 659 Arts in America: Modern to PostModern (3)

Survey of the literature of the field.

AMST 664 Transpacific Studies (3)

Critical analysis of regional formation in and across the Pacific and the role of the U.S. therein; migrations within and across the Pacific; political, military, economic, cultural, and environmental dynamics of transpacific exchanges.

AMST 668 Globalization and Transnationalism (3)

Examines the socioeconomic and cultural meanings of globalization and transnationalism. Emphasis on how the deployment and flows of power beyond the nation-state have an impact on regional, national, and/ or local communities and cultures.

AMST 669 Advanced Topics: America and the World (3)

Historical and contemporary issues in America’s global relationships.

AMST 670 Comparative Methods in American Studies (3)

Examines approaches to American studies that use comparison as a primary method. Comparison of histories, institutions, of phenomena between the U.S. and another country as well as among communities in the U.S. Graduate standing only. Co-requisite: 600 or 601 or 602, or consent. (Every 2-3 years)

AMST 671 Indigenous Curation and Museums: Practice Meets Theory (3)

Seminar explores the history, evolution, and contemporary movement towards indigenous curation within museums, emphasis on the Americas and Oceania, as shaped by colonialism, globalization, multiculturalism, selfdetermination, and nationalism. (Fall only)

AMST 672 20th Century U.S. Literature (3)

Selected works of 20th-century literature as cultural documents.

AMST 673 African American Literature (3)

Cultural and social imagination of blacks and whites as revealed in literature, poetry, and drama.

AMST 674 Preservation Field Seminar (3)

Provides participants with basic knowledge of the field of historic preservation as well as the fundamental knowledge of how to document, conserve, and preserve both tangible and intangible cultural properties. Repeatable three times. (Summer only

AMST 675 Preservation: Theory and Practice (3)

History and philosophy of historic preservation movement. Analysis of values and assumptions, methodologies and tactics, implications for society and public policy. (Cross-listed as ARCH 628 and PLAN 675)

AMST 676 Recording Historic and Cultural Resources (3)

Techniques in recording and evaluation of historic buildings and other resources, with an
emphasis on field recordings and state and federal registration procedures. (Cross-listed as ANTH 676 and PLAN 676)

AMST 677 Historic Preservation Planning (3)

Local-level historic preservation, with an emphasis on historic districts, design guidelines, regulatory controls, and community consensus-building. (Cross-listed as PLAN 677)

AMST 679 Elements of Style (3)

The manifestations, visual characteristics, and social/cultural meaning of “style” in American architecture and decorative arts from the early settlement period through the present. (Cross-listed as ARCH 679)

AMST 680 Historic Building Technology (3)

History of buildings, building technologies, materials, and finishes, including construction techniques and methods of investigating older buildings. Emphasis on North American building practices c.1600–c.1960.

AMST 681 Vernacular Architecture (3)

Methods and approaches in the study of vernacular architecture, cultural landscapes, and material culture, with an emphasis on traditions and innovations in the Americas. (Cross-listed as ARCH 650)

AMST 683 Museums: Theory, History, Practice (3)

History and theory of museums and related institutions (art galleries, historic houses, zoos, parks). Relationship between museums, collections, and communities. Introduction to governance, planning, legal, and ethical concerns.

AMST 684 Museums and Collections (3)

Work of museums and professionals (registrars, collections managers, conservators, curators and others) in the care of collections, interpretive studies of museum displays and collections and field trips. Pre: 683 (or concurrent) or consent.

AMST 685 Museums and Education (3)

Overview of museum education including museum learning theories, informal learning programs, audience research, national and international policies and reports, and community projects. Pre: 683 (or concurrent) or consent. (Cross-listed as EDCS 685)

AMST 686 Museum Studies Practicum (3)

Applies coursework in museum studies to hands-on activities under the direction of practicing professionals and university faculty. Museum studies certificate students only. A-F only. Pre: consent.

AMST 688 Indigenous Studies Practicum (3)

Applies course work in Indigenous studies to hands-on activities under the direction of practicing professionals and university faculty. Repeatable one time. Graduate students only. A-F only.

AMST 690 Research Seminar (3)

Themes, problems, and issues not addressed in other American studies graduate courses; emphasis upon research methods. Repeatable unlimited times.

AMST 695 Historic Preservation Practicum (3)

Applies course work in historic preservation to hands-on activities under the direction of practicing professionals and University faculty. Historic preservation certificate students only.

AMST 696 (Alpha) Preservation Field Study (6)

On-site historic preservation field study. Site will rotate. Academic and hands-on preservation training. (B) Hawai‘i; (C) Asia; (D) Pacific. Each alpha repeatable up to 18 credits. Pre: consent.

AMST 699 Directed Reading/Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

AMST 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

AMST 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

ANTH 151 Emerging Humanity (3)

Introduction to human biological evolution and the archaeology of culture in the world prior to AD 1500. Open to nonmajors, recommended for majors.

ANTH 151A Emerging Humanity (3)

Introduction to human biological evolution and the archaeology of culture in the world prior to AD 1500. Restricted to students in the Honors Program.

ANTH 152 Culture and Humanity (3)

Introduction to cultural anthropology. How humans create, understand, order and modify their natural, social, supernatural and physical environments, and make meaning and order. Open to non-majors, required for ANTH majors. A-F only.

ANTH 152A Culture and Humanity (3)

Introduction to cultural anthropology. How humans create, understand, order and modify their natural, social, supernatural and physical environments, and make meaning and order. Restricted to students in the Honors Program.

ANTH 175 Polynesian Surf Culture (3)

Examines environmental and cultural factors in the development of Polynesian surf culture, surfing’s decline due to Western influence, and its revitalization as a modern recreational activity. Business practices of the surfing industry are critically analyzed. A-F only. Co-requisite: 175L. (Fall only)

ANTH 175L Polynesian Surf Culture Field Lab (1)

175 co-requisite lab. Surfing sites are visited, ancient and modern Polynesian surfing practices and surfboard design and technology are discussed. Shoreline assessments emphasize ocean safety. Social issues surrounding surfing sites in Hawai‘i are analyzed. A-F only. Co-requisite: 175. (Fall only)

ANTH 204 Historical Ecology of Hawai‘i (3)

The Hawaiian socio-ecosystem is the product of centuries of human land use and resource exploitation. Explores the events and processes that have shaped the islands’ ecology and future sustainability. A-F only. (Cross-listed as SUST 204)

ANTH 210 Archaeology (3)

Introduction to prehistoric archaeology; methods and techniques of excavation and laboratory analysis; brief survey of theory in relation to change and diversity in prehistoric human groups.

ANTH 215 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)

Human evolution, primatology, human genetics, biological variation, human adaptability, growth and development. Co-requisite: 215L.

ANTH 215L Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1)

Laboratory to accompany 215. Co-requisite: 215.

ANTH 220 Quantitative Reasoning for Anthropologists (3)

Achieve basic quantitative literacy and to familiarize them with statistical reasoning so that they are prepared to carry out anthropological (and other social science) research. A-F only.

ANTH 230 Anthropology of Sports (3)

Explores sports from anthropological viewpoint: biological, cultural, linguistic, and archaeological. Open to nonmajors. Sophomore standing only.

ANTH 300 Study of Contemporary Problems (3)

Significance of anthropology for contemporary affairs, particularly American ethnic and minority group relations. Relevance to various professions, governmental policy, political action, and accomplishment of change. Pre: 152 (or concurrent).

ANTH 301 Culture and Health (3)

Social and cultural aspects of medicine; the relationship of medicine to the beliefs, social systems, ecological adaptations, and cultural changes of human groups.

ANTH 310 Human Origins (3)

Theory of evolution, evolutionary systematics, and taxonomy; evolutionary biology of primates; fossil records for primate and human evolution. Laboratory included. Pre: 215, ZOOL 101; or consent.

ANTH 313 Visual Anthropology (3)

Historical development of documentary films of non-Western peoples; critical examination of ways in which ethnographic films represent different cultures. Pre: 152 (or concurrent).

ANTH 315 Sex and Gender (3)

Cross-cultural theories and perceptions of sexual differences; linkage between biology and cultural constructions of gender; relationship of gender ideology to women’s status. Pre: 152 (or concurrent) or 301 (or concurrent). (Crosslisted as WS 315)

ANTH 316 Anthropology of Tourism (3)

Anthropological perspectives on the subject of the global phenomenon of tourism. Includes issues of cultural performance, identity, and commoditization. Open to nonmajors.

ANTH 323 Pacific Islands Archaeology (3)

Origins of Pacific peoples; chronology of settlement; sequences of culture in Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Pre: sophomore standing or consent.

ANTH 325 Origins of Cities (3)

Combined lecture/ discussion on the emergence and development of ancient cities in comparative perspective and the dynamics of (pre)modern urban life. Examples are drawn from the Near East, Mediterranean, Africa, India, China, and the Americas. A-F only. Pre: sophomore standing or consent.

ANTH 326 American Folklore and Folklife (3)

Examination of the history and ethics of folklore studies and the dynamics and social functions of traditional culture in diverse communities through topics such as ritual, storytelling, games, gossip, belief, music, and cultural tourism. Junior standing or higher. (Cross-listed as AMST 326)

ANTH 327 Ethnohistory (3)

Review of ethnohistory, i.e., the interdisciplinary, holistic and inclusive investigation of the histories of native peoples drawing not only on documented sources, but also on ethnography, linguistics, archaeology, ecology and other disciplines as an alternative to conventional Eurocolonial history. A-F only. Pre: HIST 152, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as IS 322)

ANTH 328 Food Origins, Food Culture (3)

Lectures and discussion offer an anthropological introduction to how humans created and transformed food through time. Sophomore standing or higher. (Spring only)

ANTH 329 Indigenous Peoples and Cultures of North America (3)

Survey of Indigenous peoples of North America. Integrates documentary records, ethnography, and archaeology to explore variability among native communities. Contemporary topics include political recognition and self-determination, health and education, and natural resources and economic development.

ANTH 332 Anthropology of Surfing (3)

Applies cultural anthropology to assess surfing as an indigenous Hawaiian and modern globalized activity. Discusses the history of surfing, surfing culture, and the impacts of surfing tourism on coastal development, reef ecology, and ocean safety. A-F only. (Fall only)

ANTH 333 Climate Change and Cultural Response: Past, Present, and Future (3)

Climate change is a reality, yet there is much uncertainty about how it will affect our lives. Investigates cultural response to climate change, using studies of the past to plan for the future. (Alt. years: spring) (Cross-listed as SUST 333)

ANTH 341 Anthropology of Virtual Worlds (3)

Anthropological study of computer mediated interaction. Focus on the ethnography of massively multiplayer online games, text-based chat rooms, and blogs. Pre: 152 or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 345 Aggression, War, and Peace (3)

Biocultural, evolutionary, and cross-cultural perspectives on the conditions, patterns, and processes of violence, war, nonviolence, and peace. Pre: 152. (Cross-listed as PACE 345)

ANTH 350 Pacific Island Cultures (3)

Introduction to cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia from time of first settlement to emergence of modern nation states. Pre: sophomore standing or consent.

ANTH 360 Primate Behavioral Ecology (3)

As primates are our closest living relatives, studying the range of variation in areas like life history, diet, communication, and social systems within the order primates can inform on how we ourselves evolved.

ANTH 368 Households in Cross-cultural Perspective (3)

Study of cross-cultural patterns in household and community level organizations in Latin America and elsewhere. Topics may include gender relations, kinship structures, political economy, impacts of colonialism, modernization, and globalization on households. Sophomore standing or higher. (Cross-listed as LAIS 368)

ANTH 370 Ethnographic Field Techniques (V)

Problems and techniques of social-cultural anthropological fieldwork; ethnographic literature; work with informants. Repeatable one time. Pre: 152 OR 301.

ANTH 372 (Alpha) Indigenous Peoples of Latin America (3)

Survey of the history and culture of the indigenous peoples of Latin America through a study of their literature, texts and practices. (B) Mesoamerica; (C) Andean South America. Repeatable one time for different alphas. Pre: sophomore standing or consent. (Cross-listed as LAIS 372 (Alpha))

ANTH 375 Race and Human Variation (3)

Human genetic and physical variation; latitudinal, longitudinal, and altitudinal variation across human populations; history of racism; contemporary issues in race and racism. Pre: sophomore standing, recommend 152 and 215; or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 379 Archaeology Practicum (V)

Students will gain practical archaeological experience (e.g., materials processing, analysis, documentation, conservation) under the direction of practicing archaeological professionals in the local community and in collaboration with supervising archaeological faculty. Repeatable two times, up to 6 credits. ANTH majors or minors only. Sophomore standing or higher. A-F only. Pre: 210 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 380 Archaeological Lab Techniques (4)

Laboratory analysis and evaluation of field data; preservation and restoration of artifacts. Preparation for publication. Repeatable two times. Pre: 210 or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 381 Archaeological Field Techniques (V)

Archaeological survey and excavations; field trips, mapping, photography. May focus on terrestrial or underwater. May be taught entirely in the field at a national or international archaeological site. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 210.

ANTH 382 How Archaeology Works (3)

Uses archaeological examples to illustrate social science research techniques. Students learn how to create, analyze, and evaluate data through lab-based exercises, and examine ethical issues inherent in anthropological practice. Repeatable one time. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: 210 or instructor consent.

ANTH 384 Skeletal Biology (3)

Introduction to the human skeleton and methods for analyzing archaeological human remains including age, sex, ethnicity, paleodemography, skeletal and dental variation, paleopathology, population studies. Corequisite: 384L.

ANTH 384L Skeletal Biology Laboratory (1)

Laboratory to accompany 384. Co-requisite: 384.

ANTH 385 (Alpha) Undergraduate Seminar (3)

Selected problems in current research. (B) archaeology; (C) ethnography; (D) social anthropology; (E) applied; (F) psychological; (G) biological. Repeatable nine times. Pre: consent.

ANTH 399 Directed Reading or Research (V)

Repeatable nine times. Pre: major or minor in Anthropology.

ANTH 410 Ethics in Anthropology (3)

Seminar surveying ethical cases, problems, issues and questions from the inception of anthropology to the present. Junior standing or higher or consent.

ANTH 411 Museum Anthropology (3)

Anthropological study of museums and related sites of cultural production (historic sites, memorials, theme parks). Junior standing or higher. (Alt. years)

ANTH 412 Evolutionary Anthropology (3)

Lecture discussion providing an overview of evolutionary theory in anthropology: focus on the evolution of culture, behavioral ecology, and cultural diversity; emphasis on archaeological and ethnographic research and explanatory models. Pre: 210 or 215, or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 413 Language and Gender (3)

The role of language in the construction of gender and in the maintenance of the gender order. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No previous knowledge of linguistics required. A-F only. (Cross-listed as LING 415)

ANTH 414 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3)

Introduction to the ethnographic study of speech and language. Pre: 152. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as LING 414 and IS 414)

ANTH 415 Ecological Anthropology (3)

Relationship of humans with natural environment; role of culture in ecological systems. Pre: 152. (Cross-listed as SUST 416)

ANTH 416 Wealth, Culture, and Economic Anthropology (3)

Analysis of economic activities in non-Western, non-industrial societies; production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services in a variety of cultures. Pre: 152.

ANTH 417 Political Anthropology (3)

Character of political institutions and their development in nonWestern and non industrial societies. Pre: 152.

ANTH 419 Indigenous Anthropology (3)

Exploration of how anthropology studies indigenous groups throughout the world. An examination of the changing contexts of anthropological practice as calls for reflexivity lead anthropology of all backgrounds to bring insights from their “homes.” Issues include
the question of objectivity, the emicetic distinction, and the ethics of different kinds of anthropological research and the role of anthropologists in indigenous self-determination. Repeatable one time. Pre: 152.

ANTH 420 Communication and Culture (3)

Anthropological introduction to communication; intercultural and interspecies comparisons; verbal and nonverbal. Ethnography of communication, discourse and structural analyses, ethnomethodology. Pre: 152.

ANTH 422 Anthropology of Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion (3)

Cults, legends, millennial movements, myths, possession, rituals, sacred healing, shamanism, sorcery, spirits, symbolism, witchcraft, and other forms of religious and symbolic expression and experience, from small scale to highly urban societies. Pre: 152. (Cross-listed as REL 422)

ANTH 423 Social and Cultural Change (3)

Various approaches to examples of social and cultural change in non-literate societies; evolution, diffusion, acculturation, revolution, etc. Historical features and social processes of colonialism. Pre: 152.

ANTH 424 Islands as Model Systems: Human Biogeography of the Pacific (3)

Applying the concept of islands as “model systems;” explores the impacts of human populations on the natural ecosystems of oceanic islands, and the reciprocal effects of anthropogenic change on human cultures. A-F only. Pre: 323 or consent.

ANTH 426 The Anthropology of Sexuality (3)

Explores the intersection of sexuality research and queer theory with other anthropological concerns such as identity, race, gender, religion, economy, politics, and globalization. A-F only. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as WS 426)

ANTH 427 Food, Health, and Society (3)

How human groups identify, collect, create, and transform foods; how they shape those into dietary behaviors, and the influence of those behaviors on health. Pre: junior standing or higher or consent.

ANTH 428 Anthropology of the Body (3)

Exploration of the history and development of theories of the body via topics such as phenomenology, perception, bodily rituals, gender, sex, race, colonialism, power, pain, medicalization, immunology, reproductive health and cyborgs. Pre: 152 (or concurrent) or 301 (or concurrent).

ANTH 429 Anthropology of Consumer Cultures (3)

Examines the practices and meanings of consumption in the contemporary world. Topics include social class, branding, fandom, global-local nexus. A-F only. Pre: 152 or consent. (Alt. years)

ANTH 431 Indigenous Crops/Food Systems (1)

Schemes for managing sequences and combinations of crops and crop production activities. Ecosystem and social determinants. Multiple cropping. Analysis of alternative cropping systems. Repeatable unlimited times, but credit earned one time only. Junior standing or higher.

ANTH 440 The Agriculture of Identity: Food and Farming in Anthropological Perspective (3)

Exploration of agriculture from the perspective of anthropology, with a focus on alternatives to industrial agriculture, especially in the context of Hawai‘i. Readings include academic writing and also literary non-fiction and journalism. A-F only. Pre: 152. (Alt. years)

ANTH 442 Globalization and Identity in the Himalayas (3)

Examines the influence of local culture and global flows on identity formation in the
Himalayan region. Topics include: Hindu caste and gender, constructions of ethnicity, Tibetans and tourists, Sherpas and mountaineers, development ideologies, and consumerism. Pre: 152 or 301 or ASAN 202 or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as ASAN 442)

ANTH 443 Anthropology of Buddhism (3)

Selected aspects of national, regional and local manifestations of Buddhism are explored through the perspective of anthropology with an emphasis on the daily lives of monks, nuns and lay persons in their socio-cultural contexts. Pre: 422, REL 207, REL 475, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as REL 443)

ANTH 444 Spiritual Ecology (3)

Lectures and seminars provide a cross-cultural survey of the relationships between religions, environment and environmentalism. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as REL 444)

ANTH 445 Sacred Places (3)

Lectures and seminars provide a cross-cultural survey of sites which societies recognize as sacred and their cultural, ecological and conservation aspects. Pre: junior standing or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as REL 445)

ANTH 446 Southeast Asian Cultures (3)

Cultures of Southeast Asia from hunting and gathering groups to high civilizations; kinship, economic, political, and religious systems; recent developments. Pre: junior standing or consent.

ANTH 447 Polynesian Cultures (3)

Analysis of Polynesian cultures from their origins to contemporary states. Pre: junior standing or consent.

ANTH 449 Anthropology of Melanesia (3)

Close study of cultures of Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, and Fiji through anthropological ethnography. Pre: 152 or consent. (Once a year)

ANTH 458 Forensic Anthropology (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Application of physical anthropology to problems in human identification. Determination of age, sex, ancestry, etc., of the skeleton and preparation of reports for legal medicine. Pre: 215 and 215L.

ANTH 459 Extinctions (3)

An extraordinary number of plants and animals have gone extinct. Delves deeply into the primary literature that focuses on extinction and conservation from the beginning of the earth to the present day. Pre: 215 or consent. (Alt. yrs: fall)

ANTH 460 Asian Paleoanthropology (3)

Neogene-Quaternary paleoenvironmental reconstructions; human evolution in East Asia during the Pleistocene; Out of Africa I; modern human origins. Pre: sophomore standing, recommend 310, or consent. (Alt. years)

ANTH 461 Southeast Asian Archaeology (3)

Prehistory and protohistory of Southeast Asia and of Southeast Asian contacts with East Asia, India, Australia, and Oceania. Pre: junior standing or consent

ANTH 462 East Asian Archaeology (3)

Prehistory and protohistory of China, Japan, and Korea from earliest human occupation to historic times. Geographical emphasis may vary between China and Japan/Korea. Pre: junior standing or consent.

ANTH 463 Anthropology of Global Health and Development (3)

Seminar explores the definitions and histories of development and global health initiatives
in developing countries from an anthropological perspective. Reading materials include scholarly and popular texts that propose and critique solutions to global poverty. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: 152 or 301. (Alt. years)

ANTH 464 Hawaiian Archaeology (3)

Archaeological perspective in Hawai‘i’s past; origins of Hawaiians; early settlement and culture change; settlement patterns and material culture; historic sites preservation. Pre: junior standing and consent.

ANTH 465 Science, Sex, and Reproduction (3)

Explores anthropology’s critical analysis of approaches to reproductive health and procreation, primarily in developing countries. Examines sex and reproduction as
sites of intervention from public health, development, and biomedical specialists, while also considering local strategies. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 152 or 301 or WS 151. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as WS 465)

ANTH 466 Quantitative Archaeology (4)

Combined lecture/lab. Introduction to the basic principles of statistics as applied to the analysis of archaeological data. Exploratory data analysis approach. A-F only. ANTH majors only. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 210. (Alt. years)

ANTH 467 Biomedicine and Culture (3)

Examination of the social and cultural foundations of, and responses to, the values, technologies and practices of modern medicine. Pre: junior standing or higher, 152, or consent. (Alt. years)

ANTH 471 Field Mapping (3)

Techniques for field measurement and recording of cultural and physical data. Field sketching, Brunton surveying, plane table mapping, oblique photo compilation, topographic mapping, and representation of field data. Pre: junior standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as GEO 472)

ANTH 472 Ceramic Analysis in Archaeology (3)

Concepts, methods, and approaches used in the analysis of ancient pottery. Emphasis placed on ceramic technology, stylistic analysis. Pre: 210.

ANTH 473 Lithic Artifact Assemblage Analysis (4)

Combined lecture/lab on the manufacture and analysis of stone tools. Students work with experimental collections and engage in stone tool production. The ways in which lithics enlighten us about past human behavior are discussed. Pre: 210 and 380, or consent.

ANTH 475 Faunal Analysis in Archaeology (3)

Analysis of archaeologically recovered faunal collections with emphasis on identification and interpretation of nonhuman vertebrate remains. Pre: 210.

ANTH 477 Spatial Analysis in Archaeology (3)

Lecture/lab. Introduction to the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and spatial statistics in archaeological research. Topics include: map creation; spatial database management; spatial analysis; image processing, data reporting; and data display. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 466. (Alt. years)

ANTH 478 New World Rituals and Ideologies (3)

Study of cross-cultural patterns in ritual behaviors and creolization of African, indigenous, and Iberian ideological frameworks in the Americas. Topics may include syncretic religions (voodoo, candomble), Andean Christianity, spiritual conquest, conceptions of death, etc. Sophomore standing or higher. Minimum C- required grade for prerequisites. Pre: LAIS 360, or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as LAIS 478 and REL 478)

ANTH 481 Applied Anthropology (3)

The application of anthropological methods and concepts to solving practical human problems such as homelessness, domestic violence, maternal morbidity, conflict over resources, and the loss of indigenous languages. Includes a significant service-learning component. Pre: 152.

ANTH 482 Anthropology and the Environment: Culture, Power, and Politics (3)

Investigates environmental problems from an anthropological perspective, and examines the cultural politics of contestations over resources, rights, and the meanings of nature. Pre: 152 or 415 or consent. (Alt. years) (Crosslisted as SUST 482)

ANTH 483 Japanese Culture and Behavior (3)

Sociocultural factors in Japanese behavior. Social structure; traditional institutions

ANTH 484 Japanese Popular Culture (3)

Explores contemporary Japanese popular culture through themes such as gender, consumerism, globalization and nostalgia. Rather than a survey of popular culture genres, the course is organized thematically around issues and problematics.

ANTH 485 Pre-European Hawai‘i (3)

Pre-European society and culture from an anthropological viewpoint. Pre: junior standing or consent.

ANTH 486 Peoples of Hawai‘i (3)

Critically examines the historical and contemporary experiences of various people of Hawai‘i and utilizes anthropological and ethnic studies approaches to study identity, race, ethnicity, culture, language, gender, sex, class, land, and residence. Pre: junior standing or
consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ES 486)

ANTH 487 Anthropology of Okinawa and Its Diaspora (3)

Explores the ties of identity that exist within and between Okinawa and its diasporic populations. Pre: 152. (Alt. years)

ANTH 488 Chinese Culture: Ethnography (3)

Critical interpretations of ethnographic and biographic texts depicting individual and family lives in different socioeconomic circumstances, geographical regions, and historical periods of modern China.

ANTH 490 History of Anthropology (3)

Development of anthropological ideas, focusing on theoretical issues concerning culture, society, and human nature. Required of majors. Pre: 152.

ANTH 491 Special Topics in Southeast Asian Art History: Monuments and Nationalism in Southeast Asia (3)

Focused study of particular periods, regions and critical themes in Southeast Asian art and architectural history. Monuments and nationalism in Southeast Asia. A-F only. Pre: ART 175, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as ART 490D)

ANTH 493 Oral History: Theory and Practice (3)

Literature and methodology; project design. Students develop and execute an oral history project. Junior standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 493)

ANTH 495 Senior Thesis I (3)

Preparation of a major paper in anthropology with a committee of one chairperson and one other. First semester of a two-semester sequence with 496. May be taken concurrently with 496. Optional for majors. Pre: 490 and senior standing.

ANTH 496 Senior Thesis II (3)

Preparation of a major paper in anthropology with a committee of one chairperson and one other. Second semester of a two-semester sequence with 495. May be taken concurrently with 495. Optional for majors. Pre: 490 and senior standing.

ANTH 601 Ethnology (3)

Survey, in historical perspective, of theory in social and cultural anthropology, from the origin of anthropology to 1976. A course in the graduate core of anthropology. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 602 Linguistic Anthropology (3)

Investigation of mutual influences of linguistic theory and methodology and anthropological theory and methodology. A course in the graduate core of anthropology. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 603 Archaeology (3)

Development of critical and analytical skills in assessment of archaeological literature; emphasis on the science, theory, explanation, and paradigms that comprise archaeology. A course in the graduate core of anthropology. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 604 Biological Anthropology Core (3)

Human evolution and human variability in extant and previously existing populations; emphasis on history of physical anthropology, evolutionary systematics, primate biology and behavior, paleontology, anthropological genetics, climatic adaptation, growth, and nutrition. A course in the graduate core of anthropology. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 605 Discursive Practices (3)

Emphasizes linguistic, semantic, and interactional aspects of culture, exploring ways that discourse constructs social action and social realities, examining processes by which culture is produced as meaningful behavior in actual situations. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 606 Anthropology of Infectious Disease (3)

The role of human behavior, including its social and cultural determinants, in understanding the distribution of infectious diseases and in shaping preventive and therapeutic strategies. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 607 The Media and Discursive Practice (3)

Role of the mass media in constructing meaning in social cultural processes such as nationalism, ritual, identity, and collective memory. Attention to interactional and post-structural theories of discourse that link the mass media to discursive practice. A-F only.

ANTH 608 History and Memory (3)

History and collective memory as culturally formed and politically contested realities. The role of narrative, ritual, and media technologies in shaping representations of the past. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 610 Cultural Geographies of Tourism (3)

Social and cultural analysis of tourism practices, with emphasis on Hawai‘i, Asia and the Pacific. Tourism in relation to consumer culture, transnational flows of people and images, post-colonial politics, performance and identity formation. (Cross-listed as GEO 610)

ANTH 611 Contemporary Anthropological Theory (3)

Graduate seminar that examines the history of theory in sociocultural anthropology from 1960 to present. Designed to be taken in sequence after 601. Pre: 601 or concurrent. (Once a year)

ANTH 620 (Alpha) Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3)

Major theoretical problems in (B) kinship; (C) cognitive systems; (D) religion; (E) political institutions; (F) law and social control; (G) economics; (H) ecology; (I) other to be announced. Repeatable nine times. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 623 Advanced Pacific Islands Archaeology (3)

Advanced theoretical and methodological examination of archaeological research in Oceania, a region including the islands of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. (Fall only)

ANTH 640 (Alpha) Methods and Theory in Archaeology (3)

Focused seminars pertaining to distinct areas of archaeological method and theory. (B) analytical; (C) environment/landscape; (D) applied archaeology; (E) economic/resources; (F) survey/locational. Repeatable two times. Pre: 603.

ANTH 645 Historic Preservation (3)

Federal, state, and local laws and regulations that regulate and provide protection to significant archaeological and historical resources in Hawai‘i and the region. (Alt. years: spring only) (Cross-listed as AMST 645).

ANTH 659 Advances in Extinctions (3)

To delve deeply into the primary literature that focuses on the subjects of extinction and conservation broadly speaking, with particular emphasis on the 6 mass extinction events, including the Anthropocene. (Alt. years)

ANTH 660 Paleoanthropology of Asia (3)

Survey of the Asian paleoanthropological record, particularly in its paleoenvironmental setting; Out of Africa I; modern human origins. Pre: graduate standing and relevant background in anthropology or related field. (Alt. years)

ANTH 661 Archaeological Perspectives on Southeast Asia (3)

Prehistory and protohistory of Southeast Asia, and of Southeast Asian contacts with East Asia, india, Australia, and Oceania. Pre: background in archaeology or Southeast Asian history or consent.

ANTH 663 Anthropology of Global Aid (3)

Examines ideologies of development, humanitarian, and global health interventions from an anthropological perspective. Explores the disjuncture between discourses that portrays global aid as easing suffering and those that accuse it of maintaining relationships of domination. A-F only. (Alt. years: spring)

ANTH 666 Archaeological Data Analysis (4)

Advanced introduction to the fundamental principles of statistics as applied to the analysis of archaeological data. (Alt. years)

ANTH 667 Biomedicine and Culture (3)

Examination of the social and cultural foundations of, and responses to, the values, technologies, and practices of modern medicine. Pre: graduate standing. (Alt. years)

ANTH 668 Archaeology Field Methods (V)

(5 7-hr Lab) Laboratory and field training in the principles and practice of methods of archaeology—survey, mapping, excavation, conservation. Repeatable one time, up to 12 credits. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 670 Applied Archaeology Practicum (V)

Applies course work in archaeology to handson activities under the direction of practicing professionals and university faculty. MA track in Applied Archaeology students only. Repeatable one time, up to 12 credits. Pre: consent.

ANTH 671 Applied Method and Theory in Hawaiian Archaeology (3)

Graduate seminar focused on method and theory in the practice of applied archaeology in Hawai‘i. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Alt. years)

ANTH 676 Recording Historic and Cultural Resources (3)

Techniques in recording and evaluation of historic buildings and other resources, with an emphasis on field recordings and state and federal registration procedures. (Cross-listed as AMST 676 and PLAN 676)

ANTH 681 Applied Cultural Anthropology (3)

Theory, methods, and results of application of cultural anthropological concepts to practical problems. Graduate students only.

ANTH 682 Applied Cultural Anthropology Practicum (3)

Applies course work in cultural anthropology to hands-on activities under the direction of practicing professionals and university faculty. Repeatable one time. ANTH majors only. Graduate students only. Pre: 681.

ANTH 695 Professional Skills Develop in Anthropology (3)

Seminar prepares graduate students for entry into profession, including employment
opportunities, research, presentations, ethics and outreach. Required of all Plan B students. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 699 Directed Reading or Research (V)

Repeatable nine times, up to 12 credits. Pre: graduate standing and consent.

ANTH 700 Thesis Research (V)

Research for master’s thesis. Repeatable nine times, up to 12 credits.

ANTH 710 Seminar in Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology (3)

Ethnographic research methods. Introduction to the approaches and techniques of participatory research, including the collection, analysis, and interpretation of social and
cultural data. Politics and ethics of research practice. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing in anthropology or consent.

ANTH 711 Seminar in Research Design and Proposal Writing (3)

Research design and proposal writing. For students preparing for advanced research. Pre: graduate standing and consent.

ANTH 720 Anthropology of Japan (3)

Japan examined through three dimensions of cultural anthropology: cultural/symbolic, social/organizational, and individual/psychological. Selected topics analyzed and interpreted in terms of conjunctions of these dimensions. Pre: 483 or 484.

ANTH 750 (Alpha) Research Seminar (3)

Selected problems in current research. (B) archaeology; (C) medical; (D) ethnography; (E) social; (G) biological. Repeatable nine times. Pre: graduate standing.

ANTH 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Research for doctoral dissertation. Repeatable nine times.

ARAB 101 Elementary Modern Standard Arabic (4)

Designed to provide students with basic knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic. Focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic.

ARAB 102 Elementary Modern Standard Arabic (4)

Focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language as well as formal spoken Arabic. It introduces a wide range of situation-based texts and topics that build vocabulary, grammar, and general communicative competence. Pre: 101.

ARAB 201 Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic (4)

Designed for students who have successfully completed a year of Elementary Arabic. Focus is on acquisition of more complex grammatical structures, expanding vocabulary, and developing competence in a wide range of communicative situations. Pre: 102 or exam or consent. (Fall only)

ARAB 202 Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic (4)

Designed for students who have successfully completed three semesters of Arabic. Focus is on intensive practice of interactive functional skills such as listening comprehension and fundamental conversation strategies. Pre: 201 or exam or consent. (Spring only)

ARAB 301 Third-Level Arabic I (3)

Develop proficiency in reading/listening comprehension in Modern Standard Arabic. The instructional materials consist of authentic written, visual and audio materials. Classes meet 3 hours weekly. Pre: 202 (or equivalent), or consent.

ARAB 302 Third-Level Arabic II (3)

Continuation of third-level Arabic I. Emphasis on developing writing and interaction ability at advanced levels of proficiency. Course includes extensive reading, composition exercises, listening skills, conversation practice and extensive review of Arabic grammar.
Developing fluency is the main objective of this course. Classes meet 3 hours weekly. Pre: 301 (or equivalent), or consent.

ART 101 Introduction to the Visual Arts (3)

Nature of the world’s visual arts and their influences on personal expression. Lectures, demonstrations, and studio practice. (Not for art majors or minors)

ART 101A Introduction to the Visual Arts (3)

Nature of the world’s visual arts and their influences on personal expression. Lectures, demonstrations, and studio practice. (Not for art majors or minors)

ART 103 Introduction to Fiber Arts (3)

Broad-based studio exploration of materials, techniques, concepts in contemporary fiber art. May include surface patterning/manipulation, papermaking, woven, other 2D/3D hand construction techniques. Focus on creative-problem solving, experimentation in a cooperative studio setting.

ART 104 Introduction to Printmaking (3)

Foundation explorations in the processes of relief, intaglio, and stencil printmaking. Direct workshop studio experience in the basic techniques and concepts of wood cut, linoleum cut, drypoint, monotype, and basic stencil processes.

ART 107 Introduction to Photography (3)

Studio/ lecture examining the major themes and issues in historical and current photographical production. Direct black and white darkroom experience. Students must have 35mm film-based camera with adjustable shutter speed, aperture, and light meter.

ART 113 Introduction to Drawing (3)

Descriptive, expressive, and formal aspects of visual language through drawing practice.

ART 116 Introduction to Three-Dimensional Composition (3)

Basic concepts, elements, and principles of art.

ART 123 Introduction to Painting (3)

Theory and practice of painting; material and technical procedures. A standalone course aimed at non-majors. ART majors should start with ART 223 after taking ART 113.

ART 130 Introduction to Glass (3)

Basic techniques of working with cold and molten glass. Theory of glass studio operation and introduction to glass theory.

ART 175 Survey of Global Art I (3)

Art produced in Asia, Africa, Native America, Europe, and the Pacific Islands, from prehistory to the 15th century. Religious and philosophical ideas expressed in architecture,
painting, prints, sculpture, applied art, body art, and textiles. (Fall only)

ART 175A Survey of Global Art I (3)

Art produced in Asia, Africa, Native America, Europe, and the Pacific Islands, from prehistory to the 15th century. Religious and philosophical ideas expressed in architecture, painting, prints, sculpture, applied art, body art, and textiles. (Fall only)

ART 176 Survey of Global Art II (3)

Art produced in Asia, Africa, Native America, Europe, and the Pacific Islands, from the 15th century to the present. Religious and philosophical ideas expressed in architecture, painting, prints, sculpture, applied art, body art, and textiles. (Spring only)

ART 176A Survey of Global Art II (3)

Art produced in Asia, Africa, Native America, Europe, and the Pacific Islands, from the 15th century to the present. Religious and philosophical ideas expressed in architecture, painting, prints, sculpture, applied art, body art, and textiles. (Spring only)

ART 189 Introduction to Hawaiian Art (3)

Integrated beginning studio art course, which offers students the opportunity to understand and express Hawaiian cultural perspectives through contemporary art practice. A-F only.

ART 201 Introduction to Electronic Arts (3)

Theory and practice course investigating language common to all arts activity particularly as related to the contemporary arts. Pre: any studio art course; or consent.

ART 202 Introduction to Digital Imaging (3)

Combined theory and practice examining major techniques, concepts, and aesthetics in contemporary digital image production. Direct studio experience in essential software, printing techniques and hardware necessary in producing the gallery quality inkjet print. A-F only. Pre: 113.

ART 207 Intermediate Photo: Black and White (3)

Black and white photography emphasizing communication and self-expression. Lectures,
demonstrations, and projects. Student must supply camera and material. Pre: 107 (with a minimum grade of B).

ART 213 Intermediate Drawing (3)

Extension of the observational foundation established in 113 to address contemporary conceptual and expressive approaches to drawing. Pre: 113 or consent.

ART 214 Introduction to Life Drawing (3)

Investigations of the figure concerning anatomical construction, light, space, diagramatic analysis, and thematic content. Pre: 113 or consent.

ART 215 Intaglio Printmaking (3)

Studio practice in concepts and techniques of making prints from metal plates including etching, engraving, aquatint, and drypoint. A-F only. Pre: 113.

ART 217 Screenprinting (3)

Studio practice in screenprinting on paper. Copy camera and basic photo-stencil techniques introduced. A-F only. Pre: 113.

ART 218 Relief Printmaking (3)

Studio practice in the techniques and concepts of woodblock, linoleum cut, monotype, and calligraph printmaking. Emphasis on both traditional and contemporary practices. A-F only. Pre: 113.

ART 223 Approaches to Painting (3)

Theory and practice of painting; contemporary conceptual and expressive approaches. Pre: 113.

ART 225 Painting/Water-Based Media (3)

An introduction to water-based media. Traditional transparent color, gouache and acrylics. Pre: 113 or consent.

ART 230 Glass Casting: Sand and Metal Molds (3)

Expressive explorations in glass casting with wet sand, bonded sand, and metal molds. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 and 130.

ART 234 Cold Glass Fabrication (3)

Expressive explorations using architectural sheet glass. Development of 2D and 3D forms using engraving, sandblasting, and cold joinery techniques. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 and 130.

ART 237 Woven Structures (3)

Structured studio exploration of creative potential of working with threads under tension. In-depth introduction to a variety of traditional and experimental processes/ materials. Tradition of pattern weaving to experimental woven forms. A-F only. Pre: one of 103, 116; or consent.

ART 238 Fiber Forms (3)

In-depth studio exploration of non-loom fiber techniques for creating/ manipulating 2D and 3D forms. Emphasis on concept development, skill mastery, innovative application of materials/techniques. May include felting, knotting, netting, piecing, coiling, found object/sewn constructions, papermaking. A-F only. Pre: one of 103, 116; or consent.

ART 242 Introduction to Ceramics (3)

Three-dimensional concepts in clay; hand-building and wheel-throwing techniques. Projects, lectures, and demonstrations.

ART 254 Sculpture—Metal Casting (3)

Metal casting and development of associated practices and concepts. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 or consent.

ART 255 Sculpture—Carving, Mixed Media (3)

Investigations of traditional and contemporary carving concepts and methods. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 or consent.

ART 265 Design: Studio I (3)

Introduction to graphic design. Explorations of rhetorical and semiotic structures and their relationship to visual form and content. ART 176 is recommended as a prerequisite.
A-F only. Pre: 113 or consent. Co-requisite: 265L and 266.

ART 265L Design: Studio I Lab (1)

Beginning instruction in the Macintosh computer environment, including hardware, software, and lab networking as it relates to graphic design production. ART 176 is recommended as a prerequisite. CR/NC only. Pre: 113 or consent. Co-requisite: 265 and 266.

ART 266 Design: Typography I (3)

Introduction to typography. Exploration of letterform and word compositions in the context of single-page structures. ART 176 is recommended as a prerequisite. A-F only. Pre: 113 or consent. Co-requisite: 265 and 265L.

ART 301 (Alpha) Electronic Arts Studio (3)

(6 Lec/ Lab) Combined theory and practice studio course(s) that investigate language, processes, and personalized composing systems related to the use of technological media and its application to a variety of contemporary art areas and related disciplines. (B) imaging systems; (C) sound; (D) interactive systems. Pre: 201 and one 200-level studio; or consent.

ART 302 Introduction to Contemporary Critical Theory (3)

Examination of the significant themes and issues in contemporary critical theory as they relate to the production and reception of art. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 303 Kiln-Formed Glass (3)

Expressive explorations in the use of kiln-formed, fusible-sheet glasses and enameling on glass. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 and 130.

ART 304 Digital Imaging: Professional Printing (3)

Combined theory and practice. Investigates industry standard methods for archival pigment printing. Techniques include: device calibration and profiling, black and white, coating techniques, mounting and adhesive techniques, professional portfolio presentation. A-F only. Pre: 202 (with a minimum grade of B).

ART 305 Digital Imaging: Alternative Printing (3)

Combined theory and practice. Merges digital printing, mark-making, photography, and traditional printmaking. Includes image transfers, lifts, precoating techniques, as well as printing on alternative substrates such as watercolor papers, metals, and cloth. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 202 (with a minimum grade of B).

ART 306 Lost Wax Glass Casting (3)

Glass kiln casting techniques, lost wax fuse casting, pâte de verre. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 and 130.

ART 307 Advanced Lighting (3)

Emphasis on aesthetic and critical analysis. Techniques covered include continuous light, strobe and handheld flash. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 202 and 207 with a minimum grade of B.

ART 308 (Alpha) Advanced Photographic Techniques (3)

Emphasis on aesthetic and critical analysis. (B) digital color photography and printing; (C) hand-applied emulsion. Each alpha is repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 202 and 207 with a minimum grade of B.

ART 313 Advanced Drawing (3)

Studio practice in drawing emphasizing contemporary developments in art. Repeatable one time. Pre: 213 or consent.

ART 314 Intermediate Life Drawing (3)

Further investigations of the figure concerning anatomical and diagramatic construction, light, space, and thematic content. Repeatable one time. Pre: 214 or consent.

ART 315 Experimental Art and Animation (3)

Provides students an opportunity to experiment with new mediums while collaborating with artists from different backgrounds, such as art, theatre, dance, film, and animation. ACM, ART, THEA, DNCE majors only. Pre: 113 or ACM 216 (or concurrent) or THEA 353 (or concurrent) or THEA 356 (or concurrent), or consent. (Cross-listed as ACM 315 and THEA 314)

ART 316 Lithography (3)

Studio practice in concepts and techniques of making prints from lithographic limestone and plates. Pre: (with a minimum grade of B) 215 or 217 or 218.

ART 318 Intermediate Printmaking (3)

Intermediate level specialization in either intaglio, lithography, screenprinting, or relief printmaking. Concentration on the techniques and formats of color printing and sequential image development. Repeatable two times. Pre: (with a minimum grade of B) two of 215, 217, 218, or 316.

ART 322 Advanced Color (3)

Theory and application of color as related to studio practice. Pre: 113.

ART 323 Advanced Painting I (3)

Studio practice in painting emphasizing contemporary developments in art. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 223 or consent.

ART 324 Painting from Life (3)

Painting from the model; a survey of the figurative tradition. Repeatable one time. Pre: 123 or 223, and 214.

ART 330 Advanced Glass (3)

Glass as an expressive medium. Individual problems; construction of studio equipment. Readings and discussions of contemporary glass issues. Repeatable one time. Pre: Two of the following: 230, 234, 303, 306.

ART 335 Papermaking (3)

Studio emphasis on handmade papermaking techniques, conceptual exploration in two and three dimensions. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: one fiber course or one of 104, 113, 116; or consent.

ART 336 Wearable Art—Body and Material (3)

Studio exploration of clothing as art form and the body as living armature and performance. Emphasis on development of concept, skill, collaborative and individual voice through material investigation, research, discussions, lectures, individual and group projects. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: one 200-level fiber course, or 116 and one 200-level studio course; or consent.

ART 337 Fiber Sculpture—Endurance and Impermanence (3)

Studio exploration in contemporary dimensional fiber using both conventional and non-conventional materials and processes. Emphasis on concept development, sensitivity to the evocative potential of materials, context, surface treatment and its relationship to concept and structure. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: one 200 level fiber course or 116 and one 200 level studio course; or consent.

ART 339 Designing Surface (3)

In-depth studio exploration of fiber techniques for patterning and manipulating cloth and other related experimental surfaces. Engages conceptual exploration through experimentation with traditional fiber patterning techniques such as dyeing, resisting, direct printing, embellishment drawing with thread and piercing. Group and individual projects. A-F only. Pre: 113 and 116; or consent.

ART 343 Ceramics—Sculpture (3)

Sculptural concepts and techniques specifically related to the medium of clay; advanced hand-building, throwing, glazing, and firing techniques. Repeatable one time. Pre: 242 or consent.

ART 344 Ceramics—Vessels (3)

Exploration of the ceramic vessel as function, metaphor, and expression. Advanced hand-building, throwing, glazing, and firing techniques. Repeatable one time. Pre: 242 or consent.

ART 345 Ceramics—Low Temperature (3)

Form and surface problems related to earthenware clay bodies and low-temperature glazes; mold-making for ceramics. Repeatable one time. Pre: 242 or consent.

ART 346 History of Western Ceramics (3)

Western ceramics history from chronological, developmental, contextual, and theoretical standpoints; influence of Asian ceramics. Pre: 242, with 175 and 176 recommended; or consent.

ART 347 Technical Ceramics (3)

Clay body development, glaze development, empirical and calculation methods. Emphasis on glaze maturity, surface, and color. A-F only. Pre: 242, and one of 343, 344, or 345; or consent.

ART 351 Sculpture—Figure Modeling (3)

Figure modeling, mold making, and casting. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 or consent.

ART 352 Kinetic Sculpture (3)

The design and construction of objects incorporating movement as an integral element of their content. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 or consent.

ART 356 Sculpture—Metal Fabrication (3)

Metal fabrication and development of associated practices, concepts, and historical references. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 or consent.

ART 357 Sculpture—Small-Scale (3)

Fabrication and casting of forms on a small scale such as jewelry. The development of related practices, concepts, and historical references. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 or
consent.

ART 358 Utilitarian Sculpture (3)

The design and construction of objects intended for use/interaction. Emphasis on wood and synthetic materials. Repeatable one time. Pre: 116 or consent.

ART 359 Sculpture—Contemporary (3)

Contextualization of late 20th/early 21st century sculptural practice, including stylistic and theoretical frameworks, with references to influences of various historical Western and Asian traditions and applying this knowledge in the creation of sculpture. Pre: 116 and 176, or consent.

ART 360 Exhibition Design and Gallery Management (3)

Design theory and techniques for presentation of artworks and mounting exhibitions. Pre: junior standing.

ART 361 Art Museums and Preservation Practices (3)

Introduction to collections management and preservation techniques, incorporating both
theoretical and practical approaches, and including hands-on work with the collections of the John Young Museum. Junior standing or higher. A-F only.

ART 365 Design: Studio II (3)

Intermediate graphic design. Emphasis on communication problems involving process and analysis. Introduction to modernist precedents and information theory. A-F only. Pre: 113, 116, 175, 176, 265, 266; or consent. Co-requisite: 365L and 366.

ART 365L Design: Studio II Lab (1)

Intermediate instruction in the Macintosh computer environment, software, and peripheral devices, including intermediate layout. Introduction to graphic design industry standard multi-media and web design programs. CR/NC only. Pre: 265, 265L, and 266; or consent. Co-requisite: 365.

ART 366 Design: Typography II (3)

Intermediate typographic design, exploration of word and text composition in the context of multiple-page structures. A-F only. Pre: 113, 116, 175, 176, 265, 266; or consent. Co-requisite: 365 and 365L.

ART 369 (Alpha) Study Abroad-Studio Art (3)

Intensive study of topics in studio art at a UH Mânoa approved study abroad institution. (B) introductory; (C) upper-division. Repeatable one time per alpha. A-F only. Pre: consent.

ART 371 Medieval Art (3)

Arts of Europe from early Christian era to Renaissance. Pre: 175 or consent.

ART 373 Art of Greece and Rome (3)

Minoan and Mycenaean arts; Greece and Rome. Pre: 175 or consent. (Cross-listed as CLAS 373)

ART 374 Art of the 19th Century (3)

Architecture, sculpture, and painting of Europe. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 380 Early Art of Japan (3)

Major developments, prehistoric through Kamakura; architecture, painting, sculpture. Pre: 175 or consent.

ART 381 Later Art of Japan (3)

Major developments, Muromachi to modern period; painting, sculpture, architecture. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 382 Philippine Visual Art from Burial Jars to Burning Effigies (3)

Introduction to the arts and material culture of the Philippines from the pre-colonial to the contemporary period through the examination of sculpture, metalwork, ceramics, textiles, and painting from various ethnolinguistic groups. Sophomore standing or higher. (Cross-listed as IP 382)

ART 384 Art of Korea (3)

Ceramics, sculpture, painting, and architecture; neolithic through Yi periods. Pre: 175 or consent.

ART 385 Art and Culture of Early China (3)

A culturally oriented study of Chinese visual arts; emphasis on jade, bronze, secular and religious sculptures, and paintings from prehistory to the 9th century. Pre: 175 or consent.

ART 386 Art and Culture of Late China (3)

A culturally oriented study of Chinese visual arts; emphasis on the rise of literati painting and theory individualism in art and theory, garden, and architecture, and the Chinese pursuit of modernity and post-modernity in art. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 387 Sculpture of China (3)

Thematic introduction to sculpture in China from the Neolithic period through the present day. A-F only. Pre: 175.

ART 389 (Alpha) Study Abroad-Art History (3)

Intensive study of advanced topics in art history at a UH Mânoa-approved study abroad institution. (B) introductory; (C) upper-division. Repeatable one time per alpha. A-F only. Pre: consent.

ART 390 Art of Africa, Pacific, North America (3)

Contextual study of art from selected areas in Africa, the Pacific, and North America. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 391 (Alpha) Art of Southeast Asia (3)

Critical analysis of the historical and cultural development of Buddhist and Hindu art in Southeast Asia; (B) island Southeast Asia; (C) mainland Southeast Asia. Repeatable one time for different alphas. Pre: 175 or consent.

ART 393 Art of India and South Asia (3)

Art and architecture of South Asia in historical and cultural context. Art of India and South Asia. Pre: 175 or consent.

ART 395 Art Historical Methodology (3)

Introduction to the methods and approaches of art history. Students will develop skills in perception and comprehension of visual art forms, and a critical understanding of the methods used by art historians to analyze them. A-F only. Pre: 175 and 176 and consent.

ART 396 (Alpha) History of Photography (3)

History of photography from its beginnings to the present; emphasis on the evolution of photography as an art form; (B) nineteenth century, from the invention of photography through pictorialism; (C) twentieth century, from World War I to the present. Repeatable one time for different alphas. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 399 Directed Work (V)

Individual projects; tutorial. Maximum: 3 credit hours per semester; total 3 for BA, 6 for BFA. Pre: two 200-level or above art courses in area of directed work, as well as consent of instructor and department associate chair

ART 400 (Alpha) Special Topics (V)

Intensive and specialized work at advanced level in fields of special interest of visiting or resident faculty; (B) studio art; (C) art history. Repeatable three times per alpha, up to 12 credits. Junior standing or higher and instructor consent only.

ART 401 Advanced Electronic Arts Studio (3)

Tutorial studio that encourages exploration in combined and new media through independent work within an environment of theoretical and critical discourse. Repeatable one time. Pre: 301 or consent.

ART 405 Professional Practice in the Arts: Creative, Career, and Leadership (3)

Examination of the role of the artist in society, the artist as self, as community member, as teacher. Professional Practice skills in the arts; planning, grantsmanship, fundraising, budgeting, marketing, outreach, and media relations. ART majors only. Senior standing or graduate students only. A-F only.

ART 409 Graduation Portfolio (BA) (0)

Required graduation portfolio for BA Art History and Art Studio students. BA ART majors only. Undergraduates only. CR/NC only. To be taken during the semester prior to expected graduation.

ART 410 BFA Capstone Seminar/Studio (3)

In conjunction with the production of art for the BFA annual exhibition, this seminar will examine, critique, and evaluate the student’s art within the context of contemporary art, professional practices, exhibition theory, and integrate theoretical and practical issues in
the life of an artist. BFA majors only. A-F only. Pre: BFA major or consent. (Spring only)

ART 436 Use, Re-use, and Radical Re-use (3)

Explores the related concepts of use, re-use, and radical re-use through an exploration of new applications of traditional fiber techniques and contexts of making. A-F only. Pre: 113 and 116 and one 200-level or above fiber course, and consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 436)

ART 439 Installation/Performance–Material in Context (3)

Studio investigation of the definition/ transformation of space through artist intervention.
Emphasis on the evocative potential of materials in context (physical, social, political, psychological) as well as experiments in non-object based interventions. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: two 200-level or above studio courses, or consent.

ART 460 Early 20th Century American Art (3)

American art in the first half of the 20th century and its impact on American culture. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 176 or consent. (Alt. years: fall) (Crosslisted as AMST 460)

ART 465 Design: Studio III (3)

Advanced graphic design. Emphasis on postmodernist theory, context, audience, and alternative media. A-F only. Pre: 365, 365L, and 366; or consent. Co-requisite: 465L.

ART 465L Design: Studio III Lab (1)

Advanced instruction in the Macintosh computer environment, including software and peripheral devices. Instruction in image manipulation and editing still video images for the web, CD, DVD, and portable interface devices. CR/NC only. Pre: 365, 365L, and 366; or consent. Co-requisite: 465.

ART 466 Design: Typography III (3)

Advanced typographic design. Exploration of 2D, 3D, electronic, and intermedia. Emphasis on contemporary typographic models. A-F only. Pre: 365, 365L, and 366; or consent.

ART 467 Design: Production Techniques (3)

Advanced techniques in design production from printed and digital media. A-F only. Pre: 465, 465L, and 466; or consent. Co-requisite: 467L. (Spring only)

ART 467L Design: Production Techniques Lab (1)

Advanced study of digital media for graphic designers. Focuses on skills and specific technical information to complement material covered in 467. CR/NC only. Pre: 465 and 465L and 466. Co-requisite: 467. (Spring only)

ART 469 Design: Advanced Studio (3)

Individual and team investigations of complex problems in graphic design. Emphasis on projects with actual clients (when available) and/or independent investigations addressing advanced and current questions in the graphic design field. A-F only. Pre: with a minimum grade of B- for (465 and 466) and credit for 465L. (Spring only)

ART 470 (Alpha) Renaissance Art (3)

Painting, sculpture, and architecture: (B) early Renaissance in Italy; (C) northern Europe; (D) High Renaissance and mannerism in Italy. Repeatable one time for different alphas. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 471 Baroque and Rococo Art (3)

Architecture, sculpture, and painting of Europe in the Baroque and Rococo periods. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 472 Art of the United States (3)

Emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries. Pre: 176 or AMST 202 or consent. (Cross-listed as AMST 456)

ART 473 Art of the First Half of 20th Century (3)

Development of modern art in Europe 1900–1939. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 474 (Alpha) Art Since 1945 (3)

Art since 1945, with a focus on the global expansion of the avantgarde; (B) contemporary art 1945-2000; (C) global contemporary art since 2000. A-F only. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 475 (Alpha) Art of the Pacific (3)

Visual form and function of the arts in cultural context: (B) Melanesia and Australia; (C) Polynesia and Micronesia; (D) North Pacific coast Indian, Eskimo. Repeatable one time for different alphas. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 476 Art of Tribal Africa (3)

Visual form and function of arts in cultural context. Mali, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Guinea, Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon, Congo, Zaire. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 477 Art of Indonesia (3)

Architecture, sculpture, and textile traditions of indigenous Indonesia in cultural context. A-F only. Pre: 176.

ART 478 Topics in Contemporary Art (3)

Thematic approaches to contemporary art and visual culture. Course themes may include identity, local/global issues, and appropriation. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 176 or consent. (Alt. years)

ART 479 Art of Hawai‘i (3)

Stylistic and aesthetic characteristics of art of ancient Hawai‘i; relationship to art from other parts of Polynesia. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 481 Museum Interpretations (3)

Studies the interpretive strategies and methods used by museums to communicate with visitors in museums, art galleries, historic sites, parks, and related places. Considers how interpretations contribute to cultural knowledge. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent. (Crosslisted as AMST 457)

ART 483 Applied Art of Japan (3)

Ceramics, metalwork, lacquer, and textiles throughout Japanese history. Pre: 175 and 176; or consent.

ART 484 Contemporary Art and Ecology (3)

Explores the recent history of environmental and ecological art; provides a critical framework for the contemporary image politics of environmentalism, ecology, sustainability, and climate change. A-F only. Pre: 176.

ART 485 Contemporary Art in Hawai‘i (3)

History of contemporary art in Hawai‘i: the institutions, artists, critics, and historians that have shaped it. Strong focus on oral history of Hawai‘i artists. A-F only. Pre: 176.

ART 486 Traditional Chinese Painting (3)

Stylistic and historic development of two-dimensional arts; painting and calligraphy from prehistory through 18th century. Pre: 175 or consent.

ART 487 Modern and Contemporary Art of China (3)

Introduction to the arts of China in the modern and contemporary periods, in all media and genres, from 1840 to the present. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 488 Genres of Japanese Cinema (3)

History of Japanese cinema, including silent films, samurai films, monster films, and literary adaptations, analyzed through the lens of genre and genre theory. A-F only. Pre: 175 and 176. (Summer only)

ART 490 (Alpha) Special Topics in Southeast Asian Art History (3)

Focused study of particular periods, regions and critical themes in Southeast Asian art
and architectural history. (B) Angkor & art of Khmer civilization; (C) art & architecture of Thailand; (D) monuments & nationalism in Southeast Asia. Repeatable one time for up to two different alphas. A-F only. Pre: 175, or consent. (Once a year) (D Cross-listed as ANTH 491)

ART 492 Hindu Visual Culture (3)

Art and architecture of South Asia in historical and cultural context. Hindu visual culture. Pre: 175 or consent.

ART 493 Art of Islam (3)

Major developments in art and architecture. Pre: 175 or consent.

ART 494 Photography: Critical Issues (3)

Seminar on theoretical, ethical and aesthetic issues relating to the practice of photography, past and present. A-F only. Pre: 396B or 396C, or consent.

ART 495 History of Modern Design (3)

Major design movements in Europe and America from late 19th century to present; arts and crafts movement, art nouveau, modernist trends of the 20th century. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 496 Topics in the History of Cinema (3)

Specific period or national style of cinema studied in its historical context. Repeatable two times. A-F only. Pre: 176 or consent.

ART 611 Graduate Studio Seminar in Art (3)

Selected topics in art. A critique-based course with emphasis on the development of critical analysis, artistic research, and practice. Repeatable six times. ART majors only. A-F only. Pre: consent.

ART 612 Graduate Studio Seminar in Art II (6)

Selected topics in art. Emphasis on the analysis of the systems by which art is conceived and the ability to define developing direction and related research. ART majors only. A-F only. Pre: 611 or consent. (Spring only)

ART 613 Graduate Studio Seminar in Art III (6)

Selected topics in art. Emphasis on the development of critical analysis and the understanding of one’s position relative to the contemporary art world. ART majors only. A-F only. Pre: 612 or consent. (Fall only)

ART 614 Graduate Studio Seminar in Art IV (6)

Selected topics in art. Emphasis on the convergence of one’s studio practice and research, and the refinement necessary to the preparation for entrance into thesis. ART majors only. A-F only. Pre: 613 or consent. (Spring only

ART 620 Methods in Contemporary Art (3)

Examines processes of inquiry and experimentation within studio practice. Students explore a range of research methods as a way to challenge habitual methodologies and expand notions of art and art making. A-F only. (Fall only)

ART 621 Materials in Contemporary Art (3)

Explores the physical, historical, symbolic, and contextual capacity of materials, as well as the mutually constitutive roles of artist and materials within the creative process. A-F only. (Spring only)

ART 630 Graduate Studio Teaching Practicum (3)

Observation, analysis and participation in teaching a lower division course under the direction of an instructor in the student’s area of concentration. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 690, admitted to candidacy for MFA in art, and consent.

ART 670 Art Historical Methodology (3)

An introduction to art historiography, analytical techniques, and research methods and materials. Pre: consent and graduate standing.

ART 677 Art of Oceania (3)

Arts from Polynesia, Melanesia, Micronesia explored in context of issues involving belief systems and cultural change. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 475C or consent.

ART 688 Topics in the Art of China (3)

Research topics in the history of Chinese sculpture, ceramics, bronzes, jade, and textiles. A-F only. Pre: consent.

ART 690 Seminar in Contemporary Critical Theory (3)

Research and discussion seminar supporting advanced critical theory in the context
of contemporary art and other creative practice. Pre: consent.

ART 691 Seminar in Global Contemporary Art (3)

Selected topics in global contemporary art history. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Alt. years)

ART 695 Seminar in Western Art History (3)

Selected topics in European and American art history. Pre: consent.

ART 699 Directed Work (V)

Advanced individual projects; advanced tutorial. Maximum: 3 credit hours per semester; total 6 for MA Plan A, 9 for MA Plan B, MFA students must petition OGE for permission
to apply toward degree requirement. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent of instructor and department chair.

ART 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

ART 780 Seminar in Japanese Art (3)

Selected topics in Japanese art history. Pre: consent.

ART 791 Seminar in South/Southeast Asian Art History (3)

Selected topics in South and/or Southeast Asian art and architectural history with an emphasis on Hindu and Buddhist traditions. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent, repeatable with consent.

ART 792 Orientalism and Visual Culture (3)

Investigates artistic representations, appropriations, and exchanges constructed on the basis of East/Orient vs. West/Occident differences. Includes analysis of: Orientalizing artistic traditions throughout history, history and concept of Orient, post-colonial critique of Orientalism. A-F only. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Alt. 2-3 years) (Cross-listed as ASAN 792)

ASL 101 Elementary American Sign Language I (3)

Development of basic receptive and expressive conversational skills in American Sign Language; linguistic structure introduced inductively through mix of lectures and discussion; includes discussion of history and culture of Deaf community in the U.S.

ASL 102 Elementary American Sign Language II (3)

Continued development of basic receptive and expressive conversational skills in American Sign Language; linguistic structure introduced inductively through mix of lectures and discussion; discussion of history and culture of Deaf community in the U.S. Pre: 101 (or equivalent).

ASL 201 Intermediate American Sign Language I (3)

Continued development of receptive and expressive conversational skills in American Sign Language; linguistic structure introduced inductively through mix of lectures and discussion; includes discussion of history and culture of Deaf community in the U.S. Pre: 102 (or equivalent).

ASL 202 Intermediate American Sign Language II (3)

Continued development of receptive and expressive conversational skills in American Sign Language; linguistic structure introduced inductively through mix of lectures and discussion; includes discussion of history and culture of Deaf community in the U.S. Pre: 201.

ASL 301 Advanced American Sign Language I (3)

Development of advanced receptive and expressive conversational skills in American Sign Language (ASL). Pre: 202. (Fall only)

ASL 302 Advanced American Sign Language II (3)

Development of advanced receptive and expressive conversational skills in American Sign Language (ASL). Pre: 301. (Spring only)

ASTR 110 Survey of Astronomy (3)

Introduction to the astronomical universe: sky and celestial objects, planetary motion, planets and the Solar System, Sun and stars, the Milky Way and galaxies, cosmology and the universe.

ASTR 110A Survey of Astronomy (3)

Introduction to the astronomical universe: sky and celestial objects, planetary motion, planets and the Solar System, Sun and stars, the Milky Way and galaxies, cosmology and the universe.

ASTR 110L Survey of Astronomy Laboratory (1)

Observations of constellations and the night sky, the sun and moon, planets, stars, and deep-sky objects; laboratory and observational experiments illustrating basic concepts in astronomy. Offered in the evening. Pre: 110 (or concurrent), or consent.

ASTR 120 Astronomical Origins (3)

Formation of the sun and stars; origin of our solar system; formation and evolution of galaxies, including the Milky Way Galaxy; origin of chemical elements, and the beginnings of the cosmos. A-F only.

ASTR 120A Astronomical Origins (3)

Formation of the sun and stars; origin of our solar system; formation and evolution of galaxies, including the Milky Way Galaxy; origin of chemical elements, and the beginnings of the cosmos. A-F only.

ASTR 130 Introduction to Archaeoastronomy (3)

Astronomy and celestial lore in ancient cultures: Neolithic Europe, Mayan, Mesoamerican, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, American Indian, Chinese, and Polynesian. Concepts of the cosmos, calendars, eclipse predictions, motion of celestial bodies, and navigation.
Construction of simple observing tools.

ASTR 140 History of Astronomy (3)

Covers the major discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics from the Babylonians through the 20th century, and the evolution of modern astrophysics. A-F only. (Fall only)

ASTR 150 Voyage through the Solar System (3)

An illustrated voyage through the Solar System based on recent scientific results. The class highlights the origin, evolution, and current knowledge of the eight planets, their moons, asteroids, comets, and one star, the Sun. Field trip. (Cross-listed as ERTH 105)

ASTR 210 Foundations of Astronomy (3)

A rigorous overview of modern astronomy: solar system, stellar, galactic and extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. For science and engineering students. Pre: 110; PHYS 151 or PHYS 170.

ASTR 241 Foundations of Astrophysics I: The Solar System (3)

Solar system astrophysics. Dynamics of planets, satellite systems, asteroids and comets;
planetary atmospheres and internal structure; thermal balance; the Sun as a star. Introduces numerical computing. A-F only. Pre: PHYS 170, MATH 242 or 252A, and PHYS 272 (or concurrent). (Fall only)

ASTR 242 Foundations of Astrophysics II: Galaxies and Stars (3)

Stellar and galactic astrophysics. Stellar magnitudes, colors, distances, and spectra. Galactic structure and evolution, active nuclei, large-scale structure, Big-Bang cosmology. Stellar interiors, nuclear “burning,” main-sequence and evolved stars. Introduces computer programming. A-F only. Pre: 241, PHYS 274 (or concurrent), and MATH 243 (or concurrent) or 253A (or concurrent). (Spring only)

ASTR 280 Evolution of the Universe (3)

The Big Bang, origin of the elements, formation and evolution of galaxies and stars. Pre: 110 or 210 or 241 or 242, or consent

ASTR 281 Astrobiology (3)

Are we alone in the universe? Modern astronomical, biological, and geological perspectives on this fundamental question. Searches for life on Mars, oceans on Europa, planets orbiting other stars. Space exploration and colonies, interstellar spaceflight and communication. Pre: 110 or 210, or consent. (Spring only)

ASTR 300 Observational Astronomy (3)

Principles and techniques of optical and near-infrared astronomical observation. Astronomical coordinate systems. Telescopes, cameras, spectrographs, and detectors. Astrometry, photometry, and spectroscopy of astronomical objects. A-F only. Pre: 210 or 242; PHYS 152 or 274; MATH 216, 242, or 252A. (Fall only)

ASTR 300L Observational Astronomy Laboratory (2)

Optical and near-infrared astronomy laboratory. Error analysis, properties of light, data, and image processing. Astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic measurement. A-F only. Pre: 300 (or concurrent); PHYS 152 or 274; PHYS 152L or 274L; MATH 216, 242, or 252A. (Fall only)

ASTR 301 Observational Astronomy Projects (4)

Practical astronomical observing. Students select objects to study, plan, and conduct remote observations using research-grade telescopes, reduce data, present results in written and verbal form. Introduces LaTeX, literature research, time allocation. A-F only. Pre: 300 and 300L. (Spring only)

ASTR 320 Astronomical Spectroscopy (3)

Introduction to astronomical spectroscopy. Stellar atmospheres, line formation, elements of radiative transfer. Phases of interstellar medium. Emission line diagnostics. Doppler shift and kinematics. A-F only. Pre: 210 or 242; PHYS 152 or 274; MATH 216 or 242 or 252A. (Spring only)

ASTR 380 The Cosmos in Western Culture (3)

History and intellectual context of astronomical discovery; the evolution of ideas of space, time, and motion from the Babylonians to relativistic cosmologies; emphasis on the interaction of astronomy with the history of ideas. Pre: 110 (or concurrent). (Spring only)

ASTR 399 Directed Study (V)

Individual reading, observation, or experimentation in astronomy and astrophysics. Repeatable four times. Pre: consent.

ASTR 423 Stellar Astrophysics (3)

Advanced survey of stellar astrophysics, including application of astrometry, photometry, and spectrometry to determine fundamental stellar properties; stellar structure and evolution of single and binary stars; astrophysical distance determination methods; stellar nucleosynthesis. Pre: 242 and 300, and PHYS 480.

ASTR 426 Galaxies & Cosmology (3)

Survey of extragalactic astronomy and cosmology, including: galaxy morphology and kinematics; luminosity functions; dark matter; properties of galaxy groups/ clusters; gravitational lensing; redshifts; cosmological models; the Big Bang; thermal history of the Universe; structure formation. A-F only. Pre: 300 (or concurrent); PHYS 152 or PHYS 274; MATH 216 or MATH 242 or MATH 252A. (Alt. years)

ASTR 430 The Solar System (3)

Observations and physical nature of planets and moons, asteroids, comets, and other small bodies; formation of the Solar System; discovery of other planetary systems; solar activity. Pre: 300; and PHYS 152 or 274; and MATH 216, 242, or 252A. (Alt. years)

ASTR 494 Senior Research Project (1)

Seminar focusing on development of professional skills for astronomical research, and on scientific writing as a tool for organizing research. A final paper describing a supervised research project is required. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 301; 399 (or concurrent) or PHYS 399 (or concurrent).

ASTR 622 The Interstellar Medium (3)

Astrophysics of diffuse matter, HII regions, molecular clouds, etc. Pre: consent. (Alt. years)

ASTR 623 Stellar Interiors and Evolution (3)

Structure and evolution; energy sources, radiative processes; relations to observables. Pre: consent. (Alt. years)

ASTR 626 Galaxies (3)

Observations and stellar dynamics of elliptical and spiral galaxies including our galaxy, globular clusters, and dark matter. Galaxy formation and evolution. Pre: consent. (Alt. years: spring)

ASTR 627 Cosmology (3)

Geometry and evolution of the universe. Dark matter. Early universe. Formation of large–scale structure, galaxies, and clusters. Cosmological models. Pre: consent. (Alt. years)

ASTR 630 The Solar System (3)

Survey of observational data and physical concepts on planets and smaller bodies; formation of planetary systems; solar activity. Pre: consent. (Alt. years)

ASTR 631 Radiative Transfer Stellar Atmospheres (3)

Excitation, ionization, and radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres; model atmospheres, formation of line and continuum radiation. Pre: consent. (Alt. years)

ASTR 633 Astrophysical Techniques (3)

Telescopes, positional astronomy, photon detection, error analysis, photometry, spectroscopy. Pre: consent. (Fall only)

ASTR 634 Astronomical Instrumentation (3)

Design and operation of astronomical instrumentation. Physics of optical and infrared detectors. Wavefront sensors and adaptive optics. Radio and infrared interferometry. Optical design: methods and software. A-F only. Pre: 633 (with a minimum grade of B-). (Alt. years: spring)

ASTR 635 Fundamentals of Astrophysics (3)

Applications of fundamental physics to astrophysical situations. Elements of general relativity. Basics of hydrodynamics and shock waves. Radiative processes, high energy astrophysics. Modern dynamics. Pre: consent. (Fall only)

ASTR 640 General Relativity (3)

Introduction to gravity and general relativity. Tensor basics, classical scalar, vector and tensor field theories. Exact symmetric Einstein equation, gravito-magnetic weak field, and radiation solutions. Pre: consent. (Alt. years)

ASTR 641 Active Galaxies (3)

Phenomenology of active galactic nuclei, black holes, accretion flows and jets, emission mechanisms, host galaxies, and cosmic evolution. Pre: 635 or consent. (Alt. years: spring)

ASTR 657 Astrochemistry-A Molecular Approach (3)

Formation of astrobiologically important molecules and their precursors in the interstellar medium and in our solar system: first principles and latest trends. Pre: consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as CHEM 657 and ERTH 657)

ASTR 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent

ASTR 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

ASTR 734 Astronomy Seminar I (V)

Selected advanced topics in astronomy and astrophysics. Available for 1 to 3 credit hours by arrangement. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

ASTR 735 Astronomy Seminar II (V)

Selected advanced topics in astronomy and astrophysics. Available for 1 to 3 credit hours by arrangement. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

ASTR 736 Astronomy Seminar III (V)

Selected advanced topics in astronomy and astrophysics. Available for 1 to 3 credit hours by arrangement. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

ASTR 740 Astrobiology Seminar: Origin, Evolution and the Role of Water for Life in the Universe (1)

Interdisciplinary research topics in astrobiology as they relate to the theme of water: formation in space, role in creating pre-biotic molecules, delivery to earth, and terrestrial planet habitability. Repeatable three times. Pre: graduate level sciences and ideas, or consent.

ASTR 750 Scientific Grant Writing (1)

Principles of scientific grant writing are taught by working on draft proposals through a mix of lectures, discussions, and hands on activities. The final proposal will be reviewed and evaluated via a review panel. Graduate students only. A-F only. (Fall only)

ASTR 777 Star Formation (2)

Molecular clouds, collapse processes, physics of circumstellar disks and accretion, properties of young stars, outflows and jets, formation of binaries, extrasolar planets and planet formation, meteorites and the early solar system. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Alt. years: spring)

ASTR 790 Astro-ph Seminar (1)

Seminar discussions of the most recent research papers covering all areas of astronomy. Student lead discussion sessions and discuss papers of their choice during the semester. ASTR majors only. Graduate students only. CR/NC only. (Fall only)

ASTR 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times

BIOL 101 Biology and Society (3)

Characteristics of science, historical development of scientific concepts, and interaction of society with science illustrated by topics from biological science. Not a BIOL major elective.

BIOL 101L Biology & Society Laboratory (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Explores connections between biological principles and everyday life with a focus on the environment. Topics include environmental health and sustainability with examples from Hawai‘i. Not a BIOL major elective. (Cross-listed as SUST 111L)

BIOL 104 Marine Option Program Seminar (1)

Overview of ocean issues and organizations involved with marine activities, management, education, research, and business. Exploration of internships, research, and career opportunities. Preparation of resumes, proposals, and professional presentations. Not a BIOL major elective. (Cross-listed as IS 100)

BIOL 123 Hawaiian Environment Science (3)

Characteristics of science and interaction with society illustrated by topics in geology, astronomy, oceanography, and biology of Hawaiian Islands. Not a BIOL major elective.

BIOL 171 Introduction to Biology I (3)

Introductory biology for all life science majors. Cell structure and chemistry; growth, reproduction, genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, and simple eukaryotes. Pre: CHEM (131, 151, 161, 171, or 181A) or concurrent, and BIOL 171L (or concurrent), or consent.

BIOL 171L Introduction to Biology I Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Laboratory to accompany 171. A significant portion of class time is dedicated to writing instruction, and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of graded writing. Pre: CHEM (131, 151, 161, 171, or 181A) or concurrent, and BIOL 171 (or concurrent) or consent.

BIOL 172 Introduction to Biology II (3)

Anatomy, physiology, and systematics of plants and animals; behavior; ecosystems, populations, and communities. Pre: CHEM (131, 151, 161, 171, or 181A) or concurrent, and BIOL 172L (or concurrent), or consent.

BIOL 172L Introduction to Biology II Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Laboratory to accompany 172. Pre: CHEM (131, 151, 161, 171, or 181A) or concurrent, and BIOL 172 (or concurrent) or consent.

BIOL 220 Biostatistics (3)

Introduction to statistical approaches in biology. Students will learn how to formulate hypotheses, test them quantitatively, and present results. Students will analyze biological datasets using the computer language R. A-F only. Pre: 171, 172 or BOT 101; and BIOL/BOT 220L (or concurrent) and MATH 134 or MATH assessment exam (with score required for MATH 140). (Cross-listed as BOT 220)

BIOL 220L Biostatistics Lab (1)

Laboratory to accompany 220. A-F only. Pre: 171 or 172 or BOT 101; and 220 (or concurrent); and MATH 134 or MATH assessment exam (with score for MATH 140). (Cross-listed as BOT 220L)

BIOL 265 Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (3)

Principles of ecology and evolution for life science majors stressing integrated approach and recent advance. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 171/171L, 172, 172L (or concurrent), and 265L (or concurrent).

BIOL 265L Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Laboratory to accompany 265. A significant portion of class time is dedicated to writing instruction, and requires a minimum of 4,000 words of graded writing. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 265 (or concurrent).

BIOL 275 Cell and Molecular Biology (3)

Integrated cell and molecular biology for life science majors. Modern advances in recombinant DNA technology. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 171/171L and CHEM 272. (Cross-listed as MCB 275)

BIOL 275L Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (2)

(1 4-hr Lab) Laboratory for Cell and Molecular Biology. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 275 (or concurrent) and CHEM 272.

BIOL 295 Service Learning for Biology Majors (V)

Directed participation on tutorials and related activities in public schools and approved community and UH Mânoa organizations. A-F only. Repeatable one time. Pre: 265/265L, 275/275L, and consent.

BIOL 301 Marine Ecology and Evolution (3)

Functional, ecological, and evolutionary problems faced by life in the sea. Draws from major marine habitats and associated communities, from the deep sea to the plankton. Impacts of overfishing, marine pollution, and land development on the ecology and evolution of marine organisms. Emphasis on developing problem solving and quantitative skills. MBIO majors only. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 265/265L, 301L (or concurrent), and OCN 201; or consent.

BIOL 301L Marine Ecology and Evolution Lab (2)

(1 3-hr Lab) Laboratory to accompany 301. MBIO majors only. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 301 (or concurrent).

BIOL 304 Biotechnology: Science and Ethical Issues (3)

Introduction to the concepts, goals, ethical issues and consequences of biotechnology using real-life case studies of GMOs, cloning, DNA fingerprinting, gene therapy and genetical engineering. Pre: 171 or consent. (Cross-listed as MBBE 304)

BIOL 305 Ecology (3)

General survey of the principles of ecology. Focus on processes influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms, interactions among organisms, and interactions between organisms and the environment. A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171; BIOL 172 or BOT 201. (Cross-listed as BOT 305)

BIOL 306 Ethology (3)

Introduction to animal and human ethology and sociobiology; emphasis on social and interspecific behavior, its causes and adaptive significance. Lab optional. Pre: 171 and 171L and 172 and 172L or ANSC 201; or consent.

BIOL 306L Ethology Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Application of methods in the study of animal behavior by demonstrations, labs and projects. Pre: 306 (or concurrent).

BIOL 310 Environmental Issues (3)

Global environmental problems in historical perspective; physical, biological, sociocultural views. Pre: one of 101, 123, or GEO 101; or consent.

BIOL 320 The Atoll (3)

Atoll as ecosystem and as human environment. Formation, structure, distribution, biota. Pre: two semesters of introductory science or consent. Not a BIOL major elective.

BIOL 325 Biology of the Vertebrates (3)

Introduction to the evolution and systematics of vertebrates, with emphasis on comparative morphology, physiology, and ecology. Pre: BIOL 265. Co-requisite: 325L.

BIOL 325L Biology of the Vertebrates Lab (2)

(2 3-hr Lab) Laboratory to accompany 320. Pre: 172 and 172L. Co-requisite: 325.

BIOL 331 Marine Mammal Biology (3)

Overview of marine mammal science, significance and roles of marine mammals in their ecosystems, and marine conservation issues. Current research topics in marine mammal science will also be covered. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 171/171L, 172/172L, and 265, 265L; or consent.

BIOL 331L Marine Mammal Biology Lab (2)

Laboratory to accompany 331. Activities will include taxonomy, anatomy, morphology, necropsy, hematology, population estimating methods, tracking, field distribution surveys, stranding response, and energetics, and/or similar depending on field access and availability of specimens. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 171/171L and 172/172L and 265/265L and 331 (or concurrent), or consent.

BIOL 340 Genetics, Evolution and Society (3)

The role of genetics in evolution, medicine, behavior, plant and animal breeding and technology; its impact on today’s society. Not a BIOL major elective. Pre: one semester of biological science at college level or consent. (Cross-listed as CMB 351)

BIOL 345 Parasitology (2)

Animal parasites of man, and domestic and wild animals; systematics, comparative morphology, life history, pathology, treatment, control. Pre: 275.

BIOL 350 Sex Differences in the Life Cycle (3)

Human sex differences, their biological basis and significance; genetic, hormonal, and behavioral determinants of sexual differentiation; biology of gender, sexuality, parenting, menopause, and aging. Pre: one semester of biological science. (Cross-listed as WS 350)

BIOL 360 Island Ecosystems (3)

Characteristics of island biota; examples from Hawai‘i and the Pacific. Impact of island and continental cultures; policy and ecosystem endangerment; contemporary legislation, policy, and management practices. Pre: one semester of biological science or consent. Not a BIOL major elective.

BIOL 363 Biological Field Studies (V)

Biological survey, collection, and analysis techniques will be reviewed and applied through field studies. Students will be introduced to the uniqueness of the Hawaiian environment and its diversity of life. Emphasis on diversity, evolution and ecology. Repeatable up to six credits. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 265/265L (or equivalent), or consent.

BIOL 375 Genetics (3)

Genetic concepts at advanced undergraduate level; genetic transmission, recombination, gene action, mutation, population and evolutionary genetics. A-F only. Pre: 275 or consent.

BIOL 375L Genetics Laboratory (2)

(1 4-hr Lab) Experiments with a variety of organisms to illustrate principles discussed in BIOL 375. Pre: 275/275L, 375 (or concurrent) or consent.

BIOL 390 Communicating in Biological Sciences (3)

Combined lecture/lab impart essential knowledge and skills in technical writing, poster design, and oral presentations for effective communication for life science majors. Research papers, lab reports, project proposals, conference presentations are covered. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 171/171L, 172/172L, and ENG 100.

BIOL 395 Internship in Biology Teaching (2)

Supervised laboratory internship in the preparation and demonstration of laboratory experiments in selected laboratory courses. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent.

BIOL 400 Ocean Internships and Research (V)

Students carry out marine-related internships, practica, research projects or field experience on-or off-campus with faculty guidance. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: minimum cum GPA of 2.5, junior or senior standing in any field of study and IS 100/BIOL 104 or consent, project proposal. (Crosslisted as IS 400)

BIOL 401 Molecular Biotechnology (3)

General principles, applications, and recent advances of the rapidly growing science of biotechnology. Topics include impact of biotechnology on medicine, animal sciences, environment, agriculture, forensics, and economic and socio-ethical issues. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 275 or consent. (Cross-listed as MBBE 401)

BIOL 402 Principles of Biochemistry (4)

Molecular basis of living processes in bacteria, plants, and animals; emphasis on metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 275/275L, and CHEM 273; or consent. (Cross-listed as MBBE 402)

BIOL 403 Field Problems in Marine Biology (4)

Integrated program of intensive lectures, laboratory experiments, and field research that focus on the biological processes that shape the lives of marine organisms. A-F only. Limited space; enrollment by consent; GPA considered. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 301/301L and consent.

BIOL 404 Advanced Topics in Marine Biology (3)

Current themes in marine biology and experience in scientific assessment. Repeatable two times. MBIO majors only. A-F only. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 301/301L or consent.

BIOL 406 Biology of Marine Organisms (3)

Biology, physiology, and ecology of marine organisms and marine ecosystems, and the physical and chemical factors, which influence them. Cannot be used to satisfy BS-MB major requirements. Credit granted for only one of ZOOL 200, BIOL 301, or BIOL 406. Junior standing or consent. A-F only. Pre: 171 and 172. (Spring only)

BIOL 407 Molecular Cell Biology I (3)

Relationship between structure and function at macromolecular level. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 275/275L and CHEM 273, or consent. (Cross-listed as MCB 407)

BIOL 408 Molecular Cellular Biology II (3)

Cell structure and function. Structure, chemistry, and functions of organelles and macromolecules. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 407; or consent. (Cross-listed as MBBE 408 and MCB 408)

BIOL 408L Advanced Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory (2)

(2 3-hr Lab) A laboratory to accompany 407 and 408. Pre: 407 (or concurrent) or 408 (or concurrent). (Cross-listed as MCB 408L)

BIOL 410 Human Role in Environmental Change (3)

Human impacts through time on vegetation, animals, landforms, soils, climate, and atmosphere. Special reference to Asian/Pacific region. Implications of long-term environmental change for human habitability. Pre: with a minimum grade of B, one of 101, 123 or GEO 101 and either 310 or GEO 322; or consent. (Cross-listed as GEO 410)

BIOL 411 Corals and Coral Reefs (3)

The biogeography, evolution, ecology, and physiology of corals and coral reefs, and the application of this information to the management of coral reefs. Emphasis will be placed on processes such as dispersal, the evolution and operation of mutualisms, calcification,
reproduction, and the maintenance of diversity. Pre: 265 (or concurrent) or 301 (or concurrent). (Spring only)

BIOL 425 Wildlife and Plant Conservation (3)

Principles of conservation biology and wildlife management techniques, illustrated with animal, plant, and ecosystem examples. Examination of ethical, cultural, legal, political, and socio-economic issues impinging on conservation policy and practice. Group project and field trips. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 265/265L or consent.

BIOL 430 The Biology of Fungi (2)

Will introduce the diversity, ecology, evolution, and biology of the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on our current understanding of fungal evolution and diversity and how fungi interact
with environments and hosts. Pre: 172, BOT 201; or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BOT 430 and TPSS 432)

BIOL 430L The Biology of Fungi Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to the morphology and life cycles of organisms in the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on learning how to identify a diversity of fungi based on macro- and microscopic features. Field trips to collect specimens. Pre: 430 (or concurrent) or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BOT 430L and TPSS 432L)

BIOL 440 Psychoactive Drug Plants (3)

Taxonomy, ecology, biochemistry, distribution, cultural history, and contemporary use of mind-altering drug plants; examples from primitive, traditional, and modern societies. Pre: junior standing, one semester of biological science, and either ANTH 200 or GEO 151; or consent.

BIOL 454 Natural History of Hawaiian Islands (3)

(2 Lec, 1 1-hr Lab) Geography, geology, climatology, biotic environment of Pacific Basin and Hawaiian Islands; endemism and evolution in terrestrial and marine biota. Pre: one semester of biological sciences at college level. (Cross-listed as BOT 450 and SUST 450)

BIOL 465 Fish Diversity (3)

Survey of fish biodiversity focusing on major lineages, their phylogenetic relationships, and their geographic distribution in light of evolutionary history. Taught spring semester in alternate years. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 171 and 172. (Alt. years: spring)

BIOL 465L Fish Diversity Laboratory (1)

(2 2-hr Lab) Overview of the major orders and families of fishes of the world; introduction to local Hawaiian fishes; coverage of basic fish anatomy; introduction to field and laboratory techniques in fish research. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 171, 172, and 465 (or concurrent). (Alt. years: spring)

BIOL 468 The Rise of Fishes: An Evolutionary History (3)

The origins and early evolution of fishes, with a focus on morphological innovations that have led to lineage divergence and adaptive radiation, and the nature of underlying processes associated with novel character trait evolution. A-F only. Pre: 265. (Alt. years: spring)

BIOL 470 Evolutionary Biology (3)

Process of evolution: genetic basis, natural selection, population genetics, speciation, the fossil record. Pre: 171 and 172. Recommended: a BIOL or ZOOL course at 300 or 400 level.

BIOL 472 The Biology of Cancer (3)

Integrative, in-depth focus on the genetics, cell biology, and molecular basis of cancer. Combination of classroom lectures and problem-based discussions in small groups. Addresses ethical implications of cancer research and treatment. A-F only. MCB or BIOL majors only. Senior standing or higher. Pre: 407 (or concurrent) and 408 (or concurrent) or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as MCB 472)

BIOL 480 Life in the Soil Environment (3)

An interdisciplinary study of the diverse life in the soil beneath our feet that includes bacteria, fungi, protists, nematodes, arthropods, invertebrate, viruses, and the essential functional roles these organisms contribute to sustainability of the planet. Repeatable one time. Pre: 375 or TPSS/PEPS/SUST 371, or MICR 351, or consent. (Cross-listed as TPSS 480)

BIOL 480L Life in the Soil Environment Lab (1)

Laboratory to accompany 480. Technical examination of bacteria, fungi, protists, nematodes, arthropods, and other invertebrate, and the essential functional roles these organisms contribute to sustainability of the planet. Repeatable one time. Pre: 171L and 172L, or MICR 351L, or consent. Co-requisite: 480. (Crosslisted as TPSS 480L)

BIOL 483 Introduction to Bioinformatics Topics for Biologists (3)

Focuses on the use of computational tools and approaches to analyze the enormous amount of biological data (DNA, RNA, protein) available today. A-F only. Pre: 171 (or equivalent), or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as MBBE 483)

BIOL 485 Biology of the Invertebrates (3)

Body plans, development, cellular construction, physiological integration, natural history, and ecology of invertebrate animals. Emphasis on marine species, especially local ones. Pre: 172 and CHEM 161, or consent. Corequisite: 485L.

BIOL 485L Biology of the Invertebrates Lab (2)

(2 3-hr Lab) Pre: 172 and CHEM 161, or consent. Corequisite: 485.

BIOL 490 Mathematical Biology Seminar (1)

Reports on research in mathematical biology, reviews of literature, and research presentation. Required for Certificate in Mathematical Biology. Repeatable one time. Pre: junior standing or higher and consent. (Cross-listed as MATH 490)

BIOL 499 Biological Problems (V)

Directed reading and research. For juniors and seniors majoring in life science 1-12 credits. Repeatable one time, up to 8 credits, up to 6 credits apply towards BA and BS BIOL major requirements. A-F only. Pre: 2.5 GPA minimum, written proposal and consent.

BIOL 501 (Alpha) Biology Workshop for Science Teachers (V)

Principles taught in a conceptual and/ or hands-on manner either in a laboratory setting or in the field. (B) biotechnology; (C) ecology, evolution and conservation; (D) marine biology; (F) general biology. A-F only. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: 171/171L, 172/172L, in-service teachers; or consent.

BIOL 603 Molecular Ecology (3)

) Practical introduction to molecular methods used to address ecological and evolutionary questions. Advanced undergraduate/graduate level. Focus on methods and application to independent research project. A-F only. Pre: 265/265L (or equivalent) or 275/275L (or equivalent), and 375/375L, and consent. (Alt. years)

BIOL 650 Population Genetics (3)

Mathematical, observational, experimental results on effects of mutation, selection, and systems of mating on distribution of genes. Analysis of non-experimental populations. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as CMB 650) Professional Development Courses for Science Teachers.

BOT 100 Freshman Seminar (1)

Discussion of hot topics in botany, including conservation of rare plants, invasive species, marine botany, ethnobotany, poisonous plants, evolution in action, fungal networks, and careers in botany with emphasis on Hawaiian examples. Students should enroll in BOT 100 and 101/101L, or BOT 100 and BIOL 171/171L. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Corequisite: 101/101L or BIOL 171/171L. (Once a year)

BOT 101 General Botany (3)

Growth, functions, and evolution of plants; their relations to the environment and particularly to humans and human activities.

BOT 101A General Botany (3)

Growth, functions, and evolution of plants; their relations to the environment and particularly to humans and human activities.

BOT 101L General Botany Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Lab observations and experiments illustrating basic principles of plant biology. Pre: 101 (or concurrent).

BOT 105 Ethnobotany (3)

(2 Lec, 1 Demonstration) Plants and their influence on culture and history including: plant domestication and agriculture; plant biogeography and human migration; plant use in religious, medical, and shamanic traditions; and cultural aspects of plant conservation.

BOT 105A Ethnobotany (3)

(2 Lec, 1 Demonstration) Plants and their influence on culture and history including: plant domestication and agriculture; plant biogeography and human migration; plant use in religious, medical, and shamanic traditions; and cultural aspects of plant conservation.

BOT 105L Ethnobotany Laboratory (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Laboratory exercises, experiments, and analysis in ethnobotany. A-F only.

BOT 107 Plants, People, and Culture (3)

Ethnobotany. Interactions between plants and people: use in religious, medical, and shamanic traditions; roles in cultural formation, destruction, and revolution; plant domestication and food systems; roles in human migration; cultural components of plant conservation. (Fall only)

BOT 107A Plants, People, and Culture (3)

Ethnobotany. Interactions between plants and people: use in religious, medical, and shamanic traditions; roles in cultural formation, destruction, and revolution; plant domestication and food systems; roles in human migration; cultural components of plant conservation. (Fall only)

BOT 110 Biodiversity: Evolution, Ecology, & Conservation (3)

Lecture exploring the range of Earth’s diversity, the evolutionary processes that generate it, the ecological roles it plays, the consequences of its loss, and the processes by which it can be conserved. A-F only. (Fall only)

BOT 110L Biodiversity: Evolution, Ecology, & Conservation Laboratory (1)

Laboratory and outdoor observations and experiments examining the range of biological diversity among the Earth’s species and ecosystems. A-F only. Pre: 110 (or concurrent).

BOT 130 Hawaiian Plants-Their Ecology and Cultural Significance (3)

Introduction to the native flora of Hawai‘i, its origin, evolution and ecology, and the observation, identification, and systematics of the Hawaiian flora.

BOT 130L Hawaiian Plants-Their Ecology and Cultural Significance Lab (1)

The exploration of concepts and the process of science through hands-on experience in studying Hawaiian and introduced plants, their ecology, and cultural significance. Pre: 130 (or concurrent).

BOT 135 Magical Mushrooms and Mystical Molds (3)

Impact of fungi in nature and on humankind. Selected historical events in which fungi played a significant role, their activities as decomposers and pathogens, and their uses as sources for mind altering drugs in religious ceremonies and in food and beverage production in various societies.

BOT 160 Campus Plants (3)

Nontechnical course emphasizing recognition of the many interesting tropical plants seen on campus; origin, status in Hawai‘i, and cultural and economic uses of campus plants.

BOT 180 Plant Life in the Sea (4)

(3 Lec, 1-3-hr Lab) Combined lecture-lab to introduce common marine plants in Hawaiian coastal areas via discussion of morphology, growth, ecological functions and native/alien status. Field trips to observe plants in local habitats.

BOT 200 Sophomore Seminar (1)

Presentations by faculty highlighting research in tropical ecosystems. Topics include alien species, biodiversity, ecosystem services, ethnobotany, marine ecology, plant-animal interactions, and systematics of Hawaiian species. Assigned reading and writing exercises from papers in current journals. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 101/101L or BIOL 171/171L. (Once a year)

BOT 201 Plant Evolutionary Diversity (3)

Significance of evolutionary trends in the plant world, including reproductive, morphological, and life history adaptations by algae, fungi, and vascular plants. Pre: 101 or college general biology. Co-requisite: 201L.

BOT 201L Plant Evolutionary Diversity Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Lab exercises in the morphology and systematics of land plants, fungi, and algae. Corequisite: 201.

BOT 220 Biostatistics (3)

Introduction to statistical approaches in biology. Students will learn how to formulate hypotheses, test them quantitatively, and present results. Students will analyze biological datasets using the computer language R. A-F only. Pre: 101, BIOL 171, or BIOL 172; and BOT/BIOL 220L (or concurrent) and MATH 134 or MATH assessment exam (with score required for MATH 140). (Crosslisted as BIOL 220)

BOT 220L Biostatistics Lab (1)

Laboratory to accompany 220. A-F only. Pre: 101, BIOL 171, or BIOL 172; and BIOL 220 (or concurrent); and MATH 134 or MATH assessment exam (with score for MATH 140). (Cross-listed as BIOL 220L)

BOT 300 Conservation Ethics (1)

Introduction to and discussion of ethical issues associated with biodiversity, ecology, and conservation biology. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: any DB course or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as SUST 310)

BOT 301 Plant Conservation Biology (3)

Introduction to the concepts and principles of plant conservation biology and to plant conservation-inpractice in Hawai‘i and elsewhere. A-F only. Pre: 305 or consent. Co-requisite: 301L. (Once a year) (Crosslisted as SUST 313)

BOT 301L Plant Conservation Biology Lab (1)

Introduction to approaches, methods, and analyses used in the study and practice of plant conservation, with an emphasis on experimental design and problem-solving. Includes both laboratory and field components. A-F only. Pre: 305 or consent. Corequisite: 301. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as SUST 313L)

BOT 302 Grant Writing Seminar (2)

Provides three rounds of opportunities for grant writing associated with research in biodiversity, conservation biology, ecology, and plant systematics. Students will gain experience in peer review, grant cycles, and budget preparation. A-F only. Pre: 301/SUST 313 (or concurrent) and 303, or consent. (Once a year)

BOT 305 Ecology (3)

General survey of the principles of ecology. Focus on processes influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms, interactions among organisms, and interactions between organisms and the environment. A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171; BIOL 172 or BOT 201. (Cross-listed as BIOL 305)

BOT 310 Field Botany (5)

Combined lecturelaboratory with intensive field experience for observational and experimental field work in native/impacted Hawaiian ecosystems. Field experience typically held during spring break. Terrestrial, freshwater, and marine habitats considered. A-F only. Pre: 305 and consent. (Once a year)

BOT 350 Resource Management and Conservation in Hawai‘i (3)

Management of native Hawaiian organisms and terrestrial ecosystems with particular attention to strategies, planning, research, and management actions necessary to control alien influences and promote native species. Pre: college general biology.

BOT 357 Tropical forest Ecology (3)

Introduction to the ecological processes and principles of tropical ecosystems, and to conservation issues facing tropical forests, with a particular emphasis on the neotropics.
A-F only. Pre: BIOL 171 and BIOL 172, or BOT 101; and BIOL 265.

BOT 399 Botanical Problems (V)

Individualized directed research. Intended for upper division botany majors. Repeatable six times. A-F only. Pre: 101/101L or BIOL 172/172L; or consent.

BOT 400 Senior Seminar (1)

Current research themes in botany presented in discussion format; reading current research papers. Oral presentations of primary research. Repeatable one time. BOT majors only. Senior standing and consent. A-F only. (Once a year)

BOT 401 Teaching Internship (1)

Teaching Internship (TI) allows upper division undergraduates to experience assisting in laboratory courses for BOT 101, 105, 201, 202, 203, or other lab courses in Botany or peer-mentoring for BOT 100, as available. Repeatable one time. BOT majors only. CR/NC only. Pre: 301 or SUST 313, and 301L or SUST 313L, and 303; or consent.

BOT 410 Plant Anatomy (3)

Structure of vascular plants; origin and differentiation of tissues; relation of structure to function. Pre: 201. Co-requisite: 410L. Recommended: 470.

BOT 410L Plant Anatomy Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Lab study of plant structure. Co-requisite: 410.

BOT 420 Plant Form and Function (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Lecture/laboratory to examine the anatomy, physiology, morphology, and functional ecology of plants. Labs will develop skills in microscopy, experimental techniques for studying plant physiology, and basic functional ecology. A-F only. Pre: 101/101L or BIOL 171/171L; BOT 201/201L; or consent. (Spring only)

BOT 430 The Biology of Fungi (2)

Will introduce the diversity, ecology, evolution, and biology of the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on our current understanding of fungal evolution and diversity and how fungi interact
with environments and hosts. Pre: 201, BIOL 172; or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BIOL 430 and TPSS 432)

BOT 430L The Biology of Fungi Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Introduction to the morphology and life cycles of organisms in the Kingdom Fungi. Focus on learning how to identify a diversity of fungi based on macro- and microscopic features. Field trips to collect specimens. Pre: 430 (or concurrent) or consent. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as BIOL 430L and TPSS 432L)

BOT 440 Advanced Ethnobotany (4)

(2 2-hr Lab) Advanced studies of plant uses in cultural contexts, focusing upon impacts of plant-culture interactions in development of cultures, cultivars, medicinals, ethnoecologies, ethics, and intellectual property. Lecture/discussion, term paper. Pre: 105 or 107 or consent.

BOT 442 Medical Ethnobotany (3)

Survey and theory of plants used as medicines, cultural perspectives of herbal medicine, and the botanical/ chemical basis of allopathic and naturopathic medicine. Lecture/discussion, term paper or project. Pre: 461 or consent.

BOT 444 Ethnoecology and Conservation (3)

Ecological implications of cultural uses of plants. Examines the biological basis for, and ecological effects of traditional and local resource management systems. Pre: BOT 305 or BIOL 265/265L or consent. (Crosslisted as SUST 445)

BOT 446 Hawaiian Ethnobotany (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Methods and techniques of handling and identifying plant materials used by early Hawaiians and modern Hawaiians for house and canoe construction, clothing, household and fishing items, medicine, and food preparation. Reading, laboratory, and fieldwork. Pre: 440 or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 446)

BOT 450 Natural History of Hawaiian Islands (3)

(2 Lec, 1 1-hr Lab) Geography, geology, climatology, biotic environment of Pacific Basin and Hawaiian Islands; endemism and evolution in terrestrial and marine biota. Pre: one semester of biological sciences at college level. (Cross-listed as BIOL 454 and SUST 450)

BOT 453 Plant Ecology and Environmental Measurements (4)

(2 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Influence of natural environments on plant behavior (autecology). A field-oriented course to complement 454. Field trips. Should precede 454. Pre: one of 101, BIOL 172, or ZOOL 101.

BOT 454 Plant Community Ecology (4)

(2 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) Covers selected topics in plant population and community ecology. Strong emphasis on how ecology is practiced as a science. Labs take advantage of working outdoors in local natural areas. Pre: 305.

BOT 455 Analysis of Biological Data (3)

Application of computers to analysis of biological data; preparation and storage, report production, database analysis procedures, univariate and bivariate statistical analyses. Pre: BIOL 172 or consent.

BOT 456 Plant-Animal Interactions (3)

Interdependence of plants and animals, emphasizing the influence of animals on plant fitness and evolution. Topics include pollination, fruit/seed dispersal, herbivory, and ant-plant mutualisms. Pre: 201/201L or BIOL 265/265L.

BOT 457 ‘Aina Mauliola: Hawaiian Ecosystems (3)

Comprehensive analysis of traditional Hawaiian and modern resource management practices. Rigorous overview of the dominant physical and biological processes from the uplands to the oceans in Hawai‘i. Pre: HWST 207/SUST 217 or HWST 307/SUST 317
or HWST/SUST 356. (Cross-listed as HWST 457 and SUST 457)

BOT 458 Natural Resource Issues and Ethics (4)

Overview of the history of land, resources and power in Hawai‘i; players and processes influencing land and natural resources policies today explored from Native Hawaiian and other viewpoints. Extensive use of case studies. Pre: HWST 207/SUST 217 or HWST 307/
SUST 317 or HWST/SUST 356(Cross-listed as HWST 458 and SUST 456)

BOT 459 Strategies in Hawaiian Resource Use (3)

Analyzing diverse land and water use strategies of O‘ahu, from traditional Hawaiian, scientific and economic perspectives, through classroom and on-site lectures. Topics include traditional Hawaiian methods, modern development, threatened ecosystems, ecotourism and scientific research. A-F only. Pre: HWST 207/SUST 217 or HWST 307/SUST 317 or HWST/SUST 356. (Cross-listed as HWST 459 and SUST 459).

BOT 461 Systematics of Vascular Plants (4)

(2 Lec, 2 3-hr Lab) “Hands-on” experience with Hawai‘i’s unique tropical flora; emphasis on recognition and identification of vascular plant families and the principles and methodologies that define them; evolution of biodiversity. Pre: 101 or college general biology.

BOT 462 Plant Evolution (3)

Major events and principles; includes the blue-green algae and fungi. Pre: 201 or BIOL 172. (Alt. years)

BOT 470 Plant Physiology (3)

Integration of form and function from cellular to whole plant levels in processes from seed germination, through photosynthesis, growth, and morphogenesis, to flowering and senescence. A-F only. Pre: CHEM 152 and BIOL 171, or consent. Co-requisite: 470L.

BOT 470L Principles of Plant Physiology Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Principles of experimentation in plant physiology, includes individual investigations. A-F only. Pre: consent. Co-requisite: 470.

BOT 480 Algal Diversity and Evolution (4)

(3 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Principles of algal diversity, structure, and evolution. Identification of common Hawaiian algae. Pre: one of 101, BIOL 172, MICR 351, ZOOL 101; or consent.

BOT 492 Wildlife Ecology and Management in the Tropics (3)

Practices from around the world that focuses on the tropics. Integrates across disciplines, considers how science based management interacts with world views and considers management plans that are scientifically rigorous but culturally sensitive. Pre: BIOL 265 and an upper level ecology course, or consent. (Once a year)

BOT 499 Advanced Directed Research (V)

Performance of research project under the direction of a faculty advisor. Preparation of written proposal, final oral presentation to be given to the Botany Department audience and written report required. Preference given to BOT majors. Repeatable up to eight credits. CR/NC only. Pre: 301 or SUST 313, and 301L or SUST 313L, and 302 and 303; and consent.

BOT 600 Grant Writing and Your Career in Science (2)

Scientific grant writing from inception through management to completion; students will write a DDIG and participate in a panel. Professional skills including “rules,” job applications, interviews, transitioning from graduate student to academic or non-academic job. A-F only. Pre: current standing as a graduate student, or consent.

BOT 601 Foundations of Current Botany I (2)

Discussion of current research and classical papers important to modern concepts in history of science, plant diversity, plant interactions with the environment, and plant integration. Pre: graduate standing in BOT or consent. (Fall only)

BOT 602 Foundations of Current Botany II (2)

Discussion of current research and classical papers important to modern concepts in ecology, plant interactions with other plants or animals, and ecosystem functioning. BOT majors only. Pre: graduate standing in BOT or consent. (Spring only)

BOT 603 Darwin’s Origin of Species (2)

Study and discussion of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species, 1st edition 1859, and related current literature. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: BA or BS in BOT, BIOL, GEOL, or related field; or consent. (Spring only)

BOT 606 Graduate Research Skills (2)

(1 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Survey of major research areas in the botanical sciences with emphasis upon research opportunities in Hawai‘i and an overview of 1) skills needed by botanical researchers including writing scientific papers and proposals, practicing ethical research procedures, and collection of specimens; and 2) equipment used by botanical researchers including computers, cameras, measuring and monitoring equipment, and global positioning systems. Lecture/ discussion, laboratory. Repeatable one time. Pre: graduate standing in biological science or approval.

BOT 610 Botanical Seminar (1)

Study and discussion of significant topics and problems in botany. Repeatable three times.

BOT 612 Advanced Botanical Problems (V)

Investigation of any botanical problem; reading and laboratory work. Repeatable nine times. Pre: consent.

BOT 620 Perspectives in Modern Botany (2)

Lectures by distinguished visiting professor on contemporary botanical topics in the lecturer’s area of expertise. No more than 6 credit hours may be counted toward the MS degree requirements. Repeatable five times.

BOT 621 Ecohydrology: Theory and Modeling (3)

Vegetative response to hydrologic controls and nutrient cycles; quantitative linkages between hydrological dynamics and ecological patterns/ processes. MatLab is used to develop and simulate ecohydrological models. Pre: college level calculus or consent. (Once a year)

BOT 640 Quantitative Ethnobotany (3)

Modern ethnobotanical field research project design, execution, data analysis, and documentation methods. Intended for students preparing to conduct field research studies. Lecture/discussion, term paper. Pre: 105 and one of 201, 461, ANTH 200, or BIOL 172.

BOT 644 Ethnoecological Methods (3)

Field techniques for assessing the ecological effects of cultural uses of plants. Emphasis on documenting traditional and local patterns of plant use and measuring the effects on plant individuals, populations, communities, and landscapes. Pre: previous course work in anthropology or biology.

BOT 648 Conservation Ethnobiology (3)

Practical field training experience for a scientific career conducting ethnobiological research. Repeatable one time. Pre: 640 or consent. (Summer only)

BOT 651 Invasion Biology (3)

Theories, models, patterns, and predictive methods relating to the introduction, establishment, and spread of introduced organisms. Application of principles of invasion biology to conservation and natural resource management. Pre: one of 453, 456, MICR 485 or ZOOL 439; and 462 or BIOL 375; or consent

BOT 652 Population Biology (3)

Theory and applications of population biology; behavior of population models, as revealed by analytical methods and computer simulation; application to population problems such as endangered species; discussion of classical and current literature in population biology. Pre: one of 453, 454, 456, NREM 680, PEPS 671, ZOOL 439, ZOOL 467, ZOOL 620, or ZOOL 623; or consent. (Cross-listed as ZOOL 652)

BOT 653 Population Dynamics Models with R (3)

Learn advanced modeling techniques to investigate the dynamics of size-structure populations (using matrix and integral population models in R), and discuss various applications in ecology and conservation biology. Recommended: students have working knowledge of calculus. (Alt. years: fall)

BOT 654 Advances in Plant Ecology (2)

A researchoriented course focusing on recent advances in all areas of plant ecology. Involves critical review of recent literature, independent research project, oral and written presentation of project results. Repeatable three times. Pre: consent.

BOT 660 Ecological Statistics with R (3)

Learn how to choose appropriate statistical methods to test hypotheses in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology and applications using R as a platform. Lecture/discussion, term paper. Pre: ZOOL 631 or consent. (Alt. years: fall)

BOT 661 Hawaiian Vascular Plants (3)

(2 Lec, 1 3-hr Lab) Identification, systematics, evolution, and biogeography of native plants. Field trips. Pre: 461 or consent. (Cross-listed as SUST 661)

BOT 662 High Throughput Sequencing Approaches to Ecology and Evolution (3)

Fundamentals of experimental design, lab techniques and data analysis to conduct research using high throughput sequencing. Students will work in groups to conduct an amplicon sequencing study with ten samples. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent. (Alt. years: spring)

BOT 668 Nomenclature and Practical Systematics (2)

Modern issues of naming and classifying of organisms, with a botanical emphasis. Includes lectures, discussions, class projects, and field trips. A-F only. Pre: 461 (or equivalent) or consent. (Once a year)

BOT 669 Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution (3)

Molecular approaches to evolution, phylogenetics, and systematics. Basic use of chloroplast DNA, mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, and electrophoresis. Phylogenetic analysis using parsimony, distance, and comparative methods. Repeatable two times. Recommended: 201.

BOT 670 Scientific Teaching Tools to Promote Active Learning (2)

Graduate level course to train students in the pedagogical tools to enhance active learning in STEM classes. Includes discussions of the primary literature, demonstrations and practice using scientific teaching techniques. BOT or ZOOL or MBIO majors only. Graduate students only. (Alt. years: spring) (Cross-listed as ZOOL 670)

BOT 676 Environmental Physiology Seminar (2)

Environmental stress; pollution; salinity, geobotany, and other interactions between the environment and plant processes. Current literature emphasized at multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary levels. Pre: graduate status in a biological science, geosciences, etc.; consent for well-prepared undergraduates.

BOT 680 Marine Macrophytes Seminar (2)

Discussion of current literature in physiological ecology, cellular and molecular adaptations to environmental factors by marine plants. Repeatable four times. Pre: 480.

BOT 682 Physiological Ecology of Marine Plants (3)

Discussion of current studies in morphological, physiological, cellular, and molecular adaptation to marine environments by macroalgae, phytoplankton, and seagrasses. A-F only. Pre: upper division ecology class recommended, 470 (or equivalent), 480 (or equivalent), or consent. Co-requisite: 682L.

BOT 682L Physiological Ecology of Marine Plants Lab (1)

Field and laboratory research techniques and projects in the physiological ecology of algae and seagrasses. A-F only. Pre: upper division ecology class recommended, 470L (or equivalent), 480 (or equivalent), or consent. Co-requisite: 682.

BOT 690 Conservation Biology (3)

Theories and concepts of ecology, evolution, and genetics for conservation of biological diversity. Topics will include restoration ecology, management planning, laws and policies, biological invasions. Pre: BIOL 375 and either 462 or ZOOL 480; and either 453, 454, 456, or 492; or ZOOL 410, 439, 620, 623. (Crosslisted as NREM 690 and ZOOL 690)

BOT 699 Directed Research (V)

Research preliminary to thesis or dissertation research. Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only. Pre: consent of graduate committee.

BOT 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: candidacy for MS degree and approval of thesis proposal.

BOT 750 Topics in Conservation Biology (V)

Advanced topics in conservation and environmental biology. Repeatable three times, up to twelve credits. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as ZOOL 750)

BOT 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: candidacy for PhD and approval of dissertation proposal.

CAM 101 Introduction to Modern Khmer (4)

Listening, speaking, reading, writing. Structural points introduced inductively. Meets five hours weekly

CAM 102 Introduction to Modern Khmer (4)

Continuation of 101. Pre: 101 or exam or consent.

CAM 103 Conversing in Khmer I (2)

Online course aims to develop students’ proficiency skills in speaking and listening at the first year level for the purpose of communication, travel, and for enjoyment.

CAM 104 Conversing in Khmer II (2)

Online course aims to develop students’ proficiency skills in speaking and listening at the first year level for the purpose of communication, travel, and for enjoyment. Pre: 103 or consent.

CAM 105 Reading/Writing Khmer (2)

Online course aims to develop the student’s proficiency skills in reading and writing Khmer at the First Year level.

CAM 107 First Year Khmer (2)

Continuation of 105. This online course aims to develop proficiency skills in listening, reading, and writing Khmer at the first year level. Use a multimedia CD-ROM and a textbook to complement the web-based instruction. Pre: 105 (or equivalent) or consent. (Spring only)

CAM 112 Intensive Elementary Khmer (10)

CAM 201 Intermediate Modern Khmer (4)

Continuation of 102. Conversation, reading, writing. Meets five hours weekly. Pre: 102 or exam or consent.

CAM 202 Intermediate Modern Khmer (4)

Continuation of 201. Pre: 201 or exam or consent.

CAM 203 Cambodian Folktales of the Hare I (2)

Introduction to classical Cambodian folktales of the Hare. The Hare, known as ‘Judge Rabbit,’ is one of the most famous figure in Oral folktale stories. Pre: 102 or 107, or consent

CAM 205 Second Year Khmer I (2)

Online course aims to develop student’s proficiency-based units exploring Cambodian language and culture and focusing on reading and writing at the intermediate level. Pre: 102 or 105, or consent. (Fall only)

CAM 206 Cambodian Folktales of the Hare II (2)

Introduction to classical Cambodian folktales of the Hare. Familiarize students to Cambodian basic language, cultures, and custom as seen in daily life. Pre: 203 or consent. (Spring only)

CAM 207 Second Year Khmer II (2)

Continuation of 205. Online course provides opportunities for learners to enhance their linguistic, discourse and sociolinguistic competencies in Khmer at the intermediate level. Use a multimedia CD-ROM and a textbook to complement the web-based instruction. Pre: 201 or 205, or consent. (Spring only)

CAM 212 Intensive Intermediate Khmer (10)

CAM 301 Third-Level Khmer (3)

Continuation of 202. Advanced reading, writing, conversation and comprehension. Emphasis on modern contemporary texts. Computer assisted learning. Lab work. Pre: 202 or 212 (or equivalent), or consent.

CAM 302 Third-Level Khmer (3)

Continuation of 301. Computer assisted learning. Lab work. Pre: 301 (or equivalent), or consent.

CAM 303 Accelerated Third-Level Cambodian (6)

Continuation of 212. Practice in idiomatic conversation and extensive reading. Integrated development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Meets 10 hours weekly. Pre: 212.

CAM 305 Third Year Khmer I (2)

Online course provides opportunities for learners to enhance their linguistic, discourse and sociolinguistic competencies in Khmer at the advanced level. Use a multimedia CD-ROM and a textbook to complement the web based instruction. (Fall only) Pre: 207 or consent.

CAM 306 Third Year Khmer II (2)

Continuation of 305. Online course provides opportunities for learners to enhance their linguistic, discourse and sociolinguistic competencies in Khmer at the advanced level. Use a multimedia CD-ROM and a textbook to complement the web-based instruction. Pre: 305 or consent. (Spring only)

CAM 401 Fourth-Level Khmer (3)

Continuation of 302. Computer assisted learning. Advanced reading in current literature; discussion of social and cultural issues; advanced conversation and composition. Pre: 302 (or equivalent), or consent.

CAM 402 Fourth-Level Khmer (3)

Continuation of 401. Computer assisted learning. Pre: 401 (or equivalent), or consent.

CAM 415 Khmer Language in the Media (3)

Focus on advanced reading, writing, aural comprehension and speaking skills through the study of Khmer newspaper, radio, TV, audio/video clips and film. Repeatable one time. Pre: 402 (or equivalent), or consent.

CAS 099 International Exchange (V)

Designed for students accepted for participation in an international exchange program while enrolled at UH Mânoa. CR/NC only. Pre: Admittance to an international exchange program.

CAS 101 Using Information Critically (3)

Concepts and practice for effective information seeking, evaluation, and use in context of information technology and libraries. Research framework structures activities involving fiction, film, scholarly studies, writing, oral presentation; original research is culminating project. A-F only.

CAS 102 RAP Foundation Course (3)

Focus on communication and research skills. Multilevel work with technology, community service, linking with K–12 students, creation of museum exhibits. A-F only. Open only to RAP students.

CAS 111 Integrating Seminar II (1)

Through the use of a unifying theme, students explore linkages with academic disciplines represented in Freshman Learning Communities. Theme examples: diversity, epistemology. A-F only. (Spring only)

CAS 200 (Alpha) Scholar Seminars (1)

Discussion based seminar led by senior faculty/administrator. Students meet with instructor for 1 hour once a week. Discussion based seminar led by senior faculty/ administrator. Students meet with instructor for 1 hour once a week. Freshmen may take up to three alphas. (H) scholar seminar; (I) scholar seminar; (J) scholar seminar; (K) scholar seminar; (M) scholar seminar. A-F only.

CAS 301 ACE Mentoring: Facilitating Student Development (4)

Theoretical foundations in student learning and holistic development. Practical leadership
skills acquisition and application through the facilitation of a seminar for new freshmen. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Fall only)

CHAM 101 Elementary Chamorro (3)

Introduction to Chamorro, emphasis on listening and speaking, language structure. Meets three hours weekly.

CHAM 102 Elementary Chamorro (4)

Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills; emphasis on oral and reading proficiency. Meets five hours weekly. Pre: 101 (or equivalent), or consent.

CHAM 201 Intermediate Chamorro (4)

Continuation of 102. Emphasis on comprehension and language production (speaking). Meets five hours weekly. Pre: 102 (or equivalent), or consent.

CHAM 202 Intermediate Chamorro (4)

Continuation of 201. Emphasis on comprehension and language production. Pre: 201 (or equivalent), or consent.

CHEM 100 Chemistry and Society (3)

Introduction to chemistry for non-science majors. Discussion of basic chemistry concepts and their application to everyday life. No credit for science and engineering majors. A-F only.

CHEM 110 Chemistry in a Sustainable World (3)

Introduction to chemistry for non-science majors. Discussion of the role of natural and man-made chemicals in everyday life, with an emphasis on sustainable and environmentally-sensitive use of chemicals to improve our world. A-F only. (Crosslisted as SUST 120)

CHEM 131 Preparation for General Chemistry (3

For students lacking preparation in chemistry. Provides background in algebra and elementary concepts of chemistry in preparation for entering the General Chemistry sequence. A-F only. Pre: successful completion of placement exam.

CHEM 151 Elementary Survey of Chemistry (3)

Nonrigorous but adequate background in fundamentals. Preparation for technical training in life sciences.

CHEM 151L Elementary Survey of Chemistry Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Experiments introducing laboratory techniques and illustrating chemical principles. Pre: 151 (or concurrent).

CHEM 152 Survey of Organic and Bioorganic Chemistry (3)

Structure, nomenclature, properties, reactions of organic compounds emphasizing those of practical importance in related fields. Pre: 151, 162, or 171.

CHEM 152L Survey of Organic and Bioorganic Chemistry Lab (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Techniques of preparation, purification, identification of organic compounds. Pre: 151L, 162L, or 171L; and 152 (or concurrent).

CHEM 161 General Chemistry I (3)

Basic principles of chemistry, including stoichiometry. Introduction to solution phase chemistry. Gas phase chemistry. Thermodynamics, including enthalpies of formation and reaction. Atomic structure, periodic trends, chemical bonding, molecular structure. Pre: C (not C-) in 131 or C (not C-) in 151 or successful completion of placement exam, or consent.

CHEM 161L General Chemistry Lab I (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Laboratory experiments introducing techniques and fundamental principles of chemistry. Pre: 161 (or concurrent).

CHEM 162 General Chemistry II (3)

Continuation of 161. Liquids and solids. Solutions and colligative properties. Continuation of thermodynamics, including entropy and free energy. Principles and applications of chemical equilibrium, including acidbase chemistry (titrations, buffers). Kinetics. Redox reactions and electrochemistry. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 161.

CHEM 162L General Chemistry Lab II (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Laboratory experiments introducing techniques and fundamental principles of chemistry. Pre: 161L and 162 (or concurrent).

CHEM 171 Principles of Chemistry (4)

Principles, theories, elementary analytical methods of chemistry. Intended for physical science majors and engineers. Pre: Satisfactory Placement Exam score, and MATH 241 (or concurrent) or MATH 251A (or concurrent). Co-requisite: 171L. (Fall only)

CHEM 171L Principles of Chemistry Lab (1)

(1 3.5-hr Lab) Laboratory experiments illustrating fundamental principles of chemistry. Co-requisite: 171. (Fall only)

CHEM 181A Honors General Chemistry (4)

Rigorous, in-depth introduction to chemical principles with emphasis on experimental and applied aspects of modern chemistry. Pre: satisfactory placement exam score and MATH 215 (or concurrent) or MATH 241 (or concurrent) or MATH 251A (or concurrent) with a minimum grade of C. (Fall only)

CHEM 181L Honors General Chemistry Laboratory (1)

(1 3-hr Lab) Laboratory experiments illustrating chemical principles involving advanced techniques and modern instrumentation. A-F only. Co-requisite: 181A.

CHEM 272 Organic Chemistry I (3)

Molecular structure, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, mechanisms, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 162 or 171 or 181A.

CHEM 272L Organic Chemistry I Lab (2)

(1 4-hr Lab) Techniques, synthesis and qualitative analysis, applications of spectroscopy. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 162L, 171L, or 181L; and C (not C-) or better in 272 (or concurrent).

CHEM 273 Organic Chemistry II (3)

Continuation of 272. Molecular structure, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, mechanisms, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 272.

CHEM 273L Organic Chemistry II Lab (2)

(1 4-hr Lab) Techniques, synthesis and qualitative analysis, applications of spectroscopy. Pre: 272L and 273 (or concurrent).

CHEM 274 Principles of Analytical Chemistry (3)

Selected methods and principles, e.g., phase equilibria, ionic equilibria, electrode equilibria, separations, spectroscopy, automation, and process control. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 162 or 171 or 181A, MATH 215 or MATH 241 or MATH 251A.

CHEM 274L Principles of Analytical Chemistry Lab (2)

(2 3-hr Lab) Phase separations, chromatography, titrimetry, spectrophotometry, etc. Pre: C (not C-) or better in 162L or 171L or 181L; and 274 (or concurrent).

CHEM 351 Physical Chemistry I (3)

Principles and theories; physico-chemical procedures. Pre: 274, 274L, PHYS 272, PHYS 272L, and MATH 243 or MATH 253A.

CHEM 352 Physical Chemistry II (3)

Continuation of 351. Pre: 351.

CHEM 352L Physico-Chemical Measurements (2)

(2 3-hr Lab) Modern laboratory techniques. Includes emphasis on instruction in scientific report writing. Pre: 274L, 351, and 352 (or concurrent).

CHEM 361 Physical Biochemistry (3)

Biochemical thermodynamics, chemical and enzyme kinetics, biomolecular structure, and biomolecular spectroscopy. A-F only. Pre: 162, PHYS 272, and MATH 242 or 252A with a grade of C or better for prerequisites.

CHEM 372 Bioorganic Chemistry (3)

Mechanism of biochemical reactions, biophysical structure, techniques for studying biochemical reactions. Pre: 273 (with a grade of C or better) or graduate standing with consent, or departmental approval. (Fall only)

CHEM 380 Professional Ethics for Chemists (1)

Student team-led discussions of contemporary ethical issues and ethical decision making in chemistry using case studies and additional examples from the media. CHEM or BIOC majors only. CR/NC only. Pre: 274 (or concurrent). (Spring only)

CHEM 399 Directed Reading (V)

Directed reading and discussion of scientific journal articles culminating in a written literature review. Repeatable unlimited times. CHEM or BIOC majors only.Pre: minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 or minimum in-major GPA of 3.0.

CHEM 399L Directed Research (V)

Directed laboratory research culminating in a written research report. Repeatable unlimited times. CHEM or BIOC majors only. A-F only. Pre: minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 or minimum in-major GPA of 3.0.

CHEM 425 Synthesis and Analysis of Inorganic Compounds (3)

Lecture on advanced methods of preparation and characterization of inorganic compounds and materials. A-F only. Pre: 351 (or concurrent) or 361 (or concurrent). (Fall only)

CHEM 425L Preparation and Analysis of Inoraganic Compounds Laboratory (2)

Laboratory on preparative methods and analytical techniques and instruments in inorganic chemistry. A-F only. Pre: 425 (or concurrent). (Fall only)

CHEM 427 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)

Classification, description, fundamental theory. Pre: 425.

CHEM 435 Experimental Methods in Materials Research (3)

(1 Lec, 2 2-hr Lab) Common experimental techniques in materials testing and research: x-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy, thermal and mechanical properties,
electrochemical methods—theory and hands-on experience. Pre: 351 (or concurrent) or ME 341. (Crosslisted as ME 435)

CHEM 445 Synthesis and Analysis of Organic Compounds (3)

Introduction to multi-step synthesis and instruments/analytical techniques used to characterize organic compounds. Retrosynthesis and diastereoselective reactions; spectroscopy (optical methods, NMR), mass spectrometry. Chromatography (GC, HPLC) and coupled techniques (GCMS, LCMS). CHEM or BIOC majors only. A-F only. Pre: 273 with a grade of C (not C-) or better, or departmental approval. (Spring only)

CHEM 445L Preparation and Analysis of Organic Compounds Laboratory (2)

Laboratory on the preparation of organic compounds and physical methods for their characterization. Includes optical methods (UV-vis, IR), chromatography (HPLC, GC), mass spectrometry (GCMS and LCMS) and NMR. A-F only. Pre: 273L with a grade of C (not C-) or better, or departmental approval. Co-requisite: 445. (Spring only)

CHEM 462 Advanced Biochemistry (3)

Advanced topics in biochemistry including nucleic acid replication, transcription, and translation; genetic and epigenetic regulation; bioenergetics and control of metabolism; alternative metabolic strategies; and enzyme structure and mechanism. A-F only. Pre: 372 and BIOL 402. (Spring only)

CHEM 462L Advanced Biochemistry Lab (2)

Advanced biochemistry lab techniques: protein purification and characterization, identification of unknown proteins, enzyme kinetics, ligand binding, enzyme kinetics, protein structure, and spectroscopy, with instruction in writing scientific reports. A-F only. Pre: 274L, 372, 462 (or concurrent), and BIOL 275L.

CHEM 600 Introduction to Research (1)

Introduction to field-specific methods and skills needed for success in graduate research. Includes training modules for safety, ethics, and library resources. Short faculty research overviews may also be given.CHEM majors only. Graduate students only. CR/NC only. (Fall only)

CHEM 601 Theory of Chemical Bonding (3)

Application of quantum mechanics and symmetry principles to descriptions of chemical bonding. Pre: graduate standing in CHEM.

CHEM 602 Chemical Applications of Spectroscopy (V)

Introduction to magnetic resonance, infrared, UV, and visible spectroscopy, emphasizing applications to organic and inorganic chemistry. Three topics each semester–1 credit hour per topic. Repeatable unlimited times in different topics. Pre: graduate standing in CHEM.

CHEM 622 Organometallics I (3)

Reactivity and reaction mechanisms of compounds containing metalcarbon bonds. Pre: 352 and 427.

CHEM 623 Coordination Chemistry (3)

Survey of Lewis acids and bases, coordination numbers, geometries, stereochemistry, ligand field theory, formation constants, and bioinorganic chemistry. Pre: 601 and 602 (or concurrent).

CHEM 624 Organometallics II (3)

Introduction to the principles of catalysis and the classes of catalytic reactions effected by organometallic compounds. A-F only. Pre: 622 and a minimum required grade for prerequisites of B.

CHEM 631 Methods of Instrumental Analysis (V)

Theory, instrumentation, applications. Three areas each semester-one credit hour per area. Repeatable unlimited times in different areas. Pre: 333 and graduate standing in CHEM or consent.

CHEM 641 Organic Structure Determination (3)

Interpretation of chemical and physical (primarily spectral) data in the identification of organic compounds. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

CHEM 642 Organic Synthesis I (3)

Modern synthetic methods with emphasis on the design and execution of multi-step sequences. Pre: graduate standing or consent

CHEM 643 Physical Organic Chemistry (3)

Theory of molecular structure, stereochemistry, and reaction mechanisms. Pre: 601 or consent.

CHEM 647 Organic Synthesis II (3)

Continuation of 642, and is the second half of a two-semester course in Modern Organic Synthesis. Pre: 642 and a minimum required grade for prerequisites of B. (Spring only)

CHEM 651 Chemical Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3)

Includes statistical thermodynamics, with application to chemical systems. Pre: graduate standing in CHEM.

CHEM 652 Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Dynamics (3)

Kinetics and chemical reaction dynamics of elementary reactions relevant to combustion processes, astrochemistry, chemical vapor deposition and planetary sciences. Pre: graduate standing in CHEM. (Spring only)

CHEM 653 Quantum Chemistry (3)

Rigorous introduction to quantum mechanics, including operator formalism, matrix formation, group theory, and perturbation theory; introduction to the electronic structure of atoms and molecules. Pre: graduate standing in CHEM.

CHEM 657 Astrochemistry–A Molecular Approach (3)

Formation of astrobiologically important molecules and their precursors in the interstellar medium and in our solar system: first principles and latest trends. Pre: consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as ASTR 657 and ERTH 657)

CHEM 658 Crystallography (3)

Crystal symmetry. Elementary x-ray physics. Diffraction theory and its application to crystal and molecular structure determination. Pre: 352 and MATH 244 or MATH 253A.

CHEM 661 Enzyme Reaction Mechanisms (3)

The chemical mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by enzymes in biochemical pathways, with an emphasis on the major types of cofactor and metal catalyzed reactions. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

CHEM 691 (Alpha) Chemistry Seminar I (1)

Current topics in (D) analytic-inorganic; (E) organic; (Q) biochemistry; (Z) inorganic chemistry. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: graduate standing.

CHEM 692 (Alpha) Chemistry Seminar II (1)

Continuation of 691. Current topics in: (D) analyticphysical; (E) organic; (Q) biochemistry; (Z) inorganic chemistry. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: graduate standing.

CHEM 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: consent.

CHEM 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: candidacy for MS degree and consent of thesis chair.

CHEM 721 Special Topics: Inorganic Chemistry (V)

Theory and applications. Repeatable unlimited times in different topics. Pre: consent.

CHEM 741 Special Topics: Organic Chemistry (V)

Theory and applications. Repeatable unlimited times in different topics. Pre: consent.

CHEM 751 Special Topics: Physical Chemistry (V)

Theory and applications. Repeatable unlimited times in different topics. Pre: consent.

CHEM 761 Special Topics: Biochemistry (V)

Theory and applications. A-F only. Repeatable unlimited times in different topics.

CHEM 800 Dissertation Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: candidacy for PhD degree and consent of dissertation chair.

CHN 101 Elementary Mandarin (4)

Listening, speaking, reading, writing, grammar. Meets one hour, four times a week. Pre: placement test.

CHN 101A Elementary Mandarin (4)

Listening, speaking, reading, writing, grammar. Meets one hour, four times a week. Pre: placement test.

CHN 102 Elementary Mandarin (4)

Continuation of 101. Pre: 101 or consent.

CHN 102A Elementary Mandarin (4)

Continuation of 101. Pre: 101 or consent.

CHN 103 Accelerated Elementary Mandarin (8)

Content of 101 and 102 covered in one semester. Meets two hours, four times a week. Pre: placement test.

CHN 105 Elementary Chinese for Business Professionals (8)

Accelerated, intensive elementary course focusing on everyday listening, speaking, reading, and writing communicative needs of business professionals in the Chinese business context. Pre: consent. (Fall only)

CHN 111 Elementary Conversational Mandarin I (3)

Development of basic skills (listening, speaking and grammar) of spoken Mandarin with application to some familiar everyday topics.

CHN 112 Elementary Conversational Mandarin II (3)

Continuation of 111. Pre: 101 or 111 or consent.

CHN 201 Intermediate Mandarin (4)

Continuation of 101 and 102. Meets one hour a day, four times a week. Pre: 102 or 103 or 105; or consent.

CHN 201A Intermediate Mandarin (4)

Continuation of 101 and 102. Meets one hour a day, four times a week. Pre: 102 or 103 or 105; or consent.

CHN 202 Intermediate Mandarin (4)

Continuation of 201. Pre: 201 or consent.

CHN 204 Accelerated Intermediate Mandarin (8)

Content of 201 and 202 covered in one semester. Meets two hours, four times a week. Pre: placement test and 102 or 103 or 105; or consent.

CHN 205 Intermediate Chinese for Business Professionals (8)

Accelerated, intensive intermediate course focusing on everyday listening, speaking, reading, and writing communicative needs of business professionals in the Chinese business context. Pre: 105 (or equivalent) or consent.

CHN 211 Intermediate Conversational Mandarin I (3)

Further development of listening and speaking skills in Mandarin. The student is expected to be able to comprehend and produce speech at the paragraph level. Pre: 102 or 103 or 112, or consent.

CHN 212 Intermediate Conversational Mandarin II (3)

Continuation of 211. Pre: 201 or 211, or consent.

CHN 251 Reading and Writing Chinese I (3)

For students who have completed the conversational Mandarin courses up through 212 and wish to continue on to 301, or others who can handle daily conversation in Mandarin but cannot read or write in the language. Pre: 212 or consent.

CHN 252 Reading and Writing Chinese II (3)

Continuation of 251. Pre: 251 or consent.

CHN 301 Third-Level Mandarin I (3)

Vocabulary building and extended mastery of sentence structures of modern Chinese through reading and related conversation. Meets one hour a day, three times a week. Pre: 202 or 204 or 205 or 252; or consent.

CHN 302 Third-Level Mandarin II (3)

Continuation of 301. Pre: 301 or consent.

CHN 303 Accelerated Third-Level Mandarin (8)

Content of 301 and 302 covered in one semester. Meets two hours, four times a week. Pre: 202 or 204 or 205 or 252; or consent.

CHN 305 Third-Year Chinese for Business Professionals (8)

Accelerated, intensive advanced course focusing on general advanced listening, speaking, reading, and writing communicative needs of business professionals in the Chinese business context. Pre: 205 (or equivalent) or consent.

CHN 311 Mandarin Conversation (3)

Systematic practice on everyday topics of conversation. Lab work. Pre: 202 or 204 or 252; or consent.

CHN 312 Mandarin Conversation (3)

Continuation of 311. Pre: 311 or consent.

CHN 319 Chinese Dialect Studies (V)

Advanced Cantonese or other Chinese dialects. Repeatable one time. CR/NC for native Chinese speakers. Pre: consent.

CHN 331 Advanced Chinese Listening and Writing (3)

Web-based training in Chinese listening, reading, and writing to develop skills at the advanced level. Activities combine independent work with communicative activities on the course website. Features language exchange with native speakers. Repeatable one time. Pre: 301 (or concurrent) or consent.

CHN 332 Advanced Chinese Reading and Writing (3)

Web-based training in Chinese reading and writing to develop skills at the advanced level. Activities combine independent work with communicative activities on the course web site. Ideal for in-service professionals seeking language development and maintenance. Repeatable one time. Pre: 301 (or concurrent) or consent.

CHN 399 Directed Third-Level Reading (V)

For those who need special assistance, e.g., in reading texts in their area of specialization or at a pace more rapid than those of standard courses. CR/NC only. Repeatable three times. Pre: consent.

CHN 401 Fourth-Level Mandarin I (3)

Extensive reading in academic topics. Meets one hour a day, three times a week. Pre: 302 or 303 or 305; or consent.

CHN 402 Fourth-Level Mandarin II (3)

Continuation of 401. Pre: 401 or consent.

CHN 404 Accelerated Fourth-Level Mandarin (8)

Content of 401 and 402 covered in one semester. Meets two hours, four times a week. Pre: 302 or 303 or 305; or consent.

CHN 405 Fourth-Year Chinese for Business Professionals (8)

Accelerated, intensive advanced course focusing on specialized advanced listening, speaking, reading, and writing communicative needs of business professionals in the Chinese business context. Pre: 305 (or equivalent) or consent. (Spring only)

CHN 411 Advanced Mandarin Conversation (3)

Systematic practice on academic topics of conversation. Lab work. Pre: 302 or 303, or consent.

CHN 412 Advanced Mandarin Conversation (3)

Continuation of 411. Pre: 411 or consent.

CHN 421 (Alpha) Chinese Translation (3)

Training in techniques; theory of translation. (B) Chinese–English; (C) English–Chinese. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as TI 420(Alpha))

CHN 441 Fourth Year Reading and Writing: Advanced Topics I (3)

Asynchronous web-based course with focuses on (i) reading selected texts across a broad range of genres, and (ii) writing expository and argumentative essays by referencing and reflecting on the readings, along with interacting with peers. Pre: 401 (or concurrent) or equivalent or consent. (Fall only)

CHN 442 Fourth Year Reading and Writing: Advanced Topics II (3)

Asynchronous web-based course with focuses on (i) reading selected texts across a broad range of topics and genres, and (ii) writing expository/argumentative essays by referencing and reflecting on the readings, along with interacting with peers. Pre: 401 (or concurrent) or consent. (Spring only)

CHN 451 Structure of Chinese (3)

Introduction to phonology and morphology of Mandarin Chinese; some discussion of usage and linguistic geography. Pre: 202 or 204; or consent.

CHN 452 Structure of Chinese (3)

Introduction to syntax and semantics of Mandarin Chinese; some discussion of usage and linguistic geography. Pre: 202 or 204; or consent.

CHN 453 Study of Chinese Characters (3)

Origin, structure, and evolution. Pre: 402, 461; or consent. (Alt. years)

CHN 454 Study of Chinese Characters (3)

Continuation of 453. Pre: 453 or consent. (Alt. years)

CHN 455 Chinese Pragmatics and Discourse (3)

Introduction to pragmatics and discourse analysis of Mandarin Chinese; some discussion of usage and linguistic geography. Pre: 202, 204; or consent.

CHN 456 Chinese Semantics and Communication (3)

Study of the meaning of Chinese sentences in isolation, in discourse contexts, and in written texts. Pays equal attention to theoretical issues and practical problems in Chinese semantics and communication. Pre: 202 or 204, or consent. (Once a year)

CHN 457 Chinese Words and the Lexicon (3)

Defines properties of the Chinese lexicon, introduces its principles, approaches, and methodologies in Chinese lexicology, outlines similarities and differences between the Chinese and English lexicons, and advances students’ Chinese language proficiency. Pre: 202 or 205, or consent. (Alt. years: fall)

CHN 461 Introduction to Classical Chinese (3)

Analysis of basic structural patterns through selected readings in various texts. Pre: 302 or consent.

CHN 470 Language and Culture of China (3)

Extensive exposure–chiefly through tape recordings, classroom conversation, and outside readings–to history, culture, and institutions. Pre: 202 or 204, or consent.

CHN 485 Academic/Professional Chinese I (3)

Focus on academic and professional reading, writing, speaking, and listening in order to train students to the Superior (according to ACTFL standards) level of language proficiency. Repeatable one time when taken in China as part of the UH Chinese Flagship Program. Pre: 402 or consent.

CHN 486 Academic/Professional Chinese II (3)

Continuation of 485. Focus on academic and professional reading, writing, speaking, and listening in order to train students to the Superior (according to ACTFL standards) level of language proficiency. Repeatable one time when taken in China as part of the UH Chinese Flagship Program. Pre: 402 or consent.

CHN 487 (Alpha) Readings in 20th Century Chinese Literature (3)

Representative works of writers from People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. (B) short stories; (C) poetry and drama; (D) novels and essays. Repeatable two times. Pre: 402 or consent.

CHN 488 Flagship Rhetoric and Composition Abroad (3)

Designed for students participating in the Flagship Capstone Year in China taught entirely in Chinese. Students will improve their knowledge of and ability to use Chinese to effectively communicate in writing. A-F only. Pre: 486 or consent.

CHN 489 Flagship Media and Society Abroad (3)

Designed for students participating in the Flagship Capstone Year in China taught entirely in Chinese. Students will improve their knowledge of Chinese media, how it operates, and its effects on Chinese society. A-F only. Pre: 486 or consent.

CHN 490 Flagship Experience Abroad (V)

Designed for students participating in the Flagship Capstone Year in China taught entirely in Chinese. Students will take two courses taught in Chinese in their field at Nanjing or Beijing Union University. Repeatable one time, up to six credits. CR/NC only. Pre: 486 or consent.

CHN 491 Oral Fluency Through Chinese Films (3)

Development of listening and speaking skills through discussion of Chinese films. Students will be required to watch the films before class. Pre: 301 or consent.

CHN 495 Internship Program (V)

Faculty supervised participation in the operations of an organization in a position making use of students’ Chinese language skills in Hawai‘i. Students must achieve a grade of B- in CHN 302 to take this course. Repeatable two times, up to 12 credits. CHN majors only. Junior/senior standing only. Pre: 302 (with a minimum grade of B-) or consent.

CHN 496 Overseas Internship in China (V)

Supervised internships in a Chinese-speaking institution in China. Students must pass 486 with a B- or higher and be accepted to the Flagship Capstone Year in China to take this. Repeatable two times, up to 12 credits. CR/NC only. Pre: 461 and 485 and 486 (with a minimum grade of B- or better) and proficiency assessment and acceptance to Flagship Capstone year in China.

CHN 499 Directed Fourth-Level Reading (V)

For those who need special assistance, e.g., in reading texts in area of specialization or at a pace more rapid than those of standard courses. CR/NC only. Repeatable three times. Primarily for graduate students from other departments. Pre: consent

CHN 601 Introduction to Study of Contemporary Chinese Linguistics (3)

Panoramic overview of major perspectives in contemporary Chinese linguistics. Readings on recent developments of fields. Report on selected research papers and present analysis of linguistic phenomena of interest. Pre: 452 or consent. (Alt. years)

CHN 610 (Alpha) Chinese Poetry (3)

Critical study of major traditional Chinese poetic forms. (B) ancient (to 5th century); (C) medieval (5th–10th century). Pre: 461 or consent for (B), 610B or consent for (C).

CHN 612 Traditional Chinese Fiction (3)

Formal and thematic analysis of short stories, historical romances, and novels. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 402 or consent.

CHN 631 (Alpha) History of Chinese Language (3)

(B) phonology; (C) syntax. Pre: 451, LING 421, or consent for (B); 452 or consent for (C).

CHN 633 Chinese Dialects (3)

Synchronic description of a Chinese dialect other than Cantonese and Mandarin; contrastive and comparative studies with Mandarin. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: 451 and 452, or consent.

CHN 634 Chinese Syntax and Semantics (3)

Verbal categories, aspects, focus devices, resultative and directional compounds, coverbial constructions. Interaction between syntax and semantics. Pre: 452 or consent.

CHN 642 Contrastive Analysis of Mandarin and English (3)

Pre: 452.

CHN 643 Methods in Teaching Chinese as Second Language (3)

Problems in language learning and teaching. Practice in preparing and presenting lessons with materials based on comparative linguistic analysis. Materials, teaching aids, test construction. Pre: 451 and 452, or consent.

CHN 645 Practicum: Teaching Chinese Language (3)

For graduate students pursuing teaching Chinese language. Students gain practical skills and hands-on experiences in creating instructional and assessment materials and teaching an actual Chinese language class using the self-developed materials effectively. Pre: 643 or consent. (Alt. years: fall)

CHN 650 (Alpha) Topics in Chinese Language (3)

Extensive studies of selected topics (B) teaching and testing: specific problems in teaching Chinese including characters and cultural elements; proficiency and communicative ability; (C) cognitive grammar. A-F only for (C). Pre: 451 and 452, or consent. Once a year.

CHN 655 Current Topics in Chinese Grammar (3)

Current approaches to Chinese grammar and related issues and debates, focusing on the papers published by leading Chinese linguists employing these approaches. Pre: 452, 455, or 456; or consent. (Alt. years)

CHN 660 Second Semester Classical Chinese (3)

Builds on the foundation laid in 461; introduces complex syntactic patterns, advanced vocabulary; teaches sophisticated reading strategies and cultural literary contexts; exposes students to a wide range of intermediate level texts. Repeatable two times. Pre: 461 or consent. (Spring only)

CHN 661 Advanced Classical Chinese (3)

Pre: 660 and consent.

CHN 662 Advanced Classical Chinese (3)

Pre: 661 and consent.

CHN 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

CHN 750 (Alpha) Research Seminar in Chinese Language (3)

(B) teaching methods; (C) structure; (D) classical grammar; (E) sociolinguistics. Pre: 643 for (B) and (E); 452 for (C) and (D).

CHN 753 (Alpha) Research Seminar in Chinese Literature (3)

Study of authors, a genre, a period, or a problem. (M) modern; (T) traditional. Repeatable one time for (M). A-F only for (M). Pre: EALL 611, WS 613, WS 615, or WS 650; or consent for (M); 612, or consent for (T). (Cross-listed as WS 753) (Alpha))

CLAS 121 Ancient Egypt: Mummies, Pharaohs, and Gods (3)

An overview of ancient Egyptian civilization through lectures and class discussion on Egyptian literature, archaeology, history, religion and society.

CLAS 122 Greek, Roman, and Ancient Mythology (3)

Combines readings and analyses of myths from the ancient world including Europe, Asia, Africa, and Hawai‘i, with an emphasis on comparative analysis of cultures and religions.

CLAS 123 Greek and Latin Elements in English (3)

Important roots, prefixes, and suffixes for building a literary vocabulary.

CLAS 124 Greek and Latin Elements in Scientific Terminology (3)

Important roots, prefixes, and suffixes for building a scientific vocabulary.

CLAS 151 World Myth to 1500 C.E. (3)

Reading and analysis of myths and legends from around the globe, from before the dawn of writing to 1500 C.E. Students will learn to interpret traditional stories from several theoretical and cross-cultural perspectives. A-F only.

CLAS 211 Understanding Ancient Religions (3)

Comparative and historical survey of the religious beliefs and practices in ancient times throughout Egypt, Mesopotamia, Syria-Canaan, Anatolia, Persia, Greece, and Rome. A-F only. (Cross-listed as REL 211)

CLAS 301 Biblical Hebrew I (3)

Orthography and structure of Biblical Hebrew, history and development of Hebrew as the sacred language of Judaism, overview of religious and historical development of the Hebrew Bible. Pre: sophomore standing or consent. (Fall only) (Cross-listed as REL 301)

CLAS 302 Biblical Hebrew II (3)

Reading of selected prose passages from the Hebrew Bible; analysis of literacy forms, paying special attention to stories which have played an important role in the development of the Abrahamic religions. Minimum C- grade required for prerequisites. Pre: 301/REL 301. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as REL 302)

CLAS 305 Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphics I (3)

Decipherment of hieroglyphs and reading of Middle Egyptian literary texts. (Fall only)

CLAS 306 Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphics II (3)

Decipherment of hieroglyphs and reading of Middle Egyptian literary texts, including Tale of Sinuhe. Pre: 305 or permission of instructor. (Spring only)

CLAS 321 History of the Written Word (3)

A hands-on history of writing beginning in Ancient Greece and Rome. Content includes the development of the alphabet, scripts, books, libraries, and writing in ancient culture. Sophomore standing or consent.

CLAS 323 Greek and Roman Drama (3)

Survey of Greek and Roman drama, both tragedies and comedies, tracing the history of a genre that contains some of the wittiest and most agonizing moments in ancient literature. Pre: sophomore standing or higher.

CLAS 324 Nature in the Ancient World (3)

Study of the relationship between the Greeks and Romans and the natural environment. Particular attention will be given to the place of nature in ancient science, philosophy, literature, and “real life.” Pre: sophomore standing or higher.

CLAS 325 Greek and Roman War Literature (3)

Survey of war-related literature from Greece and Rome, its major themes, and how it reflects the wide range of social, political, intellectual, and literary perspectives on war found in the ancient world. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent.

CLAS 326 The Greek and Roman Novel (3)

Survey of Greek and Roman novels, a collection of highly entertaining texts that offer windows into various aspects of life in the ancient world. Pre: sophomore standing or higher.

CLAS 327 Ancient Greek Literature in Translation (3)

Major writers: emphasis on Homer, drama, and philosophy. Pre: sophomore standing or higher or consent.

CLAS 328 Ancient Roman Literature in Translation (3)

Major writers: emphasis on Vergil, satire, and novel. Pre: sophomore standing or higher or consent.

CLAS 329 Greek and Roman Epic (3)

A survey of Greek and Roman epic literature, beginning with Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and proceeding through the Hellenistic Greek and Roman periods. Pre: sophomore standing or consent.

CLAS 355 Archaeology of Ancient Greece (3)

Introduction to the field of Greek archaeology and methods of archaeological research in the Mediterranean. Pre: sophomore standing or higher.

CLAS 356 Archaeology of Ancient Rome (3)

Examines the archaeology of the Roman world from the Etruscan period to the reign of the emperor Constantine. Pre: sophomore standing or higher.

CLAS 366 Literatures of Ancient India (3)

Survey of South Asian literature from ancient times to the early medieval period; focusing on Sanskrit, Prakrit, and Tamil poetry traditions. Readings in English translation. (Cross-listed as IP 366)

CLAS 373 Art of Greece and Rome (3)

Minoan and Mycenaean arts; Greece and Rome. Pre: ART 175 or consent. (Cross-listed as ART 373)

CLAS 430 Persia, Greece, and Rome in the Classical Age (3)

Historical examination of the interaction between the Achaemenid and Parthian empires of Persia and the classical societies of the Mediterranean, such as the Greek city-states, Macedonia, the Hellenistic, and Roman Empires. Recommended: HIST 151. (Cross-listed as HIST 430 and PER 430)

CLAS 490 Classics Capstone (3)

The Classics capstone involves the preparation of a major research paper or project that represents the culmination of the Classics degree. Topics are chosen based on student interest and experience. CLAS majors only. Junior standing or higher. A-F only. (Fall only)

COM 201 Introduction to Communication (3)

An overview of communication emphasizing intercultural, organizational and international communication and media arts with introduction to multimedia, ICTs, and public relations perspectives.

COM 310 Media Arts (3)

Combined lecture discussion on theories and criticism of visual media, covering aesthetic development and delivery through multimedia and cinematic principles. A-F only. Pre: 201 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 320 Communication and Communities (3)

Combined lecture-discussion on communication within organizational communities and between organizations and their communities with attention to intercultural issues in local, global, and online interactions. Pre: 201 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 325 Communicating Sustainability (3)

Application of scientific communication theory, strategic communication, and multimedia techniques to select issues of environmental sustainability. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 201 or consent. (Crosslisted as SUST 325)

COM 330 Information and Communication Technology Concepts (3)

Combined lecture discussion on basic technical concepts related to ICTs embedded in sociocultural context. Pre: 201 (or concurrent) or consent

COM 331 Techniques of Video and Digital Cinema (3)

Orientation to techniques of production. Emphasis on history, language, and theory of the creative process and application to video productions and multimedia. Pre: 310 or consent.

COM 337 Techniques of Multimedia (3)

Combined lecture-lab providing an orientation to, and examination of, procedures and techniques of multimedia. Emphasis on new media literacy, human computer interaction, and basic design of electronic multimedia. Pre: 310 or consent.

COM 339 Public Relations Writing (3)

Enhance students’ professional writing skills in the contemporary public relations field and equip students with the foundations of essential techniques for persuasive communication. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 201 (with a minimum grade of B).

COM 340 Intercultural Communication (3)

Problems and opportunities of communication in a variety of intercultural contexts. Focus on theory, research, and managing intercultural effectiveness. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 350 Mediated Interpersonal Communication (3)

Theory and practice of interpersonal communication from a social science perspective. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 355 Digital Cultures (3)

Introduction to the social, cultural, and ethical implications of information and communication technologies by studying new and emerging media including games, interactive media, and virtual worlds. COM majors or consent. Pre: 330.

COM 390 (Alpha) Journalism/Communications Workshops (V)

Short-term intensive workshops in journalism and mass communication skills and projects. (B) workshop in new media; (C) workshop in reporting; (D) workshop in editing; (E) workshop in broadcast journalism; (F) workshop in public relations. Repeatable in different alphas up to 6 credits. COM or JOUR majors only. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as JOUR 390)

COM 392 Emerging Topics in Communication (3)

Emerging communication topics of interest to faculty and students. Repeatable one time on different topics, up to six credits. COM majors only. A-F only.

COM 401 Survey of Inquiry Methods in Communication (3)

Exploration of quantitative and qualitative research methods commonly used in communication studies and related professional work. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 420 Communication in Multicultural Organizations (3)

Cultural diversity in multicultural and multinational organizations is examined regarding communication-related aspects of working life. Pre: 320 and 340, or consent.

COM 421 Public Relations Strategies (3)

Practice and effects of public relations. Strategic management, techniques, new communication technologies, diverse publics, ethics, and social responsibility will be emphasized. A-F only. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 422 Public Relations Campaigns (3)

Synthesizing and applying the principles and techniques of public relations to create comprehensive campaigns. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 421 or consent.

COM 425 Filming Social Change (3)

Introduction to visual documentary theory and methods. Basic instruction in using digital video technology and hands-on production to tell visual stories and examine social issues related to diverse peoples, cultures, and communities through video projects. A-F only. Pre: one DH or DS course, or consent. (Cross-listed as ES 425)

COM 431 Studio Production (3)

Studio production ranging from three-camera studio production to broadcast and magazine show formats to on-line web production. Fundamental knowledge of lighting, sound, blocking, and equipment competency. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 432 Social Media (3)

Combined lecturediscussion on situated use of ICTs in various personal and institutional settings. A-F only. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 433 Video Scriptwriting (3)

Application of communication theory to creating and revising commercial and dramatic script material for video production. Pre: 331 or consent.

COM 436 Media Effects (3)

Social, political, economic, and cultural effects of broadcast media are examined to understand their impact on human behavior. Pre: COM major and junior standing, or consent.

COM 438 Telecommunication in the Pacific Hemisphere (3)

Development of international telecommunication, with special emphasis on the evolution of wireless communication and the internet. A-F only. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 444 Communication and Gender (3)

Theories, myths, and the missing links in gendered communication. Application of established and emerging theories of gender and communication to interpersonal, organizational, intercultural, and mass communication. Pre: COM major and junior standing, or consent.

COM 451 Communication and Law (3)

Role of communication in the legal process; impact of law on communication processes. Pre: COM/JOUR major and junior standing, or consent. (Cross-listed as JOUR 365)

COM 452 Building Communication Theory (3)

Major theories of communication in terms of requirements for a theory, theory development, associated research, and application. Pre: COM major and junior standing, or consent.

COM 459 Special Topics (3)

Topics of interest to faculty and students; taught by regular and visiting faculty. Repeatable on different topics to six credit hours. COM majors only. Pre: COM/JOUR major and junior standing, or consent. (Cross-listed as JOUR 459)

COM 460 Media Ethics (3)

Ethics and social responsibility for media professionals. Application of ethical theories and principles to case studies and research projects. COM majors only. (Cross-listed as JOUR 460)

COM 465 Political Communication in the Digital Era (3)

An examination of how various aspects of digital media platforms, such as affordances and communication processes impact political outcomes. COM majors or consent. Sophomore standing or higher. Pre: 201. (Fall only)

COM 475 Global Communication (3)

Problems and opportunities of communication in a variety of international contexts. Focus on commerce, diplomacy, and mass communication. COM majors only. Pre: COM/JOUR major or consent. (Cross-listed as JOUR 475)

COM 476 Capstone in Digital Cinema Production (3)

Creating, scripting, and producing complex programs. Media aesthetics and professional production, preparation, and execution are emphasized. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 and 320 and 330 and 331, or consent.

COM 477 Capstone in Interactive Multimedia Design and Development (3)

Design, development, and evaluation of interactive computer-based multimedia communication. Emphasizes authoring and production of such multimedia elements as fullmotion images, audio, and graphics. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 and 320 and 330 and 337, or consent.

COM 478 Capstone in Communication in Communities (3)

Synthesize knowledge, apply research findings in service to community, and develop proposal for intervention or campaign. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 and 320 and 330; and 340 or 421; or consent.

COM 479 Capstone Project in ICTs and Policy (3)

Focus on specific ICT and policy problems related to Hawai‘i and the Asia-Pacific region. COM majors only. A-F only. Pre: 310 and 320 and 330; and 432 or 438; or consent.

COM 480 Communication Seminar (3)

Application of theoretic and methodological criteria to researchable questions. Topics will vary. Pre: 201 and senior standing, or consent.

COM 489 Communicating Creativity (3)

The role of communication in fostering or inhibiting creativity. Exploration of theoretical bases for shared scientific or artistic creativity in communication research. COM major or consent. Pre: 201 and senior standing, or consent. (Once a year)

COM 490 Senior Thesis Project (3)

Completion of the thesis project appropriate to the selected area of concentration within the context of a seminar. Emphasis on ongoing process of writing, editing, review, and revision. Pre: COM major and senior standing, or consent.

COM 495 (Alpha) Communication Internship (V)

Application of communication skills and knowledge. (B) community setting; (C) School of Communications activity. Under faculty supervision, interns participate in operations of an organization and analyze communication processes and effects. Maximum of three credits per semester; six credits total toward major; each alpha repeatable up to three credits. Pre: COM major or consent.

COM 499 Special Problems (V)

Independent study of selected topics under faculty supervision. Repeatable up to three credits. Pre: COM major and junior standing, or consent.

COM 500 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1)

COM 611 Communication Theories (3)

Systematic study of major theories of communication and current status of communication research.

COM 612 Communication Inquiry (3)

Introduction to inquiry and the array of quantitative and qualitative research methods commonly used in communication.

COM 623 Strategic Organizational Communication (3)

Theories, concepts, and applications of strategic communication and public relations to achieve organizational goals. Pre: 611 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 633 Information and Communication Technologies (3)

Information and communication technologies, structures, processes, and networks as an area of research and study in the social sciences. Pre: 611 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 634 Social Media (3)

Systematic study from a social science perspective of current and emerging social media. Attention to user needs and impact. Pre: 612 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 643 Intercultural Communication (3)

Problems and opportunities of intercultural communication from theory and research, consulting and training, and policy and program perspectives. Pre: 611 (or concurrent) or consent.

COM 644 Global Communication and Journalism (3)

Analysis of the emerging global media landscape as digital technologies enable the sharing of news, information, and commentary across geographical and cultural borders. Focuses on causes, characteristics, and consequences. Pre: 612 (or concurrent).

COM 645 Digital Storytelling (3)

Focus on development of narrative-based creative activities in all mediums (text, audio, video, etc.) within communication contexts, i.e., journalism, film, public relations, etc. A-F only. Pre: enrolled in the School of Communications MA program, or instructor approval.

COM 646 Intervention in Multicultural Organizations (3)

Describes the array of communication-related intervention programs designed to enhance effectiveness in multicultural organizations at home and abroad. A-F only. Pre: 623 or 643 or consent.

COM 660 ICT Policy and Planning (3)

Processes and methods of planning appropriate to the information and communication sectors, including future economic, social, political, technical, and environmental perspectives. Pre: 611 (or concurrent) or consent. (Cross-listed as PUBA 628)

COM 691 Communication Topics (3)

Coverage in depth of some area of theory and research. Repeatable one time. Pre: 611 or consent.

COM 692 Communication Research Seminar (3)

General research seminar in communication. In-depth coverage of specific research methods to develop, refine, or interpret graduate students’ thesis or dissertation projects. COM, CIS majors only. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: 611 (with a minimum grade of B) or consent.

COM 695 Communication Practicum (V)

Supervised work experience, study of an organization, and career planning. Required of Plan B students in the main communication program. Repeatable up to six credits. CR/NC only. Pre: 611 and 612, or consent.

COM 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Individual reading and/or research. Repeatable up to six credits. Pre: consent.

COM 700 Thesis (V)

Repeatable up to six credits. Pre: 611 and 612, or consent.

COMG 102 Everyday Communication with Numbers: A Survival Guide (3)

Understanding, communicating, and evaluating quantitative information in everyday contexts. Topics include describing and interpreting data, basic statistics, and evaluating the validity of results.

COMG 151 Personal and Public Speech (3)

Develops communication skills necessary to function effectively in today’s society. Students will enhance their communication skills in one-on-one situations, public speaking, and small group situations. Ideal for new majors and non-majors.

COMG 151A Personal and Public Speech (3)

Develops communication skills necessary to function effectively in today’s society. Students will enhance their communication skills in one-on-one situations, public speaking, and small group situations. Ideal for new majors and non-majors.

COMG 170 Introduction to Nonverbal Communication (3)

Beginning course on the fundamental components of nonverbal communication. Aspects of body movements, facial expressions, eye behavior, physical appearance, voice, touch, space, smell, time, and environmental features will be examined in a lecture/discussion format. Extensive practice in skills.

COMG 181 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)

Introduction to basic principles of interaction between two people. Emphasis is on enhancement of skills in a variety of interpersonal contexts.

COMG 185 Multicultural Communication Skills (3)

Expose students to practical skills needed for effective intercultural communication. Offer guidelines for improvement in diverse cultural settings such as business, education, counseling, and healthcare.

COMG 251 Principles of Effective Public Speaking (3

Combined lecture/laboratory providing extensive practice in preparing and presenting effective public speeches with special emphasis on organization, outlining, audience analysis, analytical reasoning, and delivery skills.

COMG 251A Principles of Effective Public Speaking (3)

Combined lecture/laboratory providing extensive practice in preparing and presenting effective public speeches with special emphasis on organization, outlining, audience analysis, analytical reasoning, and delivery skills.

COMG 290 Interviewing (3)

Principles and practice; training in informational, persuasive, employment, appraisal, and research interviewing. Pre: one of 151, 170, 181, 185, 251 or 301; or consent.

COMG 301 Introduction to Communicological Theories (3)

Introduction to the theoretical perspectives that are the foundations of the communication discipline. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 302 Research Methods (3)

Introduction to methods of inquiry in the field of communication. Topics include research design and problem formulation, sampling, analytic and observational techniques, and data interpretation. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 321 Instructional Communication (3

Analysis of and practice in using models of communication in the classroom. Extends application of oral communication skills to various instructional and teaching contexts. Emphasis on organization, preparation, and delivery. Pre: 151 or 251; or consent.

COMG 351 Professional Presentations (3)

Extends application of public speaking skills to professional contexts: group sales, press conferences, and corporate annual reports. Emphasis on organization, preparation, and delivery. Pre: 151 or 251, or consent.

COMG 352 Group Decision-Making and Leadership (3)

Study of decision-making within the small group. Effects of organization, leadership, membership, and goals on achieving group purposes. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 353 Argumentation and Debate (3)

Adapting communication theory to forensic strategies for social action. Practice in formal argument. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits

COMG 361 Leadership and Organizational Communication (3)

Principles and practices of organizational communication and its relationship to networks, leadership, power, conflict, cultures, and other contemporary views of organizational work, change, and development. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 364 Persuasion (3)

Theories, concepts, strategies, and processes of persuasion and social influence in contemporary society. Focus on analyzing, developing, and resisting persuasive messages. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 371 Creating Understanding (3)

Introduction to theory and research on human communication, comprehension, creation of understanding. Discussion of codes and media, information and message processing theories. Topics include inference-making, implicature, natural language processing, and deception. Junior standing or higher.

COMG 380 Family Communication (3)

Focuses on the role of interaction patterns (both constructive and destructive) in the evolution of family communications. The impact of family dynamics upon these interaction patterns is given equal attention. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 381 Interpersonal Relations (3)

Theory and research on the development, maintenance, and termination of interpersonal relationships. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 385 Culture and Communication (3)

Survey of major factors affecting interpersonal communication between members of different cultures. Emphasis upon interaction between U.S. and Asian-Pacific peoples. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 386 Special Topics in Culture and Communication (3)

Contemporary research and theory on intercultural communication. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 390 Interrogation and Interviewing (3)

Survey of theory and research on the communicative demands of obtaining reliable information from others. Restricted to students with 30 or more credits.

COMG 392 Evolution and Human Communication (3)

Analysis of the role of human communication in mate attraction, intrasexual competition, cooperation, family dynamics, and coalition formation; discussion on the biological function of language, laughter, yawning, and emotion expressions. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits.

COMG 395 Research on Communication Behavior (3)

Survey of research on communication behavior. Verbal and nonverbal data collection; analysis of research data. Students design and implement a research project. Repeatable three times. Pre: 301 and 302.

COMG 399 Internship (V)

Analysis and application of communication knowledge and behaviors in organizational settings. Repeatable up to six credits. A-F only. Pre: consent.

COMG 452 Intergroup Communication (3)

Surveys theory and research on communication between members of different social groups, highlighting how communication influences and is influenced by social identity. Applies concepts to intergenerational, health, family, educational, multilingual, and computer-mediated contexts. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits.

COMG 454 Political Communication (3)

Survey of interpersonal and mass communication theories in the political context. Topics may include communication in public opinion processes, elections, debates, political campaigning and advertising. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits.

COMG 455 Conflict Management (3)

Examination of the theories, assumptions, practices, models, and techniques of managing interpersonal conflicts. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits.

COMG 464 Human Communication and Technology (3)

Analysis of evolving communicative exchanges in the Internet age including how people communicate with computer technology: focus on personal, interpersonal, and cultural effects associated with technology use. Pre: 60 or more credits.

COMG 465 Theories and Research in Strategic Communication (3)

An in-depth overview of theories related to strategic communication and scientific approaches to attitude formation and changes. Junior standing or higher. Pre: 301 or 364 or consent.

COMG 470 Nonverbal Communication (3)

Understanding communication beyond the words themselves. Review of theory and research on gestures, facial expressions, touch, personal space, and physical appearance. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits.

COMG 471 Verbal Communication (3)

Roles of language: perception and assumption in human relationships; relation of language symbols to emotion and attitudes. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits.

COMG 472 Deceptive Communication (3)

Survey of major social scientific theories, concepts, and research findings on deceptive communication, in a lecture/discussion format. Emphasis is on how people create deceptive messages, induce deception, and strategies used to detect deception. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits.

COMG 481 Relational Management (3)

Survey and critical discussion of current theory and research in relational management literature. Focus on conversation management, deception, jealousy, privacy, communication of emotions. Pre: 381 or consent.

COMG 490 Communication in Helping Relationships (3)

Theory and application of personal and interpersonal elements affecting communication of human-service professionals. Supervised practice. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits. (Cross-listed as PSY 477)

COMG 493 Teaching Speech (6)

For communicology majors who lead, under supervision, a freshman seminar section of communicology. Pre: senior standing and consent.

COMG 495 Health Communication (3)

Develop understanding of the process through which communication influences health outcomes, and learn how to design effective health communication programs using theory and research. Restricted to students with 60 or more credits.

COMG 499 Directed Reading (V)

Pre: consent of department chair and instructor.

COMG 600 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1)

Enrollment for degree completion. Repeatable two times. A-F only. Pre: master’s Plan B candidate and consent.

COMG 601 Theories in Communicology (3)

Major theoretical foundations; humanistic and social scientific perspectives. Examination of the research and the development of different models of human communication. COMG majors only. A-F only. Pre: consent.

COMG 602 Research Methods in Communicology (3)

Design and analysis of quantitative research in communicology. Focus on measurement issues, research design, descriptive and inferential statistics. COMG majors only. A-F only. Pre: consent.

COMG 620 Practicum for Instructional Communication (1)

Combined seminar and lecture/ discussion format on techniques and procedures for teaching communication skills and their related components in a laboratory setting. CR/NC only. Repeatable three times. COMG majors only. Pre: COMG GTA or consent.

COMG 660 Business Communication (3)

Analysis of communication issues in business through discussion of verbal/nonverbal messages, interpersonal relationships, conflict, and persuasion. Focus on interviewing, group communication, and public speaking skills. A-F only. Pre: 601 (or concurrent) or 602 (or concurrent), or consent.

COMG 664 Persuasion and Social Influence (3)

Theories of persuasion and resistance to persuasion; assessment of attitudes and measurement of change. A-F only. Pre: 601 (or concurrent) or 602 (or concurrent) or consent.

COMG 670 Message Processing (3)

Theories of human message processing. Effects of verbal and nonverbal codes, channels, and message forms on encoding and decoding. A-F only. Pre: 601 (or concurrent) or 602 (or concurrent); or consent.

COMG 681 Relational Communication (3)

Major models and theories of interpersonal communication; research on interpersonal relationships; interaction and functions of human communication. A-F only. Pre: 601 (or concurrent) and 602 (or concurrent); or consent.

COMG 685 Foundations of Intercultural Communication (3)

Major models, theories, and concepts of intercultural communication; basic methodological and analytical issues of research related to intercultural communication; research on intercultural communication. Graduate standing only. A-F only. Pre: 601 (or concurrent) and 602 (or concurrent); or consent.

COMG 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. Only three credits can count toward degree.

COMG 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable three times. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

COMG 702 Advanced Research Methods in Communicology (3)

Advanced focus on survey, laboratory, and field study design, data collection, and data analysis. Emphasis on control of variance through design and statistical analysis. Appropriate preparation for graduate theses and dissertations. A-F only. Pre: 602 or consent.

COMG 721 Approaches to Instructional Communication (3)

Seminar on communication theories and models in instructional environment; emphasis on message processing, classroom dynamics, cognitive and metacognitive processes associated with learning, and learning assessment. A-F only. Pre: 601 (or concurrent) or 602 (or concurrent), or consent.

COMG 752 Research in Intergroup Communication (3)

Theory, concepts, research, and application of communication processes between members of different social groups. A-F only. Pre: 601 (or concurrent) or 602 (or concurrent), or consent.

COMG 760 Seminar in Special Topics in Communicology (3)

Substantive areas in communication that are of current interest and the focus of research, but not addresed in other COMG courses. Topics vary each semester. Content to be announced. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: (601 (or concurrent) and 602 (or concurrent)) with a minimum grade of B), or consent.

COMG 764 Seminar in Persuasion and Influence (3)

Contemporary research in persuasion and influence. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 664 or consent.

COMG 770 Issues in Message Processing (3)

Contemporary research in verbal and nonverbal message processing. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 670 or consent.

COMG 781 Seminar in Relational Communication (3)

Contemporary research in interpersonal relations. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 681 or consent.

COMG 785 Research on Intercultural Communication (3)

Functional approach to the study of communication in intercultural settings. Examination of culture-based variables and their impact on social influence, relational management, and message processing. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: 685 or consent.

COMG 787 Artificial Intelligence and Communication (3)

Comprehensive understanding of the role and function of computer technology (including. A.I.) within the field of communication. Basic methodological and analytical issues of research related to semi-intelligent artifacts as information source or receiver. COMG majors or consent. Graduate students only. A-F only. Pre: 601 (or concurrent) and 602 (or concurrent); or consent.

COMG 795 Seminar in Health Communication Research (3)

Contemporary interpersonal and/ or public communication issues in health communication research. Topics include communication functions such as information management, interpersonal influence, relational management, emotional management, social influence. A-F only. Pre: 601 (or concurrent) and 602 (or concurrent), or consent.

CUL 609 Faculty Seminar Series (1)

Seminar consists of a series of presentations by certificate faculty on topics of ongoing research. Presentations will open current debates about theory and method in cultural studies. Repeatable one time. A-F only.

CUL 610 International Cultural Studies: History and Theory (3)

Seminar on the history and theory of interdisciplinary cultural studies. The politics of culture are examined in comparative perspective, focusing on their significance for identity formation, intercultural relations, and global flows of images, people and capital. Approaches to the study of media and popular culture are taken up in terms of their relevance for contemporary issues, especially in Hawai‘i and the Asia/Pacific/U.S. region. Repeatable one time. A-F only. (Fall only)

CUL 750 International Cultural Studies: Research Project (3)

Directed reading and research culminating in a project that engages issues in international cultural studies. Types of projects include scholarly essays, community-based projects, performances or exhibitions. Written statement of purpose and selfevaluation required. A-F only. Pre: 609 and 610.

DNCE 103 Introduction to Japanese Dance (1)

Beginning techniques of Japanese dance. Repeatable three times.

DNCE 105 Introduction to Korean Dance (1)

Beginning techniques of Korean dance. Repeatable three times.

DNCE 106 Introduction to Okinawan Dance (1)

Beginning techniques of Okinawan dance. Repeatable three times.

DNCE 107 Introduction to Philippine Dance (1)

Beginning techniques of Philippine dance. Repeatable three times.

DNCE 121 Beginning Ballet Technique (3)

Introduction to classical ballet technique. Repeatable three times.

DNCE 122 Continuing Ballet Technique (3)

Continuation of beginning classical ballet technique. Repeatable three times. Pre: 121 or consent.

DNCE 131 Beginning Contemporary Dance Technique (3)

Introduction to contemporary dance technique. Repeatable three times.

DNCE 140 Hip Hop Dance (1)

Introductory lecture/lab geared towards those with or without Hip Hop dance experience. Students will learn the fundamentals of various Hip Hop dance styles. Repeatable two times.

DNCE 141 Jazz Dance Technique (1)

Introduction to jazz dance technique. Repeatable two times.

DNCE 142 Ballroom Dance (1)

Introduction to those with or without ballroom dance experience. Students will learn the fundamentals of various ballroom dances. Repeatable five times.

DNCE 150 Introduction to Dance (3)

Survey the development of major dance styles and their relationship to contemporary choreography.

DNCE 151 Music Theory for Dancers (3)

Elements of music and relationship to dance; emphasis on rhythmic analysis. (Alt. years)

DNCE 152 Live on Stage (3)

Will view 10 locally-produced theatre and dance productions. Readings, class discussion, and live demonstration will assist students to understand each performance. Performances may include theatre, dance, musical theatre, opera, and performance art. Repeatable one time. (Spring only) (Cross-listed as THEA 152)

DNCE 221 Low Intermediate Ballet Technique (3)

Low intermediate ballet technique. Repeatable three times. Pre: 122 or consent.

DNCE 231 Intermediate Contemporary Dance Technique (3)

Low intermediate modern dance technique. Repeatable three times.

DNCE 240 Introduction to Stage Production (3)

Survey class introducing theater management, lighting, costuming, scenery, and other aspects of theatre that relate to producing stage performances. (Cross-listed as THEA 240)

DNCE 240 Introduction to Stage Production (3)

Survey class introducing theater management, lighting, costuming, scenery, and other aspects of theatre that relate to producing stage performances. (Cross-listed as THEA 240)

DNCE 245 Principles of of Design (3)

Introduction to general design principles as applied to theatre. Will introduce the language and tools of visual literacy and visual communications via individual projects and collaboration. Repeatable two times. (Cross-listed as THEA 245)

DNCE 255 Global Perspectives on Dance (3)

Overview of global perspectives on dance, with emphasis on Asia and the Pacific, and related concepts.

DNCE 259 Topics in Dance (V)

Readings, research, and/or field and movement experiences. Repeatable two times, up to nine credits.

DNCE 260 Movement Fundamentals (1)

Organized somatic systems as a framework for understanding movement and dance techniques. Required for majors. Repeatable two times.

DNCE 301 Asian Dance I (V)

Performance and techniques at the introductory level. Repeatable up to eight credits.

DNCE 302 Chinese Dance I (1)

Performance and techniques at the introductory level.

DNCE 303 Japanese Dance I (1)

Performance and techniques at the introductory level.

DNCE 304 Indonesian Dance I (1)

Performance and techniques at the introductory level.

DNCE 305 Korean Dance I (1)

Performance and techniques at the introductory level.

DNCE 306 Okinawan Dance I (1)

Performance and techniques at the introductory level.

DNCE 307 Philippine Dance I (1)

Performance and techniques at the introductory level.

DNCE 311 Oceanic Dance I (1)

Performance and techniques at the introductory level.

DNCE 312 Hula/Chant Ensemble I (2)

Ancient style. Pre: upper division standing or consent. A-F only. (Cross-listed as MUS 312)

DNCE 321 Intermediate Ballet Technique (3)

Intermediate ballet technique. Repeatable four times. Pre: 222 or consent.

DNCE 331 High Intermediate Contemporary Dance Technique (3)

Intermediate modern dance technique. Repeatable four times. Pre: 232 or consent.

DNCE 334 Taiji (T’ai Chi) for Actors I (3)

Basic Taijiquan (T’ai Chi Ch’uan) movement training. Repeatable two times. Pre: sophomore standing or higher, or consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 334)

DNCE 345 Lighting I: Beginning Lighting Design (3)

Basic principles of lighting design and associated technologies. Includes functions and properties of light, lighting and control equipment, working procedures, and drafting and paperwork techniques. Pre: DNCE/ THEA 240 or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as THEA 345)

DNCE 353 Scenic I: Beginning Scenic Design (3)

Workshop introducing the basic principles and approaches of scenic design for theatre and dance, with emphasis on the creative process. Pre: a course in THEA or DNCE, production experience, or consent. (Consent required for production experience option) (Cross-listed as THEA 353)

DNCE 354 Introduction to Costume Construction (4)

Workshop on basic principles of costume construction for theatre and dance. Professional practices, materials, and methods. (Cross-listed as THEA 354)

DNCE 356 Costumes I: Beginning Costume Design (3)

Basic principles and approaches to costume design for theatre and dance. Visual communication methods, creative process, historical research, and organizational practices. Repeatable one time. Pre: 250, THEA 240, or consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 356)

DNCE 360 Dance Kinesiology (3)

Practical information for dance students on diet and nutrition, anatomy, training and conditioning, and injury prevention. Pre: 260 or consent.

DNCE 361 Elementary Labanotation (3)

Elementary theory of Labanotation with practical application in scoring and reconstructing dances. (Alt. years)

DNCE 362 Visual Media for Dance (3)

Introductory theory of digital technology for dance with practical applications in documentation and performance. (Alt. years)

DNCE 370 Movement Improvisation (3)

Introduces movement improvisation to all levels and disciplines. Movement studies will explore improvisation approaches, devices, elements, exercises, and implications to gain skills in and appreciation for the art of improvisation. Repeatable one time.

DNCE 371 Choreography I (3)

Elementary techniques and theories for dance-making. Pre: 370 or consent.

DNCE 372 Choreography II (3)

Intermediate techniques and theories for dance-making. Pre: 371 or consent.

DNCE 401 Asian Dance II (V)

Performance and techniques at intermediate level. Repeatable up to eight credits. Pre: 301 or consent.

DNCE 402 Chinese Dance II (1)

Performance and techniques at intermediate level. Repeatable up to eight credits. Pre: 302 or consent.

DNCE 403 Japanese Dance II (1)

Performance and techniques at intermediate level. Repeatable up to eight credits. Pre: 303 or consent.

DNCE 404 Indonesian Dance II (1)

Performance and techniques at intermediate level. Repeatable up to eight credits. Pre: 304 or consent.

DNCE 405 Korean Dance II (1)

Performance and techniques at intermediate level. Repeatable up to eight credits. Pre: 305 or consent.

DNCE 406 Okinawan Dance II (1)

Performance and techniques at intermediate level. Repeatable up to eight credits. Pre: 306 or consent.

DNCE 407 Philippine Dance II (1)

Performance and techniques at intermediate level. Repeatable up to eight credits. Pre: 307 or consent.

DNCE 411 Oceanic Dance II (1)

Performance and techniques at intermediate level. Repeatable up to eight credits. Pre: 311 or consent.

DNCE 412 Hula/Chant Ensemble II (2)

Ancient style. Pre: 312 or consent. (Cross-listed as MUS 412)

DNCE 413 Hula/Chant Ensemble III (2)

Ancient style; hâlau protocol. Repeatable nine times. Pre: 412. (Cross-listed as MUS 413)

DNCE 421 Advanced Ballet Technique (3)

Advanced ballet technique. Repeatable six times. Pre: 321 or consent

DNCE 431 Advanced Contemporary Dance Technique (3)

Advanced contemporary dance technique. Repeatable six times. Pre: 331 or consent.

DNCE 433 Movement Workshop (V)

Special workshops in movements relating to specific departmental theatrical productions beyond the scope of movement taught in 437 and 438. Repeatable one time. Pre: one of 435 or THEA 435, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as THEA 433)

DNCE 434 Taiji (T’ai Chi) for Actors II (3)

Intermediate-level Taijiquan (T’ai Chi Ch’uan) movement training. Repeatable two times. Pre: 334 or consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 434)

DNCE 435 Movement for Actors (3)

Training actors to discover experientially the sources of movement; to teach skills for analyzing movement for its mechanical, anatomical, spatial, and dynamic content; and then to apply these skills in a role. Pre: THEA 222 or consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 435)

DNCE 436 Advanced Movement for Actors (3)

Detailed development of material presented in 435. Focus on Bartenieff fundamentals and movement analysis as it applies to the physical interpretation of theatrical roles. Pre: 435 or THEA 435, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as THEA 436

DNCE 437 Period Movement Styles, 1450–1650 (3)

Movement styles and social deportment of European societies in the Renaissance and early Baroque periods. Pre: 435 or THEA 435, one semester of a 100-level dance technique class; or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as THEA 437)

DNCE 438 Period Movement Styles, 1650–1800 (3)

Movement styles and social deportment of the Baroque and pre-Romantic periods in Europe and the American colonies. Pre: 435 or THEA 435, one semester of a 100-level dance technique class; or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as THEA 438)

DNCE 439 Musical Theater Dance Forms (3)

Theatrical dance forms used in 20th-century musical theater. Pre: 100 level or above dance technique class, 421, or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as THEA 439)

DNCE 446 Topics in Costume Construction (3)

Costume production techniques, both Western and Asian, for theatre and dance. Topic rotation includes: understructures and armatures, patterning, tailoring, dyeing, fabric modification, millenery and crafts, within the context of current industry practice. Repeatable two times. A-F only. Pre: 354, 356, or consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 446)

DNCE 452 Dance History I: From Ritual to the Concert Stage (3)

Development of Western theatrical dance from Ancient Greece through 19th-century ballet. Pre: upper division standing or consent.

DNCE 453 Dance History II: 20th Century to the Present (3)

Development of modern dance, contemporary ballet, and dance forms of musical theater and film. Pre: upper division standing or consent.

DNCE 456 Costumes II: Intermediate Costume Design (3)

Advanced costume design for theatre and dance. Introduction to collaborative process in costume. Intensive work on rendering skills, applied to various design problems. Cost analysis and organizational techniques. Pre: 356 or consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 456)

DNCE 458 Field Experiences in Dance (V)

Field experiences in relevant contexts under professional and faculty supervision. Repeatable one time. CR/NC only. Pre: upper division standing and consent.

DNCE 459 Topics in Dance (V)

Readings, research, and/or field and movement experiences. Repeatable if topic changes unlimited times. Pre: upper division standing and consent.

DNCE 460 Teaching Dance Technique (3)

Principles, techniques, and materials used in the teaching of dance technique. A-F only.

DNCE 470 Dance Performance (1)

Performance in various dance styles and settings. Repeatable eight times.

DNCE 471 Improvisation II (1)

Advanced-level dance improvisation. Repeatable two times. Pre: 370 or consent.

DNCE 480 Dance Repertory (V)

Preparation of standard and new works for performance. Repeatable three times. Pre: consent.

DNCE 490 Creative Dance (3)

Dance activities for young people. Appropriate for teachers, group workers, recreation majors, and others working with children. Also adults with special needs. Supervised field activities.

DNCE 495 Senior Project (1)

Individual choreographic project; student choreographs, performs, and oversees all technical aspects of a creative project; tutorial. A-F only. Pre: 372, senior standing, and consent.

DNCE 499 Directed Work (V)

Individual projects, tutorial. Pre: consent.

DNCE 617 Seminar in Performance Studies (3)

Special topics. Repeatable up to two times when topics change. Pre: THEA 615 or consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 617)

DNCE 651 Seminar in Dance Research (3)

Research materials and methods; preparation for thesis and scholarly research reporting. Required for graduate concentrations in dance. (Alt. years)

DNCE 652 Seminar: Dance Theory and Criticism (3)

Major theories of dance and dance criticism; emphasis on Western ideas. Pre: 452 and 453, or consent.

DNCE 653 Dance Ethnology Seminar (3)

Exemplary studies and field research. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Alt. years)

DNCE 654 Dance and Performance Theory: Asia (3)

Dance content and historico-social context of principal dance traditions. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Alt. years)

DNCE 655 Dance and Performance Theory: Oceania (3)

Dance content and historico-social context of principal dance traditions. Pre: graduate standing or consent. (Alt. years)

DNCE 658 Business for the Arts (3)

Seminar offering overview and foundation for launching or advancing enterprises in the arts. A focus on the processes and method for creating economically successful grants and project development applications. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 658)

DNCE 659 Advanced Topics in Dance (V)

Readings, research, and/or field movement experiences. Repeatable one time if topic changes. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

DNCE 660 Laban Movement Analysis (3)

Study and application of Laban Movement Analysis as a framework for enhancing analytical and artistic abilities. Pre: 260 (or concurrent) and 360 (or concurrent); or consent.

DNCE 661 Advanced Problems in Movement Analysis (3)

Advanced skills in movement analysis and interpretation of movement scores. Emphasis on Labanotation. Repeatable two times. Pre: 362. (Alt. years)

DNCE 671 Advanced Choreography (3)

Advanced analytic and creative study. Pre: 372 or consent. (Alt. years)

DNCE 672 Dance Performance (V)

Graduate performance in various dance styles and settings. By audition only. Repeatable six times. Pre: consent.

DNCE 673 Advanced Dance Technology and Live Performance (3)

Advanced skills in dance and technology in live performance. Emphasis on New Media. Graduate students only. Pre: 362 or consent. (Alt. years: spring)

DNCE 676 Seminar in Choreographic Methods (3)

Graduate level course designed for students with prior choreographic experience. Students will research, create, revise, and perform new works based on a variety of choreographic methodologies. Repeatable one time. Pre: 371, 372; or consent. (Alt. years)

DNCE 679 Directed Choreography (1)

Concert choreography for selected performance settings under the direction of a faculty advisor. Repeatable six times. Pre: 372 (or concurrent) or 671 (or concurrent), or consent.

DNCE 691 Seminar in Teaching Dance/Theater (3)

Pedagogy and classroom experience in teaching technique and theory. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as THEA 691)

DNCE 692 Practicum in Teaching (V)

Supervised teaching experience at the introductory or undergraduate level. Students will teach an appropriate level course in their field of expertise under faculty supervision. Repeatable up to nine credits. THEA or DNCE majors only. (Cross-listed as THEA 692)

DNCE 693 Internship: Youth Theater/Dance (V)

Supervised leadership experiences in dance/theater program with children. Students spend nine hours per week in supervised setting and three hours in weekly class meeting. Pre: 490, THEA 470, or THEA 476; or consent. (Cross-listed as THEA 693)

DNCE 695 Dance Colloquium (1)

Forum for presentation and discussion of current intellectual and artistic activities in the dance field. Repeatable three times. Pre: consent.

DNCE 696 (Alpha) Professional Internship (V)

Internship program where students will work for or with a professional theatre company under supervision of a UH faculty member, plus possible supervisor(s) from the theatre company. Students must participate hands-on in production activities of that company and receive a satisfactory (or better) review from their supervisor(s); (B) entertainment design: costume, lighting, scenery, props, sound, or other related disciplines; (C) performance: acting, directing, dance, choreography, or other related disciplines. Repeatable eight times per alpha, up to nine credits per alpha. A-F only. Pre: 345 or 353 or 356 for (B); 621 or 682 or DNCE 371 for (C). (Cross-listed as THEA 696 (Alpha))

DNCE 699 Directed Reading and Research (V)

Individual projects: tutorial. Repeatable up to six credits. Pre: consent.

DNCE 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

EALL 140 Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture (3)

Provides students with interesting perspectives on and some general knowledge of Chinese language, literature, and culture.

EALL 271 Japanese Literature in Translation– Traditional (3)

Survey of all major forms from the earliest era to mid-19th century.

EALL 272 Japanese Literature in Translation– Modern (3)

Survey from mid-19th century to present; emphasis on fiction.

EALL 273 Survey of Japanese Literature–KIC (3)

Survey of traditional and modern Japanese literature in translation, covering all major genres. Only offered at Konan University in Japan. Not open to students with 271 or 272.

EALL 281 Korean Literature in Translation– Traditional (3)

Survey of Korean literature from earliest times with emphasis on development and cultural context; all readings in English translation. Students write essays about the readings.

EALL 282 Korean Literature in Translation– Modern (3)

Survey of 20th-century Korean literature with emphasis on development and cultural context; all readings in English translation. Students write essays about the readings.

EALL 325 (Alpha) Japanese Film: Art and History (3)

Study and analysis of Japanese film; its history and relationship to cultural, social, philosophical, and aesthetic contexts. (B) 1900-1960; (C) 1960-present; (D) special topics. Pre: upper division standing or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 325)

EALL 330 Chinese Film: Art and History (3)

Study and analysis of Chinese film; its history and relationship to cultural, social, philosophical, and aesthetic contexts. (Cross-listed as ASAN 330)

EALL 360 Literary Traditions of East Asia (3)

Selected works of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean literature in English; relationships and parallels. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent.

EALL 361 Chinese Literature: Ancient (3)

Survey of all major genres from antiquity until the ninth century. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent.

EALL 362 Chinese Literature: Pre-modern (3)

Survey of all major genres from the ninth into the 20th-century. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent.

EALL 363 (Alpha) 20th-Century Chinese Literature and Culture (3)

Survey of 20th-century Chinese literature in translation. Includes a variety of genres from the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong: (B) 1919–1949; (C) 1949–present. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent.

EALL 364 20th-Century Chinese Women Writers (3)

A survey and critical examination of contemporary Chinese women writers from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Traces a genealogy of women’s writing from the early 1920s up until now through novels, poetry, drama, and film. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 364 and WS 346)

EALL 365 (Alpha) Traditional Chinese Fiction in Translation (3)

Survey of pre-modern Chinese fiction in translation. (B) short story; (C) novel. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent.

EALL 366 The City in Modern Chinese Literature and Visual Arts (3)

Study of the fictional and visual representations of the city in the changing contexts of Chinese modernization from the late imperial age to the beginning of the 21st century. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent. (Once a year)

EALL 371 Topics in Traditional Japanese Literature (3)

Reading and analysis of English translations of selected important works in the classical tradition. No knowledge of Japanese required. Repeatable two times in different topics with consent.

EALL 372 Topics in Modern Japanese Literature (3)

Reading and analysis of English translations of selected important works in modern Japanese literature. No knowledge of Japanese required. Repeatable two times in different topics with consent.

EALL 375 Topics in Japanese Cultural Studies (3)

Multi-disciplinary and historically located study of Japanese culture through the examination of literary and visual texts. Specific topics will depend upon the term. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent. (Alt. years)

EALL 384 Modern Korean Women Writers and Culture (3)

Study of fiction by modern Korean women writers in the changing context of Korean culture. A-F only. Pre: sophomore standing or higher.

EALL 472 East-West Cultural Encounters (3)

Critical examination of encounters between Western and East Asian cultures across time. In addition to literary texts, the course may use sources from other media, and focus on a specific era, region, or genre. Pre: an EALL course at 200 level or above; or a DH or DL course at 200 level or above; or consent.

EALL 473 Topics in Chinese Cultural Studies: Visual Culture–Chinese Diaspora (3)

Multidisciplinary and historically located study of Chinese culture through the examination of literary/visual texts and critical essays from cultural studies. Specific topics will depend upon term. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: one DH or DL course or consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 473)

EALL 474 Transnational Chinese Popular Culture (3)

Survey of contemporary Chinese popular entertainment forms that are produced and appreciated transnationally. Examples include martial arts genres, kung fu films, commercial novels, ballroom dancing, karaoke culture, music videos and rock music. Material will be selected based upon availability and readings will include critical essays from the fields of popular culture, media studies, and literary criticism. Pre: any 300- or 400-level DL or DH course. (Cross-listed as ASAN 474)

EALL 476 Perspectives on Chinese Cinema (3)

Introduction to Chinese cinema studies, with emphasis on the theoretical and critical approaches to Chinese film. Pre: one DH or DL course, or consent. (Once a year)

EALL 491 Senior Colloquium in East Asian Literature (3)

Comparative perspectives; some works studied in the original. Pre: third-level East Asian language.

EALL 492 (Alpha) Study of East Asian Languages (V)

Less commonly taught languages of East Asia: (B) Manchu; (C) Mongolian. Recommended: previous experience in history, linguistics, or languages. Repeatable one time. Pre: consent.

EALL 601 Current Issues in East Asian Language Pedagogy (3)

Survey on East Asian language pedagogy designed to develop students’ familiarity with and facility in addressing the major issues, initiatives, and innovations in the field. Pre: graduate standing or consent.

EALL 602 Introduction to East Asian Linguistics (3)

Introduction to cross-linguistic comparison of the writing systems, dialects, history, phonology, morphology, and syntax of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Pre: CHN 451 and 452, or JPN 451, or KOR 451 and 452; or consent. (Once a year)

EALL 603 (Alpha) Bibliographical and Research Methods (3)

Traditional and modern references and other library materials basic to research in all areas of East Asian studies: (C) Chinese; (J) Japanese; (K) Korean. Pre: CHN 402 for (C); JPN 407 (alpha) for (J); KOR 402 for (K).

EALL 611 Topics in 20th Century Chinese Literary and Cultural Studies (3)

Critical scholarship in Chinese literature and cultural studies, broadly defined to include the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and others. Reading knowledge of Chinese desirable but not required. Repeatable one time with consent. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 612)

EALL 647 Contemporary Chinese Documentary: Record, Expression, Cultural Space (3)

Introduction to contemporary Chinese independent documentary with these goals: to achieve in-depth understanding of Chinese society through documentary; be familiar with theoretical debates on documentary form; and understand documentary as a cultural discourse. Pre: 473 or 476, or instructor consent. (Alt. years: fall)

EALL 665 Special Topics in East Asian Literary Culture & Society (3)

In-depth study of selected topics and issues in modern/contemporary East Asian literary and cultural studies using an interdisciplinary, inter-regional, and transnational approach, from an intercultural perspective. Repeatable two times in different topics, but need consent for second repeat. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Cross-listed as ASAN 665)

EALL 691 Introduction to Classical Tibetan (3)

Introduction to Classical Tibetan grammar and vocabulary with emphasis on the earliest Tibetan texts; reading and analysis of pre-classical, classical and postclassical texts.

EALL 699 Directed Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times. CR/NC only. Pre: consent.

EALL 700 Thesis Research (V)

Repeatable unlimited times.

EALL 735 Seminar in Comparative East Asian Literature (3)

Comparison of authors, modes, topics, and genres in poetry and prose; theoretical and practical criticism. Pre: consent.

EALL 750 Seminar in Comparison of East Asian Languages (3)

Comparison of lexicon, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, etc., of two or more East Asian languages, contact influence on them. Pre: CHN 451, CHN 452, or JPN 451; or consent.

EALL 800 Dissertation Research (1)

Repeatable unlimited times.

ECON 120 Introduction to Economics (3)

One semester survey of the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics to enable students in all disciplines to understand current economic events.

ECON 130 Principles of Microeconomics (3)

Examination of the decision-making process of both households and firms. Analysis of the functioning of a competitive market system, using supply and demand models and the role of government in cases where the market system fails. Additional topics include the effects of international rate on the welfare of a nation and the effects of different competitive market structures on society.

ECON 130A Principles of Microeconomics (3)

Examination of the decision-making process of both households and firms. Analysis of the functioning of a competitive market system, using supply and demand models and the role of government in cases where the market system fails. Additional topics include the effects of international rate on the welfare of a nation and the effects of different competitive market structures on society.

ECON 131 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

An introduction to macroeconomics–the study of the overall economy. Topics include the determination of national income, causes and effects of inflation, unemployment, and income inequality; causes and consequences of international differences in economic growth; sources of business cycle expansions and contractions; role of government policy in stabilizing the economy and promoting long-term growth; financial markets and monetary policy; taxes, spending, consequences of budget deficits, determination of trade imbalances, exchange rate fluctuations, and balance of payment crises.

ECON 131A Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

An introduction to macroeconomics–the study of the overall economy. Topics include the determination of national income, causes and effects of inflation, unemployment, and income inequality; causes and consequences of international differences in economic growth; sources of business cycle expansions and contractions; role of government policy in stabilizing the economy and promoting long-term growth; financial markets and monetary policy; taxes, spending, consequences of budget deficits, determination of trade imbalances, exchange rate fluctuations, and balance of payment crises.

ECON 256 Data Analysis and Visualization (3)

Develops basic techniques of data analysis and visualization. Introduces sources of economic data; methods of preparing data from various file/data formats for analysis; methods of visualization: bubble plots, scatterplot matrices, heatmaps, hexbins, rug plots, etc. A-F only.

ECON 300 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)

Develops basic techniques and fundamental concepts used to study the overall macroeconomy and policies that affect it. Study the determinants of national income and long-run growth; causes and consequences of unemployment, inflation, and business cycle fluctuations; determination of foreign exchange rates and current account imbalances, and the role of government policy in various settings. Pre: 131 or consent.

ECON 300A Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)

Develops basic techniques and fundamental concepts used to study the overall macroeconomy and policies that affect it. Study the determinants of national income and long-run growth; causes and consequences of unemployment, inflation, and business cycle fluctuations; determination of foreign exchange rates and current account imbalances, and the role of government policy in various settings. Pre: 131 or consent.

ECON 301 Intermediate Microeconomics (3)

Develops basic techniques and fundamental concepts of microeconomic theory. Learn to use economic reasoning to understand the social consequences of decisions made by individual consumers, producers, and governments. Analyze the nature of market outcomes under alternative market structures, and further discuss possible welfare-improving government policies when markets fail to be efficient. Special attention is paid to the analysis of strategic behavior and markets with public goods and externalities. Pre: 130 or consent.

ECON 301A Intermediate Microeconomics (3)

Develops basic techniques and fundamental concepts of microeconomic theory. Learn to use economic reasoning to understand the social consequences of decisions made by individual consumers, producers, and governments. Analyze the nature of market outcomes under alternative market structures, and further discuss possible welfare-improving government policies when markets fail to be efficient. Special attention is paid to the analysis of strategic behavior and markets with public goods and externalities. Pre: 130 or consent.

ECON 311 The Economy of Hawai‘i (3)

History of development of Hawaiian economy; current economic problems. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 317 The Japanese Economy (3)

Analysis of Japan’s growth past and present. Does Japan’s economy look different in terms of its international trade structure, industrial structure, labor market, savings patterns, government policies, etc.? Does it matter? Pre: 120 or 130, or consent.

ECON 317A The Japanese Economy (3)

Analysis of Japan’s growth past and present. Does Japan’s economy look different in terms of its international trade structure, industrial structure, labor market, savings patterns, government policies, etc.? Does it matter? Pre: 120 or 130, or consent.

ECON 320 Introduction to Tourism Economics (3)

Examines tourism from an economic perspective. Topics include: the determinants of consumer demand for leisure travel, structure of competition among suppliers of tourism services, benefits and costs of tourism development to the host community, government’s role in the taxation, subsidy, regulation and protection of the tourism industry, tourism’s impact on the environment, and sustainable tourism development. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131; consent. (Cross-listed as TIM 320)

ECON 321 Introduction to Statistics (3)

Basic elements; descriptive statistics, probability, inference, distributions, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation analysis.

ECON 332 Economics of Global Climate Change (3)

Nature and causes of global climate change and economic solutions. Topics include valuing climate change impacts, energy solutions, environmental implications, societal adaptation, and international cooperation. A-F only. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as SUST 332)

ECON 336 Energy Economics and Policy (3)

Analysis of economic and policy aspects of energy use, and interactions of markets for various nonrenewable and renewable energy options. Evaluations of policies to develop alternative energy sources. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131. (Cross-listed as PPC 336 and SUST 336)

ECON 340 Financial Markets and Institutions (3)

The determination of asset prices; the risk and term structure of interest rates; efficient markets hypothesis; risk management and financial derivatives, asymmetric information models of financial market structure, innovation, regulation and deregulation; and financial crises. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 341 Comparative Economic History (3)

Comparative historical study of economic ideas and change since around 1700. Considers the histories of capitalism, poverty, industrialization and labor in Europe, Asia, the U.S., and other regions. (Cross-listed as HIST 340)

ECON 342 The History of Economic Thought (3)

Introduces major western economic theorists and ideas since around 1700. Considers the history of views on work, poverty, the market and government, and the relationship of those doctrines to society, philosophy, and public policy. Pre: 130, 131, or HIST 151, or HIST 152; or consent. (Alt. years) (Cross-listed as HIST 342)

ECON 350 Sustainable Development (3)

Transdisciplinary introduction to sustainable development. Interactions between environment, economy, and public policy, especially in Hawai‘i. Topics include: curse of paradise, global warming, energy use, health, poverty, population, water resources, traffic congestion, biodiversity, pollution controls. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131, or consent. (Once a year) (Cross-listed as SUST 350)

ECON 355 Network Economics (3)

Fundamental questions about the connections in the social, economic, and technological worlds. Topics include: matching markets, traffic, financial and social networks; and the political and economic consequences of the internet and other large networks. Pre: 120 or 130 or 131.

ECON 356 Games and Economic Behavior (3)

Introduces students to the study of strategic behavior with applications to economics, business, and public policy. Simple economic models of strategic decision making are used to analyze provision of public goods; competition, cooperation, and coordination among firms; bargaining between employers and labor unions; international trade negotiations; reputation as a competitive advantage, and others. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 358 Environmental Economics (3)

Nature and causes of environmental degradation/economic solutions, with emphasis on relevant ethical issues and decision-making. Topics include air and water pollution, toxic waste, deforestation, soil erosion, biodiversity, global warming, and sustainable development. Pre: 120, 130, or 131; or consent.

ECON 361 Seminar: Women and International Development (3)