Unit: Curriculum Studies
Program: Early Childhood Education (MEd)
Degree: Master's
Date: Fri Nov 05, 2010 - 7:49:23 pm

1) Below are the program student learning outcomes submitted last year. Please add/delete/modify as needed.

The MEd in ECE program includes a unique set of program assessments designed to measure the candidates’ competency in meeting Five Core Program Standards. These assessments are based on the unit’s Conceptual Framework. They include measures of each candidate’s knowledge about the field of early childhood education, ability to be an effective early childhood educator and leader, and dispositions as caring professionals. These three foci are conceptual framework of the College of Education

The conceptual framework of the COE provides broad direction and focus for the program design: the MEd in ECE provides a narrower lens through which to interpret and manifest the conceptual framework. The two are directly linked through the mission, the program goals and the objectives of the MEd in ECE. These, in turn, are linked to the Program Standards and Key Assessments. 

The mission of MEd in ECE is to prepare leaders in the field of education who can work collaboratively to design and implement high quality, inclusive programs for young children.

The goal of the MEd in ECE program is to provide candidates with a conceptual framework, skills, and knowledge that will make them more effective in their roles as early childhood educators. It is designed to develop master’s level competence relating to five Core Program Standards and two additional candidate-selected Program Standards. Learning outcomes are embedded in each of the required courses and the Plan B project—a Standards-Based Portfolio. 

The Five Core Program Standards embedded in the required courses are:

  • Standard I: Child Development
  • Standard II: The Field of Early Childhood Care and Education
  • Standard III: Early Childhood Special Education
  • Standard IV: Professionalism
  • Standard V: Research

The objectives of the program are that candidates:

  1. Become better informed about the developmental and educational needs of young children from various types of communities;
  2. Increase knowledge in the areas of early childhood care and education, child development and work with families;
  3. Learn about current issues and trends in early care and education;
  4. Learn about current issues and trends in assessment;
  5. Increase skills in working collaboratively with families and other professionals;
  6. Increase skills in developing inclusive educational programs to meet individual and group needs;
  7. Reflect on their own practice;
  8. Increase understanding and ability to critically analyze, apply, and conduct educational research;
  9. Increase ability and disposition to advocate on behalf of young children and their families with regard to policy decision-making and government agencies;
  10. Acquire understanding of the ethical dimensions of work with young children and their families;
  11. Become more able to provide ethical leadership in an early childhood classroom or agency.

Though engagement in class discussion and activities, exams and research-based papers designed around the objectives and standards of the program, candidates demonstrate that their ability to meet the larger COE mission:

Preparing knowledgeable, effective, and caring/professional educators to contribute to a just and democratic society.

Student Learning Outcomes

What candidates should know, do, and care about

Standard ONE: Child Development

MEd ECE graduates are knowledgeable about the developmental needs of young children from the prenatal period to eight years of age. As professionals who care about children achieving their maximum potential, they use that knowledge to effectively create programs that support children’s optimal development and to effectively develop translational strategies for families in an ethical and culturally sensitive manner.

Standard TWO: The Field of Early Childhood Education and Care

Med ECE candidates are knowledgeable about current issues and trends in early childhood care and education. As professionals who care about the larger needs of the community, they use that knowledge to effectively provide ethical and culturally sensitive leadership and advocacy with regard to policy decision-making, government agencies, and their own programs.

Standard THREE: Early Childhood Special Education

MEd ECE candidates are knowledgeable about children and families with special needs. As professionals who care about equity for all children and families, they effectively use their knowledge to develop inclusive educational programs to meet individual and group needs in an ethical, caring, and culturally inclusive manner.

Standard FOUR: Professionalism

Med ECE candidates are knowledgeable about what it means to be a professional in the field of early childhood education. As professionals who care about the field, they work effectively in collaboration with families and other professionals to provide services in an ethical, caring and culturally sensitive manner. Candidates identify and conduct themselves as members of the early childhood profession. They know and use ethical guidelines and other professional standards related to early childhood practice.

Standard FIVE: Research

MEd ECE candidates are knowledgeable about the role of research in the field of early childhood education. As professionals who care about using research-based strategies and methods, they effectively reflect on their current practice and initiate their own action-research projects. They critically analyze, and apply current educational research to their own settings.

2) As of last year, your program's SLOs were published as follows. Please update as needed.

Department Website URL:
Student Handbook. URL, if available online:
Information Sheet, Flyer, or Brochure URL, if available online: NA
UHM Catalog. Page Number:
Course Syllabi. URL, if available online: NA
Other: NCATE Advanced Programs Report available on COE Wiki
Other:

3) Below is the link to your program's curriculum map (if submitted in 2009). If it has changed or if we do not have your program's curriculum map, please upload it as a PDF.

Curriculum Map File(s) from 2009:

4) The percentage of courses in 2009 that had course SLOs explicitly stated on the syllabus, a website, or other publicly available document is indicated below. Please update as needed.

0%
1-50%
51-80%
81-99%
100%

5) State the assessment question(s) and/or goals of the assessment activity. Include the SLOs that were targeted, if applicable.

We wanted to find out how the students woudl do on the two assessments designed to measure SLO's for Standards 3 and 5.

Standard THREE: Early Childhood Special Education

MEd ECE candidates are knowledgeable about children and families with special needs. As professionals who care about equity for all children and families, they effectively use their knowledge to develop inclusive educational programs to meet individual and group needs in an ethical, caring, and culturally inclusive manner.

Standard FIVE: Research

MEd ECE candidates are knowledgeable about the role of research in the field of early childhood education. As professionals who care about using research-based strategies and methods, they effectively reflect on their current practice and initiate their own action-research projects. They critically analyze, and apply current educational research to their own settings.


6) State the type(s) of evidence gathered.

For Standard III students submitted a  final project to the SPED 631 instructor; for Standard IV students submitted a research proposal to the EDCS 632 instructor. The project and research proposals are the specific formative assessments for these two Core Standards.

7) Who interpreted or analyzed the evidence that was collected?

Course instructor(s)
Faculty committee
Ad hoc faculty group
Department chairperson
Persons or organization outside the university
Faculty advisor
Advisors (in student support services)
Students (graduate or undergraduate)
Dean/Director
Other:

8) How did they evaluate, analyze, or interpret the evidence?

Used a rubric or scoring guide
Scored exams/tests/quizzes
Used professional judgment (no rubric or scoring guide used)
Compiled survey results
Used qualitative methods on interview, focus group, open-ended response data
External organization/person analyzed data (e.g., external organization administered and scored the nursing licensing exam)
Other:

9) State how many persons submitted evidence that was evaluated.
If applicable, please include the sampling technique used.

For EDCS 632 all 28 students who passed the course submitted evidence; for SPED 631 the 27 students who passed the course submitted evidence. One person took an incomplete due to health reasons; she will finish in the fall of 2010.

10) Summarize the actual results.

a.    All 28 students received overall “acceptable” scores for the EDCS 632 class;
b.    All 27 students received overall “acceptable” scores for the SPED 631 class.
11.    Use of results/program modifications:

11) How did your program use the results? --or-- Explain planned use of results.
Please be specific.

We are using the results to inform our practice for future cohorts. For example, as a result of a general weakness in the rubric item listed below. Students did not have enough time to adequately reflect on their current practice. We are considering how to change the scheduling to remedy this.
Quality of the Conclusion
/Lessons Learned
Section    Med ECE candidates  effectively reflect on their current practice
    Reflection on current practice is overt and explicit
    Reflection on current practice is not overt and/or explicit

12) Beyond the results, were there additional conclusions or discoveries? This can include insights about assessment procedures, teaching and learning, program aspects and so on.

We think we may want to offer the SPED course as a Hybrid/Elluminate class for the next cohort to lighten the load on students for the second summer.

13) Other important information:

N/A