Category Archives: Faculty

Asian Studies Emeritus Prof. Belinda Aquino Quoted in Mouth-Watering NYT Article

Dr. Belinda Aquino, emeritus professor of Asian Studies and founding director of the Center for Philippine Studies at UHM, was quoted in a New York Times article about Filipina food writer Doreen Gamboa Fernandez and the newfound popularity of Filipino cuisine in the US.

Check it out here: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/30/dining/filipino-food-doreen-fernandez.html

Dr. Kristi Govella on Trump in Japan

The Washington Post published an article by Dr. Kristi Govella published about US President Donald Trump’s recent visit to Japan. She argues that the visit sent mixed signals about key issues affecting the future of the US-Japan relationship.

Check it out at: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2019/05/29/trumps-trip-japan-reveals-some-mixed-signals/?utm_term=.ff149cb96f10

Dr Patrick Patterson on Asian Beauty

Click the link below to hear Honolulu Community College professor Dr Patrick Patterson talk to KTUH host Crystal Kwok about concepts of Beauty in Asia!

http://stream.ktuh.org/archives/2.tuesday/12-3pm.mp3
(Dr Patterson’s interview begins at 6 minutes 30 seconds)

Like this topic? Enroll now for Dr. Patterson’s summer online course at UHM, ASAN 320Z (602), Advertising, Beauty and Desire in East Asia!!
Enrollment period ends at noon on Friday May 10.

Dr. Jojo Abinales Comments on Chinese Investments in the Philippines

Stars & Stripes quotes Asian Studies faculty member Dr. Jojo Abinales about Chinese plans to invest in a shipping company and an industrial park on the grounds of the former US military bases at Subic Bay and Clark Air Base.
For the full text of the article, please see https://www.stripes.com/news/pacific/chinese-firms-could-gain-footholds-at-both-subic-and-clark-in-the-philippines-1.579955

A Talk: The Resilience of China’s Political System

Lessons from China’s Engagement with the West

a talk by Dr. Sungmin Cho
of the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies

Monday, April 8, 12pm
Moore Hall 319
(Tokioka Room)

In March 2018, Xi Jinping removed the term limits on his presidency of China. Many in the West took this as a sign of the failure of Western engagement. But evidence shows that China has been more open to Western programs that promote democracy than other authoritarian countries like Russia and Iran. Why?

In this talk, Dr. Sungmin Cho will examine how Chinese authorities have collaborated with Western organizations since the early 1990s to develop China’s rule of law, village electoral system, and practices of good governance and civil society. He will explain the Chinese Communist Party’s strategic motivation and its intended effects, and discuss the implications for the future of Chinese politics and US policy toward China. His counterintuitive findings contribute to scholarly discussions of democratization and authoritarian resilience in comparative politics.

Dr. Sungmin Cho is Associate Professor at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, specializing in the politics of China and North Korea. Originally from South Korea, he holds an M.A. in International Relations from Peking University and a Ph.D. in Government from Georgetown.

The full description of this event is provided on page.

The Arrest of Journalist Maria Ressa

Asian Studies professor Patricio N Abinales has published an analysis of last week’s arrest of journalist Maria Ressa of the Philippines.

Ms. Ressa is CEO and Executive Editor of The Rappler, the Philippines’ most successful online news outlet and one that has not shied away from publishing stories that are critical of President Rodrigo Duterte and his associates. Dr. Abinales points out similarities between Duterte’s attacks on the free press and similar attacks made by dictator Ferdinand Marcos in the 1970s.

The article appears in the Australian Outlook, published by the Australian Institute of International Affairs. Full text of the article is available at http://www.internationalaffairs.org.au/australianoutlook/maria-ressa-arrest-philippines/.

What’s so scary about Huawei?

Smartphones, sanctions and death sentences: what’s going on with Huawei?

Faculty member Eric Harwit of University of Hawaii at Manoa‘s Asian Studies department weighs in on Huawei Technologies with BBC News!

The tech giant has had a meteoric rise over the last ten years. It has overtaken Apple in the global smartphone market, and its equipment is in telecommunications systems in 170 countries worldwide. But Huawei now finds itself at the centre of a global scandal.

Its chief financial officer – the daughter of the company’s founder – is under house arrest in Canada, accused of selling telecom equipment to Iran in contravention of US sanctions.

A week later, a US court charged the whole company with bank fraud, obstruction of justice and theft of technology from rival T-Mobile.

The company has been banned in New Zealand and Australia, and there are moves in the US to stop government employees from buying their products.

Critics say if it wins the contracts for the new 5G network being created globally, it could give the Chinese government control over everything from smart phones, to cars, to pacemakers in other countries.

So why has the success story soured? This week, we ask: what’s so scary about Huawei?

His segment is in the last 6 minutes of the 23-minute program. Check it out!

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cswqvl

Dr. Anna Stirr Wins national recognition

Dr. Anna Stirr receives the Bernard S. Cohn Book Prize
Asian Studies faculty member Dr. Anna Stirr has been selected to receive the 2019 Bernard S. Cohn Book Prize from the Association for Asian Studies. The Cohn prize honors outstanding and innovative scholarship across discipline and country of specialization for a first single-authored monograph on South Asia. The award is in recognition of Dr. Stirr’s book Singing Across Divides: Music and Intimate Politics in Nepal, published by Oxford University Press in 2017.

Dr. Stirr, who holds a PhD in Ethnomusicology from Columbia University, is Associate Professor in Asian Studies at UH-Manoa. Her book Singing Across Divides examines how forms of love and intimacy are linked to changing conceptions of political solidarity and forms of belonging, through the lens of Nepali dohori song. The book describes dohori: improvised, dialogic singing, in which a witty repartee of exchanges is based on poetic couplets with a fixed rhyme scheme, often backed by instrumental music and accompanying dance, performed between men and women, with a primary focus on romantic love. Dr. Stirr examines how dohori gets at the heart of tensions around regional, ethnic, caste, and gender differences within Nepal, as it promotes potentially destabilizing musical and poetic interactions, love, sex, and marriage across these social divides.

The Cohn Prize is named to honor the distinguished South Asia scholar, Bernard S. Cohn. Books nominated may address either contemporary or historical topics in any field of the humanities or the social sciences related to any of the countries of South Asia: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, and Nepal in the spirit of Dr. Cohn’s broad and critical scholarship on culture and history in South Asia. The prize will be presented at the AAS annual conference in Denver in March 2019.

Asian Studies course featured in Ka Leo

ASAN 464, a summer session course on K-Pop and J-Pop, was recently featured in Ka Leo, the student newspaper. This unique course combines business, cultural studies and pop culture studies and was a whole lot of fun for fans or wannabe-fans.

Read the full article here:  “America’s First K-POP and J-POP Class” by Kailanianna Ablog, Ka Leo, July 24, 2018.