Prepare

Prepare

Coursework

Creating a 4-Year Plan

Overview

Planning is critical for pre-health students who want to graduate with four years. Th best time to make a four-year plan is now. This guide is designed to help incoming students navigate the task of setting up a basic four-year academic plan. If you would like to have an advisor help you, then feel free to walk-in to the Pre-Health/Pre-Law Advising Center.

This guide is separated into four sections. Section I will go over ways you can find information about required courses. Sections II and III will help you create the outline for your four-year plan and begin scheduling courses into the plan. Section IV will explain how to check the accuracy and comprehensiveness of your schedule.

Section I: Gathering Information

All students pursuing a Bachelors degree must fulfill five requirement areas: General Education Core, Graduation Requirements, Degree Requirements, College Requirements, and Major Requirements. Pre-health students must also fulfill and additional set of requirements called “pre-requisites” (i.e. courses that you must complete before applying to professional schools. Planning can help you figure out how the prerequisites fit into your degree and ensure that you complete all of your requirements, including your prerequisites, as efficiently as possible.

  1. Visit the Pre-Health/Pre-Law Advising Center (PAC) website to learn about pre-requisites for the profession you are considering.
    • Learn the steps in the “Path to Professional School.”
    • Research the basic admission requirements for your field.
    • Make a list of the required courses for professional schools in your field of interest.
  2. Visit the Manoa Catalog website to go over your basic requirements.
    • General Education Core (Foundation & Diversification)
    • Graduation Requirements (Focus & Languages)
    • Degree Requirements (B.A., B.S., B.F.A., B.Ed., etc.)
    • College Requirements
  3. Visit your College or School website (depending on your major). Every program of study at the university is housed within a college or school. Your college sets its own policies for withdrawals, major declarations, etc. Check the Manoa Catalog to find the website and contact information for your college or school advising office.
  4. Visit the department website for your intended major. Links to the department websites can be found on the program sheets.
    • Print out a list of your major requirements.
    • Use the Manoa catalog to check whether you have to take courses in a specific order.
  5. Check whether any of your courses have pre-requisites/co-requisites or placement tests. Some courses, such as Math, Chemistry, and Language may require you to take an assessment test before you can register for the class. The Schedule of Classes lists where and when tests are offered and whether you need to make an appointment or reserve a seat.
    • Schedule and take any necessary placement exams.

Section II: Setting Up the Template

  1. Download a four-year academic planning sheet. Notice that it is arranged by academic years rather than by calendar years.
  2. Fill in the years next to the semester titles. Remember that calendar years begin with the spring semester of each academic year.
    • For example, if you were to begin school in Fall 2009, the next semester in that academic year is Spring 2010.
  3. Label your application year (when to take standardized tests, application deadline, letters of recommendation, interviews). For most health fields, applications are due a full year before the date you plan to enter professional school (i.e. the summer between your junior and senior year). Refer to the following downloadable handouts for more information about your application year in your field of interest.
    • Accelerated Timeline
      • Allopathic Medicine, Osteopathic Medicine, Podiatric Medicine, Dentistry, Optometry, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Veterinary Medicine 
    • Standard or Regular Timeline
      • Chiropractic Medicine, Communication Science and Disorders (Speech Pathology and Audiology), Naturopathic Medicine, Occupational Therapy, Physician Assistant, Public Health

Section III: Filling Out the Template

  1. Gather your lists. You should have three:
    • Core Courses – including Foundation, Diversification, Focus, Language, and any college or school requirements (from your college/school website or the Catalog)
    • Pre-Health Requirements (from this website)
    • Major/Degree Requirements (from your major/department website or the Program Sheets)
  2. Review the courses on your lists.
    • Look for overlapping courses. Certain courses on one list may fulfill multiple requirements (e.g. Your biology course may satisfy a pre-health pre-requisite, meet a core requirement, and fulfill a related major requirement).
    • Re-check whether your courses have pre-requisites. Course pre-requisites determine the order in which you must schedule your courses.
  3. Pencil in your courses.
    • Start with your math and science health prerequisites and your language courses. These courses must be taken in a specific order and may only be offered in certain semesters. Try to take only two (2) science or math courses each semester for your first two years.
    • Pencil in your Foundation courses (FW, FS, FG), which should be taken within the first year.
    • Fill in your remaining core and major requirements.
    • Fill in any remaining health prerequisite courses. It helps to spread your humanities and social sciences throughout your four years. They can serve to balance your course load during particularly demanding semesters.
    • Figure out whether you have room for elective courses. A minimum of 120 credits are required to graduate. Total up the credits in your plan and determine whether you have room for electives. Check the PAC website for a list of recommended health electives.

Section IV: Verifying Your Schedule

  1. Check that your courses are correctly sequenced and that your course load is reasonable. Take into account study time and work time if you plan to be a working student. As a rule of thumb, you should spend two hours studying outside of class for every one hour spent in class.
  2. Show your academic plan to a: 1) PAC peer advisor (schedule an appointment), 2) major/department advisor, (and) 3) school/college advisor. Please refer to the Notes Section of your respective program sheet to determine who are your major/department and school/college advisors.  Be sure to discuss your plans with each of them and ask them to confirm that your plan is complete and correct.

CONGRATULATIONS!

You have created your very own Four-Year Academic Plan! Keep in mind that you can always add or move courses, depending on what is offered each semester, but don’t delete any courses or credits without first talking to all three of your advisors. Finally, check in with your advisors each semester to make sure you stay on track.

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Pre-Health Pre-Requisites Across the UH System

Compiled from the UH System Course Transfer DatabaseUH Manoa 2017-2018 Catalog, UH Hilo Catalog 2018-2019, UH West Oahu 2018-2019 General Catalog, Hawaii Community College Catalog 2017-2018, Honolulu Community College 2017-2018 Catalog, Kapiolani Community College 2018-19 Catalog, Kauai Community College Catalog 2018-2019, Leeward Community College Catalog 2018-2019, UH Maui College’s General Catalog: 2017-2018, and Windward Community College Course Catalog 2017-2018.

The following are commonly required prerequisite courses for various health programs/schools, as found across the ten different campuses within the University of Hawaii System.  Prerequisites vary from program to program, and thus it is highly recommended that students research the prerequisites for their program(s) of interest!

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Field Specific Pre-Requisites

Dentistry


More than 25% of the programs in this field require the following UHM courses for admission:
BIOL 171/171L and 172/172LIntroduction to Biology I and II8 cr.
BIOC 241 or higherBiochemistry3 or 4 cr.
CHEM 161/161L and 162/162LGeneral Chemistry I and II*8 cr.
CHEM 272/272L and 273/273LOrganic Chemistry I and II10 cr.
ENG 100 and 200Composition I and II3-12 cr.
MATH 140 or higherPrecalculus or higher*3 cr.
MICR 130 or higherMicrobiology**3 cr.
PHYL 141/141L and 142/142LHuman Anatomy and Physiology I and II***8 cr.
PHYS 151/151L and 152/152L
(or PHYS 170/170/L and 272/272L)
College Physics I and II
(or General Physics I and II)
8 or 9 cr.

Additional requirements may include courses such as calculus and upper-division biology. It is also recommended that non-science majors take additional upper-division or advanced science electives beyond the prerequisites listed above.

ART 113, ART 116, ART 242, and ART 344 are recommended to take in preparation for the perceptual ability section of the DAT.

CHEM 171/171L might not be accepted by dental schools in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L. Students should double check with the schools they are interested in if the schools would accept CHEM 171/171L in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L.

*If you are planning on taking a chemistry or math course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the chemistry placement exam can be found here, and information on the math placement exam can be found here.

**Some schools may require microbiology lab.

***It is strongly recommended to check with each school for specific requirements.  Oregon Health & Science University School of Dentistry requires PHYL 301/301L and 302/302L. 

Medicine (Allopathic)

More than 25% of the programs in this field require the following UHM courses for admission:

BIOL 171/171L and 172/172LIntroduction to Biology I and II8 cr.
CHEM 161/161L and 162/162LGeneral Chemistry I and II*8 cr.
CHEM 272/272L and 273/273LOrganic Chemistry I and II10 cr.
BIOC 241 or higher
(BIOL/MBBE/PEPS 402 or BIOC 441 strongly recommended to prepare for the MCAT. These courses will fulfill the biochemistry course requirement for JABSOM.**)
Biochemistry3 or 4 cr.
PHYS 151/151L and 152/152L
(or PHYS 170/170L and 272/272L)
College Physics I and II
(or General Physics I and II)
8 or 9 cr.
ENG 100 and higherComposition I and higher (2 courses)6 cr.
PSY/SOCS 225 or ECON 321 and/or MATH 215/241 and/or MATH 216/242
(Stats is strongly recommended to prepare for the MCAT​. Check with schools for their specific requirements.​)
Statistics and/or Calculus3 to 8 cr.

*If you are planning on taking a chemistry course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the chemistry placement exam can be found here.

**Please note that the prerequisites for BIOL/MBBE/PEPS 402 and BIOC 441 are BIOL 275 and CHEM 273. BIOL 275L is also a prerequisite for BIOL/MBBE/PEPS 402.

Additional requirements may include courses such as biochemistry, calculus, and humanities. It is also recommended that non-science majors take additional upper-division or advanced science electives beyond the prerequisites listed above.

CHEM 171/171L might not be accepted by medical schools in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L. Students should double check with the schools they are interested in if the schools would accept CHEM 171/171L in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L.

The following UHM courses are commonly recommended for allopathic schools:

PSY 100 (strongly recommended for MCAT)Survey of Psychology3 cr.
SOC 100 (strongly recommended for MCAT)Introduction to Sociology3 cr.
ANTH, ART, COMM, ECON, HIST, LIT, PHIL, POLS, PPC, PSY, SW and/or foreign language.Behavioral Sciences and Humanities (Please see the Medical School Admissions Requirements below for specific requirements.)Varies.

For the MCAT, the following courses are also highly recommended:

BIOL 275/L
(BIOL 275/L is strongly recommend to prepare for the MCAT
and is a prerequisite for BIOL/MBBE/PEPS 402, but not a pre-requisite for BIOC 441)
Cell and Molecular Biology5 cr.
MATH 140 or higherPrecalculus or higher*3 cr.
PSY 212Survey of Research Methods**4 cr.

*If you are planning on taking a math course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the math placement exam can be found here.

**Research Methods concepts necessary for the MCAT may already be covered in your pre-medical science and behavioral science prerequisites. For more information about what is on the MCAT for Research Methods, please click on this link: Scientific Inquiry & Reasoning Skills: Overview.

Medicine (Osteopathic)

More than 25% of the programs in this field require the following UHM courses for admission:

BIOC 241 or higher (BIOL/MBBE/PEPS 402 or BIOC 441 strongly recommended)Biochemistry*3 or 4 cr.
BIOL 171/171L and 172/172LIntroduction to Biology I and II8 cr.
CHEM 161/161L and 162/162LGeneral Chemistry I and II**8 cr.
CHEM 272/272L and 273/273LOrganic Chemistry I and II10 cr.
PHYS 151/151L and 152/152L
(or PHYS 170/170L and 272/272L)
College Physics I and II
(or General Physics I and II)
8 or 9 cr.
ENG 100 and higherComposition I and higher6 cr.
E.G. ANTH/PSY/SOC***Behavioral Sciences (2 courses)6 cr.

Additional requirements may include courses such as advanced biology, anatomy, biochemistry, genetics, mathematics, microbiology, physiology, and additional behavioral sciences and humanities. It is also recommended that non-science majors take additional upper-division or advanced science electives beyond the prerequisites listed above.

*BIOL/MBBE/PEPS 402 or BIOC 441 is recommended for preparation for the MCAT.

**If you are planning on taking a chemistry course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the chemistry placement exam can be found here.

***Each Osteopathic school has different behavioral science requirements. Students should double check with the schools they are interested in to see specifically which behavioral science courses they should take.

CHEM 171/171L might not be accepted by osteopathic medical schools in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L. Students should double check with the schools they are interested in if the schools would accept CHEM 171/171L in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L.

For the MCAT, the following courses are also recommended:

BIOL 275/L
(BIOL 275/L is strongly recommend to prepare for the MCAT
and is a prerequisite for BIOL/MBBE/PEPS 402, but not a pre-requisite for BIOC 441)
Cell and Molecular Biology5 cr.
MATH 140 or higherPrecalculus or higher*3 cr.
PSY 100Survey of Psychology3 cr.
PSY 212Survey of Research Methods**4 cr.
PSY/SOCS 225 or ECON 321Statistics3 cr.
SOC 100Introduction to Sociology3 cr.

*If you are planning on taking a math course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the math placement exam can be found here.

**Research Methods concepts necessary for the MCAT may already be covered in your pre-medical science and behavioral science prerequisites. For more information about what is on the MCAT for Research Methods, please click on this link: Scientific Inquiry & Reasoning Skills: Overview.

Nursing (at UH Manoa)

Prerequisites: UHM’s School of Nursing’s prerequisites are listed below:

PHYL 141/141L and 142/142LHuman Anatomy and Physiology I and II8 cr.
MICR 130
General Microbiology
3 cr.
PSY 100Survey of Psychology3 cr.
HDFS 230 (formerly FAMR 230)Human Development3 cr.
COMG 151/251Public Speaking3 cr.
1 FW course
(e.g. ENG 100)
3 cr.
1 FS/FQ course*
(e.g. MATH 100)
3 cr.
1 FG course(e.g. HIST 151)
3 cr.
1 DP course*CHEM 151/152/161/162 or BIOC 241/244/3413 cr.

For UHM’s School of Nursing, a grade of “B” (not Credit/No Credit, Pass/Fail) or higher is required for all PHYL and MICR courses. Remaining prerequisites must receive a grade of “C” (not C-, Credit/No Credit, Pass/Fail) or higher. Any combination of 16 or more prerequisite credits listed above must be satisfactorily completed at the time of application, which must include 1 PHYL lecture/lab & MICR 130. Applicants must complete all prerequisites by August 1.

*If you are planning on taking a chemistry or math course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the chemistry placement exam can be found here, and information on the math placement exam can be found here.

For admission to UHM’s School of Nursing, students may only repeat a maximum of six (6) prerequisite credits; only the most recent grade is used to calculate the prerequisite GPA.

Occupational Therapy

More than 25% of the programs in this field require the following UHM courses for admission:

BIOL 171/171L and possibly 172/172LIntroduction to Biology I and possibly II*8 cr.
ENG 100 and possibly 200Composition I and possibly II*6 cr.
HLTH 110 or 125 at KCCMedical Terminology1 or 2 cr.
PHYL 141/141L and 142/142L
(or PHYL 301/301L and 302/302L)
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II
8 or 10 cr.
PHYS 151/151LCollege Physics I4 cr.
PSY 100Survey of Psychology3 cr.
PSY/SOCS 225 or ECON 321Statistics3 cr.
PSY 371 (Spring only)Abnormal Psychology3 cr.
HDFS 230 (formerly known as FAMR 230) and/or PSY 240Human Development and/or Developmental Psychology**3 cr.
SOC 100/ANTHIntroduction to Sociology or Anthropology*3 cr.

Please note that the corequisite for BIOL 171/171L and BIOL 172/172L is CHEM 131 or CHEM 161.

*Please check with each school for specific requirements. Some schools may require additional biology and English courses. 

**Please check with each school for specific requirements. Some schools may require the development course to cover life from birth to death, so multiple courses may have to be taken to satisfy this prerequisite.

Please note that the corequisite for BIOL 171/171L and BIOL 172/172L is CHEM 131 or CHEM 161.

Additional requirements include courses in communicology, chemistry, kinesiology, other humanities, and other social sciences. It is also recommended that non-science majors take additional upper-division or advanced science electives beyond the prerequisites listed above.

Optometry

More than 25% of the programs in this field require the following UHM courses for admission:

BIOL 171/171L and 172/172LIntroduction to Biology I and II8 cr.
CHEM 161/161L and 162/162LGeneral Chemistry I and II*8 cr.
CHEM 272/272L Organic Chemistry I 5 cr.
PHYS 151/151L and 152/152L (or PHYS 170/170L and 272/272L)College Physics I and II (or General Physics I and II)**8 or 9 cr.
MATH 215
(or MATH 241)
Applied Calculus I
(or Calculus I)*
4 cr.
BIOC 241 or higherBiochemistry***3 or 4 cr.
ENG 100 and higherComposition I and higher6 cr.
PSY 100 Survey of Psychology 3 cr.
MICR 130/140L (Fall only)
(or MICR 351/351L (Spring only))
General Microbiology
(or Biology of Microorganisms****)
5 cr.
PHYL 141/141L and 142/142L
(or PHYL 301/L and 302/L)
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II8 or 10 cr.
PSY/SOCS 225 or ECON 321Statistics3 cr.
ANTH, HIST, ECON, GEOG, POLS, PSY, SOC, ART, DNCE, ENG, ES, HIST, HWST, LING, MUS, PHIL, REL, THEA, WS, etc.Social Sciences and/or Humanities (Please check with the schools you’re interested in for specific requirements)3 to 15 cr.

Additional requirements may include human anatomy and physiology, communicology, computer literacy, and upper division biology like biochemistry. It is also recommended that non-science majors take additional upper-division or advanced science electives beyond the prerequisites listed above.

Click here to view pre-requisites for colleges and schools of optometry

CHEM 171/171L might not be accepted by optometry schools in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L. Students should double check with the schools they are interested in if the schools would accept CHEM 171/171L in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L.

*If you are planning on taking a chemistry or math course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the chemistry placement exam can be found here, and information on the math placement exam can be found here.

**Although most, if not all optometry programs accept trigonometry-based physics (PHYS 151/L and 152/L), calculus-based physics (PHYS 170/L and 272/L) is recommended to prepare for the OAT and optometry school.

***Please note that the prerequisites for MICR 351/L are BIOL 171 and CHEM 272/L. BIOL 275/L are recommended for MICR 351.

Pharmacy

 More than 25% of the programs in this field require the following UHM courses for admission:

BIOL 171/171L and 172/172LIntroduction to Biology I and II8 cr.
BIOC or BIOLBiochemistry (Please see the Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements below for specific requirements.
400-level recommended to prepare for the PCAT)*
3 to 5 cr.
CHEM 161/161L and 162/162LGeneral Chemistry I and II**8 cr.
CHEM 272/272L and 273/273LOrganic Chemistry I and II10 cr.
COMG 151 or 251Personal and Public Speaking or Public Speaking3 cr.
ECON 130 or 131Economics3 cr.
ENG 100 and higherComposition I and higher6 cr.
ART, DNCE, ENG, ES, HIST, HWST, LING, MUS, PHIL, REL, THEA, and/or foreign languageHumanities (Please see the Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements below for specific requirements)6 to 12 cr.
MATH 215 (and 216)
or MATH 241 (and 242)
Applied Calculus I (and II)
or Calculus I (and II)**
7 or 8 cr.
MICR 130/140L
(or MICR 351/351L***)
General Microbiology
(or Biology of Microorganisms)
5 cr.
PHYL 141/141L and 142/142L
(or PHYL 301/L and 302/L)
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II8 or 10 cr.
PHYS 151/151L (and 152/152L)
or PHYS 170/170L (and 272/272L)
College Physics I (and II)
or General Physics I (and II)
8 or 9 cr.
PSY/SOCS 225 or ECON 321Statistics3 cr.

*Please note that the prerequisites for BIOL/MBBE/PEPS 402 and BIOC 441 are BIOL 275 and CHEM 273. BIOL 275L is also a prerequisite for BIOL/MBBE/PEPS 402.

**If you are planning on taking a chemistry or math course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the chemistry placement exam can be found here, and information on the math placement exam can be found here.

***Please note that the prerequisites for MICR 351/L are BIOL 171 and CHEM 272/L. BIOL 275/L are recommended for MICR 351.

Please note that if you are retaking courses because pharmacy schools may not accept Advanced Placement (AP), online, or community college credit, your financial aid and/or scholarship status may be affected.

For the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP), the following courses are also required:

ART, DNCE, ENG, ES, HIST, HWST, LING, MUS, PHIL, REL, THEA, and/or foreign languageHumanities***6 cr.
ANTH, HIST, ECON, GEOG, POLS, PSY, SOC, WS, etc.Social/Behavioral Sciences***6 cr.
ANTH 152, GEOG 102, HIST 151 or 152, REL 150, etc.Cultural Diversity***3 cr.

Click here to view the prerequisites for DKICP.

Click here to view DKICP’s course equivalencies for top feeder schools.

****Courses used to fulfill these requirements may not double-dip with other pharmacy school prerequisites.  Please check with each school for specific requirements.  DKICP does not accept double-dip courses.

Biochemistry, Calculus 2, and Physics 1 and 2 are not prerequisites for DKICP.

Additional requirements may include courses such as additional humanities and social sciences. It is also recommended that non-science majors take additional upper-division or advanced science electives beyond the prerequisites listed above.

CHEM 171/171L might not be accepted by pharmacy schools in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L. Students should double check with the schools they are interested in if the schools would accept CHEM 171/171L in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L.

Physical Therapy

Applicants can view prerequisites for programs participating in PTCAS here.

More than 25% of the programs in this field require the following UHM courses for admission:

BIOL 171/171L and 172/172L
Introduction to Biology I and II8 cr.
CHEM 161/161L and 162/162LGeneral Chemistry I and II*8 cr.
PHYS 151/151L and 152/152L
(or PHYS 170/170L and 272/272L)
College Physics I and II
(or General Physics I and II)
8 or 9 cr.
MATH 140 or higherPrecalculus or higher*3 cr.
PSY/SOCS 225 or ECON 321Statistics3 cr.
PHYL 141/141L and 142/142L
(or PHYL 301/301L and 302/302L)
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II8 or 10 cr.
PSY 100 Survey to Psychology
3 cr.
PSY 240 (Fall only) or 371 (Spring only)Advanced Psychology Course (Developmental or Abnormal)3 cr.
ENG 100English Composition3 cr.
KRS 354/354LExercise and Sport Physiology**5 cr.
HLTH 110 or 125 at KCCMedical Terminology1 or 2 cr.

Please note that if you are retaking courses because PT schools may not accept Advanced Placement (AP), online, or community college credit, your financial aid and/or scholarship status may be affected.

Additional requirements may include CPR certification and courses such as kinesiology (KRS 305, 353, 415, 416, 419, 420, 421, or 463), social sciences, and humanities. It is also recommended that non-science majors take additional upper-division or advanced science electives beyond the prerequisites listed above. A summary of the prerequisites can be found here.

CHEM 171/171L might not be accepted by physical therapy schools in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L. Students should double check with the schools they are interested in if the schools would accept CHEM 171/171L in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L.

*If you are planning on taking a chemistry or math course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the chemistry placement exam can be found here, and information on the math placement exam can be found here.

** KRS 354/354L is a major restricted course. Its prerequisites are KRS 113 or PHYL 103 or PHYL 142/142L (or concurrent), or BIOL 171/171L (or concurrent). To enroll, complete the prerequisites for KRS 354/354L and email the instructor for an override. More seats may be available during the spring and summer semesters.

Physician Assistant

 More than 25% of the programs in this field require the following UHM courses for admission:

BIOL 171/171L and 172/172LIntroduction to Biology I and II8 cr.
BIOC 241 or CHEM 272*Biochemistry or Organic Chemistry I3 cr.
CHEM 161/161L and 162/162LGeneral Chemistry I and II**8 cr.
MICR 130/140L***
(or MICR 351/351L****)
General Microbiology
(or Biology of Microorganisms)
5 cr.
PHYL 141/141L and 142/142L***
(or PHYL 301/301L and 302/302L)
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II8 or 10 cr.
PSY/SOCS 225 or ECON 321Statistics3 cr.
ENG 100 and higherComposition I and higher6 cr.
MATH 134 or higherPrecalculus or higher (highly recommended for GRE preparation)**3 cr.

It is recommended that non-science majors take additional upper-division or advanced science electives beyond the prerequisites listed above.

CHEM 171/171L might not be accepted by PA programs in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L. Students should double check with the programs they are interested in if the programs would accept CHEM 171/171L in place of CHEM 161/161L and 162/162L.

*Please contact the specific schools that you are interested in applying to concerning these courses. Some schools may require the higher level biochemistry or the lab portion of the course to apply to their Physician Assistant program.

**If you are planning on taking a chemistry or math course for the first time, please make sure to fulfill the placement exam requirement prior to registration. Information on the chemistry placement exam can be found here, and information on the math placement exam can be found here.

***Please contact the specific schools that you are interested in applying to concerning these courses. Some schools may require the higher level course to apply to their Physician Assistant program.

****Please note that the prerequisites for MICR 351/L are BIOL 171 and CHEM 272/L. BIOL 275/L are recommended for MICR 351.

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Grade Replacement Policy

Repeat Policy

 

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Experience Log

When applying for professional school, you will be asked to list and describe the experiences you have gained in preparation for the profession of your interest. Rather than having to recall from memory all your experiences, having an experience log will allow you to fill out your application with more ease. Students can use their C.V. as a record of these experiences. However, an experience log can include additional beneficial information, such as your employer’s contact information and a reflection portion of what you learned. You may choose to make a personalized experience log or download our sample by clicking here.

Volunteer Opportunities

Volunteering can come in many different forms, either within clubs and organizations or at different locations such as hospitals or clinics. Volunteers are often for the benefit of private organizations. Health professional fields look for volunteer work in their applicants and take into consideration the different types of volunteering their applicants participate in.

For current volunteer opportunities, click here.

Ongoing Clinical Experience

OrganizationPhone NumberEmail AddressMinimum Commitment
Adventist Health Castle(808) 263-5252francine.kong@ah.orgYear: 4 hours/week for 6 months
Summer: Varies
Hawaiʻi Pacific Health
(Kapiolani, Pali Momi, Straub, Wilcox)
(808) 983-6333
(808) 983-6754
volunteers@kapiolani.org4 hours/week for 6 months
Hawaiʻi State Hospital(808) 236-8292Douglas Pyle at douglas.pyle@doh.hawaii.gov6 months
Hospice Hawaiʻi(808) 924-9255volunteer@hospicehawaii.orgN/A
Kaiser Permanente(808) 432-8138hi.kp.volunteer@kp.orgYear: 4 hours/week,
total 80 hours.
Summer: 4 hours/shift, 2 shifts/week.
Kuakini Medical Center(808) 547-9184volunteers@kuakini.org3-4 hours/week for 3 months
Lunalilo Home(808) 395-4065iwalani@lunalilo.orgN/A
Pearl City Nursing Home(808) 687-3280
(808) 453-1919
N/AN/A
Rehabilitation Hospital of the Pacific(808) 566-3741Melissa MullenVolunteer: 60 hours
Observing/Shadowing: 20 hours
Shriners Hospital for Children(808) 951-3646apply.hon@shrinenet.org2 hours/week for 5 months
Wahiawa General Hospital(808) 621-4243David Toyama5 hours/week for 4 months

Ongoing Non-Clinical Experience

OrganizationPhone NumberEmail AddressMinimum Commitment
Honolulu Museum of ArtN/AN/AN/A
Honolulu ZooN/AN/A1 shift/week for 6 months
Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaiʻi(808) 945-7633 (ext. 25)volunteers@jcch.org3 hours/week for 1 year
Waikiki AquariumN/AN/AN/A

Other Volunteer Experience – Hawaii State

Volunteer Experience In Hawaii
Aloha United Way
Easter Seals Hawaii
Hawaii Nature Center
Hawaii Society of Naturopathic Physicians
Health Care Volunteer
Ronald McDonald House Charities of Hawaii
Volunteer Match
American Red Cross

Other Volunteer Experience – Out-of-State

Volunteer Experience Out-of-State
American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Enrichment Programs
Cross-Cultural Solutions
International Student Volunteers (ISV)

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Research Opportunities

Research is an increasing important experience that many health professional fields look for in their candidates. Especially if you are interested in a research oriented program, gaining research experience may be a key component to being accepted to the program.

For current research opportunities, click here.

Research Opportunities – Hawaii State

Research ProgramWhen
BUILD-EXITOYear-Round
Department of Native Hawaiian Health (DNHH) Summer Research Internship (SRI)Summer
Hawaiʻi Pacific Health (HPH) Summer Student Research Program (SSRP)Summer
Hawaii Pacific Neuroscience Summer Internship Program (HPN-SIP)Summer
IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE)Semester
Summer
JABSOM Trainees in Research OpportunitiesVaries
Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training Program (MHIRT)Year-Round
Queen’s Medical Center (QMC) Summer Research Internship (SRI)Summer
UH Cancer Center Summer Cancer Research InternshipSummer
UH Hilo Pacific Internship Programs for Exploring Science (PIPES)Summer
UH Mānoa Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP)Semester
Summer
Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP)Year-Round

Research Opportunities – Out-of-State

Research ProgramWhen
Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Summer Undergraduate Research ProgramsSummer
American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Enrichment ProgramsVaries
RIT Biomedical Summer Research OpportunitiesSummer
Cornell University Summer Research OpportunitiesSummer
Swarthmore College Summer OpportunitiesSummer
Diversity Summer Health-Related Education Program (DSHREP)Summer
NIDA Summer Research Internship Program Summer
National Science Foundation Varies
Student Opportunity Center Varies

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Internships and Fellowships

Why Intern?

  • Many students have found their ideal future careers through internships.

  • Interning allows students to gauge their interest toward their intended field of study.

  • It is the ideal situation for networking with other professionals in the same field.

  • However, be careful NOT to use an internship for the sake of just building your resume; be certain that you have some interest in the field.

Researching Internships

  • Make sure to apply for an internship that you’re genuinely interested in – you’ll get more out of your experience.

  • Utilize the Manoa Career Center and the A&S website to stay up to date with upcoming opportunities.

    • Visit the PAC website for potential internship opportunities!

  • Consider the costs. Some internships are paid while others are not. Make sure to also research if you will have access to safe, secure housing.

Before Applying

  • ONGOING

    • Do well in school as there is often a minimum GPA required.

      • Invest your best efforts in your lab classes. Many internship positions (especially those in the science fields) require that you have a firm understanding of basic lab techniques.

    • Keep an eye out for career fairs and recruiter visits on campus.

  • APPLICATION PERIOD

    • Research the company and the position beforehand to understand the requirements/expectations.

    • Find out what kind of work/research they are doing.

    • Look for strong and clear examples of resumes & learn how to create a professional one.

      • PAC and the Manoa Career Center offer workshops to help you!

When Applying

  • Demonstrate your passion for the topics related to the internship. On your application, this could mean citing related side-projects and hobbies. This shows your passion for a certain topic or experience.

  • WRITING YOUR RESUME

    • Tailor the resume with the position in mind (i.e. pick relevant experiences, skills, etc.)

    • Be honest on the application; it will be evident to the interviewer if you are not.

    • Be sure to add some entry-level skills on your resume such as Excel, Microsoft, etc.

    • If you do not have experiences that would be applicable to the internship, then you can highlight what you have done to put the focus on the skills you have acquired, which you will use during the internship.

  • INTERVIEW

    • Practice and set yourself apart from other applicants. Send a thank you letter afterwards!

    • Grades matter, but personality and communication skills matter too, come across positively during an interview.

    • Dress and speak professionally for your interview – it leaves a good first and lasting impression.

    • During the interview, present yourself as clearly and effectively as your application and resume did.

    • Attend the Interviewing workshops held by the Manoa Career Center and PAC, and schedule one-on-one appointments to get lots of practice.

    • Ask questions! Have a few topics in mind, including but not limited to: how the research is progressing, what the work environment is like, etc.
 For current internships and fellowships opportunities, click here.
Internship or FellowshipHealth ProfessionLocation
American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Enrichment ProgramsDentistryNational
American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM) InternshipsPodiatric MedicineNational
Atlantis Clinical Shadowing FellowshipAllopathic Medicine
Osteopathic Medicine
International
Courier ProgramN/ANational
Department of Native Hawaiian Health (DNHH) Summer Research Internship (SRI)Allopathic Medicine
Osteopathic Medicine
Public Health
Oʻahu
Hawaiʻi Pacific Health (HPH) Summer Student Research Program (SSRP)Allopathic Medicine
Osteopathic Medicine
Public Health
Oʻahu
Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training Program (MHIRT)Allopathic Medicine
Osteopathic Medicine
Public Health
O’ahu
International
Oral Health America Summer Internship OpportunitiesDentistry
Dental Hygiene
National
Project Horseshoe FarmN/ANational
Queen’s Medical Center (QMC) Summer Research Internship (SRI)Allopathic Medicine
Osteopathic Medicine
O’ahu
UH Mānoa Department of Biology Internship OpportunitiesN/AHawaiʻi
National

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Shadowing

Many health professional fields want to know if you understand the field that you are interested in and that type of knowledge can come from shadowing a professional in the field. For example, the 2015 data analysis of matriculating medical school students show that 94% have shadowed a physician or other healthcare professional. Shadowing opportunities can also be found in community service, internships, and volunteer opportunities. Students should double check in those areas when looking for shadowing opportunities.

For pre-health shadowing opportunities, click here.

Getting Started:

Think about what kind of professional you want to shadow and why you want to shadow them. Some possible outcomes of a shadowing experience include gaining clinical experience or getting a different perspective on your professional field of interest.

The following are considerations for those who are interested in shadowing a health professional. Be prepared for professionals to not allow you to shadow them. Some may not allow shadowing or others may believe there is too much legal risk. Keep trying!

The Ask:

The following are some considerations when asking a professional if you can shadow them:

  • Be sure to:
    • Research the professional before shadowing and ask about location, parking, or any other logistics you would need to know before going to shadow the professional.
  • Who to:
    • Try asking your family practitioner first.
    • Checking the phonebook or yellow pages may be a good place to start finding professionals.
    • Googling/Searching online hospital directories is also a good place to start finding professionals.
    •  
  • How to:
    • Have a high degree of professionalism when asking
    • Giving an updated resume or curriculum vitae (CV) to the professional is suggested when requesting to shadow a health professional.
    • Call or visit the professional. Sometimes emails may get lost or marked as spam.
    • State your career goals and why you would like to shadow them.

During the Shadowing Experience:

While you are shadowing a health care professional, here are some considerations:

  • Arrive 15 minutes early.
  • Have a high degree of professionalism in appearance, hygiene, clothing, and communication.
    • Some places may instruct you on what to wear, for example, if you need to wear scrubs.
    • Business attire is appropriate in most medical office settings.
    • Asking what the dress code beforehand may be helpful as well.
  • Keep a notepad or composition book.
    • Take notes during the shadowing experience.
    • Be sure to document the day, number of hours, facility, and any other important information so you can reflect on it later when applying for professional school.
  • Be ready to ask questions.
    • Think of some questions you would like to ask the health professional and try not to ask question you can simply find online.
    • Suggested Questions:
      • “What is your day to day routine like?”
      • “Why did you decide to pursue this field?”
  • Patient privacy is really important and may even be a reason you won’t be able to shadow some professionals.
    • Be sure to respect patient’s privacy.
    • Possibly educate yourself beforehand on privacy laws and HIPAA (Health Information Portability and Accountability Act).

After Shadowing:

Some considerations for after you shadowed a health care professional:

  • Be sure to write a “thank you” note.
  • If you have a good relationship with a professional you shadowed, possibly asking them for a letter of recommendation (LOR) is good for some professional schools require or recommend a LOR from a professional in that field.

Resources for Shadowing:

OrganizationContactRequirements
Gap MedicsContactCheck Website
Hawaii Pacific HealthHuman Resources Office
(808)535-7571
Proof of double negative TB results.
Send in immunization records.
Hawaii Pre-Health Career CorpsAlex Campos1-Day shadowing for Corps members, up to 3 times/year. Must attend 1-on-1 HIPAA training.
Mark Kuioka, DDS, Honolulu, HawaiiMark Kuioka, mkuiokadds@gmail.comNo requirements, shadowing times available 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays
Sagawa Dental, Hilo, HawaiʻiDr. Kiana Shiroma, kianak@hawaii.edu, 808-956-8646Every other month on a Wednesday for 1/2 a day

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Curriculum Vitae

A curriculum vitae is a comprehensive database of your education, academic background, and extra-curricular activities. Its purpose is to keep track of everything you have done, both inside and outside of school. CV’s are used for applications to professional school, your personal statement, jobs, careers, fellowships, scholarships, and grants.

You can also use an Experience Log to record additional detailed information and to reflect on what you are gaining and contributing through the experiences. You may choose to make a personalized experience log or use our sample by clicking here.

Categories to include in CVResources
Contact Information

•Name
•Permanent Address
•Phone number
•E-mail address (make sure it is appropriate)
Sample Curriculum Vitae
Academics/Research

•Schools attended
•Research completed, etc.
UH Mānoa Undergraduate Research Opportunities

MSMP Research Opportunities

MSMP Academic Enrichment Programs
Recognition & Awards

•Scholarships
•Awards
•Honors
•Grants, etc.
UH Mānoa Honors Program

UH Mānoa Star Scholarships

UH Mānoa Academic Honor Societies
Career Development

•Jobs held
•Experience gained in field, etc.
Mānoa Career Center (QLCSS 212)

UH Mānoa Political Internships
Service

•Any volunteer work completed
•Community activities, etc.
UH Mānoa Service Learning Program
Leadership

•Club positions held
•Job positions, etc.
List of UH Mānoa RIO’s
Intercultural Awareness

•Study abroad experience
•Foreign languages
•Cultural clubs/activities, etc.
UH Mānoa Study Abroad Program

UH Mānoa National Student Exchange Program

UH Mānoa International Exchange Program
Personal Wellness

•Hobbies
•Sports teams
•Leisure classes, etc.
UH Mānoa Student Recreation Services

Tips:

•Your CV is a living document, you can always go back to it and make edits.
•Your CV can be formatted in anyway you desire, however keep in mind that it should be easy to read.
•Don’t use one event for multiple sections.
•You should transfer information from your CV to your résumé.

Résumé

A résumé is a compiled list of your education, academic background, and extra-curricular activities that are relevant for the position/graduate school that you are applying for.  Résumé’s are used for applications to professional school, jobs, careers, fellowships, scholarships, and grants.

Tips:

•You select experiences from your CV and transfer them over to your résumé.
•As opposed to the C.V. your résumé should only be 1-2 pages.
•Each résumé should be unique to the position that you are applying for.

 

C.V. vs Résumé

Curriculum Vitae
Résumé
Latin meaning “course of life”
French meaning “summary”
A comprehensive database of your education, academic background, and extra-curricular activitiesConcise summary of your recent, significant, pertinent qualifications tailor-made for a specific purpose
Its purpose is to keep track of everything you have done
Its purpose is to apply to something specific
As long as it needs to beRanges from 1-2 pages

Style is whatever works for you, unless it is being used for applying
Think carefully about the style; must be appropriate to the position you’re applying for
Screen Shot 2015-10-09 at 12.06.28 PM
 

 

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How To Prepare For An Entrance Exam

If you are planning to pursue a professional or graduate level degree, it is essential that you are prepared to do well on your entrance exam. For admission to medical school, students must take the MCAT exam and for most other graduate schools, the GRE is required.

Depending on the type of exam you plan on taking, recommended preparation could range from one year to three months prior to the exam. In addition to practicing test taking abilities and reviewing of content knowledge, students benefit greatly from taking one full-length practice exam every two weeks. There are three main questions you should consider:

  • When should I take my exam?
  • When should I start studying?
  • How should I study?

The answers to these questions can vary between each applicant and will depend on your situation. It is important that you should first take an practice/ diagnostic exam to gauge where you stand. Read the information below to help answer these questions.

For scholarship opportunities to help fund entrance exam material, click here.

Which exam should I take?

UH Mānoa’s Pre-Health/Pre-Law Advising Center (PAC) offers current students access to their lending library. Here, students may check out test prep books for most entrance exams including MCAT, PCAT, GRE, LSAT and more. Please visit our office for more information.

Test Administered Related Fields Overview Website
MCAT– Allopathic Medicine
– Osteopathic Medicine
– Podiatric Medicine
– Physician Assistant (some programs)
– Public Health (some programs)
– Veterinary Medicine (some programs)
MCAT OverviewAAMC
PCAT– PharmacyPCAT OverviewPCATWEB
DAT– DentistryDAT OverviewDental Admission Test (ADA)
OAT– OptometryOAT OverviewOptometry Admission Test (ASCO)
GRE– Physician Assistant
– Physical Therapy
– Public Health
– Occupational Therapy
– Social Work
– Speech Pathology and Audiology
– Veterinary Medicine
GRE OverviewEducational Testing Service – GRE
NLN
TEAS
– NursingNLN Overview
TEAS Overview
National League of Nursing (NLN)
TEAS Website
 

When should I take my exam?

To answer this question, first identify when you plan to attend and apply for professional/ graduate school. Most applicants will take their exam at least one year prior to entering professional/ graduate school. In general, the earliest time an applicant should take their exam is after they have finished all their courses relevant to their exam, and at the latest, (receiving their scores) right before they submit their applications. If you have not completed a course or learned content that covers a significant portion of your exam, you may want to wait until you do so. That particular content may be learned through self-study material (prep books, online videos) and a course may not be necessary.

Applicants should only take the exam when they feel they are ready. Keep in mind that your particular entrance exam will be offered during various dates and locations throughout the year. More information regarding time, date, and location can be found on your entrance exam’s main website, which can be found under ‘Which exam should I take?’. When choosing your exam date, you should consider if you have any classes, special events, work, or any other responsibilities that may hinder your focus or time of preparation. Many applicants take their exam during the summer when they are off school and have more free time to focus and prepare. Again, the right time to take your entrance exam is when it is RIGHT FOR YOU.

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When should I start studying?

For those taking the MCAT, DAT, OAT, & PCAT, about one year of studying prior to the exam date is recommended. For those taking the GRE, about three to six months of studying prior to exam date is recommended. In general, although study time can vary depending on the student, the earlier students study, the better the result. Depending on how much material you may need to go over, recommended study time is at least one hour per day, and for those who need more time should study at least two hours per day. Again, in addition to learning/ practicing test taking abilities and reviewing content, students should take a full-length practice exam every two weeks prior to exam date.

To determine when you should start studying and how often, ask yourself the following questions:

  • How comfortable am I with the material?
  • How long ago have I taken courses relevant to my exam?
  • Have I taken a practice or diagnostic exam? If so, how do I feel about my performance?

Keep in mind that many test prep companies and test providers (eg. AAMC, Kaplan, The Princeton Review, Nextstep Prep, Gold Standard MCAT Prep) offer diagnostic/ practice exams from fee to free.

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How should I study for my exam?

There are four main ways that students study for entrance exams:

  • Independent Study
  • Group Study
  • Private Tutor
  • Commercial Course Preparation

Each method has their own pro’s and con’s, and it is up to you to determine which one is right for you.

Independent Study – This has been the most common and traditional way students prepare for their entrance exams. Students who have been successful in the past and are most comfortable with self-studying utilize this method. The main advantage of independent study is that it gives you the flexibility to study on your own time, location, and schedule. It is essential to create and follow a structured and well thought out study plan that is suited to your schedule and learning style. Although this is one of the most cost effective ways of preparation, applicants tend to get distracted, procrastinate, and fall behind their study schedule. Students typically use self-study preparatory books offered by popular commercial companies such as Kaplan, Princeton Review, ExamKrakers, Nextstep PrepGold Standard MCAT Prep, and others. Material can also be accessed online, as well as content review videos (eg. Khan Academy Videos for MCAT).

Group Study – Applicants who are successful studying in small groups use this method to study for entrance exams. Applicants can learn many things from their peers such as new study techniques and ways of viewing concepts. Another advantage of using a study group is that students can test their peers to reinforce the knowledge that they have learned. Choose study partners that you are most comfortable studying with, not ones that can get you easily distracted!

Private Tutor – Hiring a private tutor may be the most beneficial way of preparation. Typically, hiring private tutor provides flexibility as they can work around your schedule based on the times you are free. This method provides a personalized and focused one-on-one learning experience, although it may be the most expensive option.

Commercial Course Preparation – Another popular study method is taking a commercial preparatory course. These courses are specific to your entrance exam, and they typically provide three options: self-paced, in-person, and live online. Self-paced courses fall under individual study, as the prep company provides you material to study at your own pace and location. In-person courses provides in-class instruction taught by an instructor, and are regularly scheduled in various locations and dates offered by the prep company. Live online courses are similar to in-person courses, except the learning sessions are held online and can be taken wherever you have internet access. Again, many commercial prep companies that offer these courses are Kaplan, Princeton Review, ExamKrakers, Nextstep Prep, Gold Standard MCAT Prep, and many others.

Pros and Cons

 Pro’s Con’s
Individual Study– Flexible Schedule
– Can study anywhere
– Cost effective
– Lack of structure
– Tendency to procrastinate and fall behind study schedule
– No professional assistance/ guidance
Group Study– Help from peers
– Interactive
– Fun
– Distraction
– At group’s pace
Private Tutoring– One-on-one learning experience
– Flexible schedule and location
– Cost
– Tutor Compatibility
Commercial Prep Course– Structured
– Professional assistance
– Different options
– Cost
– Less flexible schedule
– Limited in-class locations

Each applicant is different, and there is no single right way to prepare for an entrance exam.  Choose the test date, study length, and study method that suitable for you. Be diligent, start studying early, and take practice exams to prepare!

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Preparing for the MCAT

There is no right or wrong way to prepare for the exam and examinees use many different ways to prepare. It’s important to find what works best for you. To get you started, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has developed five guiding steps that you can tailor to fit your study habits.

1. Understand all about the MCAT exam and what it tests.

  • Explore the content outline of the exam and the necessary skills tested by the exam by using the What’s on the MCAT Exam? interactive tool. This tool allows you to click around, watch videos, and even see sample questions and explanations.
  • Walk through the Official Guide to the MCAT® Exam to get a complete overview of MCAT exam, including registration, scoring, exam content, and more. The guide includes 120 practice questions and solutions, with an option to access those questions online.

2. Establish a baseline of knowledge to help you plan how to study

  • Start by taking the Official MCAT® Sample Test. This is a full-length exam with the same features and functionality as the actual MCAT exam. While this test won’t provide you a score at the end, it will show you the percent and number correct you achieve. This will help you identify where you need to study and help you plan for your future practice.
  • Check out the “How I prepared for the MCAT Exam” webpage by AAMC to see how other students have prepared for the MCAT Exam.

3. Study the areas you have identified to work on.

  • Watch the Khan Academy MCAT Collection videos to brush up on familiar topics or get exposure to new material not yet covered in your courses. The collection includes 1,100 videos and nearly 3,000 review questions that cover all the natural and behavioral and social sciences content on the exam, as well as 11 passages and questions in the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills section.
  • Take a look at and download the Roadmap to MCAT Content in Sociology and Psychology Textbooks. This includes a list of textbooks (many of them open-access) in which MCAT content in sociology and psychology has been identified by the textbook publishers. They have already done the hard part for you!
  • Remember to use the resources already available to you. Take a look at course notes and textbooks, use the campus library, or perhaps even form a study group.

4. Practice and identify areas that might need additional work. The AAMC offers online resources to help you practice with the same features and functionality you will see on test day and all questions have been written by the test developers.

  • AAMC MCAT® Section Bank with 300 questions in the natural and behavioral sciences with an emphasis on psychology, sociology, and biochemistry.
  • Target a specific discipline with the Official MCAT® Question Packs. There are six packs of 120 questions each in biology (two sets), physics, chemistry, and critical analysis and reasoning.
  • Remember to go back and review concepts as needed! You can use resources such as course notes, textbooks, or even the Khan Academy MCAT Collection.

5. Simulate your test day experience from start to finish.

  • AAMC MCAT® Practice Exam (Scored) 1 is a full-length 230-question exam that includes estimated scoring to give you an understanding of how you might perform on test day. Use the Simulate Actual Test feature to get yourself comfortable with all the elements of test day, especially your endurance during the exam.

Additional Resources

More InformationOfficial MCAT Website
PAC’s MCAT Overview
MCAT Preparation Statistics 2016

Health Fields Accepting the MCATAllopathic Medicine
Osteopathic Medicine
Podiatric Medicine
Physician Assistant
Veterinary Medicine

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How do medical schools handle multiple MCAT scores?

 Please see the table below for a list of how different allopathic medical schools accept multiple MCAT scores.

SchoolMultiple MCAT ScoresAdditional Notes
Albany Medical CollegeViews all scores, but prioritizes highest score
Albert Einstein College of MedicineMost recent score and trend
Baylor College of MedicineMost recent score
Boston University School of MedicineSuperscore (Highest score in each section)
Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina UniversitySuperscore (Highest score in each section)
California Northstate University College of MedicineHighest score
California University of Science and Medicine School of MedicineMost recent score
Carle Illinois College of MedicineHighest scoreIf taken 3 or more times, an average score is calculated
Case Western Reserve University School of MedicineMost recent score
Central Michigan University College of MedicineHighest score
Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic UniversityHighest score
Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine & ScienceMost recent score
Columbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsHighest score
Cooper Medical School of Rowan UniversityHighest score
Creighton University School of MedicineMost recent scoreIf taken 5 or more times, an average score is calculated
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/NorthwellHighest score
Drexel University College of MedicineViews all scores, but prioritizes most recent score
Duke University School of MedicineSuperscore (Highest score in each section)
East Tennessee State University James H. Quillen College of MedicineMost recent score and trend
Emory University School of MedicineFirst 3 scores (if taken more than 3 times)
Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of MedicineHighest score
Florida State University College of MedicineMost recent score and trendAlso looks at individual section scores
Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac UniversityHighest scoreFor secondary application selection, the highest score is considered. For interview and acceptance selection, it depends on the committee.
Geisel School of Medicine at DartmouthMost recent score
Geisinger Commonwealth School of MedicineHighest score
George Washington University School of Medicine and Health SciencesSuperscore (Highest score in each section)
Georgetown University School of MedicineMost recent score
Harvard Medical SchoolViews all scores, but prioritizes most recent score
Howard University College of MedicineMost recent score
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMost recent score
Indiana University School of MedicineMost recent score
Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at BuffaloHighest score
Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineHighest score
Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern CaliforniaAll scores
Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple UniversityViews all scores, but prioritizes most recent score
Loma Linda University School of MedicineMost recent score
Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New OrleansAll scores
Louisiana State University School of Medicine in ShreveportAll scores
Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of MedicineHighest score and trend
Mayo Clinic School of MedicineMost recent score
Mayo Medical School-Arizona CampusMost recent score
Medical College of Georgia at Augusta UniversityAll scores and trend
Medical College of WisconsinSuperscore (Highest score in each section)
Meharry Medical CollegeMost recent score
Mercer University School of MedicineAverage score
Michigan State University College of Human MedicineMost recent score, highest score, and highest section scores
New York Medical CollegeViews all scores, but prioritizes most recent score
New York University School of MedicineViews all scores, but prioritizes most recent score
Northwestern University The Feinberg School of MedicineMost recent score
Nova Southeastern University College of Allopathic MedicineHighest score
Oakland University William Beaumont School of MedicineAll scores from last 3 years and trend
Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public HealthHighest score
Pennsylvania State University College of MedicineAll scores
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaMost recent score
Robert Larner, M.D., College of Medicine at the University of VermontViews all scores, but prioritizes most recent score
Rush Medical College of Rush University Medical CenterHighest score
Rutgers New Jersey Medical SchoolMost recent score and trend
Rutgers, Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolMost recent score
Saint Louis University School of MedicineHighest score
Sanford School of Medicine The University of South DakotaMost recent scoreAlso consider number of repeats and average score of all repeats
Seton Hall-Hackensack Meridian School of MedicineHighest score
Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson UniversityAverage score
Southern Illinois University School of MedicineMost recent score
Stanford University School of MedicineAll scores
State University of New York Downstate Medical Center College of MedicineAll scores and trend
State University of New York Upstate Medical UniversityMost recent score
Stony Brook University School of MedicineAverage score
Texas A&M University System Health Science Center College of MedicineViews all scores, but prioritizes highest score
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of MedicineHighest score
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, Paul L. Foster School of MedicineHighest score
The University of Toledo College of MedicineMost recent score and trend
The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityHighest score
Tufts University School of MedicineHighest score
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences F. Edward Hebert School of MedicineViews all scores, but prioritizes highest and most recent score
University of Alabama School of MedicineMost recent score
University of Arizona College of Medicine-TucsonHighest score
University of Arizona College of Medicine-PhoenixAll scores
University of California, Davis, School of MedicineMost recent score
University of California, Irvine, School of MedicineMost recent score
University of California, Los Angeles David Geffen School of MedicineAll scores and trend
University of California, Riverside School of MedicineMost recent score
University of California, San Diego School of MedicineMost recent score
University of California, San Francisco, School of MedicineViews all scores, but prioritizes most recent score
University of Central Florida College of MedicineAll scores
University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences The Pritzker School of MedicineHighest score
University of Cincinnati College of MedicineAll scores
University of Colorado School of MedicineAverage score
University of Connecticut School of MedicineAll scores
University of Florida College of MedicineHighest score
University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of MedicineMost recent score
University of Illinois College of MedicineTwo attempts: highest score
Three attempts in past 3 years: average score
Only look at scores within the past 3 years
University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of MedicineMost recent score
University of Kansas School of MedicineAll scores
University of Louisville School of MedicineMost recent score
University of Maryland School of MedicineAll scores
University of Massachusetts Medical SchoolHighest score
University of Miami School of MedicineHighest score
University of Michigan Medical SchoolHighest score
University of Minnesota Medical SchoolViews all scores, but prioritizes highest and most recent score
University of Missouri-Columbia School of MedicineHighest score
University of Missouri–Kansas CityHighest score
University of Nebraska College of MedicineMost recent score
University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of MedicineAll scores
University of New Mexico School of MedicineHighest score
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of MedicineMost recent score
University of Oklahoma College of MedicineMost recent score
University of Pittsburgh School of MedicineHighest score
University of Rochester School of Medicine and DentistryHighest score
University of South Alabama College of MedicineMost recent score
University of South Carolina School of MedicineAll scores and trend
University of South Carolina School of Medicine GreenvilleAll scoresAlso looks at number of times taken and section scores
University of South Florida College of Medicine Morsani College of MedicineHighest score
University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of MedicineSuperscore (Highest score in each section) and trend
University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical SchoolHighest score
University of Texas Medical School at GalvestonHighest scoreAlso looks at number of times taken and section scores
University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of MedicineViews all scores, but prioritizes highest score
University of Texas School of Medicine at HoustonHighest score
University of Texas Long School of Medicine at San AntonioAll scores and trend
University of Texas Southwestern Medical SchoolHighest score
University of Utah School of MedicineMost recent score
University of Virginia School of MedicineMost recent score
University of Washington School of MedicineAverage score and trend
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public HealthAll scores
Vanderbilt University School of MedicineSuperscore (Highest score in each section)
Virginia Tech Carilion School of MedicineHighest score
Wake Forest School of Medicine of Wake Forest Baptist Medical CenterHighest scoreMay look at average score before deciding who to interview
Washington State University Elson S. Floyd College of MedicineHighest score
Washington State University in St. Louis School of MedicineMost recent score
Wayne State University School of MedicineHighest score
West Virginia University School of MedicineMost recent score
Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M.D. School of MedicineHighest score
Wright State University Boonshoft School of MedicineHighest score

Last updated: July 2018

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Entrance Exam Locations in Hawaii

Pearson Professional Centers

1441 Kapiolani Blvd
Suite 204
Honolulu, HI 96814
Phone: (808) 944-5057

Exams Offered:

  • MCAT (Medical College Admission Test)
  • PCAT (Pharmacy College Admission test)

Prometric Hawaiʻi

1132 Bishop Street
Suite 710
Honolulu, HI 96813
Phone: (808) 521-4389

Exams Offered:

  • GRE (Graduate Record Examination)
  • DAT (Dental Admission Test)
  • OAT (Optometry Admission Test)

Additional Locations for GRE

ETS – UH Mānoa

2600 Campus Road
Queen Liliʻuokalani Center for Student Services
Honolulu, HI 96822
Phone: (808) 956-3454
Register here!

UH Maui College

310 Kaʻahumanu Ave.
The Learning Center – L01
Kahului, HI 96732
Phone: (808) 984-3240
Register here!

UH Hilo

200 W. Kāwili Street
Room PB 9
Hilo, HI 96720
Phone: (808) 932-7881
Register here!

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Researching Health Professional Schools

Once your decision is made in pursuing professional school in health, the next step is to research programs that are best fit with your interests and needs. Each professional pathway might have a lot of programs that you can apply to but here are some factors that you may want to consider when deciding on which schools you really want to attend. It may be costly with the application process and you want to apply to the school(s) that are right for you. To start researching schools, you would do the following:

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1. Start by considering all schools

You can start by reviewing your options and making an initial list with all professional schools in the United States, U.S. Territories, and internationally (e.g. Canada, Caribbean, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand).

Many professional programs have admission requirement books. Some programs also have a general website where you can find the listings of the different schools and general information such as  pre-requisite courses needed, areas of specialization, and tuition cost. As you compile a shorter list of your choices for professional school, you might want more detailed information about each school. So searching through their individual websites, visiting the schools itself to see their facilities, talking to admissions directors, or chatting with students would be great options to find the right fit for you.

 Remember, it is important to find the right fit; big name schools do not always mean a successful future.

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2. Create your “Long List”

The purpose of building the long list is to eliminate all schools that are poor fits. You should start building your long list a year before the application cycle starts. When building the long list, there are 7 initial factors that you should take into consideration: Residency, Focus Population, Curriculum Style, Focus, Area of Strength, Geography, and Compatibility.

Residency – Your future school may depend on your current residency status. Typically, your chances of getting accepting into home state schools are higher than the schools you apply for out of state. When applying out of the state, consider if those schools accept non-residents. Eliminate schools that do not accept non-residents or accept in very low percentages.

Focus Population – Some schools may cater to a specific ethnic group or religion. Many Underrepresented Minority (URM) students can take advantage of schools that offer URM programs and/or  have an emphasis in a diverse student body. Some schools may also have an affiliation with a specific religion, in which preference will be given to those that are members of that particular religious group. Depending on your situation, this may play to your advantage or disadvantage.

Curriculum Style – Depending on the professional field you are pursuing, schools can have one of many different types of curriculum or learning styles. In medical schools, there may be a standard, Problem-based learning (PBL), system-based, or hybrid curriculum style. Generally, there is no best learning style, this factor will be based on your own preference.

Focus – Another factor you should take into consideration when building your long list is an institution’s specific focus. Medical schools can have a research, clinical, or service-based focus.

Area of Strength – Your degree of interest in a school may depend on its areas of strength. One example of this is John A. Burns School of Medicine’s well known area of strength in Tropical Diseases. Another example is the Richardson School of Law’s area of strength is in environmental law. You may want to search for schools that have areas of strength in a topic or subject that you are interested in.

Geography – Will studying in a particular location help you meet personal or professional goals? There is a high possibility that you will be living in the area the school is located for the next two to seven years depending on the program. It is important that you visit the area and see if you are comfortable and will enjoy spending your time there.

Compatibility – Is the school compatible with you? What kind of educational environment do you want to be in? Are there relatable people at this school? Take in account all of these factors, and research more about the school itself. Visiting the school you are interested in may provide a more deeper insight and a better feel for that program. Speak with current students about their experiences.

Long List of Medical Schools for Hawaii Students

3. Transforming Long List → Short List

The short list will most likely be the schools you will be applying to. You will need your entrance exam scores and current cumulative GPA to narrow and sort your choices of schools into “reach, match, and safety” schools. “Reach” schools are schools that are slightly above your admission test scores and GPA. “Match” schools are schools where your average matriculant test scores and/or GPA requirements are exactly where yours stand. “Safety” schools are schools where your test scores and/or GPA requirements are slightly below where yours stand.

You can also consider other factors when categorizing your “reach, match, and safety”  like pre-requisites, pass rate on boards/ licensing exams, areas of specialization, and cost/ aid. Be sure to apply to schools in all three categories. When deciding how many schools to apply to, consider how many schools you can afford to apply to. Finally, keep in mind when choosing, if the school you have chosen is an institution that you really want to attend if/when accepted.

4. Tipping Points

Additional factors that you might want to consider are location, tuition, aid offered, extra-curricular opportunities, libraries & facilities, network & affiliations. Research programs like the WICHE Professional Student Exchange Program provides reduced tuition for those accepted into the program and see if those would apply to you.

The PAC peer advisors can assist with this process of researching professional schools, so please feel free to walk-in or make an appointment.

Researching Professional Schools Resources: 

Field Resource
Dental HygieneAmerican Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA)
American Dental Association (ADA)
DentistryADEA U.S. and Canadian Dental Schools
American Dental Association (ADA)
Dietetics/Nutrition Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND)
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Medical TechnologyNational Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS)
UHM’s Department of Medical Technology
Medicine (Allopathic)AAMC’s Medical School Admission Requirements
Medicine (Osteopathic)AACOM’s Choose DO Explorer
Medicine (Podiatric)AACPM’s Podiatric Medical College Information Book
Medicine (Chiropractic)Association of Chiropractic Colleges (ACC)
Medicine (Naturopathic)Association of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges (AANMC)
Nursing Nursing School Degrees (CNA to BSN programs)
AACN Nursing Program Search (BSN to DNP/PhD programs)
Peterson’s Book (BSN to DNP/PhD programs)
Occupation TherapyAccreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE)
OptometryAssociation of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO)
PharmacyPharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS) School Directory
Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements (PSAR)
Physical TherapyDirectory of Accredited Physical Therapy Programs
Physician AssistantPA Programs Directory
Public HealthAssociation of Schools and Programs of Public Health Program Finder
Social Work & WelfareCouncil on Social Work Education (CSWE)
Speech Pathology & AudiologyEdFind
Veterinary Medicine Veterinary Medical School Admission Requirements (VMSAR)
Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) College Descriptor Pages

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Taking a Gap Year

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A “gap year” is the period of time between the end of your undergraduate education and the start of your professional school. A gap year might be a year or more depending on each person’s particular circumstances. When deciding to take a gap year or not, consider the following:

Why are you taking a gap year?

Why are you taking a gap year?

Attending professional school can be daunting and time after graduation can be pivotal for your identity development and exploration of career goals. Students usually take a gap year to become a stronger candidate for the professional program of interest. Students can do various activities during their gap year, such as volunteering, taking an internship/ fellowship, strengthening GPA or entrance exam score. Some students also try to pay down their debt or take a break to travel, relax, and recharge before embarking themselves in a long journey of formal education.

When it comes time to discussing your gap year during interviews, you should keep in mind that your gap year was to help you strengthen your knowledge and improve skills that will make you a better health professional and person, not just to make yourself look good. Here are some follow-up questions that might help you decide: What is motivating you to take a gap year? Have you thoroughly thought through how it might fit with your future career or your professional goals? What is your vision?

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What opportunities do you have during a gap year?


What opportunities do you have during a gap year?
There are a variety of opportunities to participate in your gap year. You may decide to do more than one of the opportunities listed. Also note that you are NOT only limited to the list below. These are some of the major types of opportunities that you can be involved in your gap year.

Experience Based Opportunities

    • Employment/ Internship – Whether you are looking to enhance your résumé or earn money during your gap year, employment or interning in your field of interest is a great way to gain exposure and experience. Working in a hospital, clinic, or office provides students with an opportunity to explore a potential career path as well as a preparation for their future studies. For example, a student looking to apply for medical school may work as a medical scribe during their gap year. Medical scribe positions can serve as an introduction to learning new medical terminology while working closely with a physician in an inpatient or outpatient setting. Here are some great resources to help you start exploring your options:
    • Volunteering – Many students use their gap year time in order to volunteer and give back to the community. Having meaningful volunteer experiences, whether in a health related or non-health related field can help build relationships as well as make change in the community. These experiences can vary greatly, from volunteering internationally in a third world country or volunteering at your local hospital or clinic. Again, there are many different types of volunteer opportunities out there for students, and they can all be beneficial as long as the experience is meaningful or valuable to you. Working in an environment related to your field can help you gain exposure and experience interacting with people you may be working with in the future. Here are some great resources to help you start exploring:
    • Shadowing – Students shadow health professionals to get a better feel of what their future career entails, establish new connections, and explore potential career paths. Shadowing or following a health professional can provide students with patient experience and a realistic view of what various specialties and working environments are really like. It may be difficult to arrange a shadowing experience if you do not have a personal relationship with the health professional, so here are some tips to help you.

Education Based Opportunities

    • Post-Baccalaureate Classes – Retaking or taking additional classes can help students strengthen their academic record. Students may retake courses in which they have not performed well in the past in order to raise their GPA and to gain a better understanding of the different concepts and content of that particular course. Students also consider taking additional courses that they have not had a chance to fit in during college to further prepare themselves for their intended graduate or professional school. For example, classes such as anatomy or physiology can help prepare many students that are planning to work in the health field. Here are some recommended classes to provide you with pre-health related learning or build upon important professional skills (such as writing, speaking, and analyzing) for your future.
    • Pre-Health Post-Baccalaureate and Special Master’s Degree Programs: Post-baccalaureate programs are typically designed for students who already have a bachelors degree in a non-science field and wish to take or retake the prerequisites courses required for their intended professional school (Medical, Pharmacy, Optometry, etc.). There are many types of post-baccalaureate programs such as academic enhancers and career changers (described in further detail below). Many programs offer a post-baccalaureate ‘certificate’ upon completion of the program.Special Masters Programs (SMPs) are master degree programs geared towards preparing students for their intended professional school by taking relevant graduate/professional school level courses. Some SMP curriculums consist of courses that are taken along side graduate, PhD, or professional school (medical, dental, etc.) students, allowing admissions committees to directly measure and compare students’ proficiencies at these higher levels. Other programs consist of courses that are strictly offered to the students in that particular SMP. For more information, click here.
    • Graduate Program: Master’s (MHP), PhDs, or other degree programs – Pursuing a graduate degree is another option for students to spend their gap year. This is a great option for those who intend to earn a Master’s of Public Health (MPH) or another degree along with their professional degree at one point or another. In general, earning an MPH would not help your professional school application as much as science course work. The reason to pursue a degree as such should be for your career and own personal interest. A master’s or doctoral degree in a natural science, also termed  ‘hard’ science under areas such as the Biological and Biomedical Sciences provide a more science-intensive curriculum that reinforce and further advance your understanding in these areas. Many students who look to conduct scientific research along with their health profession pursue a master’s or doctoral degree in the hard sciences. Keep in mind that many institutions also offer combined degree programs. Here is a link to the graduate programs offered at UH Manoa.

Enrichment Opportunities

    • Study Abroad – Study abroad is a valuable cultural enrichment experience for students to broaden their horizons by experiencing different cultures. Cultural competence, or the ability to serve the social, linguistic, and cultural needs of a wide variety of individuals, is becoming an increasingly important quality of a well-rounded health professional. Studying abroad can assist students in cultural immersion and help them to acquire the skills to become excellent healthcare professionals. The University of Hawai‘i Mānoa Study Abroad Center (UHM SAC) provides study abroad opportunities to countries across the globe. Students are still eligible to apply for UHM SAC’s programs after graduation. For more information on study abroad opportunities, click here.

Professional School Application Based Activities

    • Entrance Exam Preparation – A gap year provides time for students to take their entrance exam for the first time or to retake the entrance exam to improve their previous scores. Students who are taking the entrance exam for the first time should familiarize themselves with the components and scoring of the exam. Once first-time test takers are familiar with what the exam entails, students may prepare for entrance exams by studying with practice books, online programs, courses, and tutoring programs. For retaking test takers, students should review the sections that they find challenging. It is recommended for all types of test takers to prepare early for their entrance exams to do well. For entrance exam preparation opportunities, click here.
    • Personal Statement – Writing a good personal statement takes an investment of time to do. Students can start writing their personal statements during their gap year to leave room for revisions. To start a personal statement, students can view the PAC Guidelines here.

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Create a prospective timeline

Create a prospective timeline

Once students have an idea of what to do in their gap year, students may create a prospective timeline. The timeline is a guide for students to track the events that need to be accomplished prior to starting professional school. The timeline includes not only the gap year options, but also professional school application components (i.e. entrance exam, primary/secondary applications, interviews etc.). With your timeline, consider alternative options in case there are any limitations or unforeseen challenges in options you apply to.

After completing your timeline, consider if your plan is an appropriate pace. It is important to participate in options and prepare for professional school applications. However, cramming multiple of events can reduce your best quality work in your gap year opportunities and/or admission application preparation. Be sure to incorporate all needed activities in an appropriate time frame. Click here for a form-fillable four-year plan template.

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Talk with an Advisor

Talk with an Advisor

Discuss your gap year plan with an advisor. Talking with an advisor can help organize your career goals and corporate these goals in your gap year. In addition, talk with an advisor about preparing for the application year by discussing past grades, experiences, entrance exams etc. Please feel free to schedule an appointment with a Peer Advisor in our office here.

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Take Action: Apply Early to Gap Year Opportunities

Take Action: Apply Early to Gap Year Opportunities

Apply to gap year opportunities EARLY. Some opportunities may have deadlines and limited space. By applying early, you will provide yourself time to wait for decisions and seek out other options if needed. If the opportunity does not follow through, then keep your options open. Other opportunities may be suitable for your gap year!

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Be Actively Involved in Your Gap Year

Be Actively Involved in Your Gap Year

Once you have a timeline set and are confirmed to participate in the opportunity, be actively involved in your gap year! Take time to learn what you are doing in your opportunities. You will not only learn more about your profession of interest, but you will also develop characteristics and helpful skills set for the future. Additionally, being actively involved with your gap year activities will allow you to form relationships with your mentors, supervisors, and co-workers. By forming these relationships, you will be able to connect with other professionals related to your field.

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Keep track of everything!

Keep track of everything!

Start to track everything you do in your gap year. Whether it is dates, hours, or contact information, record this information somewhere for future reference. For professional school applications, some sections may request for details of the activities you were involved in. By keeping track of your gap year, you will be able to recall and explain how your experiences shaped you to be a good and potential candidate for the professional program you are applying to.

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References

Non-Traditional Applicant/Students

Non-Traditional students or applicants are applicants that may have been out of school for some time, discovered their passion later in life, or realized they need a career change. Professional field dreams are for anyone who has the passion and drive to pursue their goals. With great planning, anyone can apply to professional schools regardless of their timeline.

An option for non-traditional students are post-baccalaureate programs or Special Masters Programs (SMPs). These programs are for students who already have a bachelors degree and want to strengthen their application to professional school. Post-baccalaureate programs are typically for students from a non-science field and wish to take the prerequisite courses for professional school. SMPs are master degree programs geared towards preparing students for professional school by taking graduate/professional school level courses. Keep in mind that various Special Masters and Post-baccalaureate programs offer linkage, where qualified students are offered guaranteed admission or interview to affiliated professional schools upon meeting certain requirements. For more information on post-baccalaureate program or SMPs please see our Post Bacc and Special Masters Program for Pre-Health Students webpage.

To apply to professional schools you will need the following:

Coursework

Many professional health fields require prerequisite coursework that you will need to complete before attending the professional school. Each field and school is different please visit the webpage of the field you are interested for a list of commonly required coursework. Some schools may have a sunset date for the courses meaning that there may be a timeframe where the courses will no longer be accepted by the school, ie. courses taken more than 10 years ago. Double check with any of the schools you are interested in attending if they will accept courses if you have taken them some time ago.

If you already have a bachelors degree but still need to take courses and wish to take them at UH Manoa, you may apply as a Post-Baccalaureate Unclassified (PBU) student.

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Experience

Fitting in time to gain experience may be difficult. Some things to consider include family obligations, financial needs, and other factors that would require your time. Gaining experience is a key part when applying to professional school.

Gaining experience in the health professional field in which you are interested is a huge benefit in figuring out if that is the field you want to work in and provides you with a deeper understanding of the field. Some professional schools want to see that you have experience in their field and some schools may require a large amount of particular experience such as hands-on, patient contact experience or experience shadowing a professional in that field. Schools need to be certain that the students they accept are capable of completing the curriculum and are likely to become strong professionals in the field. Schools may see this through the experiences students had.

Admissions committees seek students who have completed the pre-requisites, have high overall and science/math GPAs, performed well on the entrance exam (if applicable), and have balanced course loads which are challenging yet realistic. These are indications that students are capable of completing the curriculum. Opportunities for exam preparation can be found here: Entrance Exam Preparation Opportunities.

Experiences can provide proof that students will likely be strong practitioners. Admission committees seek students who demonstrated empathy, compassion, and a commitment to public service which can be shown through community service or volunteer work. Committees also want to see high ethical and moral standards and a conscientious work ethic as well as demonstrated maturity through judgment, responsibility, and dependability. Work ethics can be shown through employment opportunities.

Committees seek students who understand the field and what it entails. Different experiences that could provide exposure to the field include enrichment opportunitiesinternshipsshadowing, or volunteering. Through experiences students may show that they have excellent communication skills and a high degree of professionalism in all aspects of life, and potentially gain strong letters of recommendation from supervisors.

Students should aim to have a well-rounded life that balances academics which include a broad liberal arts education with the humanities and social sciences, research, social activities, and personal interests (hobbies, skills, sports, etc.) through Clubs and Organizations.

Please click on the following links to explore the different opportunities.

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Other Things to Consider

Researching Schools

When researching schools some additional factors to consider include location, cost, and time. Each professional field has a recommended resource to research schools. You may have other family commitments that may play a factor in where you attend school. The availability of scholarships and financial aid could also play a factor as well.

Entrance Exam

Not all professional fields require an entrance exam. Studying for the entrance exam can take a lot of time. If the recommended coursework to study for the exam was a taken some time ago, then perhaps retaking the courses would be helpful.

The Application Process

Applications can get costly and if you need to fly anywhere for interviews can take time.

Financial Aid

Financial Planning is a crucial step in applying to allopathic medical schools. It is important for students to create a plan and make decisions in their educational expenses. Students are highly encouraged to budget their finances before, during, and after professional school. Financial aid for PBU students and returning students are not as abundant therefore you may need to rely on family. More planning and thought should be done while considering professional school.

Please explore the following careers for more specific information on the field you are interested in.

Healthcare Careers

Those marked with an asterisk (*) are available in Hawai’i.

Post-Baccalaureate Level

The following careers begin after you have completed your Bachelors degree and require a Masters or Doctoral degree.  For more information, click on the career that interests you:

*Allopathic MedicineOptometryOsteopathic Medicine
*PharmacyPhysical TherapyChiropractic Medicine
DentistryPhysician AssistantNaturopathic Medicine
Occupational TherapyVeterinary MedicinePodiatric Medicine

Bachelors or Masters (and Doctoral) Level

In these fields, you can begin working with a Bachelors or Masters degree, although some continue on to the Doctoral level. For more information, click on the career that interests you:

*Medical Technology*Nursing
*Public Health*Social Work
*Dental HygieneOccupational Therapy
*Dietetics*Speech Pathology

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Post Bacc and Special Masters Programs for Pre-Health Students

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What are Post Baccalaureate and Special Masters Programs?

What are Post Baccalaureate and Special Masters Programs?

Post-baccalaureate programs are typically designed for students who already have a bachelors degree in a non-science field and wish to take or retake the prerequisites courses required for their intended professional school (Medical, Pharmacy, Optometry, etc.). There are many types of post-baccalaureate programs such as academic enhancers and career changers (described in further detail below). Many programs offer a post-baccalaureate ‘certificate’ upon completion of the program.

Special Masters Programs (SMPs) are master degree programs geared towards preparing students for their intended professional school by taking relevant graduate/professional school level courses. Some SMP curriculums consist of courses that are taken along side graduate, PhD, or professional school (medical, dental, etc.) students, allowing admissions committees to directly measure and compare students’ proficiencies at these higher levels. Other programs consist of courses that are strictly offered to the students in that particular SMP.

Keep in mind that various Special Masters and Post-baccalaureate programs offer linkage, where qualified students are offered guaranteed admission or interview to affiliated professional schools upon meeting certain requirements.

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Which Post-Bacc/Special Master Program is right for me?

Which Post-Bacc/Special Master Program is right for me? 

Post bacc programs typically have designated focus which can be academic enhancer, career changer, and educationally/economically disadvantaged or underrepresented minority students (URM). Select your post-bacc program depending on the focus suited for you.

Academic enhancers (AE) are intended for pre-health students who wish to raise their overall GPA by retaking relevant prerequisite courses or other science-based pre-health courses. Keep in mind that depending on your program, your courses may or may not be factored into your undergraduate GPA.
Career changers (CC) are for students who have obtained a bachelors degree in a non-science or health related field and have decided for a career change to a health profession. These students in career changer programs take the necessary prerequisites for admission to their intended professional school.
Educationally/economically disadvantaged or underrepresented minority (EED) focus programs offer qualified students preparation and help to become competitive applicants to professional school. The goal of these programs are usually to increase diversity in the work force and provide opportunities for disadvantaged students.

Special Masters Programs offer various types of masters degrees. These programs may offer a thesis or non-thesis track, which are decided upon a student’s interest. Typically, thesis based programs take 2 years to complete; the first year focused on coursework and the second year dedicated to research, while non-thesis tracks take about one year to complete. Courses vary depending on the program curriculum, and help students build a solid foundation to prepare for professional school. SMP degrees include but are not limited to:

MS in Physiology
MS in Biomedical Sciences
MS in Biological Sciences
MS in Medical Sciences

There are a number of things to take into consideration when choosing a SMP; examples are listed below. When researching SMP programs, take a look at their website to get a good feel of their curriculum and what is expected.

  • Tuition and fees
  • Location
  • Courses offered
  • Length of program
  • Admission prerequisites
  • Thesis or non-thesis
  • Student advising

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What are the disadvantages of Post-Bacc and Special Masters Programs?

What are the disadvantages of Post-Bacc and Special Masters Programs? 

Post-bacc and SMP programs allow students to improve their credentials and take necessary prerequisite courses, although they may also have their downsides. Again, one thing to keep in mind are the tuition and fees that come along with these programs. Post-bacc programs typically are not covered by financial aid, and many non-degree seeking students pay out-of-pocket per credit. SMP programs are expensive and usually do not offer much in terms of financial aid or grants. Compared to post-bacc programs, SMPs are relatively more competitive to get into. Another previously mentioned disadvantage regarding both Post-bacc and SMP programs is that your scores may not be factored towards your undergraduate GPA. Many application services such as AMCAS (for allopathic medical schools) will separate your undergraduate GPA from your Post-bacc/SMP GPA. In addition to this, admission committees typically weigh your Post-bacc/SMP performances heavily, and performing poorly may heavily hurt your chances for professional school admission. In particular, SMP programs can be seen as “make or break”.

List of Post-Bacc and Special Masters Programs in the United States

Post-Bacc and Special Masters Programs in the United States

Post-bacc and Special Masters Programs offer pre-health students an opportunity to become prepared for the professional school level. Depending on your goal, choose which program is right for you, and utilize the table below to compare the different programs offered in each state across the country.

InstitutionProgram NameProgram LengthMinimum GPA RequiredExam(s) RequiredFocus
Alabama
University of Alabama at Birmingham Master of Science in Biomedical and Health Sciences Program
11 Months3.0 Cumulative/Science
GRE, PCAT, MCAT, DAT, or OATAE
Arizona
Midwestern University College of Health SciencesMasters – M.A in Biomedical Sciences in Glendale9 months2.75MCAT, PCAT, DAT, or GREAE
California
California State Los AngelesPost-Bacc. Certificate Program for Pre-Health Professionals (Option 1/ Option 2)~1 Year, 18 Credits 3N/AAE/CC
California State University, East BayPre-Professional Health Certification Academic Program1-2 Years, 43-98 Credits2.8N/AAE/CC
California State University, FullertonPre-Health Postbaccalaureate Program5 Semesters3.0 (Last 60 Units Attempted)N/ACC
Charles Drew University of Medicine and SciencesPost-Baccalaureate Program in Pre-Medicine
1-2 Years, 24 credits 3.2Standardized tests consideredAE/CC
California State University San MarcosPre-Health Professions Program

<2 Years, 51 Credits2.75N/ACC
Chapman UniversityPre-Health Post-Baccalaureate Program
55 Credits3.2N/ACC
Keck Graduate InstitutePostbac Premedical Certificate Program (PPC)~1 Year, 24 CreditsN/AMCAT or GREAE
Loyola Marymount UniversityPre-Medical Post-Baccalaureate Program
12 Units for Each Term Enrolled3.2 RecommendedN/ACC
Mills CollegePost-baccalaureate Pre-Medical Certificate
1-2 Years3N/ACC
San Francisco State UniversityPre-Health Professions Post-Bac Programs (Two Tracks)
40 Units2.5N/AAE/CC
Scripps CollegePost-Baccalaureate Premedical Program13/24 Months3SAT, ACT or GRE CC
UC Berkeley Extension Post-Baccalaureate Health Professions Program24 Credits3MCAT, PCAT, DAT, or GRE consideredAE/CC
UC Davis Postbaccalaureate ProgramOne Year (Designated Track)2.7N/AEED
UC IrvinePostbaccalaureate Program40 Quarter Units2.8MCAT 492EED
UC San Diego ExtensionPost-Baccalaureate Pre-Medicine Program
1 Year2.8N/AAE/EED
UC Los AngelesUCLA Re-Application Program (UCLA RAP)11 Months2.7MCAT 491AE/EED
UC Irvine AyalaPostbaccalaureate Premedical Program2 Years3SAT or ACTCC
UC San FranciscoInterprofessional Health Post Baccalaureate Certificate Program
11 Months2.93 Overall / 2.75 ScienceMCAT 494AE/EED
University of Southern California KeckMasters of Science in Global Medicine32 Units3MCAT 505AE
University of Southern California DornsifePostbaccalaureate Premedical Program

10 Core Courses & MCAT completed3N/ACC
Western University Master of Science
in Medical Sciences
12 Months, 46.50 Credits3One Standardized Test (Professional)AE
Colorado
Colorado State UniversityMaster of Science in Biomedical Sciences (3 Options)1 YearN/AGRE, MCAT, or DATAE
Colorado State UniversityMaster of Science in Toxicology1-2 Years3N/AAE
Regis UniversityMaster of Science in Biomedical Sciences
9 Months, 32 Credits3.0 recommendedGRE or MCAT recommendedAE
Regis UniversityBiomedical Genetics and Genomics Academic Certificate
8 Months, 13 Credits3N/AAE
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical CampusMaster of Science in Modern Human Anatomy
1 Year, 43 CreditsN/AGRE, MCAT, or DAT consideredAE
University of Colorado BoulderPost-Baccalaureate Health Professions
1 Year, 8 Core Classes~3.3 Average AcceptedN/ACC
University of Northern ColoradoMasters in Biomedical Sciences (online track available)1 Year3Standardized test applicable to your field (eg. MCAT, GRE)AE
Connecticut
Quinnipiac UniversityMaster of Health Science Medical Laboratory Science35/38 Credits2.75N/AAE
University of ConnecticutMedicine and Dental Medicine Post-Baccalaureate Program (Program A or B)~2 Years3N/AAE/CC
District of Colombia
American UniversityPostbaccalaureate Premedical Certificate~1 Year3.2N/AAE/CC
George Washington UniversityPost-Baccalaureate Pre-Medicine Program12 Months, 35 Credits3SAT, ACT, or GRECC
George Washington UniversityGraduate Certificate in Anatomical & Translational Sciences18 Credits3MCAT or GRE recommendedAE
Georgetown University MS in Physiology – Complementary and Alternative Medicine11 Months3MCAT, GRE, DAT, or PCAT; other standardized test acceptedAE
Georgetown University Regular or Special Masters in Physiology10/12 Months~3.5 (Regular MS)
~3.2 (Special Masters) Average Accepted
MCAT (Special Masters)AE
Georgetown UniversityPost-Baccaulaureate Pre-Medical Certification Program15-24 Months3.2N/ACC
Delaware
University of DelawarePremedical Post-Baccalaureate Undergraduate Certificate26-44 Hours3N/ACC
Florida
Barry UniversityMS Biomedical Sciences (Medical, Dental, or Research Curriculum)33/34 Units3GRE, MCAT, DAT, OAT, VAT and PCATAE
Florida Atlantic UniversityPost-Baccalaureate Medical Pathway Program (AE or CC Track)1-2 Years3.4 (AE track)
3.0 (CC track)
MCAT 504 (AE track)
AE/CC
Florida International UniversityGraduate Certificate in Molecular and Biomedical Sciences20 CreditsN/AN/AAE
Florida State UniversityBridge to Clinical Medicine12 MonthsN/AN/AAE/EED
Larkin Health Sciences InstituteMasters of Science in Biomedical Sciences33 Credits2.7GRE, MCAT, DAT, VAT, and PCATAE
University of FloridaPre-Health Post-Baccalaureate Program (Career Changer or ReStart Program)61-76 Credits3N/AAE/CC
University of MiamiPre-Health Post-Baccalaureate Career Changer Program
1-2 Years3.5 in last 4 semesters of courseworkN/ACC
University of South FloridaMaster’s in Medical Sciences (Medical Track or Research Track)1 Year3GRE or MCATAE
University of South FloridaMasters in Medical Science with a Concentration in Interdisciplinary Medical Science31 Credits3MCAT 494AE/EED
Georgia
Agnes Scott CollegePost-Baccalaureate Pre-Medical Program13 Months, 35 Credits3.5GRECC
Mercer UniversityMaster of Science in Biomedical Sciences (Thesis Based)2 Years3GRE, MCAT, VCAT, or DATAE
Mercer UniversityMaster of Science in Preclinical Sciences31 Credits2.8GRE, MCAT, VCAT, OAT, DAT, or PCATAE
Hawaii
Hawaii Pacific UniversityPost-Baccalaureate Certificate in Pre-Medical/Pre-Health Studies2 Years, 56 Credits2.5 Cumulative/ 2.5 Last 60 creditsN/ACC
John A. Burns School of Medicine‘Imi Ho’ōla Post-Baccalaureate Program1 year, 3 Science-intensive coursesN/AN/AAE/EED
Illinois
Dominican UniversityBachelor of Medical Science (Post Baccalaureate Second Bachelors Degree)124 Credits in total; 34 earned from Dominican University3N/AAE/CC
Illinois Institute of TechnologyMaster of Science in Biology for the Health Professions
32 Credit Hours2.5 or GPA waiverDAT, MCAT, or GRE consideredAE
Lewis UniversityPre-Medical Studies Program
323N/AAE
Loyola University ChicagoMA in Medical Sciences
24 Credit Hours3MCAT 500AE
Loyola University ChicagoMS in Infectious Disease and Immunology2 Years, 24 Credits and Research ThesisN/AN/AAE
Loyola University ChicagoMS in Physiology9 Months, 24 Credits3MCAT 504AE
Midwestern UniversityMA in Biomedical Sciences2 Years, 45 Quarter Hour Credits2.75MCAT, DAT, OAT, GRE, or PCATAE
Northwestern University School of Professional StudiesPremedicine Certificate Program
12, 15, or 21 MonthsN/AGRE consideredCC
Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine & ScienceMS in Biomedical Sciences1 YearBased on prerequisite grades (C or better)DAT, MCAT, or GREAE
Rush UniversityMS in Biotechnology1 Year, 34 Credits3.0 RecommendedMCAT, GMAT, PCAT DAT, or GREAE
Souther Illinois University School of MedicineMEDPREP2 YearsBased on prerequisite grades (C or better)N/AAE/EED
Indiana
Indiana UniversityMS Pre-Professional Degree Program
30 Credits3MCAT 498, GRE 50%, or DAT 17AE
Indiana University School of MedicineMaster of Science in Medical Science Program2 Years, 36 Credits3MCAT 490AE/EED
Iowa
Iowa State UniversityMaster of Science in Biomedical Sciences1 Year, 30 Credits3GRE Verbal 150, Quantitative 150, Analytical Writing 3.0; MCAT 494; PCAT 381; DAT 17; or OAT 280 AE
Kentucky
University of LouisvillePostbaccalaureate Pre-medical Program
2 Years3.3ACT 24, SAT 1200/1600 or 1750/2400 Minimum Composite, GRE 50% in each area, GMAT 50th percentile minimum composite, or LSAT 50th percentile minimum compositeCC
Louisiana
University of LouisvillePost-Baccalaureate Pre-Med ProgramN/A3.3 SAT 1200/1600 or 1750/2400, GRE Each area 50 percentile, ACT 24, or GMAT 50th percentileCC
Louisiana State University ShreveportMaster of Science in Biological Sciences (Thesis or Non-thesis)30 Semester Hours2.5GRE (new) 300 combined verbal & analytical, or GRE (old) 1000 combined analytical & quantitive AE
Tulane University MS in Cell & Molecular Biology2 Semesters, 30 Credits3MCAT, GMAT, LSAT, DAT, ORT, or GRE.AE
Tulane School of MedicineMS in Medical Genetics & Genomics1 Year, 30 hours3.0 RecommendedGRE 308 or MCAT 22 recommendedAE
Tulane University School of Medicine MS in Microbiology and Immunology (Thesis or Non-thesis)1 Year3MCAT 27/504, DAT 18, GRE 300 or 1100 AE
Tulane University School of MedicineMS in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology2 Semesters, 30 Credit Hours3MCAT 26/500, or DAT 19AE
Tulane University MS in Pharmacology
(Thesis or Non-thesis)
1 Year, 27 (Thesis) or 31 (Non-thesis)3MCAT 27/500, DAT 18, GRE 300AE
Tulane UniversityMS Physiology1 Year, 30 Credits3MCAT 502, DAT 18, or GRE 310 AE
Massachusetts
Boston UniversityPost-Baccalaureate Certificate in Pre-Medical Studies32 Credits3.3N/ACC
Boston University School of MedicineMaster of Science in Oral Health Sciences1 Year, 32 Credits2.9DAT 17AE
Boston University School of MedicineMS in Medical Sciences Program1-2 Years, 32 Credits3MCAT 50th percentile (500), or GRE 70th PercentileAE
Brandeis UniversityBrandeis University
Post-baccalaureate Premedical Program (Career Changer or Finisher Track)
2 Years (career changer) or 15 Months (finisher track)3SAT, ACT, or GRECC
Elms CollegePost-Baccalaureate Program1-2 YearsN/AN/ACC
Harvard Medical SchoolMaster of Medical Science in Immunology64 CreditsN/AGRE or MCATAE
Harvard Extension SchoolPremedical ProgramN/A3.0 RecommendedN/AAE/CC
MGH Institute of Health ProfessionsPrerequisites for the Health Care ProfessionsN/AN/AN/ACC
Mount Holyoke CollegeMount Holyoke College
Postbaccalaureate Prehealth Program
12 Months3.5ACT, SAT, or GRECC
Tufts UniversityPostbaccalaureate Premedical Program1-2 YearsN/ASAT, ACT, or GRE CC
Tufts UniversityMaster of Science in Biomedical Sciences1-2 YearsN/AMCAT, GRE, or DATAE
University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Pre-Health Professions Certificate
4 SemestersN/AN/ACC
WorcesterPostbaccalaureate Pre-Medical Program30 Credits2.75N/ACC
Maryland
Goucher CollegePost-Baccalaureate Premedical Program11 MonthsN/ASAT, ACT, or GRE CC
John Hopkins UniversityPost-Baccalaureate Premedical Program
9-14 Months3.0 RecommendedN/ACC
John Hopkins UniversityPost-Bacc Health Science Intensive
1 Year3MCAT, GRE, SAT or ACTAE
John Hopkins University BloombergMaster of Health Science1 Academic YearN/AN/AAE
University of MarylandScience in the EveningN/A2.5N/ACC
Michigan
Lawrence Technological UniversityPost-Baccalaureate Certificate In Premedical Studies44 Credits (17 credits accepted for transfer)2.9N/ACC
University of Michigan Medical SchoolMS in Physiology34-35 Credits3MCAT 27/502, DAT 17, PCAT 410, GRE 660 Quant/500 Verbal or 160 Quant/115 Verbal (post 2011)AE
University of Michigan Medical SchoolPostbac MEDPREP
8-14 Months3.5N/ACC
Minnesota
Northwestern Health and Sciences UniversityPostbaccalaureate Prehealth41 Credits2N/ACC
Missouri
Avila UniversityPost-Baccalaureate ProgramN/AN/AN/ACC
Rockhurst UniversityPre-medical Post-baccalaureate Program2 Years3.3ACT or SATCC
St. Louis UniversityMedical Anatomy and Physiology Preparatory Program
24 Credits3MCAT 495 or GRE 40th PercentileAE
Washington University in St. LouisPost-Baccalaureate Premedical Program30 Units3.2N/ACC
Mississippi
Mississippi CollegeMaster of Science in Medical Sciences1-2 Years, 33 hoursN/AMCAT 20/490, DAT 15, GRE (old) 850 Verbal & Quantitative, GRE (new) 146 Verbal and 146 on Quantitative AE
University of Mississippi Medical CenterMaster of Science in Biomedical Sciences30 Credit Hours3.0 recommendedGRE 295 on Verbal & Quantitative, MCAT 20/492, or DAT 15AE
William Carey University of Osteopathic Medicine Master of Biological Science34 HoursN/AMCAT 20 (25 Preferred), GRE 290 (300 Preferred), or DAT 15 (17 Preferred)AE
Montana
Montana State UniversityPost Baccalaureate Pre-Medical Certificate12-15 Months3N/ACC
Montana State UniversityMaster of Science in Health Science
1 Year, 30 Credits3N/AAE
North Carolina
Campbell University School of Osteopathic MedicineMaster of Science in Biomedical Sciences2 Years3Any graduate level standardized test consideredAE
Duke University School of MedicineMaster of Biomedical Sciences1 Year, 38 Credits3.2MCAT, GRE, DAT, or other professional school test scores consideredAE
Guilford CollegePost-Baccalaureate Pre-Health ProgramN/AN/AN/AAE/CC
Meredith CollegePre-Health Post-Baccalaureate Certificate
24 Credit HoursN/ASAT, ACT, GRE, or MCATAE/CC
North Carolina State UniversityMasters of Physiology (Thesis or Non-Thesis Option)36 Semester Hours3GREAE
University of North Carolina GreensboroPremedical and Predental Post-Baccalaureate Program

15 MonthsN/AN/AAE/CC
Wakeforest UniversityMaster of Science in Biomedical Science30-36 Semester Hour Credits3N/AAE
Creighton UniversityPre-Medical Post-Baccalaureate Program
13 MonthsN/AN/AAE/EED
University of DarthmouthMasters of Public Health (1 Year Accelerated or 2 Year Online) or Master of Science in Healthcare Research25 Credits3.2 to be eligible for test waiverGRE, MCAT, or GMATAE
New Jersey
Cooper Medical School of Rowan UniversityPost Baccalaureate in Advanced Premedical Studies27 Credits3MCAT recommendedAE
Drew UniversityPost-Baccalaureate Pre-Medical Preparation Program24 Credits3N/ACC
Fairleigh Dickinson UniversityGateway to Professional Studies
(Masters of Health)
33 Credits3CAT, PCAT, DAT or GRE (if applicable)AE
Rider UniversityPremedical, Predental, and Preveterinary Studies
N/A3.25N/ACC
Rutgers UniversityPostbaccaluareate PreHealth Program

12/21 Credits3.2N/ACC
Rutgers University Master of Biomedical Science

1-4 Years3MCAT 22 or GRE 60th Percentile; DAT acceptedAE
William Paterson University of New JerseyPost-Baccalaureate Pre-Professional Program
16 MonthsN/AN/ACC
Nevada
University of Nevada School of MedicinePost-Baccalaureate Program
16 Credits Per Semester2.85N/AAE
New York
Adelphi UniversityCertificate in Basic Sciences for Health Professions

34 Credits3.25ACT or SATCC
City College of New YorkPostbaccalaureate Certificate in Health Professions Preparation43 credit3.0N/AAE/CC
Columbia UniversityPostbaccalaureate Premedical Program

N/A20 Points for CertificateN/ACC
Columbia University Medical CenterMaster’s in Nutrition Science1 Year, 33 CreditsN/AGRE, MCAT, or DATAE
Cornell UniversityNutritional Sciences Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Health Studies1 Year2.8Any standardizes test scores consideredAE
Farmingdale State CollegeSciences for the Health Professions Certificate34-50 Credits3N/ACC
Fordham UniversityFordham Post Baccalaureate Pre-Medical/Pre-Health Program6 Courses or 30 Credits3N/ACC
Hofstra UniversityPremedical Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Natural Science
15 Months, 32 Credits3N/ACC
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiClinical Research Training Program (Certificate)

9 Courses, 26 CreditsN/AGRE, MCAT, or USMLE AE
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMaster of Science in Biomedical Sciences
45 Credits
N/AGRE or MCATAE
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMaster of Science in Clinical Research2 Years, 38 CreditsN/AGRE, MCAT, or USMLE AE
Manhattanville CollegePost Baccalaureate Pre-HealthCore Courses3N/ACC
New York Medical CollegeMaster of Science in Basic Medical Sciences – Accelerated Track1 Year, 32 Credits3.1MCAT 28 or 70% PercentileAE
New York Medical CollegeMaster of Science in Basic Medical Sciences – Traditional Track2 Years, 30 Credits (Thesis/Review)N/AMCAT, GRE, or DATAE
New York UniversityPostbaccalaureate Prehealth Studies Program18-24 Months3N/ACC
Purchase CollegePremedical StudiesN/AN/AN/ACC
Stony Brook UniversityPost-Baccalaureate Pre-Health Program
N/A3.3 RecommendedN/ACC
Syracuse UniversityMS in Biomedical Forensic Sciences
36 CreditsN/AGRE or MCATAE
City College of New YorkPost-Baccalaureate Pre-Medical Studies
Specified Courses Required2.8N/ACC
Touro College of Osteopathic MedicineMaster of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences

43 Credits3MCATAE
University at BuffaloMS/MA in Biological Sciences2 Years, 18 Credits3.2 if no test scores submittedMCAT, DAT, or GRE AE
University of RochesterPost-baccalaureate Pre-medical Program

12-24 Months3N/ACC
Ohio
Case Western Reserve UniversityMaster of Science in Nutrition27 Semester Hours3ACT or SATAE
Case Western Reserve UniversityMasters in Bioethics27 Semester HoursN/AGRE, MAT, MCAT, LSAT, or the GMATAE
Case Western Reserve University MS in Pathology
Specified Courses Required3.0 RecommendedMCAT 26 or GRE verbal 150 and quantitative 150AE
Case Western Reserve UniversityMS in Applied Anatomy30 Credit HoursN/AGRE, MCAT or DATAE
Case Western Reserve UniversityMS in Medical Physiology2.9 RecommendedN/ARecommended: MCAT 25/500, DAT 18, GRE 40th PercentileAE
Case Western Reserve UniversityPost-baccalaureate Readiness Instruction for bioMedical Education Program (PRIME)1-2 Years3.4 (Considered competitive)N/AAE/CC
Cleveland State UniversityPre-Professional Health Post Baccalaureate Programs (Pre-Med, Pre-Vet, Pre-Pharm)N/AN/AN/AAE/CC
Northeast Ohio Medical UniversityNEOMED-CSU Partnership for Urban Health Postbacc/M.D.

2 Years3MCAT 492 or GRE 150 on both Verbal and Quantitative SubtestAE/CC
John Carroll UniversityPre-Medical Post-Baccalaureate Program34 Semester Credit Hours3N/ACC
The Ohio State UniversityMedicine Medical Careers Pathway Post Baccalaureate Program (MEDPATH)1 Year3MCATAE
University of Cincinnati College of MedicineSpecial Masteräó»s Program in Physiology1 Year3MCAT 28/504AE
The University of ToledoMSBS in Medical Sciences

1 YearN/AMCAT 28/500 recommendedAE
Oklahoma
Northeastern State UniversityPost-baccalaureate Pre-health Certificate Program

~2 Years3N/ACC
Oregon
University of OregonHealth Professions ProgramN/AN/AN/ACC
Pennsylvania
Bryn Mawr CollegePost-baccalaureate Premedical Program
12 Months3.3N/ACC
Chatham UniversityMaster of Science in Biology33-34 Credits3N/AAE
Premedical Post-BaccalaureatePost-Baccalaureate Program (Basic Core in Health Sciences Track or Advanced Core in Health Sciences Track)1 Year3.0 RecommendedN/AAE/CC
Drexel UniversityInterdepartmental Medical Science1 Year3MCAT 27 or 75th, Percentile, DAT 20, or OAT 330AE
Drexel UniversityDrexel Pathway to Medical School (DPMS) program1 Year3.0 RecommendedMCAT 27th Percentile in each Section and OverallAE/EED
Drexel Medical SchoolMasters in Biomedical Studies2 Years2.9MCAT 21 or 35th Percentile,AE
Drexel UniversityMasters in Medical Science2 Years3MCAT, GRE, OAT, or DATAE
Drexel UniversityEvening Post-Baccalaureate Pre-Medical (PMED) program2 Years3SAT 60th Percentile, ACT 20, or GRE 60th Percentile CC
Duquesne UniversityPost-Baccalaureate Pre-Medical and Health Professions Program1 Year3Not encouragedAE/CC
Lake Erie College of Osteopathic MedicineHealth Sciences Post Baccalaureate Program

9 Months2.7ACT, SAT, or MCATAE/CC
LaSallePostbaccalaureate Premedcial Certificate Program7 Science/Math Courses3N/ACC
LeHigh UniversityHealthcare Systems Engineering30 Credits2.75GREAE
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic MedicineMS in Biomedical Sciences1-2 yearsN/AMCAT, PCAT, DAT, OAT, or GREAE
Rosemont CollegePost Baccalaureate Pre-Medical Program

N/AN/AN/AAE/CC
Temple University School of MedicineBasic Core in Medical Sciences Program (BCMS)1 Year, 34 Credits3.3N/ACC
Temple University School of MedicineAdvanced Core in Medical Sciences Program (ACMS)10 Months, 23 Credits3.4N/AAE
The Commonwealth Medical CollegeMaster of Biomedical Sciences (MBS) Program
36 CreditsN/AN/AAE
Thomas Jefferson UniversityPostbaccalaureate Pre-Professional Program (P4)1-2 Years3.2ACT 21 or SAT 1000 (Before 2005)/ 1600 (After 2005)CC
University of Pennsylvania Pre-Health Core Studies Program1-2 YearsN/AN/ACC
Pennsylvania UniversityPre-Health Specialized Studies Program

1-2 YearsN/AN/AAE
University of PittsburgBiomedical Masters Program1-2 Years3.2N/AAE
Puerto Rico
Ponce Health Sciences UniversityMaster of Science in Medical Sciences1 Years2.7MCATAE
Rhode Island
Providence CollegePre-Health Professions Certificate24 Credits3N/ACC
South Carolina
Medical University of South CarolinaMaster of Science in Medical Sciences

31 Credits3MCAT 50th Percentile or DAT 50th PercentileAE
University of South Carolina School of MedicinePost-Baccalaureate Certificate in Biomedical Sciences

1 Year3GRE 300/1100, MCAT 500/21, or DAT 17AE
Tennessee
Carson-Newman CollegePost-baccalaureate Program
1-2 YearsN/AN/ACC
Lincoln Memorial UniversityMaster of Science (in Anatomical Sciences, Biomedical Professions, Life Science Research, Life Science Teaching, or Veterinary Biomedical Sciences)1 Year3MCAT 492, GRE 292 and writing score of 3.5, or DAT 17; PCAT consideredAE
Lipscomb UniversityMaster of Science in Biomolecular Science1 Year, 30 Hours3GRE 300/1000, MCAT 24/490, DAT 17, Biology MFT 155AE
Texas
Texas Tech UniversityMS in Biomedical Sciences2 Years3.6 RecommendedGRE 310/1220, MCAT 27 RecommendedAE
University of North Texas Health Science CenterSpecialized MS in Medical Sciences1 YearN/AMCAT, GRE, or DATAE
Virginia
Eastern Mennonite UniversityMA in Biomedicine

2 Years2.5MCAT or GREAE
Eastern Virginia Medical SchoolMaster’s of Biomedical Science1 or 2 Year Program2.75MCAT 27/530 (1 Year Program) or 23/496 (2 Year Program), or DAT 18AE
Eastern Virginia Medical SchoolContemporary Human Anatomy Program3 Semesters2.75GRE, MCAT, DAT or TOEFAE
Edward Via College of Osteopathic MedicineGraduate Certificate Premedical Program1 Year2.9N/AAE
George Mason UniversityGraduate Certificate in Advanced Biomedical Sciences
9 Month, 20 CreditN/AN/AAE
Hampton UniversityMasters in Medical Science Program2 Years, 50 Credits2.5MCAT, DATAE, EED, and CC
Liberty UniversityMS in Biomedical Sciences1-2 Years, 39 Hours3MCAT 20/493, GRE 140 Verbal and 145 Quantitative, DAT 14.5, or PCAT 70AE
University of VirginiaPost-Baccalaureate Pre-Medical Program
1 YearN/ASAT, ACT, or GRECC
Virginia Commonwealth UniversityPremedical Graduate Health Sciences Certificate Program

1 Year, 27 Credits3MCAT 25/500, DAT 16, or GRE 151 Quantitative and 153 Verbal (or 1200 Combined on Previous Scale) AE
Vermont
Bennington CollegePostbaccalaureate Premedical Program1 YearN/ASAT, ACT, or GRE recommendedCC
University of VermontPost-Baccalaureate
Premedical Program
1-2 Years, 24 Credits3.2 RecommendedN/ACC
University of VermontMaster of Medical Science Degree12 Months, 30 CreditsN/AMCAT or GREAE
Washington
Heritage UniversityMaster of Arts in Medical Sciences1 Year, 36 Credits3MCAT, GRE, PCAT, OAT, or DATAE
Seattle UniversityPostbaccalaureate Premedical Program

1-3 Years3.0 Highly RecommendedN/ACC
West Virginia
West Virginia UniversityMaster of Science in Health Sciences31 Credits3GRE, MCAT or DAT (if taken)AE

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