Frequently Asked Questions

 

On this page:

Who can submit to the journal?

My project isn’t a research paper or essay. Can I still submit it?

When is the submission deadline?

How long can my submission be?

What file formats do you accept?

What if I worked with a faculty mentor, graduate student, or postdoc?

Is there any charge for submitting or publishing my work?

How do I write the abstract?

How do I list my works on my CV/résumé?

What if I have a question that is not listed here?


Who can submit to the journal?

 

All work whose primary investigators, performers, or authors are undergraduate students may be considered for submission. The work must have been conducted or completed during the 2016-2017 academic year to be considered for publication. Co-authored works can be submitted, but all contributors should be undergraduate students enrolled at UHM during the semester when the work was completed. (The student author or authors may have graduated during the 2016-2017 year; work conducted while you were still enrolled is eligible.)

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My project isn’t a research paper or essay. Can I still submit it?

 

YES. All kinds of undergraduate work are welcome: creative installations, recitals, art projects, creative writing, exemplary reports, presentations, and other forms of scholarship can also be published in Mānoa Horizons. If you submit a short story or poem, an image, audio, or video file, you must also submit an accompanying Artist Statement. You may find more information regarding the Artist Statement here.

 

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When is the submission deadline? 

 

There will be two submission cycles for volume 3 of the journal. The first submission cycle has a deadline of January 12, 2018. For works submitted by this initial deadline, student authors will have the option to revise and resubmit submissions not accepted during this first cycle. The second round of submissions are due no later than May 1, 2018. Students whose work is not accepted for publication during the second round do not have the revise and resubmit option. In both submission cycles, all student works undergo peer review by members of the Editorial Board. Reviewers’ anonymous feedback is sent directly to the email provided by the student who submits the work online, along with the editorial decision. All works undergo substantial review before publication.

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How long can by submission be?

 

There is no minimum (we welcome your haiku!) word count or length. If you are submitting a piece of writing, the maximum length is 6000 words, plus references, endnotes, figures and tables, or other supplementary materials. At this time, there are no limits for audio or video file submissions.

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What file formats do you accept?

 

For text submissions, please submit your file as a PDF. Audio and video files should be submitted in commonly used file formats (such as mp3, m4a, mov, wav, dat). Please note that images should have a minimum resolution of 640 x 480 pixels; a somewhat higher resolution (1024 x 768) is better.

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What if I worked with a faculty mentor, graduate student, or postdoc?

 

You need to discuss your intention to submit the work to the journal with your co-researchers and mentor. If some or all of the data you use is proprietary (if it is the product of a research project whose Principal Investigator is your advisor or other faculty), you may need to get written permission to publish the work from all concerned parties. It is possible to wait to publish your work on ScholarSpace until the data have been published elsewhere. The work that you submit to this journal, however, must be your own; we ask you to check a box confirming that all authors are undergraduate UHM students.

For example, if you participate in a project in your mentor’s lab and you are a co-author on an article about that research, you cannot simply submit that article to Mānoa Horizons. You must discuss your intention to publish your own written summary of the work with the project PI and other co-authors. You must obtain permission to publish the data your paper uses, if accepted to this journal (if requested, we will delay publication on ScholarSpace and/or the journal’s website until after the data are published elsewhere by the project). Once you have permission to do so, you write and submit your own (sole-authored, or co-authored with other undergraduate students who participated in the research) paper about the work to us.

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Is there any charge for submitting or publishing my work?

 

No, there is not. Mānoa Horizons makes the scholarship it publishes freely available to readers around the world to download, read, cite, copy, print, search, and link to the work published in the print and online versions of the journal.

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How do I write the abstract?

Visit the Abstract page for guidance.

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How do I write the artist statement?

Visit the Artist Statement page for guidance.

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How do I list my works on my CV/résumé?

 

Below are some general guidelines for listing a published work on your CV/résumé (note: the exact format will depend on your major and the CV/résumé style; consult with your faculty mentor/advisor for specific formatting guidelines within your field of study).

 

This information will be listed within a broader section titled “Research and Publications,” under a subsection that indicates the status of your work:

  • Published Work
    • includes works that are published (featured in a journal/publication) and forthcoming (accepted for publication, but not yet printed)
    • separated by academic and non-academic publications
  • Works in Progress
    • includes works that have been submitted for publication with a pending status, are completed and unpublished, and are incomplete/still being worked on
    • remember to list by degree of completion (see order in bullet above)

 

APA/MLA FORMATTING:

The APA (American Psychological Association) and MLA (Modern Language Association) formats have specific style manuals, thus have more stringent format guidelines. APA is often used in the social sciences, while MLA is most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities.

 

APA/MLA* Format:

    Published work:
    Last Name, First Name Middle Initial; Collaborator’s Last Name, First and Middle Initials [if applicable]. (Date of Publication). Title of
    Article. Title of Periodical, volume number (issue number), pages.

    Forthcoming work:
    Last Name, First Name Middle Initial; Collaborator’s Last Name, First and Middle Initials [if applicable]. (in press). Title of Article. Title
    of Periodical
.

    Submitted for publication:
    Last Name, First Name Middle Initial. (Year). Title of Work. Manuscript submitted for Publication.

    Unpublished work:
    Last Name, First Name Middle Initial (Year written). Title of Work (Unpublished [insert work type here]). Name of Institution, Location.

    Works in progress:
    Last Name, First Name Middle Initial. (Most recent year  it was written). Title of WorkManuscript in preparation.

*For MLA format guidelines, see here.

Other web resources:

MLA and APA style guide can be found here.
Information about APA citations can be found here and here.

 

APA Format in a CV/Résumé:

   Research and Publications
    Published work:
    Taylor, Rielle M.; Quiero, Javier T. (2014). My Really Great First Article. Undergraduate Journal of American Studies, vol. 2 (23), 112-125.

    Forthcoming work:
    Taylor, Rielle M.; Quiero, Javier T. (in press). My Really Great Second Article. Mānoa Horizons Undergraduate Journal.

    Submitted for publication:
    Taylor, Rielle M. (2016). My Really Great Thesis. Manuscript submitted for Publication.

    Unpublished work:
    Taylor, Rielle M. (2016). My Really Great Thesis (Unpublished Undergraduate Senior Thesis). University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI.

    Works in progress:
    Taylor, Rielle M. (2016). My Really Great Thesis. Manuscript in preparation.

 

CHICAGO FORMATTING:

The Chicago Manual of Style, first printed in 1906 and still published by the University of Chicago Press, is commonly used in history, art history, and anthropology, among other disciplines. As it has a printed manual (now available online from many sources), it also has strict guidelines.

 

Chicago Format:

    Published Work:
    Last Name, First Name Middle Initials, Collaborator’s First Name Middle Initials Last Name [if applicable]. “Title of Article.” Title of
    Periodical,
volume, issue number (Year of Publication) : pages. *Note: text on subsequent lines to be indented

    Unpublished and Submitted Work:
    Last Name, First Name Middle Initials, “Title of work.” Work type, Name of Institution, Most recent year written. *Note: text on subsequent
    lines to be indented

Find additional information on the Chicago style guide here.

 

Chicago Format in a CV/Résumé:

   Research and Publications
    Published Work:
    Taylor, Rielle M., Javier T. Quiero, Robertson, Mark K. “My Wonderfully Terrific First Article.” Mānoa Horizons Undergraduate Journal, 1, no.
            1 (2016) : 112-125.

   Unpublished and Submitted Work:
    Taylor, Rielle M.“My Really Great Thesis.” Undergraduate senior thesis, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, 2016.

 

HARVARD FORMATTING:

The Harvard formatting style is often used by the scientific community. It differs from the formats noted above in one key area: the Harvard style does not have a manual. Because of this, there are various versions that can be followed. Below are some of the more commonly used formats.

 

Harvard Format:

    Published Work:
    Last Name, First Name Middle Initials, Collaborator’s Last Name, First Name Middle Initials [if applicable] Year of Publication, ‘Title of
    Article’, Title of Periodical, volume, issue number, pp. pages. *Note: text on subsequent lines to be indented

    Unpublished and Submitted Work:
    Last Name, First and Middle Initials Most recent year written, ‘Title of Article’, Work type, Name of Institution, Location. *Note: text on
    subsequent lines to be indented

Find additional information about the Harvard style guide here and here (note that this style can vary).

 

Harvard Format in a CV/Résumé:

   Research and Publications
    Published Work:
    Taylor, Rielle & Quiero, Javier T. 2016, ‘My Wonderfully Terrific, Really Great First Article’, Mānoa Horizons Undergraduate Journal, vol. 1, no.
            1, pp. 112-125.

    Unpublished and Submitted Work:
    Taylor, R M 2016, ‘My Really Great Thesis’, Senior thesis, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI.

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What if I have a question that is not listed here?

 

Feel free to contact us at horizons@hawaii.edu or (808) 956-8361.

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