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FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS: Patterns to Communicate

Now that you've explored how Morse Code uses patterns to transfer information, you may begin to notice that there are other patterns that are used to communicate all around you! Below are a few examples to give you ideas. Do some research on your own to learn about patterns are used!

  • <p>Fig. 1. An example of english braille.</p>Braille: Braille is a system of touch reading and writing for a person who is blind in which raised dots represent the letters of the alphabet. Braille is read by moving the hand or hands from left to right along each line.

  • <p>Fig. 2. Road signs use patterns and colors to give information to drivers. These signs are located in&nbsp;Sturminster Marshall, England.</p>Road Signs: These signs at the side of or above roads give instructions or provide information to road users. Many countries have adopted color patterns, pictorial signs, or simplified and standardized their signs to overcome language barriers.

  • <p>Fig. 3. Digital communication is all based on binary code.&nbsp;</p>Binary: The simplest possible signal of any kind that can be employed to transmit messages is the binary signal, which consists of only two possible values. These values are represented by the binary digits, or bits, 1 and 0. The pattern in these 1's and 0's can transmit information. 

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Exploring Our Fluid Earth, a product of the Curriculum Research & Development Group (CRDG), College of Education. University of Hawaii, 2011. This document may be freely reproduced and distributed for non-profit educational purposes.