News (all)

  • Adolescent Childbirth is Associated with Greater Framingham Risk Scores for Cardiovascular Disease Among Participants of the IMIAS (International Mobility in Aging Study)

    Posted Nov 1, 2017 at 10:15am

    A new study by researchers at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and colleagues in Brazil and Canada finds that older women from multiple countries who reported adolescent childbirth had greater cardiovascular disease risk.

    What is new? To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate in postmenopausal women from multiple global settings that adolescent childbirth is related to greater overall cardiovascular risk, as measured by the Framingham Risk Score, compared to women who gave birth at later ages, as well as compared to nulliparous women.

    What are the clinical implications? Adolescent childbirth may serve as a cardiovascular disease risk marker; women who were adolescent mothers may benefit from earlier and increased cardiovascular screening to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events.
     

  • Fall 2017 Career Panel and Alumni Mixer

    Posted Oct 31, 2017 at 9:23am

    Thank you to all of our fabulous panelists and public health student participants who attended yesterday's OPHS Public Health Career Panel! We were fortunate to have been joined by several BAPH alum who graduated this past May and are already hard at work improving public health in our local communities. The Alumni Mixer that followed was also a wonderful success!

  • Early life adversity experiences, such as hunger and poverty, are negatively associated with one's physical health across the life course, especially for women

    Posted Oct 19, 2017 at 8:22am

    The study examines the relationship between economic adversity transitions from childhood to older adulthood and older adulthood physical performance among 1,998 community-dwelling older adults from five demographically diverse sites from middle and high-income countries.

  • OPHS Researcher Rebecca Schweitzer Shares Information About Her Research on KHON-2 News

    Posted Sep 29, 2017 at 1:45pm

    OPHS Researcher, Rebecca Schweitzer, DrPH, was interviewed on KHON-2 News yesterday speaking about the tobacco stings that her research team conducts.

  • Inadequate housing plays a large role in unnecessary hospitalizations

    Posted Jul 28, 2017 at 6:58am

    Homelessness and inadequate housing are major causes of unnecessary hospitalizations, according to a study by University of Hawaiʻi researchers.

    The study, “I Need my Own Place to get Better”: Patient Perspectives on the Role of Housing in Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations", is from an ongoing project to understand and reduce potentially preventable hospitalizations for diabetes and heart disease in Hawaiʻi.

    Principal investigator and Office of Public Health Studies Associate Professor Tetine Sentell, says, “We were interested in patient perspectives on the role of housing as contributing to their potentially preventable hospitalization.”

    Said Michelle Quensell, MPH '15, lead author of the study and a UH public health graduate, “We talked to 90 patients, and almost 25 percent reported a housing-related issue as a major factor in hospitalization. About half of these patients were homeless, noting the high cost of housing in Hawaiʻi.”

    “Patients said it was hard to care for their diabetes or heart disease when they were living without amenities such as refrigeration, running water, a stove or a safe place to store medications,” added Sentell. “Patients also mentioned challenges of following diet plans when canned goods were the only available foods at the shelters and food banks.”

    Several major health providers in Hawaiʻi have recently created innovative new programs to address social determinants, including housing, within the health care setting to improve health care quality and reduce health care costs. This research strongly supports these efforts.

    Other investigators include Kathryn Braun, UH Public Health, Deborah Taira, Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at UH Hilo, and Todd Seto, Queen’s Medical Center.

  • Congratulations to the 2017 UH Mānoa Awardees from Our Very Own Public Health ‘Ohana!

    Posted Jun 30, 2017 at 1:27pm

    Congratulations to the 2017 UH Mānoa Awardees from our very own Public Health program ‘ohana - doctoral student, Mapuana, and assistant professor, Denise Nelson-Hurwitz!

    Dr. Nelson-Hurwitz received the Frances Davis Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. She was selected because of her incredible work developing and teaching the BA in public health.

    Mapuana Antonio won the Student Excellence in Research Award for her studies of Native Hawaiian physical and mental health resilience. Mapuana graduated in May 2017 with her DrPH and is now teaching at Leeward Community College.

     

  • Spring 2017 OPHS Undergraduate Summit a Success!

    Posted May 2, 2017 at 9:37am

    The Spring 2017 OPHS Undergraduate Summit was a success. This event was a poster presentation of project proposals from 4-5pm and final projects from 5-6pm for their Applied Learning Experience (a BA Public Health degree requirement). There were 58 students presenting in total (25 proposals and 33 final projects), including 31 students graduating later this month and 5 Honors students. 

    Thank you to all the fabulous people who helped make this event possible including Lisa Kehl, Debbie Drummondo, Maya Uemoto, Chevelle Davis, Dejah Fa’asoa, and OPHSAS. Congratulations to all of our wonderful students for their accomplishments

  • Assistant Professor Catherine Pirkle Selected as a Fulbright Specialist

    Posted Mar 15, 2017 at 10:33am

    Assistant Professor Catherine Pirkle (Health Policy and Management) has been selected as a Fulbright Specialist by the J. William Fulbright Council for International Exchange of Scholars. She will collaborate with faculty at the College of Health Sciences of Trairí (FACISA), which is a rural satellite campus of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte in Northeast, Brazil.

    Dr. Pirkle will be working on FACISA’s health system and research capacity to address issues such as reproductive and sexual health including early pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and violence against women. She will lead teacher training and participate in short-term lecturing and seminars.

    Dr. Pirkle has a long history of working in underserved global settings including West Africa and Arctic regions. She has strong, long-term international connections to research teams around the globe with which to link faculty and staff at FACISA. She will help prepare students to address critical public health needs and to attract more local and international students.

    As a Fulbright Specialist, Dr. Pirkle will also be considered for additional future overseas assignments that require her unique expertise during the next three years.

  • Fall 2016 OPHS Undergraduate Summit a Success!

    Posted Dec 6, 2016 at 3:29pm

    The Fall 2016 OPHS Undergraduate Summit was a success. This event was a poster presentation of project proposals from 4-5pm and final projects from 5-6pm for their Applied Learning Experience (a BA Public Health degree requirement). 

    There were 45 students presenting in total (20 proposals and 25 final projects), including 17 students graduating later this month and 2 Honors students. 

  • OPHS Hosts UH-Fudan University Public Health Summit

    Posted Sep 29, 2016 at 11:43am

    The UHM Office of Public Health Studies (OPHS) hosted a UH-Fudan Public Health Summit from September 26-28, 2016. Eight faculty members from Fudan University and Wuhan University in China — including Wen Chen, dean of the Fudan School of Public Health — attended the summit at East-West Center’s Jefferson Hall.

    UH President David Lassner, School of Social Work Dean Noreen Mokuau and OPHS Director Kathryn Braun gave opening remarks, emphasizing the value of and their support for international exchange and collaborations. More than 50 UH faculty and students attended the summit.

    The summit’s main purpose was to highlight and promote academic exchange and research between UH Mānoa and China. Summit speakers shared views on health policy and reform, aging, environmental degradation and global health challenges — all important areas of public health.

    During the summit, UH Mānoa signed an agreement with Fudan University for 2016-2021. The agreement renews the decade-long collaboration between the OPHS and Fudan University School of Public Health. The UH-Fudan agreement formalizes a BS/MS fast track program, also called the 4+1+1 Program.  Students who pursue and successfully earn bachelor degrees at Fudan in preventive medicine study may then pursue a fast-track master’s degree in public health at UH Mānoa.

    “The successful 10-year relationship between UH Mānoa and Fudan University in public health is testament to the evolving need for international partnerships on global health,” stated Dean Mokuau.

    Added Dean of Graduate Education Krystyna Aune, “Fudan University has a strong worldwide reputation for its research, teaching and caliber of students.  The Public Health 4+1+1 Program will further strengthen the partnership between UHM and Fudan, and attract stellar students to pursue graduate education here.”

    OPHS pioneered such fast-track degree programs at UH Mānoa, with its first agreement with Wuhan University in 2008. To date, OPHS has developed such agreements with four universities in China — Wuhan, Fudan, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, and Nanchang.  OPHS also has agreements in place with Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany), the University of Tokyo, Korea University and Catholic University of Korea.

    “More than 125 Chinese students and faculty have visited UH, and more than 80 UH students and faculty have visited China. They all have benefited from this international exchange program by developing research credentials and experience,” said Dr. Yuanan Lu, the professor who has led OPHS since 2007. “The objective of our UH-China program is to enhance public health education globally and to promote international cooperation with China, the most populated country in the world.”

    Over the past ten years, OPHS has worked with four leading schools of public health in China, including Fudan and Wuhan universities. Beside student and faculty exchange, research collaborations between OPHS and China have resulted in more than 50 peer-reviewed publications in environmental health, social and behavioral health, health policy and management, and epidemiology.

    To further strengthen the UHM-China partnership, OPHS has established the China-Hawaii Public Health Exchange Fund at the UH Foundation. To donate, see https://giving.uhfoundation.org/ and search for account 12748304, or contact Dr. Yuanan Lu at (808) 956-2702 or yuanan@hawaii.edu.

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