Abstract

The Kūʻokoʻa: Sustaining Abundant ʻĀina & Resilient Leadership proposal was submitted by Hui ʻĀina Momona in collaboration with twenty-­five faculty across the University of Hawaiʻi who teach courses and conduct research in key areas related to sustainability, resilience and aloha ʻāina in fourteen different departments. To enhance community capacity to cultivate, care for and govern natural resources at the local level throughout Hawai‘i nei, we will establish the Kūʻokoʻa Certificate in ʻĀina Based Leadership (Aloha ʻĀina Certificate), a graduate-­level program focused on culturally grounded resource management and sustainability. We aim to connect university and community more closely by:

  1. working with communities, and collaborating with mālama ʻāina organizations and agencies,
  2. catering courses to students, working professionals and community members alike,
  3. converting existing courses across the university to distance offerings,
  4. providing place-based learning through field courses,
  5. focusing research and learning on community needs, and
  6. building an interactive multi-media resource center ( ʻAuamo.org ) that enhances community access to and application of research and other existing resources. These efforts will position the University of Hawaiʻi to extend its reach to enhance the resilience of communities across the pae ‘āina, while enhancing pono decision-making regarding land and resources in Hawai‘i.

Principal Investigators

Mehana Blaich Vaughan (Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, CTAHR; Hui ʻĀina Momona; UH Sea Grant College Program, CREST Coastal Sustainability Hire, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology), Malia Nobrega-Oliveira (Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge)

Co-Principal Investigators

Kamana Beamer (Hui ʻĀina Momona; Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies, HSHK; William S. Richardson School of Law), Greg Chun (Hui ʻĀina Momona; William S. Richardson School of Law; Social Science Research Institute, College of Social Sciences (CSS)), Malia Akutagawa (Hui ʻĀina Momona; Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies, HSHK; William S. Richardson School of Law), Noelani Puniwai (Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies, HSHK), Noelani Goodyear-Kaʻōpua (Indigenous Politics Program, Department of Political Science, CSS), Kekuewa Kikiloi (Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies, HSHK), Rosie Alegado (UH Sea Grant College Program, CREST Coastal Sustainability Hire, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology; Center of Microbial Oceanography, Department of Oceanography, SOEST), Oceana Francis (UH Sea Grant College Program, CREST Coastal Sustainability Hire, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering), Noa Lincoln (Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, CTAHR; Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, CTAHR), and Carl Lovell Imaikalani Evensen (Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, CTAHR)

Collaborators

Faculty across the UH Mānoa campus, and members of CREST, the UH Sea Grant Coastal Resilience and Sustainability Team, and Native Hawaiian faculty, along with KUPU, DLNR, Kua ʻĀina Ulu ʻAuamo, OHA and communities across Hawaiʻi nei