Christine Beaule

Assistant Professor

Moore Hall 462
1890 East-West Rd.
Honolulu, HI 96822

Phone: (808) 956-4170
Fax: (808) 956-9536
E-mail: beaule@hawaii.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, Anthropology Department, December 2002. Thesis entitled Late Intermediate Period Political Economy and Household Organization at Jachakala, Bolivia (under Dr. Marc Bermann).
  • Latin American Studies Graduate Certificate, University of Pittsburgh, 2002.
  • M.A., University of Pittsburgh, Anthropology Department, 1999. Thesis entitled Wealth and Power: The Role of Prestige Goods in the Political Economies of El Aspero and the Upper Mantaro Valley, Peru.
  • B.A. with Honors, Northwestern University, Anthropology Department with dual major in Philosophy, 1993. Honors Thesis entitled A Model of Sociopolitical Evolution for Preceramic Coastal Peru: The Maritime Chiefdom (Advisor: Dr. Gil Stein).

Courses Taught

  • LAIS 360B Studies in Culture: Latin America
  • LAIS/ANTH 372B Indigenous Peoples of Mesoamerica (Writing-Intensive)
  • LAIS/ANTH 372C Indigenous Peoples of the Andes (Writing-Intensive)
  • LAIS 468/HIST 478 Colonial Latin American History
  • SPAN 695 Colonial Latin American History
  • ANTH 151 and ANTH 151A Emerging Humanity
  • ANTH 380Archaeological Laboratory Techniques (Writing-Intensive)
  • ANTH 699 Independent Readings: The Archaeology of Colonialism
  • HON 491 Archaeology of Death

Research

My research has focused on the impact of trade relations with the ancient Tiwanaku State (ca. AD 400-1000) on small villages in the eastern altiplano of Oruro, Bolivia. Employing the methodologies and theoretical approaches of household archaeology, I have traced changes in the domestic economies of agropastoralists from two village sites—Jachakala and Condor Chinoka—through time, and tested models of the origins of complex societies against those patterns.

I have recently started a new project that aims to reconstruct settlement patterns and demographic levels from the Formative Period Wanakarani through Inka occupations of the eastern edge of the Oruro altiplano. The first stage of this multi-year project was conducted as a field school through UH, and I am hoping to continue the research through NSF’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates program in 2012. See the field school website here for more information:

http://www.anthropology.hawaii.edu/Fieldschools/Obrajes/

Grants and Awards

  • Settlement Patterns, Demography, and Inter-regional Exchange in Eastern Oruro, Bolivia. Grant application for three-year project in preparation for submission to the National Science Foundation’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.
  • Sustainable Agriculture in the Bolivian Highlands. Co-PI with Dr David Schaad of Duke University’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Submitted to P3 competition, a National Student Design Competition for Sustainability Focusing on People, Prosperity, and the Planet—Agriculture (EPA-G2010-P3-Q50).
  • Bridge to Market: A Sustainable Mobility Plan for Moving Agricultural Products over a Rain Swollen River in the Bolivian Highlands (2009). Co-PI with Dr David Schaad of Duke University’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Construction costs are funded by the Iovino Family Foundation, and the Thornton Tomasetti Foundation.
  • Duke University Award for Excellence in Teaching Writing (2008).
  • Building Bridges: Site Assessment with Engineering Students and Archaeological Site Mapping in the Obrajes Valley of Oruro, Bolivia (2008). Title VI Faculty Travel Grants for Research in Latin America and the Caribbean, Duke University.
  • Expanding Horizons at the World Archaeological Congress in Dublin, Ireland (2008). Mellon Research Grant, University Writing program, Duke University.
  • Blackboard Great Ideas Mini-Grant, Center for Instructional Technology, Duke University. Award for innovative use of technology in teaching (2008).
  • Logistical Preparation for 2008 Archaeological Settlement Patterns and Demography Project in Eastern Oruro, Bolivia (2007). Title VI Faculty Travel Grants for Research in Latin America and the Caribbean, Duke University.
  • Quechua Immersive Language Training for Archaeological Research in Bolivia (2006). Mellon Research Grant, University Writing program, Duke University.
  • The Andean Political Economy on the Periphery: Households, Status, and Gender at Condor Chinoka, Bolivia (2005). Heinz Grant Program in Latin American Archaeology.
  • Dean’s Tuition Scholarship (2002), Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh.
  • Fulbright IIE Grant awarded for dissertation project entitled Elite Emergence and Political Economy on the Tiwanaku Periphery (1997).
  • National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant awarded for project entitled Late Intermediate Period Political Economy and Household Organization at Jachakala, Bolivia (1997), Principal Investigator: Dr. Marc Bermann.
  • Dean’s Tuition Scholarship (1997), Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh.
  • Graduate Student Field Research Travel Grant (1996), Center for Latin American Studies, University of Pittsburgh, for project entitled Formative Period Wankarani Intervillage Relations: Craft Specialization, Long-Distance Exchange, and Settlement Hierarchy.
 

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