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Research team discovers intact ‘ghost ship’ off the coast of Oahu

The USS Kailua, 1943.

Researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries today announced the discovery of an intact “ghost ship” in 2,000 feet of water nearly 20 miles off the coast of Oʻahu.  Sitting upright, its solitary mast still standing and the ship’s wheel still in place, the hulk of the former cable ship Dickenson, later the ... Read More »

Climate researchers discover El Nino’s fueling effect on intense hurricanes

Typhoon Vicente

El Niño, the abnormal warming of sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, is a well-studied tropical climate phenomenon that occurs every few years. It has major impacts on society and Earth’s climate – inducing intense droughts and floods in multiple regions of the globe. Further, scientists have observed that El Niño greatly influences the yearly variations of tropical cyclones ... Read More »

Another human footprint in the ocean: Rising anthropogenic nitrate levels

boat deck

Human-induced changes to Earth’s carbon cycle – for example, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and ocean acidification – have been observed for decades. However, a study published this week in Science showed human activities, in particular industrial and agricultural processes, have also had significant impacts on the upper ocean nitrogen cycle. The rate of deposition of reactive nitrogen (i.e., nitrogen oxides ... Read More »

Hunting monsters…with sound

Infrasound data

UH Mānoa’s Milton Garces has contributed a new essay to the Sounding Out blog’s “Hearing the Unheard” series.  The story highlights Garces’ research work in infrasound, low-frequency sounds in the atmosphere that are inaudible to the human ear, but can carry for thousands of kilometers.  Infrasound has a variety of important and practical applications including its use in detecting secret missile ... Read More »

Researchers embarking on extraordinary expedition to Loihi Seamount

R/V Falkor

UH Mānoa is leading an expedition to Loihi Seamount, southeast of the island of Hawai‘i, whose base remains largely unexplored. Dr. Brian Glazer, lead scientist and Associate Professor of Oceanography, his team from UHM, and colleagues from the University of Minnesota, IFREMER Centre de Brest and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), will map the Seamount’s deeper reaches using WHOI’s Sentryautonomous underwater ... Read More »

[VIDEO] Simons Foundation funds UH microbial oceanography research

boat deck

For decades now, the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa has been at the forefront of microbial oceanography—the study of microscopic organisms, or microorganisms, in the sea. Because of the cutting edge research done at the university’s School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology and C-MORE, the Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education, UH Mānoa was awarded one of ... Read More »

Water in Moon rocks provides clues and questions about lunar history

Pyroclastic glass beads

A recent review of hundreds of chemical analyses of Moon rocks indicates that the amount of water in the Moon’s interior varies regionally – revealing clues about how water originated and was redistributed in the Moon.  These discoveries provide a new tool to unravel the processes involved in the formation of the Moon, how the lunar crust cooled, and its impact ... Read More »

Deep origins to the behavior of our volcanoes

View of eruption plume from Overlook vent in Halema'uma'u crater on the summit of Kilauea volcano on 27 March 2008, 9 days after the start of the ongoing eruption. Credit: Christine Heliker, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey.

Kīlauea volcano, on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, typically has effusive eruptions, wherein magma flows to create ropy pāhoehoe lava, for example. However, Kīlauea less frequently erupts more violently, showering scoria and blocks over much of the surface of the island. To explain the variability in Kīlauea’s eruption styles, a team including Bruce Houghton, the Gordon Macdonald Professor of Volcanology ... Read More »

Investigating effects of military munitions disposed of off Pearl Harbor

HUMMA project investigator

On March 29, a full array of state-of-the-art technologies including several owned and operated by University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa School of Ocean Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) will be used in the latest phase of an Army-funded research effort to further investigate sea-disposed military munitions. This research will take place south of Pearl Harbor at an area designated by ... Read More »

Antarctic fjords are climate-sensitive hotspots of diversity

Giant bristle worm

Deep inside the dramatic subpolar fjords of Antarctica, researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have discovered an unexpected abundance and diversity at the seafloor. During a recent expedition, UH scientists for the first time studied the seafloor communities of glacier dominated fjords along the west Antarctic Peninsula, a region undergoing very rapid climate warming. The scientists expected to ... Read More »

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