Friday , April 18 2014
Home / Tag Archives: SOEST

Tag Archives: SOEST

Feed Subscription

Investigating effects of military munitions disposed of off Pearl Harbor

HUMMA project investigator

On March 29, a full array of state-of-the-art technologies including several owned and operated by University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa School of Ocean Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) will be used in the latest phase of an Army-funded research effort to further investigate sea-disposed military munitions. This research will take place south of Pearl Harbor at an area designated by ... Read More »

Antarctic fjords are climate-sensitive hotspots of diversity

Giant bristle worm

Deep inside the dramatic subpolar fjords of Antarctica, researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have discovered an unexpected abundance and diversity at the seafloor. During a recent expedition, UH scientists for the first time studied the seafloor communities of glacier dominated fjords along the west Antarctic Peninsula, a region undergoing very rapid climate warming. The scientists expected to ... Read More »

An ecosystem-based approach to protect the deep sea from mining

Starfish in deep sea

Five hundred miles southeast of Hawai‘i, in international waters far out of sight of any land, there are vast mineral resources 5,000 meters below the sea. Manganese nodules, rich in commercially valuable mineral resources including nickel, copper, manganese, cobalt and rare-earth elements, overlay a broad swath of the deep-sea floor. It took millions of years to form these deposits. The ... Read More »

Achieving Smart Growth in ‘Ewa, Hawai‘i

Rendering of Kapolei

A University of Hawaiʻi Sea Grant College Program (UH Sea Grant) article on smart growth and community design in ‘Ewa, Hawaiʻi, is the featured story on the National Sea Grant Office website.  View the full article here. “What we do on land directly impacts the ocean, making sustainable development critical to coastal ocean health,” said Kathryn R. MacDonald, communications specialist in the National ... Read More »

Paths of possible debris from storm surge of super typhoon Haiyan

Paths of possible debris from storm surge of super typhoon Haiyan

Images of the storm surge from super typhoon Haiyan as it struck the city of Tacloban on November 8 awaken memories of the tsunami devastation in Japan a little over 2½ years ago. How much and what kind of debris the storm surge washed into the ocean is not yet known. Should such debris have been generated, however, a large ... Read More »

Website tracks tagged sharks off of Maui

Tiger shark

Scientists from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) completed the first phase of a project to observe the movements of tiger sharks caught and tagged around the island of Maui. In response to an uptick in the number of shark attacks recorded on Maui, the State of Hawaiʻi’s Department of Land and Natural Resources ... Read More »

Safety in Numbers? Not so for corals.

Acropora species coral

Traditionally, it was assumed that corals do not face a risk of extinction unless they become very rare or have a very restricted range. A team of scientists from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM), Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has revealed that global changes in climate and ocean ... Read More »

[VIDEO] Open house excites future scientists

Child with magnifying glass

The School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology celebrated 25 years of excellence and innovation in 2013. Its popular biennial Open House featured the four SOEST departments and numerous researcher units, including the UH Mānoa Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education; the engineering, physics, astronomy, marine biology and Hawaiian studies departments; the National Weather Service; the National Oceanic ... Read More »

El Niño is becoming more active

Corals, tree rings, and sediment cores

A new approach to analyzing paleo-climate reconstructions of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon resolves disagreements and reveals that ENSO activity during the 20th century has been unusually high compared to the past 600 years. The results are published in Climate of the Past by a team of scientists from the University of New South Wales, the University of Hawai‘i at ... Read More »

Scroll To Top