Home / Tag Archives: School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology (SOEST)

Tag Archives: School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology (SOEST)

Protecting diversity on coral reefs: DNA may hold the key

Coral reef in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument teeming with fishes. (credit: James Watt, courtesy of PMNM/NOAA)

Coral reefs are widely known for their stunning array of color, shape and forms of life, making them a model for extreme biodiversity. Hidden within the multitude of reef inhabitants, but no less important, is their genetic diversity— variability in DNA that gives species the capacity for adaptation, speciation and resilience in the face of stress. Research published on April 27 by a ...

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Coral toolkit allows floating larvae to transform into reef skeletons

Two newly settled juveniles and a swimming larva on coralline algae. (credit: H Putnam)

In a study published today, researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Rutgers University and the University of Haifa identified key and novel components of the molecular “toolkit” that allow corals to build their skeletons (called biomineralization) and described when—in the transformation from floating larvae to coral skeleton—these components are used. Corals are the sum of a symbiotic relationship between cnidarian animals and millions of ...

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Microbial takeover on coral reefs?

A healthy reef dominated by calcifying corals and coralline algae, Line Islands. (photo credit: Jennifer Smith, Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Coral reefs—the world’s most productive and diverse marine ecosystems—rely on a masterful recycling program to stay healthy. The corals and algae that form the base of the reef’s food web release a variety of nutrients that support a complex and efficient food chain. But when this system gets out of whack, the cycle breaks down and endangers the coral reef’s ...

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David Karl wins $770,000 Balzan Prize in oceanography

Dr. David Karl

David Karl, director of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE), was awarded the 2015 Balzan Prize in recognition of his lifetime of impactful research in the field of microbial oceanography. This honor includes a prize of 750,000 Swiss Francs ($770,000). Karl is also the Victor and Peggy Brandstrom Pavel ...

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New study uses meteorites to date moon-forming impact


Not too long after the planets began forming, a Mars-sized object slammed into Earth, creating the debris that would later coalesce into the moon. Some of the debris from this giant impact escaped all the way out to the asteroid belt. Collisions there left shock-heating signatures – a permanent record of the impact event – that can still be detected ...

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David Karl elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

David Karl

Some of the world’s most accomplished leaders from academia, business, public affairs, the humanities and the arts have been elected members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among those elected this year is David Karl, the Victor and Peggy Brandstrom Pavel Chair in Oceanography and Director of the Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) at ...

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[VIDEO] How to train your coral


Scientists warn extreme sea temperatures could cause a “historic” coral reef die-off around the world over, following a massive coral bleaching event in fall 2014 in the North Pacific. A huge swathe of the Pacific was affected, including the Northern Marianas Islands, Guam, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Hawai‘i, and Kiribati. Some areas recorded serious bleaching for the first time, and ...

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U.N. task force says new ocean telecom cables should be ‘green’

global undersea communications cable infrastructure

The global system of submarine telecommunications cables that supports our connected world is deaf, dumb and blind to the external ocean environment – and represents a major missed opportunity for tsunami warning and global climate monitoring, according to UH scientists and a United Nations task force. “For an additional 5-10 percent of the total cost of any new cable system ...

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New study shows the importance of jellyfish to deep-sea ecosystem

Jellyfish baits in the deep sea

This week, researchers from University of Hawai‘i, Norway, and the UK have shown with innovative experiments that a rise in jellyfish blooms near the ocean’s surface may lead to jellyfish falls that are rapidly consumed by voracious deep-sea scavengers.Previous anecdotal studies suggested that deep-sea animals might avoid dead jellyfish, causing dead jellyfish from blooms to accumulate and undergo slow degradation ...

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