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Science & Engineering

Bacteria affects sand more than seawater

manoa-engineering-shoreline

Sewage-contaminated coastal waters can lead to stomach aches, diarrhea and rashes for those who accidentally swallow harmful microbes or come into contact with them. New research recently published in the American Chemical Society (ACS) journal Environmental Science and Technology sheds light on why fecal contamination affects sand more than water. University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Associate Professor of Civil and ...

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New research uncovers brain circuit in fruit fly that detects anti-aphrodisiac

The decision to mate is influenced by pheromones. Photo credit: Klaus Dreisewerd and Joanne Yew.

New research, published today in eLife from a researcher at the Pacific Biosciences Research Center (PBRC), a newly integrated research unit of the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, identified the neural circuit in the brain of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) that is responsible for detecting a taste pheromone, ...

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Deep sea sharks are buoyant

Shark with tag

Scientists from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and University of Tokyo revealed that two species of deep-sea sharks, sixgill and prickly sharks, are positively buoyant—they have to work harder to swim downward than up and they can glide uphill for minutes at a time without using their tails. Their results were published in a recent study,“Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in ...

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[VIDEO] Third HI-SEAS mission accomplished

Zak Wilson

On Saturday, June 13, looking pale but smiling broadly, the six crew members of the Hawaiʻi Space Exploration Analog and Simulation or HI-SEAS mission emerged from the dome on the slopes of Mauna Loa where they had been isolated for eight months. Led by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, this third NASA-funded HI-SEAS mission was meant to simulate what ...

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UH Mānoa recognized for excellence in cybersecurity research

IT Center

The National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security have designated the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Research (CAE-R). “This designation is demonstrative of the quality and substance of the education the University of Hawaiʻi has to offer, and more importantly underscores justification for additional grant and research capacity ...

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Lake Tahoe research provides new insights on global change

Lake Tahoe

A recently published study on how natural and man-made sources of nitrogen are recycled through the Lake Tahoe ecosystem provides new information on how global change may affect the iconic blue lake. “High-elevation lakes, such as Lake Tahoe, are sentinels of climate change,” said Lihini Aluwihare, associate professor of geosciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) at UC San Diego ...

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Research team releases app for tracking Yellowstone geysers

Geyser

When people throughout the world want to watch the iconic Old Faithful eruption at Yellowstone National Park in real time, they now can turn to their smartphones, through a free app, courtesy of a UH Mānoa-led research team studying mobile media and communication. Brett Oppegaard, an assistant professor in the School of Communications within the College of Social Sciences, has led the development ...

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Advanced Light Source evidence confirms combustion theory

soot formation

Researchers at UH Mānoa have published the first direct experimental evidence for the validity of a fundamental reaction mechanism thought to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution.  The so-called HACA mechanism–the hydrogen abstraction-acetylene addition mechanism–had so far only been speculated theoretically.  A news highlight from the Advanced Light Source user facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory describes the research ...

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U.N. task force says new ocean telecom cables should be ‘green’

global undersea communications cable infrastructure

The global system of submarine telecommunications cables that supports our connected world is deaf, dumb and blind to the external ocean environment – and represents a major missed opportunity for tsunami warning and global climate monitoring, according to UH scientists and a United Nations task force. “For an additional 5-10 percent of the total cost of any new cable system ...

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Massive debris pile reveals risk of huge tsunamis in Hawaii

1946 Hawaii tsunami

A mass of marine debris discovered in a giant sinkhole provides evidence that at least one mammoth tsunami, larger than any in Hawaiʻi’s recorded history, has struck the islands, and that a similar disaster could happen again, new research finds.  Scientists, led by Rhett Butler, Director of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) at UH Mānoa, are reporting ...

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