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Inventor of free-electron laser to lecture at 2015 Nobel Symposium

Free-electron laser FELIX

Professor John Madey of the UH Mānoa Department of Physics and Astronomy has been invited to give a plenary lecture at the Nobel Symposium on Free Electron Laser Research, which will be held in Sigtuna (near Stockholm), Sweden, from June 14 -18, 2015.  The Symposium is devoted to an “area of science where breakthroughs are occurring” and is sponsored by the Nobel Foundation and the Knut ... Read More »

UH partners on R&D project to improve nuclear arms control technology

infrasound listening station

The University of Hawai‘i is a key team member in a new five-year, $25 million research and development program focused on improving the nation’s nuclear arms control technology. Milton Garces, associate researcher in the Hawai‘i Institute for Geophysics and Planetology, will lead the infrasound portion of the new program funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The consortium effort ... Read More »

Klaus Sattler recognized among 100 notable

Klaus Sattler

Klaus Sattler, a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa physics professor, has just been featured on “Learn from the Best: 100 Notable Professors at Top Research Universities” by OnlinePhDProgram.org. The website is a comprehensive guide to accredited online PhD programs. The article points out that academic research is a driving force behind innovation in science, technology and culture. The published list comprises 100 ... Read More »

Cities support more native biodiversity than previously thought

Honolulu skyline and grass

The rapid conversion of natural lands to cement-dominated urban centers is causing great losses in biodiversity. But Chris Lepczyk, an associate professor in the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources at UH Mānoa, is a contributor to a new study showing that surprisingly high numbers of plant and animal species persist and even flourish in urban environments—to the tune ... Read More »

Moth lineage provides a key to species diversification

Hyposmocoma caterpillar casings

To many, moths are just the dull relatives of butterflies that often startle us in the dark. But for UH Mānoa junior researcher William Haines, former junior researcher Patrick Schmitz and professor Daniel Rubinoff, these fascinating creatures provide insights into Hawai‘i’s ancient, vanished ecosystems. The College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources entomologists published their findings in an article, “Ancient diversification ... Read More »

Reintroducing the Native Hawaiian Hāhā plant

Lyon_Cyanea_Rare_Plants

Recently, the Lyon Arboretum Micropropagation Lab, Lyon Arboretum Seed Storage Lab, Pahole Rare Plant Facility, O`ahu Plant Extinction Prevention Program (OPEPP), and the State Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DLNR DOFAW), and volunteers were able to re-introduce a Native Hawaiian Hāhā, Cyanea grimesiana (subspecies grimesiana), to the State’s Mānoa Cliffs Restoration Site within the Honolulu ... Read More »

University of Hawaii partners on $5.3-million cyberinfrastructure award

David Lassner

The University of Hawaiʻi is one of the founding partners of a new initiative led by Clemson University to enable a national network of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Research and Education Facilitators (ACI-REFs) that will broaden the research and education impacts of advanced computing resources at campuses across the country. Advanced cyberinfrastructure refers to high-performance computing systems, massive data storage systems and visualization environments, all linked ... Read More »

Intensity matters in new tropical cyclone research award

Assistant Professor Michael M. Bell

UH Mānoa’s Michael Bell wins NSF CAREER grant University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Assistant Professor Michael Bell has been awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Grant, recognizing his early-career work on tropical storms and his promising future in research and science education. He is the fourth UH Mānoa professor in two years to be honored with a prestigious NSF ... Read More »

Corroborating the castaway story

Path of tracers

The fisherman’s improbable 13-month voyage from Mexico westward across the Pacific agrees with simulations of a computer model developed at the University Hawai‘i at Mānoa International Pacific Research Center. Scientist Nikolai Maximenko and Scientific Programmer Jan Hafner placed 16 tracers into their ocean model 200 nautical miles southwest of the coastal fishing village Chiapas, Mexico, on December 20, 2012, around the ... Read More »

Ecology paper named one of 100 most influential

Lyon_Cyanea_Rare_Plants

Tamara Ticktin, a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa botanist and ethnoecologist, authored a research paper chosen as one of the 100 most influential papers published by the British Ecological Society journals in its 100-year history. Her paper, “The ecological implications of harvesting non-timber forest products,” was published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, one of the Journals of the British ... Read More »

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