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[VIDEO] World’s largest marine reserve created in Pacific

Hawaii Institute for Marine Biology

On Thursday, September 25, President Obama used his legal authority to create the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve in the central Pacific Ocean, by expanding the Pacific Remote Islands National Marine Monument. The Pew Charitable Trusts has shared this video, “Protecting a Legacy for the Future,” about this landmark expansion.  It features Robert Richmond, a research professor and director ... Read More »

New cell sorting method developed by UH Manoa mechanical engineer

Cell Sorting

UH Mānoa College of Engineering mechanical engineer Yi Zuo has developed a new, high-throughput method for sorting cells capable of separating 10 billion bacterial cells in 30 minutes. The finding has already proven useful for studying bacterial cells and microalgae, and could one day have direct applications for biomedical research and environmental science—basically any field in which a large quantity ... Read More »

Discussion paper: Pesticide regulation amid the influence of industry

Chiricahua leopard frog, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service (credit: Jim Rorabaugh)

For UH Mānoa graduate student Leigh Ann Boswell, an invitation to contribute to a discussion paper on pesticide regulation led to a surprising discovery: Good research gets cut out of government rule-making.  It happens all of the time. Boswell joined lead author Michelle Boone from Miami University of Ohio in exploring these murky waters in a recently published article in ... Read More »

Bladder cancer national clinical trial launched by Cancer Center, Queen’s

Dr. Charles Rosser

The University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center, in partnership with The Queen’s Medical Center (Queen’s) via the Hawaiʻi Cancer Consortium, is launching a new national clinical drug trial looking at the effectiveness of a promising new drug against non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, the most common type of bladder cancer with very high recurrence rates. Unlike other national drug trials based on ... Read More »

From dandruff to deep sea vents, an ecologically hyper-diverse fungus

Malassezia sp.

A ubiquitous skin fungus linked to dandruff, eczema and other itchy, flaky maladies in humans has now been tracked to even further global reaches—including Hawaiian coral reefs and the extreme environments of arctic soils and deep sea vents. A review in the scientific journal PLOS Pathogens considers the diversity, ecology and distribution of the fungi of the genus Malassezia in light of new insights ... Read More »

Retrofits for the next big quake in Hawaii

In this video by media outlet Big Island Video News, UHM professor Donald Thomas outlines the very real risk to Hawaii from earthquakes. Many people may be surprised to learn that our state’s earthquake risk is as much as two times higher than areas of comparable size in California. In fact, the state has experienced 24 earthquakes greater than 6.0 ... Read More »

Electrical engineering graduate student wins prestigious fellowship

Jonathan H. Dang

Jonathan H. Dang, a UH Mānoa electrical engineering graduate student, has been named the 2014-15 recipient of the IEEE Life Members Graduate Study Fellowship in Electrical Engineering. Established in 2000, this prestigious award is given annually to one first-year, full-time graduate student in electrical engineering worldwide. The award carries a stipend of $10,000 per year, and is renewable for a ... Read More »

UH startup SmarTummy takes home $10K from national innovation competition

Larry Martin

A University of Hawai‘i (UH) startup company that designed a unique medical training device has won 3rd place in a national competition: the of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2014 Innovation Showcase (IShow). SMARTUMMY LLC, (SmarTummy) led by UH Mānoa graduate student Larry Martin, has developed a tool to train medical, nursing, and osteopathic students in conducting an abdominal ... Read More »

[VIDEO] The Koloa Project — preserving the endangered Hawaiian Duck

Koloa Maoli

Even wildlife biologists have a tough time telling the difference between the endangered Hawaiian Duck, Koloa Maoli, and the common mallard. Cross-breeding or hybridization between the two species is the primary reason the endemic Koloa duck is endangered. A new collaborative program between the State of Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the ... Read More »

Research leads to sensor breakthrough, promises safer structures

Haleiwa Bridge

UH Mānoa Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor David Ma and Graduate Student Hui Zhang have achieved a long-sought technical breakthrough by proving an efficient method of harvesting mechanical energy to power autonomous sensor networks. Their research findings appear in the prestigious Applied Physics Letters of the American Institute of Physics. Large-scale wireless sensor networks are extremely useful in monitoring the behavior of both ... Read More »

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