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Advanced Light Source evidence confirms combustion theory

soot formation

Researchers at UH Mānoa have published the first direct experimental evidence for the validity of a fundamental reaction mechanism thought to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution.  The so-called HACA mechanism–the hydrogen abstraction-acetylene addition mechanism–had so far only been speculated theoretically.  A news highlight from the Advanced Light Source user facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory describes the research ... Read More »

U.N. task force says new ocean telecom cables should be ‘green’

global undersea communications cable infrastructure

The global system of submarine telecommunications cables that supports our connected world is deaf, dumb and blind to the external ocean environment – and represents a major missed opportunity for tsunami warning and global climate monitoring, according to UH scientists and a United Nations task force. “For an additional 5-10 percent of the total cost of any new cable system ... Read More »

Massive debris pile reveals risk of huge tsunamis in Hawaii

1946 Hawaii tsunami

A mass of marine debris discovered in a giant sinkhole provides evidence that at least one mammoth tsunami, larger than any in Hawaiʻi’s recorded history, has struck the islands, and that a similar disaster could happen again, new research finds.  Scientists, led by Rhett Butler, Director of the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) at UH Mānoa, are reporting ... Read More »

BOFFFFs [Big, Old, Fat, Fertile, Female Fish] sustain fisheries

Big Fish

Recreational fishermen prize large trophy fish.  Commercial fishing gear targets big fish.  After all, larger fish feed people’s egos as well as their bellies. A new compilation of research from around the world now shows that big, old, fat, fertile, female fish – known as BOFFFFs to scientists – are essential for ensuring that fishery stocks remain sustainable. “Information on ... Read More »

Misreporting diet information could impact nutrition recommendations for Hispanic community

quesadillas

You are what you eat, unless you’re not quite sure what you ate. A new paper by Jinan Banna and Marie Kainoa Fialkowski of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources and Marilyn Townsend of the University of California, Davis’ College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences takes a critical look at how faulty self-reporting ... Read More »

UH to develop new wireless communications systems to serve remote areas

HCAC testing communications technologies

Advanced communications technology could bring broadband wireless service to remote and rural areas in the Hawaiian Islands, under a new research grant funded by the National Science Foundation. The Hawai‘i Center for Advanced Communications at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s College of Engineering received $500,000 to pursue an innovative solution based on improving the efficiency of radio spectrum utilization. And ... Read More »

Turtle tumors linked to excessive nitrogen from land-based pollution

Green turtle with tumors

Some of Hawai‘i’s sea turtles are afflicted with chronic and often lethal tumors caused by consuming non-native algae superweeds along coastlines where nutrient pollution is unchecked. The disease responsible for these tumors is considered one of the leading causes of death in endangered green sea turtles. The new research was just published in the scientific journal PeerJ. Turtles that graze on ... Read More »

[VIDEO] World’s largest marine reserve created in Pacific

Hawaii Institute for Marine Biology

On Thursday, September 25, President Obama used his legal authority to create the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve in the central Pacific Ocean, by expanding the Pacific Remote Islands National Marine Monument. The Pew Charitable Trusts has shared this video, “Protecting a Legacy for the Future,” about this landmark expansion.  It features Robert Richmond, a research professor and director ... Read More »

New cell sorting method developed by UH Manoa mechanical engineer

Cell Sorting

UH Mānoa College of Engineering mechanical engineer Yi Zuo has developed a new, high-throughput method for sorting cells capable of separating 10 billion bacterial cells in 30 minutes. The finding has already proven useful for studying bacterial cells and microalgae, and could one day have direct applications for biomedical research and environmental science—basically any field in which a large quantity ... Read More »

Discussion paper: Pesticide regulation amid the influence of industry

Chiricahua leopard frog, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service (credit: Jim Rorabaugh)

For UH Mānoa graduate student Leigh Ann Boswell, an invitation to contribute to a discussion paper on pesticide regulation led to a surprising discovery: Good research gets cut out of government rule-making.  It happens all of the time. Boswell joined lead author Michelle Boone from Miami University of Ohio in exploring these murky waters in a recently published article in ... Read More »

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