Home / Ocean & Earth Sciences (page 8)

Ocean & Earth Sciences

Advances in animal tracking redefine how we discover and manage ocean life

Advances in telemetry enabled discoveries of tiger sharks' behavior and movement. Credit: K Holland.

A new paper, published this month in Science, details the explosion in aquatic animal tracking research over the past 30 years and its impact on discoveries about the movements, migrations, interactions and survival of both common and elusive aquatic species. The review, co-authored by Kim Holland, researcher at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB), ...

Read More »

Plants may run out of time to grow under ongoing climate change

Corn at Waimanalo Research Station Open House

A key potential “benefit” of global warming — namely, that plants at northern latitudes will thrive in a warmer world — is challenged by a new study released by University of Hawai’i scientists. The prevailing assumption ignores the fact that plants in the North will remain limited by solar radiation, curbing positive effects of warming and additional CO2 availability. In ...

Read More »

Professor Brian Bowen receives prestigious 2015 Kobe Award

Brian Bowen

Dr. Brian Bowen, research professor at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology and University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program funded researcher, was awarded the 2015 Kobe Award for lifetime achievement in aquatic biology. The award, established in 2011 by Suma Aqualife Park in Kobe, Japan, is given to only one scientist each year in honor of his or her considerable ...

Read More »

Dive discovers missing aircraft hangar of sunken WW II-era Japanese submarine

Pisces V submersible

The dramatic discovery of a lost World War II-era Imperial Japanese Navy mega-submarine by a University of Hawaiʻi and U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) team in December 2013 inspired a new search by NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Corporation, to find key missing pieces of the battleship. The recent survey, the first to return to I-400 submarine since its ...

Read More »

David Karl elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

David Karl

Some of the world’s most accomplished leaders from academia, business, public affairs, the humanities and the arts have been elected members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among those elected this year is David Karl, the Victor and Peggy Brandstrom Pavel Chair in Oceanography and Director of the Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) at ...

Read More »

[VIDEO] How to train your coral

Coral

Scientists warn extreme sea temperatures could cause a “historic” coral reef die-off around the world over, following a massive coral bleaching event in fall 2014 in the North Pacific. A huge swathe of the Pacific was affected, including the Northern Marianas Islands, Guam, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Hawai‘i, and Kiribati. Some areas recorded serious bleaching for the first time, and ...

Read More »

New research finds oceanic microbes behave in synchrony across ocean basins

Artist's rendering of the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), suspended from the flotation buoy during a free-drifting deployment for plankton sampling (Credit: MBARI, Moss Landing, CA).

Researchers from UH Mānoa and colleagues found that microbial communities in different regions of the Pacific Ocean displayed strikingly similar daily rhythms in their metabolism despite inhabiting extremely different habitats – the nutrient-rich waters off California and the nutrient-poor waters north of Hawai‘i. Furthermore, in each location, the dominant photoautotrophs – light-loving bacteria that need solar energy to help them photosynthesize ...

Read More »

UH Professor honored with American Meteorological Society’s highest award

Bin Wang

Bin Wang, professor and former chair of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at UH Mānoa, was awarded the 2015 Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal by the American Meteorological Society “for creative insights leading to important advances in the understanding of tropical and monsoonal processes and their predictability.” Wang has been with the Department of Atmospheric Sciences (formerly Department of Meteorology) at ...

Read More »

Research team discovers intact ‘ghost ship’ off the coast of Oahu

The USS Kailua, 1943.

Researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries today announced the discovery of an intact “ghost ship” in 2,000 feet of water nearly 20 miles off the coast of Oʻahu.  Sitting upright, its solitary mast still standing and the ship’s wheel still in place, the hulk of the former cable ship Dickenson, later the ...

Read More »

Climate researchers discover El Nino’s fueling effect on intense hurricanes

Typhoon Vicente

El Niño, the abnormal warming of sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, is a well-studied tropical climate phenomenon that occurs every few years. It has major impacts on society and Earth’s climate – inducing intense droughts and floods in multiple regions of the globe. Further, scientists have observed that El Niño greatly influences the yearly variations of tropical cyclones ...

Read More »