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EPA grants recognize two grad students working with corals

Colony of rare corals

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced $168,000 in fellowship grants to two graduate students at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB). John Burns and Raphael Ritson-Williams were named as recipients of the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) fellowship. Burns’ research will focus on the relationship between land-based sources of pollution and coral reef ecosystem function off the Hamakua ... Read More »

New study shows the importance of jellyfish to deep-sea ecosystem

Jellyfish baits in the deep sea

This week, researchers from University of Hawai‘i, Norway, and the UK have shown with innovative experiments that a rise in jellyfish blooms near the ocean’s surface may lead to jellyfish falls that are rapidly consumed by voracious deep-sea scavengers.Previous anecdotal studies suggested that deep-sea animals might avoid dead jellyfish, causing dead jellyfish from blooms to accumulate and undergo slow degradation ... Read More »

UH ranked among top universities for excellence in scientific publications

ResultsCities

The University of Hawai‘i has just been ranked among the top world universities for its scientific publications. On October 10, the National Taiwan University Ranking (NTU Ranking) team released the results of its 2014 Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities. The ranking lists the University of Hawai‘i as 203rd Overall, and 80th in the United States, out of the top 500 ... Read More »

*Deadline is Nov 3 – Apply today!* UH Sea Grant seeks proposals

He'eia Fishpond

The University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program is requesting preliminary proposals for funding available beginning February 1, 2016 and ending January 31, 2018. The application deadline is Friday, November 3, 2014. Proposals that integrate the physical, biological, and social sciences toward addressing issues that are relevant to living sustainably along coasts and that engage in graduate student training are ... Read More »

Seafood substitutions can expose consumers to unexpectedly high mercury

Fish market

New measurements from fish purchased at retail seafood counters in 10 different states show the extent to which mislabeling can expose consumers to unexpectedly high levels of mercury, a harmful pollutant. Fishery stock “substitutions”—which falsely present a fish of the same species, but from a different geographic origin—are the most dangerous mislabeling offense, according to new research by University of ... Read More »

[VIDEO] Touring C-MORE with ThinkTech Hawaii

Planktonic microbes

OC16 Hosts Duke Oihsio and Ali Yamashita discover the Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education building at UH Mānoa, with Director Dave Karl. C-MORE Hale was the first LEED Platinum building in the state of Hawai‘i for a laboratory facility. Learn more about C-MORE: http://cmore.soest.hawaii.edu/ Read More »

Rapid warming of the Atlantic is source of recent Pacific climate trends

Waves crashing over roadway

UH Mānoa climate scientists have partnered with Australian colleagues to solve a puzzle that has challenged scientists for over a decade. Climate models predict that the equatorial Pacific trades should weaken with increasing greenhouse gases. Yet, since the early 1990s, satellites and climate stations reveal a rapid and unprecedented strengthening of the Pacific trade winds, accelerating sea level rise in the ... Read More »

[VIDEO] Ocean expedition maps Loihi’s deepest reaches

R/V Falkor

The Lōʻihi Seamount is an active underwater volcano just over a half-mile below the ocean’s surface, 21 miles southeast of the island of Hawaiʻi. Now there is a greater understanding of the youngest volcano in the Hawaiian island chain, and the role submerged volcanoes play in Earth’s history, after a scientific expedition in the summer of 2014 led by researchers ... Read More »

Ocean’s most abundant organisms have clear daily cycles

Planktonic microbes

Imagine the open ocean as a microbial megacity, teeming with life too small to be seen. In every drop of water, hundreds of types of bacteria can be found.  Now scientists have discovered that communities of these ocean microbes have their own daily cycles—not unlike the residents of a bustling city who tend to wake up, commute, work, and eat ... Read More »

New tools forecast potential sea level flooding events

PacIOOS forecast

Seawater overtopping roadways or flooding homes and businesses in low-lying communities can threaten the public health and safety of Pacific Islanders. A team of physical oceanographers working with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’sPacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) has developed new tools to forecast potential inundation events so that affected communities can better prepare and respond to such threats days ... Read More »

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