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Ocean’s most abundant organisms have clear daily cycles

Planktonic microbes

Imagine the open ocean as a microbial megacity, teeming with life too small to be seen. In every drop of water, hundreds of types of bacteria can be found.  Now scientists have discovered that communities of these ocean microbes have their own daily cycles—not unlike the residents of a bustling city who tend to wake up, commute, work, and eat ... Read More »

New tools forecast potential sea level flooding events

PacIOOS forecast

Seawater overtopping roadways or flooding homes and businesses in low-lying communities can threaten the public health and safety of Pacific Islanders. A team of physical oceanographers working with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’sPacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) has developed new tools to forecast potential inundation events so that affected communities can better prepare and respond to such threats days ... Read More »

New study reveals whales as marine ecosystem engineers

Whale feeding habitats

Baleen and sperm whales, known collectively as the great whales, include the largest animals in the history of life on Earth. Though large in size, whales have long been considered too rare to make much of a difference in the ocean, and the focus of much marine ecological research has been on smaller organisms, such as algae and planktonic animals. ... Read More »

Researchers embarking on extraordinary expedition to Loihi Seamount

R/V Falkor

UH Mānoa is leading an expedition to Loihi Seamount, southeast of the island of Hawai‘i, whose base remains largely unexplored. Dr. Brian Glazer, lead scientist and Associate Professor of Oceanography, his team from UHM, and colleagues from the University of Minnesota, IFREMER Centre de Brest and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), will map the Seamount’s deeper reaches using WHOI’s Sentryautonomous underwater ... Read More »

New understanding of key ocean passageway could aid climate change forecasts

Indonesian Throughflow linking Pacific Ocean to Indian Ocean

The passageway that links the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean is acting differently because of climate change and now its new behavior could in turn affect climate in both ocean basins in new ways. UH Mānoa physical oceanographer James Potemra is co-author of a study led by Janet Sprintall of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.  The scientists ... Read More »

Fostering Hawaii’s young marine scientists one expedition at a time

Student with MOCNESS net

On Thursday, June 19, 2014, University of Hawai‘i marine science students returned from the last of three research expeditions aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The group sailed to Station ALOHA, a long-term ocean sampling site 60 miles north of O‘ahu. The 11 students on this past cruise makes a total of 58 UH students (graduates and undergraduates) who have ... Read More »

[VIDEO] Largest ever private award to UH funds microbial oceanography research

boat deck

For decades now, the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa has been at the forefront of microbial oceanography—the study of microscopic organisms, or microorganisms, in the sea. Because of the cutting edge research done at the university’s School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology and C-MORE, the Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education, UH Mānoa was awarded the largest ... Read More »

Antarctic ice-sheet less stable than previously assumed

Iceberg in Scotia Sea

The first evidence for massive and abrupt iceberg calving in Antarctica, dating back 19,000 to 9,000 years ago, has now been documented by an international team of geologists and climate scientists. Their findings are based on analysis of new, long deep sea sediment cores extracted from the region between the Falkland Islands and the Antarctic Peninsula. The study in the ... Read More »

Water in Moon rocks provides clues and questions about lunar history

Pyroclastic glass beads

A recent review of hundreds of chemical analyses of Moon rocks indicates that the amount of water in the Moon’s interior varies regionally – revealing clues about how water originated and was redistributed in the Moon.  These discoveries provide a new tool to unravel the processes involved in the formation of the Moon, how the lunar crust cooled, and its impact ... Read More »

Precursor volcano to the island of O‘ahu discovered

Map showing volcanoes thought to have made up the region of O‘ahu, Hawai‘i

  Researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM), Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de L’Environment (France), and Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute recently discovered that O‘ahu actually consists of three major Hawaiian shield volcanoes, not two, as previously thought.  The island of O‘ahu, as we know it today, is the remnants of two volcanoes, Wai‘anae and Ko‘olau.  But ... Read More »

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