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Health Sciences & Social Welfare

UH medical students’ research recognized at national liver disease meeting

JABSOM liver researchers

University of Hawai`i medical school researchers had already sparked national news when they presented research posters last November in Boston at the national conference of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, the leading organization of scientists and health-care professionals committed to preventing and curing liver disease. The findings by the John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) students ...

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Rare cancer found in Nevada likely caused by asbestos in nature

178px-Mesothelioma

Southern Nevada counties that include Las Vegas show high proportionsof women and younger residents coming down with a rare and aggressive cancer more commonly found in older men occupationally exposed to asbestos, suggesting that naturally occurring mineral fibers in that region are a contributing source of the cancers, University of Hawai‘i Cancer Center researchers have found. The findings published in ...

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Cancer from asbestos caused by more than one cell mutation

Cancer Center

It has been a long-held belief that tumors arising from exposure to asbestos are caused by mutations in one cell, which then produces multiple clones. This hypothesis is challenged by new research published in the open access Journal of Translational Medicine, which suggests it is caused by mutations in multiple cells. Malignant mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that ...

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Medical professor nationally recognized for work on infectious diseases

Pediatrics Professor and scientist Dr. Richard Yanagihara (pictured fifth from left) was recognized for his infectious disease research.

John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) Pediatrics Professor and scientist Dr. Richard Yanagihara has received a national award for his work to expand infectious disease research capabilities at UH, and for his prominent role in helping focus attention on needed research into why people of certain cultural backgrounds suffer disproportionately worse health. The award was presented at the 2014 Minority Health and Health ...

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Long lives, short lives: Why are there stark differences among Hawai`i’s people?

JABSOM geriatric medicine

The University of Hawai`i’s multidisciplinary research into why some of Hawai`i’s residents live the longest while others struggle to get beyond their 50’s will continue under the leadership of John A. Burns School of Medicine Dean Jerris Hedges, MD and Dr. Noreen Mokuau. The $15.4 million, five-year renewal comes on the heels of a successful foundation laid in the first ...

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Bringing gender equity into research

Marla Berry, PhD

Are there gender differences in how males and females react to nutrients? University of Hawai`i at Mānoa researcher Dr. Marla Berry is working to find out, and her efforts are part of a new initiative announced by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to begin addressing persistent gender bias in laboratory research. Women are not adequately represented in many clinical ...

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Ebola: What do we know?

CDC Response Volunteers

The Center for Disease Control’s response to Ebola is the largest international outbreak response in CDC’s history.  As of September 16, CDC had more than 100 disease detectives on the ground in West Africa, supported by hundreds of public health emergency response experts stateside. On September 17, the Department of Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology and Pharmacology at JABSOM hosted a ...

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$11M in new NIH funding for groundbreaking work in reproductive research

green lamb

The Institute for Biogenesis Research at the John A. Burns School of Medicine has been awarded $10.8 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue its groundbreaking work in reproductive and developmental biomedical research. The Institute laid the scientific foundation for human in vitro fertilization under founder Dr. Ryuzo Yanagimachi, whose assisted reproductive methods are still being used around ...

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Culture and family influence on smoking in Filipina girls

girl smoking

Smoking rates for youth in the U.S. have been declining, but the trend does not hold true for some Asian American ethnicities.  Recent results from Hawai‘i’s Youth Tobacco Survey indicate that 20.1% of Filipina high school girls smoke, compared to only 5.6% of Japanese and 5.3% of Chinese girls.  In fact, Filipinas in Hawai‘i are picking up their first cigarettes ...

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Epigeneticist from Wai’anae discovers science behind native traditions

Alika Maunakea

Epigenetics and epigenomics are big and somewhat unfamiliar words to many, but they are likely terms you will hear about more and more. Department of Native Hawaiian Health researcher and Assistant Professor Dr. Alika Maunakea’s studies are helping to ensure that happens. His research in the field, detailing a link between epigenomics and alternate promoter usage, has been published in ...

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