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Spiritual side of indigenous ocean sports explored


Eight years ago, Harald Barkhoff, professor of kinesiology and exercise sciences at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, started a lifelong commitment to participate in Uluākea, a program managed by the Kīpuka Native Hawaiian Student Center designed to help develop the university into more of a “Hawaiian place of learning.” Cultural practitioners at Uluākea teach faculty in various academic disciplines ...

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Coral reef resiliency research draws high-profile investments

A healthy reef with associated high ecological, cultural and economic value. (photo credit: Robert Richmond)

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology researcher and coral expert Ruth Gates and her team are racing against time and climate change to breed corals that can withstand future ocean conditions and that can be used to restore and build resilience in our reefs. Part of that work involves figuring out why healthy brown corals thrive while ...

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Student engineers participate in Native Hawaiian STEM symposium

IKE student symposium presentation

The 4th Annual Indigenous Knowledge in Engineering (IKE) Student Symposium held on August 15, 2015 focused on hōʻike, meaning culminating demonstration. The IKE program helps promote Native Hawaiians in engineering. Students who presented at the symposium completed a summer engineering experience, finished a pre-engineering math emporium course and a completed a hands-on engineering or research project over the academic year ...

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Lunar conference on climate change launched at UH Mānoa


Hundreds of cultural experts, scientists and community leaders convened on September 25 at the East-West Center at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa to apply the use of the traditional lunar calendar and explore how ancestral knowledge can address and mitigate the impacts of climate change. The ʻAimalama conference, which featured panel discussions, site trips and presentations, was launched by Pualani ...

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Herbarium links up with largest ex-situ plant conservation program in world

Acacia koa seeds being prepared for long-term storage

The Joseph F. Rock Herbarium in the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa botany department has initiated a new research collaboration with the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership project. The Millennium Seed Bank Partnership, a global program of the Royal Botanic Garden in the United Kingdom, is the largest ex-situ plant conservation program in the world. The focus is on global plant ...

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College of Education doctorate graduate wins international award

Dr. Makalapua Alencastre

Makalapua Alencastre, Assistant Professor of Indigenous Education at UH Hilo and UHM College of Education alumni, is the winner of the 2015 Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) Dissertation in Practice of the Year Award. Her dissertation, E Hoʻoulu ʻIa Nā Kumu Mauli Ola Hawaiʻi: Preparing Hawaiian Cultural Identity Teachers, was selected for its high quality research and potential ...

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New aquatic science curriculum now online


Science teachers throughout the state and nation now have a website, based on the award-winning Fluid Earth/Living Ocean aquatic science curriculum, where they can investigate, discover, evaluate, communicate and learn about marine science. The Exploring Our Fluid Earth curriculum, which examines coastal and ocean sciences by studying the influence of water on the planet, was developed to be useful to ...

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Protecting Hawai‘i’s key pollinators


Honeybees pollinate many tropical fruits and nuts and are key pollinators for crops such as melons, squash, and cucumbers—$200 million worth of crops statewide. However, the large colony losses experienced recently on O‘ahu and the Big Island have awakened concern for the preservation of honeybee populations and the sustainability of bee-dependent fruit, nut, and vegetable production in Hawai‘i. UHM’s College ...

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New anthurium blight website from CTAHR

"Marian Seefurth" is a staple variety of the modern anthurium industry. Credit: Joanne Lichty, CTAHR.

Anthurium blight is a serious disease that has severely impacted Hawai‘i’s anthurium industry. The College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) has been instrumental in the fight against the pest since it was first discovered, and now a new website created by Scot Nelson (PEPS) describes its history and shows what’s in store for the future. Anthurium Blight: Pathogen, Symptoms ...

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