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Astronomy & Space

UH faculty featured in President’s speaker series at Maui and Hawaiʻi

The University of Hawaiʻi invites the community to an series of talks featuring outstanding faculty. The President’s Series will take place at UH Maui College’s ʻIke Leʻa (Room 144) and at Hawaiʻi Community College–Pālamanui outdoor theatre. Chip Fletcher Will your property be beachfront in the future? A discussion of climate impacts in Hawaiʻi UH Maui College: Monday, January 9 5 …

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Largest digital sky survey released by Pan-STARRS

The Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) project at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Institute for Astronomy is publicly releasing the world’s largest digital sky survey today, via the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland. “The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys allow anyone to access millions of images and use the database and catalogs containing precision measurements of …

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Cosmic-ray antiparticle experiment selected for NASA grant

Philip von Doetinchem, a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa physics assistant professor, is part of a team working on the design of a next-generation cosmic-ray balloon antiparticle experiment called General AntiParticle Spectrometer (GAPS). This fall, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration selected the experiment for funding and awarded the project $487,259 for the next five years. The GAPS team includes researchers …

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Ice is everywhere on the dwarf planet Ceres

At first glance, Ceres, the largest body in the main asteroid belt, may not look icy. Images from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft have revealed a dark, heavily cratered world whose brightest area is made of highly reflective salts—not ice. But newly published studies from Dawn scientists, including University of Hawaiʻi astronomer Norbert Schörghofer, show two distinct lines of evidence for ice …

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Giving the Sun a brake

A a long-standing solar mystery may have been solved by astronomers from the University of Hawaiʻi Institute for Astronomy (IfA), Brazil and Stanford University. Two decades ago, scientists discovered that the outer five percent of the Sun spins more slowly than the rest of its interior. In a new study, to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters, researchers …

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Undergraduate journal Mānoa Horizons publishes first issue

Mānoa Horizons, a new peer-reviewed academic journal featuring high quality creativity, innovation and research conducted and synthesized by undergraduate students at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, has published its first issue this fall. Under the editorship of Christine Beaule, Mānoa Horizons represents a partnership among the UHMānoa’s Honors Program, Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program and the honors faculty. The journal will be published annually in the fall and …

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Retracing the origins of a massive, multi-ring crater

An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have reconstructed the extreme collision that created one of the moon’s largest craters, 3.8 billion years ago. Jeffrey Taylor, a professor in the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, was among the scientists who retraced the moon’s dramatic …

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Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope on track to be operational in 2019

The Hawaiʻi State Supreme Court has affirmed the Conservation District Use Permit for the construction of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope on Haleakalā, Maui. The majority opinion said that the telescope is consistent with the purposes of the conservation district. The high court also unanimously affirmed the environmental assessment, which protects natural resources in the Haleakalā Observatories site. The …

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[VIDEO] Lessons learned from a year on simulated Mars

For one record-breaking year, six Mars-simulation crewmembers ate, slept, worked and played in their isolated habitat on the slopes of Mauna Loa, for the Hawaiʻi Space Exploration Analog and Simulation or HI-SEAS project operated by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. “A mission to Mars would be two-and-a-half to three years long. So if you really want to test out …

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