Saturday , December 20 2014
Home / Astronomy & Space (page 3)

Category Archives: Astronomy & Space

Feed Subscription

UH astronomer helps solve massive galaxy mystery

The evolutionary sequence in the growth of massive elliptical galaxies over 13 billion years

University of Hawaii at Manoa astronomer David Sanders is one of a group of scientists who have combined observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer and Herschel infrared space telescopes, and ground-based telescopes in Hawaii to assemble a coherent picture of the formation history of the most massive galaxies in the universe, from their initial burst of violent ... Read More »

Space dust carries water and organic compounds

Interplanetary dust particles and sun

Researchers from the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and University of California – Berkeley have discovered that interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) could deliver water and organics to the Earth and other terrestrial planets. Interplanetary dust, dust that has come from comets, asteroids, ... Read More »

Astronomer obtains the first image of a normal galaxy in the early universe

Image of movement of gas in the galaxy

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa astronomer Regina Jorgenson has obtained the first image that shows the structure of a normal galaxy in the early universe. The results were presented at the winter American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, DC. The galaxy, called DLA2222-0946, is so faint that it is virtually invisible at all but a few specific wavelengths. It is ... Read More »

Monsters in the dark: Supermassive black holes and their destructive habits

Blue Einstein ring

Nicholas McConnell, the IfA’s Beatrice Watson Parrent Postdoctoral Fellow, delivered an informative and entertaining talk about the largest (“supermassive”) black holes in the Universe at a Frontiers of Astronomy Community Event held on the UH Mānoa campus. The first thing McConnell explained is that supermassive black holes live in galaxies. In keeping with the Halloween theme, he began by explaining ... Read More »

[VIDEO] Kim Binsted and Brian Shiro on ThinkTech Hawaii

Jay Fidell and Brian Shiro

NASA has awarded $1.2 million to the Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) program to continue its work studying the human factors that contribute to astronaut crew function and performance during long-duration space travels, such as those anticipated for a manned mission to Mars. UH Mānoa associate professor Kim Binsted and graduate student Brian Shiro discussed this research and ... Read More »

The weak solar maximum of 2013

Sun storm

Like every human inquisitive endeavor into the whims of Nature, one looks for patterns in the hope of achieving some predictability. One such pattern is the appearance and disappearance of sunspots on the surface of the Sun. This pattern was first discovered in the mid-nineteenth century by Samuel Heinrich Schwab, who established that an almost eleven-year cycle existed between two ... Read More »

Subaru Telescope reveals growth of galaxies in the early universe

Subaru telescope

Using the Fiber-Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope, a team of astronomers participating in the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) has found that galaxies, over nine billion years ago, provided a nurturing environment for the birth of new stars at remarkable rates while doing so in an orderly manner. “FMOS has clearly revolutionized our ability to study how galaxies ... Read More »

Astronomer Donald Hall named AAAS Fellow

Dr. Donald N. B. Hall

  Dr. Donald N. B. Hall of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. As part of the astronomy section, Hall was elected as an AAAS Fellow “for distinguished contributions to ... Read More »

Infrasound informs fresh look at Russian meteor fall

Chelyabinsk Infrasound

The Russian meteor that rocked the world on 15 February 2013 appeared 30 times brighter than the sun, and we may be in for more airbursts of this size than we had previously anticipated.  These are some of the new findings about the Chelyabinsk meteor fall included in the Nov. 6 electronic edition of the scientific journal Nature. Much of ... Read More »

Astronomers conclude habitable planets are common

Habitable zone around a star

Astronomers from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and the University of California, Berkeley now estimate that one in five stars like the sun have planets about the size of Earth and a surface temperature conducive to life. This conclusion is based on a statistical analysis of all observations from NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope. Though Kepler is now crippled, it ... Read More »

Scroll To Top