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[VIDEO] The Koloa Project — preserving the endangered Hawaiian Duck

Koloa Maoli

Even wildlife biologists have a tough time telling the difference between the endangered Hawaiian Duck, Koloa Maoli, and the common mallard. Cross-breeding or hybridization between the two species is the primary reason the endemic Koloa duck is endangered. A new collaborative program between the State of Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the ... Read More »

Research leads to sensor breakthrough, promises safer structures

Haleiwa Bridge

UH Mānoa Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor David Ma and Graduate Student Hui Zhang have achieved a long-sought technical breakthrough by proving an efficient method of harvesting mechanical energy to power autonomous sensor networks. Their research findings appear in the prestigious Applied Physics Letters of the American Institute of Physics. Large-scale wireless sensor networks are extremely useful in monitoring the behavior of both ... Read More »

Physics team moves ahead on research project at KEK Super B Factory

Inside the KEK Super B Factory in Tsukuba, Japan.

One of the UHM’s future physics projects, Belle II at the KEK Super B Factory, has passed a critical U.S. funding and approval milestone and is on track for installation in 2015 in Tsukuba, Japan. UH Mānoa Physics Professors Tom Browder, Sven Vahsen and Gary Varner, along with other UHM postdoctoral researchers and graduate students, participated in the first Belle ... Read More »

Pacific Islands Studies undergraduates complete community-based capstone research projects

PACS 401 students with Lola Quan Bautista

For the first time since UH Mānoa’s Center for Pacific Islands Studies’ BA program began in 2011, the senior capstone ran as a course (PACS 401) rather than as a one-on-one project with faculty. PACS401 requires BA candidates to complete community-based research projects and give presentations on their processes and outcomes. Lola Quan Bautista and Julie Walsh designed the course ... Read More »

ARCS Foundation partnership brings new funding for student research in Life Sciences

ARCS Foundation logo

The Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS) Foundation Honolulu Chapter has given more than $1.5 million in awards to UH students since its inception in 1974. On June 3, the Roche Foundation and ARCS Foundation announced a unique program to support outstanding graduate life science students at universities across the United States, including UH Mānoa.  The Roche/ARCS Foundation Scholar Award Program in ... Read More »

[VIDEO] Hawaii EPSCoR – Stimulating competitive research

Ho‘opononono 2 satellite

The University of Hawaii describes how its EPSCoR program is helping protect Hawaii’s environment and secure the state’s economic future. The mission of EPSCoR, the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, is to assist the National Science Foundation in its statutory function “to strengthen research and education in science and engineering throughout the United States …” http://www.epscor.hawaii.edu/ Video courtesy UH ... Read More »

Antarctic ice-sheet less stable than previously assumed

Iceberg in Scotia Sea

The first evidence for massive and abrupt iceberg calving in Antarctica, dating back 19,000 to 9,000 years ago, has now been documented by an international team of geologists and climate scientists. Their findings are based on analysis of new, long deep sea sediment cores extracted from the region between the Falkland Islands and the Antarctic Peninsula. The study in the ... Read More »

Water in Moon rocks provides clues and questions about lunar history

Pyroclastic glass beads

A recent review of hundreds of chemical analyses of Moon rocks indicates that the amount of water in the Moon’s interior varies regionally – revealing clues about how water originated and was redistributed in the Moon.  These discoveries provide a new tool to unravel the processes involved in the formation of the Moon, how the lunar crust cooled, and its impact ... Read More »

Inventor of free-electron laser to lecture at 2015 Nobel Symposium

Free-electron laser FELIX

Professor John Madey of the UH Mānoa Department of Physics and Astronomy has been invited to give a plenary lecture at the Nobel Symposium on Free Electron Laser Research, which will be held in Sigtuna (near Stockholm), Sweden, from June 14 -18, 2015.  The Symposium is devoted to an “area of science where breakthroughs are occurring” and is sponsored by the Nobel Foundation and the Knut ... Read More »

IFA alumnus Brendan Bowler wins Trumpler Award

Brendan Bowler

Brendan Bowler, who completed his dissertation last year at the Institute for Astronomy (IfA) and is now a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology, Joint Center for Planetary Astronomy has received the Robert J. Trumpler Award given by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific for a recent Ph.D. thesis considered unusually important to astronomy. According to the Astronomical Society ... Read More »

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