Saturday , November 1 2014
Home / Author Archives: kaunana (page 26)

Author Archives: kaunana

Feed Subscription

Plastic for dinner? Big fish eat more than you expect

Examples of marine debris found in fish stomachs.  Image courtesy C. Anela Choy.

Large, predatory fishes from the offshore waters around Hawai‘i have been ingesting a surprisingly large amount of plastic and other marine debris, according to new research by scientists at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. These observations are the first of their kind in scope and in number, and they suggest that more attention should be given to marine debris ... Read More »

Laser scanning confocal microscope generates artful images of science

Confocal Image of Coral

Corals are beautiful when seen through your own eyes in sunlight, but for scientists at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, seeing corals in this manner is simply not enough. As part of a new PBS digital video series called UnderH20, viewers see live corals–and their associated microorganisms–from a whole new perspective. Using a revolutionary new tool, a laser scanning ... Read More »

NSF awards bring new dark matter, meteorology research and opportunities

Jennifer Small

Three UH Mānoa professors have won National Science Foundation (NSF) awards to support fundamental research that also brings opportunities for hands-on discovery to undergraduates and Hawai‘i high school students. The prestigious NSF CAREER grants were awarded to Jason Kumar in Physics, Jennifer Small in Meteorology and Yi Zuo in Mechanical Engineering. These UH Mānoa assistant professors are considered early-career faculty ... Read More »

[VIDEO] Taro Day brings together diverse points of view

man in taro field

Taro, or kalo, is sacred to many Native Hawaiians, some of whom revere it as an ancestor. Made into poi, taro was a critical part of the diet of early Hawaiians and is still popular today. Thousands of varieties of taro grow around the world, but only select plants were brought to Hawaiʻi by Polynesian settlers. “If you’re carrying taro ... Read More »

Graduate student wins fellowship to research endemic plant on Kaua’i

Cabbage on a stick plant

UH Mānoa graduate student Seana Walsh, a candidate for a Master’s degree in the Department of Botany, has been awarded the Eloise Gerry Fellowship from the Sigma Epsilon/Graduate Women in Science National Fellowships Program to continue her research on a critically endangered Hawaiian plant endemic to Kaua‘i and historically to Ni‘ihau—the ‘ōlulu, or “cabbage on a stick” plant, Brighamia insignis. ... Read More »

Hawaii may not be accurately predicting groundwater contamination

River

A recent audit of Hawai‘i’s Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) drinking water source susceptibility analysis shows that the state’s current approach may not be accurately predicting groundwater contamination at local drinking water sources. The research was performed by Alan Mair, a former postdoctoral fellow at UH Mānoa’s Department of Geology & Geophysics and Water Resources Research Center (WRRC), and Aly ... Read More »

Natural dietary supplement demonstrates positive results in the fight against diabetes

Group photograph of alternative medicine dept.

By Kathleen Kihmm Connolly Research conducted by the John A. Burns School of Medicine’s Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) department has demonstrated that a dietary supplement containing 5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) has the potential to prevent or delay the progression of diabetes in pre-diabetic populations (Rodriguez et al. 2012). In their study researchers demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in two hours ... Read More »

David Karl and Edward DeLong awarded $4.2M to pursue high risk research in marine microbial ecology

L-R: Dr. Karl and Dr. DeLong outside  the Daniel K. Inouye C-MORE Hale laboratory, UH Mānoa.
Photo by Anthony Consillio

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has awarded Dr. David Karl and Dr. Edward DeLong, both UH Mānoa professors in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) individual grants totaling $4.2M to support their marine research. These awards are part of the Moore Foundation’s national Marine Microbiology Initiative that awarded 16 scientists from 14 different institutions a ... Read More »

Indonesia partners with Hawaii to strengthen disaster management training

NDPTC logo

A dozen faculty members from Indonesian universities have come to the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa this summer to learn about disaster risk management training and how it specifically can be applied to save lives in their country. Indonesia is one of the most natural-disaster prone countries in the world. In the last decade alone, it has been affected by ... Read More »

Black holes were abundant among earliest stars

By comparing infrared and X-ray background signals across the same stretch of sky, an international team of astronomers, including University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa astronomer Guenther Hasinger, has discovered evidence of a significant number of black holes that accompanied the first stars in the universe. Hasinger discussed the findings this week at the 222nd meeting of the American Astronomical Society ... Read More »

Scroll To Top