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Website tracks tagged sharks off of Maui

Tiger shark

Scientists from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) completed the first phase of a project to observe the movements of tiger sharks caught and tagged around the island of Maui. In response to an uptick in the number of shark attacks recorded on Maui, the State of Hawaiʻi’s Department of Land and Natural Resources ... Read More »

[VIDEO] Navigating through generations

Haunani Kane

Haunane Kane just graduated with her MS in Coastal Geology at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa. Along with her applied graduate studies, Kane is also learning a traditional skill and perspective of navigation while sailing with the Polynesian Voyaging Society. Kane is investigating the spatial and temporal effects that sea-level rise may have upon wetlands and other coastal ecosystems. Her ... Read More »

Safety in Numbers? Not so for corals.

Acropora species coral

Traditionally, it was assumed that corals do not face a risk of extinction unless they become very rare or have a very restricted range. A team of scientists from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM), Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has revealed that global changes in climate and ocean ... Read More »

‘Super cool’ food storage options

Fruit with a thermometer

Dr. Soojin Jun of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) recently received a grant to study a high-tech new way to preserve food for storage and shipping.  Jun, an associate professor in CTAHR’s Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences (HNFAS), proposed a research project to address the loss of quality in ... Read More »

Infrasound informs fresh look at Russian meteor fall

Chelyabinsk Infrasound

The Russian meteor that rocked the world on 15 February 2013 appeared 30 times brighter than the sun, and we may be in for more airbursts of this size than we had previously anticipated.  These are some of the new findings about the Chelyabinsk meteor fall included in the Nov. 6 electronic edition of the scientific journal Nature. Much of ... Read More »

Untamed skies: Where science meets humanity [TEDxHonolulu 2013]

Owen Shieh

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa graduate student Owen Shieh is presenting a talk at the TEDxHonolulu event, titled:  “Untamed skies:  Where science meets humanity.” “Centuries of scientific and technological advancements have allowed us to survive the harshest of conditions, but weather remains an untamed force of nature,” said Shieh, a graduate student in the UH Mānoa department of meteorology. “For ... Read More »

High energy physicists predict new family of four-quark objects

Beijing Spectrometer Experiment

An international team of high-energy physicists says the discovery of an electrically charged subatomic particle called Zc(4020) is a sign that they have begun to unveil a whole new family of four-quark objects. The Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII) collaboration, which includes scientists from UH Mānoa, previously announced the discovery of a mysterious four-quark particle called Zc(3900) in April 2013. “While quarks have long ... Read More »

Music in Kubrick films examined in new book

We'll Meet Again - Book Cover

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Associate Professor of Musicology Kate McQuiston has published, “We’ll Meet Again”: Musical Design in the Films of Stanley Kubrick. Her study reveals the importance of music in both the creation and reception of Kubrick’s major films. The book was a recipient for an award from the AMS 75 PAYS endowment, awarded to small selection of books annually by the American Musicological Society. McQuiston’s ... Read More »

Astronomers conclude habitable planets are common

Habitable zone around a star

Astronomers from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and the University of California, Berkeley now estimate that one in five stars like the sun have planets about the size of Earth and a surface temperature conducive to life. This conclusion is based on a statistical analysis of all observations from NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope. Though Kepler is now crippled, it ... Read More »

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