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Energetics of the deep-water bluntnose sixgill shark

Bluntnose sixgill shark

Deep sea sharks get less attention than their surface-loving counterparts.  Take for example the bluntnose sixgill shark (Hexanchus griseus).  At 16 feet in length, this shark is almost large as a white shark or a tiger shark, and the species has a wide global distribution.   H. griseus might be a top predator, but because he tends to be found up ...

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The Kanak Awakening: New book about nationalism in New Caledonia

The Kanak Awakening

The Center for Pacific Islands Studies (CPIS)  is pleased to announce the publication of a new volume in its Pacific Islands Monograph Series (PIMS) — The Kanak Awakening: The Rise of Nationalism in New Caledonia by David Chappell, UH Manoa History Department and CPIS affiliate faculty. This study examines the rise in New Caledonia of rival identity formations that became increasingly polarized in the 1970s and examines in particular the ...

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Monsters in the dark: Supermassive black holes and their destructive habits

Blue Einstein ring

Nicholas McConnell, the IfA’s Beatrice Watson Parrent Postdoctoral Fellow, delivered an informative and entertaining talk about the largest (“supermassive”) black holes in the Universe at a Frontiers of Astronomy Community Event held on the UH Mānoa campus. The first thing McConnell explained is that supermassive black holes live in galaxies. In keeping with the Halloween theme, he began by explaining ...

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Batteries put to test in PV plan

Solar panels

The Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) is actively involved with several issues of energy storage.  One important aspect relates to the increased utilization of renewable resources by electric utilities in the State of Hawaii.  Some of these resources (such as solar and wind energy) are intermittent, and this can present a problem of storing the energy generated when it is ...

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HURL enables discovery of dramatic long-term shift in Pacific Ocean ecosystem

Hawaiian gold coral

The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) has enabled scientists to determine that a long-term shift in nitrogen content in the Pacific Ocean has occurred as a result of climate change.   Researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California – Santa Cruz analyzed ...

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Project PEARL produces trainer’s guide to help students with research

Student Researcher

Pathways for Excellence and Achievement in Research and Learning (PEARL), a project funded by the UH Mānoa Institute of Museum and Library Services and directed by the Library and Information Science Program in the Department of Information and Computer Sciences, has produced an online trainer’s guide. The three-year project provided professional development for teams of teachers and librarians from 20 Hawaiʻi ...

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Dengue detection kit can diagnose virus in under five hours


University of Hawai`i at Mānoa scientists have found that a commercially available, FDA-approved dengue detection kit bests the former “gold standard” test by producing results in under five hours. A study conducted at the John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) sought to evaluate the use of the commercially available, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved InBios Dengue virus IgM ...

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New television show: Voice of the Sea on KFVE

Voice of the Sea host and guest

A new television show highlighting ocean and coastal scientists and cultural experts from Hawai‘i and the Pacific is airing on KFVE, The Home Team (Channel 5 and 1005) on Sundays at 6:00 p.m. The show, titled Voice of the Sea, is hosted by Kanesa Duncan Seraphin, world paddleboard champion, shark researcher, and science education expert. Seraphin, director of the University of Hawai‘i ...

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The weak solar maximum of 2013

Sun storm

Like every human inquisitive endeavor into the whims of Nature, one looks for patterns in the hope of achieving some predictability. One such pattern is the appearance and disappearance of sunspots on the surface of the Sun. This pattern was first discovered in the mid-nineteenth century by Samuel Heinrich Schwab, who established that an almost eleven-year cycle existed between two ...

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[VIDEO] Modern science, traditional platform

Hokulea at dawn

Scientists at the University of Hawaiʻi are partnering with the Polynesian Voyaging Society to conduct five research projects as part of the Hōkūleʻa Worldwide Voyage. The crew will study hydroponics, fish population, marine acoustics and the importance of plankton as a part of the marine food chain. They also seek to identify a network of indigenous scientists as they travel ...

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