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UH-led team successfully observes the solar eclipse over the arctic

Solar eclipse

The international Solar Wind Sherpas team, led by Dr. Shadia Habbal of the University of Hawaii at Manoa Institute for Astronomy, braved Arctic weather to successfully observe the total solar eclipse of March 20 from Longyearbyen on the island of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard archipelago east of northern Greenland. Their preliminary results were presented at the Triennial Earth-Sun Summit in ...

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UH Mānoa recognized for excellence in cybersecurity research

IT Center

The National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security have designated the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Research (CAE-R). “This designation is demonstrative of the quality and substance of the education the University of Hawaiʻi has to offer, and more importantly underscores justification for additional grant and research capacity ...

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UH Cancer Center Excellence in Research Award

Wei Jia

Wei Jia, a professor and associate director leading the UH Cancer Center’s Shared Resources Program, won the first quarterly Excellence in Research Award in October 2014 for his team’s work on metabolic biomarkers for a particular form of leukemia. The panel of six biomarkers studied by the team has the potential to become a test that could eventually help increase a patient’s chances of survival. Their paper, “A distinct glucose ...

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Robotically discovering Earth’s nearest neighbors

Artist’s impression of a view from the HD 7924 planetary system looking back toward our sun, which would be easily visible to the naked eye. Since HD 7924 is in our northern sky, an observer looking back at the sun would see objects like the Southern Cross and the Magellanic Clouds close to our sun in their sky. Art by Karen Teramura & BJ Fulton, UH IfA.

A team of astronomers using ground-based telescopes in Hawaiʻi, California and Arizona recently discovered a planetary system orbiting a nearby star that is only 54 light-years away. All three planets orbit their star at a distance closer than Mercury orbits the sun, completing their orbits in just 5, 15 and 24 days. Astronomers from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, the University ...

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Dive discovers missing aircraft hangar of sunken WW II-era Japanese submarine

Pisces V submersible

The dramatic discovery of a lost World War II-era Imperial Japanese Navy mega-submarine by a University of Hawaiʻi and U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) team in December 2013 inspired a new search by NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Corporation, to find key missing pieces of the battleship. The recent survey, the first to return to I-400 submarine since its ...

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New study uses meteorites to date moon-forming impact


Not too long after the planets began forming, a Mars-sized object slammed into Earth, creating the debris that would later coalesce into the moon. Some of the debris from this giant impact escaped all the way out to the asteroid belt. Collisions there left shock-heating signatures – a permanent record of the impact event – that can still be detected ...

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David Karl elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

David Karl

Some of the world’s most accomplished leaders from academia, business, public affairs, the humanities and the arts have been elected members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among those elected this year is David Karl, the Victor and Peggy Brandstrom Pavel Chair in Oceanography and Director of the Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) at ...

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[VIDEO] How to train your coral


Scientists warn extreme sea temperatures could cause a “historic” coral reef die-off around the world over, following a massive coral bleaching event in fall 2014 in the North Pacific. A huge swathe of the Pacific was affected, including the Northern Marianas Islands, Guam, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Hawai‘i, and Kiribati. Some areas recorded serious bleaching for the first time, and ...

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New research finds oceanic microbes behave in synchrony across ocean basins

Artist's rendering of the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), suspended from the flotation buoy during a free-drifting deployment for plankton sampling (Credit: MBARI, Moss Landing, CA).

Researchers from UH Mānoa and colleagues found that microbial communities in different regions of the Pacific Ocean displayed strikingly similar daily rhythms in their metabolism despite inhabiting extremely different habitats – the nutrient-rich waters off California and the nutrient-poor waters north of Hawai‘i. Furthermore, in each location, the dominant photoautotrophs – light-loving bacteria that need solar energy to help them photosynthesize ...

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Lake Tahoe research provides new insights on global change

Lake Tahoe

A recently published study on how natural and man-made sources of nitrogen are recycled through the Lake Tahoe ecosystem provides new information on how global change may affect the iconic blue lake. “High-elevation lakes, such as Lake Tahoe, are sentinels of climate change,” said Lihini Aluwihare, associate professor of geosciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) at UC San Diego ...

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