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UH Professor honored with American Meteorological Society’s highest award

Bin Wang

Bin Wang, professor and former chair of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at UH Mānoa, was awarded the 2015 Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal by the American Meteorological Society “for creative insights leading to important advances in the understanding of tropical and monsoonal processes and their predictability.” Wang has been with the Department of Atmospheric Sciences (formerly Department of Meteorology) at ... Read More »

Research team releases app for tracking Yellowstone geysers

Geyser

When people throughout the world want to watch the iconic Old Faithful eruption at Yellowstone National Park in real time, they now can turn to their smartphones, through a free app, courtesy of a UH Mānoa-led research team studying mobile media and communication. Brett Oppegaard, an assistant professor in the School of Communications within the College of Social Sciences, has led the development ... Read More »

Three-planet system holds clues to atmospheres of Earth-size worlds

Kepler spacecraft

Extrasolar planets are being discovered by the hundreds, but are any of these newfound worlds really like Earth? A planetary system recently discovered by the Kepler spacecraft will help resolve this question. The system of three planets, each just larger than Earth, orbits a nearby star called EPIC 201367065. The three planets are 1.5 to 2 times the size of Earth, ... Read More »

Marketing professor named one of world’s most influential by Thomson Reuters

Stephen Vargo

Shidler College of Business Marketing Professor Stephen L. Vargo was named one of the World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds of 2014 by Thomson Reuters, the world’s leading source of intelligent information for businesses and professionals.  The UH Mānoa faculty member earned the distinction by publishing the highest number of articles that were most frequently cited by researchers. Vargo is one of ... Read More »

Research team discovers intact ‘ghost ship’ off the coast of Oahu

The USS Kailua, 1943.

Researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries today announced the discovery of an intact “ghost ship” in 2,000 feet of water nearly 20 miles off the coast of Oʻahu.  Sitting upright, its solitary mast still standing and the ship’s wheel still in place, the hulk of the former cable ship Dickenson, later the ... Read More »

Cancer from asbestos caused by more than one cell mutation

Cancer Center

It has been a long-held belief that tumors arising from exposure to asbestos are caused by mutations in one cell, which then produces multiple clones. This hypothesis is challenged by new research published in the open access Journal of Translational Medicine, which suggests it is caused by mutations in multiple cells. Malignant mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that ... Read More »

Climate researchers discover El Nino’s fueling effect on intense hurricanes

Typhoon Vicente

El Niño, the abnormal warming of sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, is a well-studied tropical climate phenomenon that occurs every few years. It has major impacts on society and Earth’s climate – inducing intense droughts and floods in multiple regions of the globe. Further, scientists have observed that El Niño greatly influences the yearly variations of tropical cyclones ... Read More »

Audio alternative for National Park brochures in works for visually impaired

View of eruption plume from Overlook vent in Halema'uma'u crater on the summit of Kilauea volcano on 27 March 2008, 9 days after the start of the ongoing eruption. Credit: Christine Heliker, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey.

A team of UH Mānoa researchers has received a $278,300 National Park Service grant for the development of new technologies to provide dynamic experiences for visually impaired visitors of national parks. Led by Assistant Professor Brett Oppegaard in the School of Communications within the College of Social Sciences, the group will explore the use of digital communication to convert traditional ... Read More »

Another human footprint in the ocean: Rising anthropogenic nitrate levels

boat deck

Human-induced changes to Earth’s carbon cycle – for example, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and ocean acidification – have been observed for decades. However, a study published this week in Science showed human activities, in particular industrial and agricultural processes, have also had significant impacts on the upper ocean nitrogen cycle. The rate of deposition of reactive nitrogen (i.e., nitrogen oxides ... Read More »

Medical professor nationally recognized for work on infectious diseases

Pediatrics Professor and scientist Dr. Richard Yanagihara (pictured fifth from left) was recognized for his infectious disease research.

John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) Pediatrics Professor and scientist Dr. Richard Yanagihara has received a national award for his work to expand infectious disease research capabilities at UH, and for his prominent role in helping focus attention on needed research into why people of certain cultural backgrounds suffer disproportionately worse health. The award was presented at the 2014 Minority Health and Health ... Read More »

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