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Marketing professor named one of world’s most influential by Thomson Reuters

Stephen Vargo

Shidler College of Business Marketing Professor Stephen L. Vargo was named one of the World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds of 2014 by Thomson Reuters, the world’s leading source of intelligent information for businesses and professionals.  The UH Mānoa faculty member earned the distinction by publishing the highest number of articles that were most frequently cited by researchers. Vargo is one of ... Read More »

Research team discovers intact ‘ghost ship’ off the coast of Oahu

The USS Kailua, 1943.

Researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries today announced the discovery of an intact “ghost ship” in 2,000 feet of water nearly 20 miles off the coast of Oʻahu.  Sitting upright, its solitary mast still standing and the ship’s wheel still in place, the hulk of the former cable ship Dickenson, later the ... Read More »

Cancer from asbestos caused by more than one cell mutation

Cancer Center

It has been a long-held belief that tumors arising from exposure to asbestos are caused by mutations in one cell, which then produces multiple clones. This hypothesis is challenged by new research published in the open access Journal of Translational Medicine, which suggests it is caused by mutations in multiple cells. Malignant mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that ... Read More »

Climate researchers discover El Nino’s fueling effect on intense hurricanes

Typhoon Vicente

El Niño, the abnormal warming of sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, is a well-studied tropical climate phenomenon that occurs every few years. It has major impacts on society and Earth’s climate – inducing intense droughts and floods in multiple regions of the globe. Further, scientists have observed that El Niño greatly influences the yearly variations of tropical cyclones ... Read More »

Audio alternative for National Park brochures in works for visually impaired

View of eruption plume from Overlook vent in Halema'uma'u crater on the summit of Kilauea volcano on 27 March 2008, 9 days after the start of the ongoing eruption. Credit: Christine Heliker, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, U.S. Geological Survey.

A team of UH Mānoa researchers has received a $278,300 National Park Service grant for the development of new technologies to provide dynamic experiences for visually impaired visitors of national parks. Led by Assistant Professor Brett Oppegaard in the School of Communications within the College of Social Sciences, the group will explore the use of digital communication to convert traditional ... Read More »

Another human footprint in the ocean: Rising anthropogenic nitrate levels

boat deck

Human-induced changes to Earth’s carbon cycle – for example, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and ocean acidification – have been observed for decades. However, a study published this week in Science showed human activities, in particular industrial and agricultural processes, have also had significant impacts on the upper ocean nitrogen cycle. The rate of deposition of reactive nitrogen (i.e., nitrogen oxides ... Read More »

Medical professor nationally recognized for work on infectious diseases

Pediatrics Professor and scientist Dr. Richard Yanagihara (pictured fifth from left) was recognized for his infectious disease research.

John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) Pediatrics Professor and scientist Dr. Richard Yanagihara has received a national award for his work to expand infectious disease research capabilities at UH, and for his prominent role in helping focus attention on needed research into why people of certain cultural backgrounds suffer disproportionately worse health. The award was presented at the 2014 Minority Health and Health ... Read More »

CT scans of coral skeletons reveal ocean acidity increases reef erosion

Colony of rare corals

Coral reefs persist in a balance between reef construction and reef breakdown. As corals grow, they construct the complex calcium carbonate framework that provides habitat for fish and other reef organisms.  Simultaneously, bioeroders, such as parrotfish and boring marine worms, break down the reef structure into rubble and the sand that nourishes our beaches. For reefs to persist, rates of ... Read More »

Study reveals tiger shark movements around Maui and Oahu

Shark_Tag1_web

UH Mānoa researchers are using tracking devices to gain new insights into tiger shark movements in coastal waters around Maui and O‘ahu. The ongoing study reveals their coastal habitat preferences “We need to understand tiger shark movements in our coastal waters to gain a clearer comprehension of the circumstances bringing sharks and humans together,” said Dr. Kim Holland, senior shark scientist at the ... Read More »

UH astronomer shares $3 million Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics

The W. M. Keck Observatory on Maunakea

UH astronomer John Tonry has been named a recipient of the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for the discovery that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, rather than slowing as had been long assumed. He shares the award with the other members of the High-Redshift Supernova Search Team and with members of the Supernova Cosmology Project. In all, 50 astronomers ... Read More »

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