Undergraduate Degrees

KAMAKAKŪOKALANI CENTER FOR HAWAIIAN STUDIES

Bachelor of Arts Program

I took courses exploring the many facets of Hawaiian culture including hula, mahi‘ai kalo, mālama loko i‘a, lā‘au lapa‘au to help balance the academic, theoretical approach with the practical hands on learning.  Ma ka hana ka ‘ike.  (Hawaiian Studies undergraduate major, 2012)

The Bachelor of Arts in Hawaiian Studies requires 35 credits, including 23 credits from required courses and 12 from one of five areas of concentration. Hawaiian Studies students must meet a third-year level Hawaiian language fluency, ideally completing 4 to 6 semesters of Hawaiian Language prior to enrollment in the major. While students must earn a 2.0 GPA in all UH Mānoa registered credit hours, students must maintain a 3.0 grade point average for the Hawaiian Studies major. See Exhibit 4, KCHS Major Requirements, Revised 2010k and Appendix 1: HWST UG Course Listing.

Through consultation with the Hawaiian Studies academic advisor, students design their program around a selected area of concentrations or strands. Program strands explore knowledge through disciplinary learning, cultural practice and reinforcement, and creative expression. The center is committed to Native Hawaiian self-determination. Hence, the program is includes several integral components that encompass national self-governance, resource management and sustainability, and comparative indigenous studies. Courses that populate our program strands span diverse subject matter that give students the depth and breadth needed for a foundation that supports our overall program learning objectives.

  • Hālau O Laka (Native Hawaiian Creative Expression):  Hawaiian fiber arts studio, Hawaiian printmaking studio, Hawaiian painting and drawing studio, Oli Makawalu and Mele Au Hou: Music and Native Identity.
  • Kūkulu Aupuni (Envisioning the Nation):  Myths of Hawaiian history, Issues in Modern Hawai‘i, Hawaiian Institutions, Hawaiian Political Speech, Kumu Kanawai: Practical Application of Rights, Ka Mana’o Politika Hawai‘i: Political Thought in Hawaiian.
  • Kumu Kahiki (Comparative Hawaiinuiākea and Indigenous Studies):  Hawaiian Genealogy, Modern Pacific Women’s Poetry, Hawai‘i and the Pacific, Geography of the Pacific, Literature of the Pacific, and Samoan, Tahitian, and Maori Languages.
  • Mālama ‘Āina (Hawaiian Perspectives on Resource Management):  Mālama Ahupua‘a: Resource Management, Ho‘okele I: Hawaiian Astronomy, La‘au Lapa‘au: Hawaiian Medicinal Herbs and Mahi‘ai Kalo I: Taro Cultivation, Mālama Loko I‘a, and Hawaiian Aquatic Medicine.
  • Mo‘olelo ‘Ōiwi (Native History and Literature): Chiefs of Post-Contact Hawai‘i, Pana O‘ahu: Famous Place Names, Māhele Land Awards, Ceded Lands: Crown and Government Lands, Mo‘olelo Hawai‘i, Ka‘ao Hawai‘i.

Kamakakūokalani Undergraduate Program Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of a B.A. in Hawaiian Studies, our students are expected to demonstrate knowledge, understanding, critical analysis and synthesis of the following:

  • Knowing our genealogical ties to Papahānaumoku, our earth mother, and ko Hawaiʻi paeʻāina as our ancestral homeland.
  • Kanaka Maoli are one Lāhui connected by our one ancestor Hāloa across nā kai ʻewalu.
  • History, culture and politics in academic and non-academic settings.
  • The interconnectedness of all knowledge, contemporary and ancestral, from a Kanaka Maoli perspective.
  • Kanaka Maoli applications, protocols and disciplines.
  • Students can discuss Kanaka Maoli experiences in the context of the world’s indigenous people.

KAWAIHUELANI CENTER FOR HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Undergraduate Program

The Kawaihuelani undergraduate program in Hawaiian seeks to teach the Hawaiian language to our students as a means of communication that is appropriate for this place and time. We also seek to provide our students with the ability and the opportunity to access the thoughts, ideas, and knowledge of our kūpuna, in the language of our kūpuna, through primary sources, both written and oral, while encouraging them to create new forms and ways of expressing the knowledge of the past and their attempt to understand the way it impacts our present and future. The learning and speaking of the Hawaiian language provides an opportunity that was denied to many of our parents and grandparents, a fact that only serves as further motivation to revive the voice of the kūpuna.

Kawaihuelani offers an undergraduate certificate in Hawaiian Language, a new undergraduate minor in Hawaiian, a joint undergraduate minor in Hawaiian Immersion Education with Ho‘okulāiwi and the College of Education, and a bachelor’s degree in Hawaiian.

Minor in Hawaiian Immersion Education

Our Minor in Hawaiian Immersion Education, offered in partnership with Ho‘okulāiwi: ‘Aha Ho‘ona‘auao ‘Ōiwi (Center for Native Hawaiian and Indigenous Education), housed within UH Mānoa’s College of Education, is most appropriate for students who are interested in becoming secondary subject area teachers in the Hawaiian Language Immersion Program of the Department of Education. Acceptance into the minor follows:

  • Completion of 55 credits of university work with a 2.75 cumulative and major GPA
  • Admission to an appropriate academic major
  • Successful completion of the College of Education entrance exam and personal admissions interview
  • Successful completion of HAW 302 or higher
  • Attainment of a B (not B-) average for all advanced level Hawaiian language courses.

Requirements

Students are required to complete a total of 27–36 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the minor courses: 15–18 from the College of Education and 12–18 from Hawaiian Language.

  • College of Education: ITE 312, EDEP 311, EDEF 310, one complementary course (ETEC 414; SPED 445; ITE 360; EDCS 431), ITE methods course (33X–34X) in subject area
  • Hawaiian: HAW 331, 332, 401, 402, 463, and 470

For the academic years under review (Fall 2007 – Spring 2012), we have not awarded any joint minors in immersion education. This has sparked a revision to the focus and requirements of this joint minor that we will be proposing in Fall 2012 to be offered in Fall 2013.

Minor in Hawaiian

The overall purpose of the Minor in Hawaiian is to provide an undergraduate learning opportunity specifically tailored to classified students at UH Mānoa who are interested in Hawaiian language as a second discipline of specialization that will complement their major studies, support their future work in and for the Hawaiian community, and/or empower their growth and a development as Native Hawaiians. Our new Minor in Hawaiian requires 18 credit hours with a B (not B-) or better made up of 12 credit hours from core/foundational courses in advanced, continuing language study beyond the beginning and intermediate levels  (HAW 301 – 402); and 6 credit hours from elective courses at the 300 – 400 levels in various content areas to add a level of depth and/or breadth to their learning experience. Students must have completed all the prerequisite courses (HAW 101, 102, 201, and 202) with a grade of C (not C-) or better before enrolling in these advanced core/foundational courses.  Students may waive some of the HAW prerequisites with a qualifying placement score on the Hawaiian Language Placement Exam. Students must also maintain a 3.0 GPA in courses leading to the Minor.

Bachelor of Arts Degree

Requirements

  • 30 credit hours above HAW 202 with a GPA of 3.0 or better, including the following:
    • 15 credits of required courses
    • 15 credits of electives
  • Students must earn a grade of C or better for all Hawaiian Language courses that serve as prerequisites for other Hawaiian Language courses. Students who do not meet this requirement will not be permitted to register for the next level of Hawaiian Language
  • For Hawaiian Language majors, a grade of B or better is required for 300-400 level Hawaiian courses counted towards the Hawaiian Language major.

Kawaihuelani Undergraduate Program Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of a B.A. in Hawaiian, our students should excel in the following:

Speaking:

  • Engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions on more abstract topics at an advanced level of fluency and accuracy.
  • Present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners at an advanced level of fluency and accuracy.

Listening:

  • Understand and interpret spoken Hawaiian at an advanced level on a variety of topics beyond the immediacy of the situation.

Reading:

  • Comprehend and interpret a wide variety of texts written in Hawaiian that are more conceptually abstract and linguistically complex, and/or texts that focus on unfamiliar topics and situations (e.g., primary source materials like literature, poetry, newspaper articles written by native speakers of Hawaiian).

Writing:

  • Present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of readers in a variety of more lengthy written forms about a number of possible topics using advanced vocabulary, expressions, and structures.

Cultures, Comparisons, Connections, Communities:

  • Deepen understanding of and respect for the Hawaiian culture and its people through the study of unique practices, perspectives, issues, and products of the culture that are expressed through and embedded in the Hawaiian language.
  • Continue to develop insight into the nature of language and culture by comparing Hawaiian language and culture to other languages and cultures.
  • Expand and broaden appropriate application of Hawaiian language and culture in authentic settings within and beyond the classroom in order to connect to other disciplines, contexts, and domains, access information, and interact with others in the Hawaiian language community.

Double Majors in Hawaiian Language & Hawaiian Studies

Hawaiʻinuiākea students may opt to be a double major in both Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies to earn their undergraduate degree.  The university defines a double major as a student who majors in two disciplines offered by the same school or college.  At Hawaiʻinuiākea, double majors earn a degree in Hawaiian Language (HAW) and Hawaiian Studies (HWST).

The application to double major should be made after a student has earned 25 credits of successful course work towards the BA with a minimum 2.0 GPA.

There are specific course requirements for completing both the BA general education requirements and the double major requirements for Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies.  This generally means that the student must plan for more time and more expenses towards degree completion.

Double majors must also maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA overall for Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies courses required for the double major.  All double major courses must earn a B (not B-) grade or better.

Policy on Double Counting for Double Majors

Please be advised that students who qualify to double major in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies MAY NOT DOUBLE COUNT COURSE CREDITS REQUIRED FOR BOTH MAJORS. In other words, students may not double dip, i.e., use the same course to satisfy major requirements in both degree programs

For example, Hawaiian 301 and Hawaiian 302 are currently required for both Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies majors.  Students must declare what major these courses will apply towards meeting the major’s requirements (i.e., either Hawaiian Language or Hawaiian Studies, but NOT BOTH) before the undergraduate degree is awarded.

Furthermore, the student must assign both courses to HAW or HWST and not split the assignment of courses.

Students who qualify to double major must be prepared to complete the additional equivalent credits by enrolling and completing equivalent courses, usually at the upper division (300-400 levels) in order to fulfill the requirements of both majors.=

Please see your Academic Advisor for applying for a double major and developing a plan of study for meeting the specific requirements and agreements that need to be approved.

 

Course Requirements For Hawaiʻinuiākea Double Majors

HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE & HAWAIIAN STUDIES

(65-66 Credits Total)

  • Students who qualify to double major in Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian Studies must complete the following double major requirements (65-66 credits total).
  • All courses for the double major must earn a grade of “B” or better (not B-) to be acceptable for completing the double major.
  • Students who double major must agree to meet the requirements stipulated by the Memorandum of Agreement Policy on Double Counting Course Credits before being accepted.

Hawaiian 301 and Hawaiian 302 are currently required for both majors. The student must declare what major these courses will apply towards meeting the major’s requirements (i.e., either Hawaiian Language or Hawaiian Studies, but NOT BOTH) before the undergraduate degree is awarded. Alternative and appropriate elective courses (300-400 level) must be completed. Furthermore, the student must assign both courses to HAW or HWST and not split the assignment of courses.

Concurrent Majors in Hawaiian Language (or Hawaiian Studies) & Another Discipline

Hawaiʻinuiākea students may opt to be a concurrent major in Hawaiian Language (or Hawaiian Studies) and another academic major (e.g., History) to earn their undergraduate degree.  The university defines concurrent majors as students who earn degrees from two different schools or colleges (e.g., HAW & TIM;  HWST & HIST).

Caution: Not all UHM schools or colleges will approve a concurrent major with Hawaiʻinuiākea.  Individual schools or colleges may determine their concurrent major policies and academic relationships with one another. 

This declaration for a concurrent major should be made after a student has earned 25 credits of successful course work towards the BA with a minimum 3.25 GPA

There are specific course requirements for completing both the BA general education requirements and the concurrent majors requirements.  Completion of a minimum of 30 credits in each degree program is required.  This generally means that the student must plan for more time and more expenses towards degree completion.  Concurrent majors must also maintain a minimum 3.25 GPA overall.

Policy on Double Counting for Concurrent Majors

For concurrent majors, the same courses may not be used to satisfy major requirements in both degree programs, unless the specific course is required by both programs.  In other words, students may not double dip, i.e., use the same course to satisfy major requirements in both degree programs

In general, students must meet all of the requirements for Hawaiian Language (or Hawaiian Studies), their second major (e.g., History) and the BA general education requirements.  Where there is a potential for conflict, the current UH Mānoa policy and regulations stipulated for Concurrent Undergraduate Majors will apply.

Please see your Academic Advisor for applying for a concurrent major and developing a plan of study for meeting the specific requirements and agreements that need to be approved.