David A. Chappell

Associate Professor

Pacific, Africa, World, Maritime History

 

Office: Sakamaki A412
Phone: (808) 956-6771

Email Dr. Chappell

 

BA Syracuse, 1968; MA Stanford, 1971; PhD Hawai'i, 1991

 

After earning my BA in 1968 from Syracuse University (and Hamilton College) in European and African History, I taught English in the Peace Corps for two years in the Ivory Coast, West Africa.  I then earned my MA in African History from Stanford University in 1971 and traveled in Asia, teaching history in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  I also taught history in secondary schools in the mainland US and on Maui.  In 1991, I earned my Ph.D. in Pacific history at UHM and have since taught that here and in the Marshall Islands, American Sāmoa and New Caledonia.  My early research was on Pacific Islanders who worked and traveled on foreign ships, but more recently I have worked on the Francophone Pacific. My new book, The Kanak Awakening: The Rise of Nationalism in New Caledonia, is forthcoming from UH Press (Pacific Islands Monograph Series).

 

Representative publications:

  • 2013  The Kanak Awakening: The Rise of Nationalism in New Caledonia. Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  • 2010  “A ‘Headless’ Native Talks back: Nidoish Naisseline and the Kanak Awakening,” The Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 22, No. 1, Spring 2010, 37-70.
  • 2005  “‘Africanization’ in the Pacific: Blaming Others for Disorder in the Periphery?” Comparative Studies in Society and History, 47:2, 286-317.
  • 2000  “The Forgotten Mau: Anti-Navy Protest in American Samoa, 1920-35,” Pacific Historical Review, 69: 2 (May), 217-60. [Winner, AHA-PCB Koontz Award, 2001]
  • 1999  “Transnationalism in Central Oceanian Politics: A Dialectic between Diasporas and Nationhood?” Journal of the Polynesian Society, 108: 3 (September), 277-303.
  • 1997  Double Ghosts: Oceanian Voyagers on Euroamerican Ships. Armonk:M.E. Sharpe.