400 Level Courses

Spring 2012: 400 Level Courses

All information on this page subject to change without advanced notice.

 

HIST 416 Chinese Intellectual History (3)

M 2:00-4:30p Davis, Ned


Content:
History 416 is an upper-division course on the intellectual history of China from ancient times through the early Ming dynasty (16th c.). This semester the course will focus on the philosophical and religious orientations of ancient China, especially during the period from the 6th century B.C. when Confucius lived through the Qin and Han dynasties, and on the relation of these orientations to the illumination of ancient Chinese political culture. Three books have been chosen to represent the history of these orientations in the ancient period: Philip Ivanhoe and Bryan Van Norden, Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy (2006); Yuri Pines, Envisioning Eternal Empire: Chinese Political Thought of the Warring States Era (Hawaii, 2009); and Mark Edward Lewis, The Early Chinese Empires: Qin and Han (Harvard, 2007). Class will be devoted to a discussion of these three books.


Requirements:
Requirements include short papers or presentations based on that week’s reading and a final paper (10 -15 pages), whose subject may be chosen according to the student’s interest in consultation with the professor. Since this course will be conducted as a seminar, class attendance is required, and class attendance and participation will be considered in the assignment of a final grade. The course will teach the student how to read, contextualize and understand texts from ancient culture, how to construct an historical argument, and the relevance of this ancient political culture to contemporary China.


Required Texts:
Ivanhoe and Van Norden, Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy; Lewis, The Early Chinese Empires: Qin and Han; Pines, Envisioning Eternal Empire: Chinese Political Thought in the Warring States Era.


HIST 419 The Chinese Revolution (3) (WI focus)

MWF 11:30-12:20p Wang, Wensheng


Content:
This writing-intensive course aims to help students understand the making of modern China by tracing a long series of crises, reforms, and revolutions since 1800. These critical events and processes provide a prism through which to view how China has developed from a collapsing dynastic empire to one of the world’s greatest powers. Students will examine how this dramatic transformation has shaped the lives of ordinary people as well as the way they have understood their past. Students will also think about the enduring influence of Chinese tradition and its interplay with foreign impact which have been shaping China’s quest for modernization.


Requirements:
To be announced in class.


Required Texts:
Spence, The Search for Modern China; Mitter, A Bitter Revolution; Cheek, Mao Zedong and China’s Revolutions, Hsun, The True Story of Ah Q.


HIST 424 Twentieth-Century Japan (3)

TR 1:30-2:45p Totani, Yuma


Content:
This course explores the rise and fall of Japan’s fortune as a world power since around the time of the Russo-Japanese War (1904-5) to the present. No prior knowledge of the Japanese language, history, or culture is required, although students are expected to undertake intensive reading and writing assignments as well as participate in classroom discussions on a regular basis.


Requirements:
Participation & attendance; two written exams; one essay (1,500-1,800 words)


Required Texts:
Course Packet; Andrew Gordon, A Modern History of Japan: From Tokugawa Times to the Present (2003)


HIST 441 Expansion of Europe (3) (WI Focus)

TR 9:00- 10:15a Bentley, Jerry


Content:
Christopher Columbus’ famous voyage of 1492 began the process by which all parts of the world came into permanent and sustained contact with each other. What prompted Europeans to sail beyond the Mediterranean? What were the results of their travels? This course examines the first age of global history and charts the various effects of global interaction. The emphasis falls on the theme of encounters between peoples of different societies and cultural regions, and on the changes brought about by these encounters.


Requirements:

Regular attendance, reading, and discussion. Undergraduates will write four short reflective essays on the readings as well as one longer research paper. Graduate students will prepare one research paper. All will have the opportunity to present the results of individual study in class.


Required Texts:
Sparks, Two Princes of Calabar; Elison, Deus Destroyed: The Image of Christianity in Early Modern Japan; Pigafetta,Magelan’s Voyage; Wolf, Europe and the People without History; Crosby, Ecological Imperialism; Schwartz (ed.), Victors and Vanquished.


HIST 444 The History of the Holocaust

TR 1:30-2:45a Ziegler, Herbert


Content:
During the Second World War the Nazi regime and its collaborators targeted all European Jews for mass murder. The Holocaust is the name used to refer to this systematic, bureaucratic, and state-sponsored campaign of persecution and genocide. During this period, the Nazis also targeted other groups because of their perceived "racial inferiority": Roma (Gypsies), people with disabilities, and some of the Slavic peoples (Poles, Russians, and others). Other groups were persecuted on political and behavioral grounds, among them Communists, Socialists, Jehovah's Witnesses, and homosexuals. Six decades after the fact, and despite--or because of--the voluminous research and the flood of publications, the Holocaust still engenders compelling historical questions and spawns contentious interpretations. It is the aim of this course to chronicle the origins, progression, and culmination of the Holocaust, and to grapple with the questions and issues surrounding this human catastrophe. Students taking this lecture/discussion course will be exposed to a variety of historical sources including: primary documents, monographic literature, memoirs, photographs, maps, and films.


Requirements:
There will be a number of reading assignments (one for each assigned book), and a comprehensive final examination. The reading assignments will account for 50% of your grade in the course, while the final examination will account for the other 50% of the course grade.


Required Texts:
Eichengreen & Frommer, Rumkowski and the Orphans of Lodz; Muller, Eyewitness Auschwitz; Gutman,Resistance: The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising; Müller, Eyewitness Auschwitz: Three Years in the Gas Chambers; Browning,Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland; Kaplan, Between Dignity and Despair: Jewish Life in Nazi Germany


HIST 445 French Revolution and Napoleon (3)

TR 10:30-11:45a Matteson, Kieko


Content:
A study of the French Revolution, its origins, drama, and lasting effects on world history. The scope will be as comprehensive as possible, covering ideas, politics, social conflict, cultural change, warfare, economics, nationalism and gender relations. While the focus will be on the late eighteenth-century and the development of the Revolution itself, the course will also cover Napoleon’s seizure and consolidation of power and the Revolution’s enduring legacy.


Requirements:
To be announced in class.


Required Texts:
McPhee, The French Revolution, 1789-1799; Blaufarb, Napoleon: A Symbol for an Age: A Brief History with Documents.


HIST 448 Imperial Spain and Portugal (3)

MWF 11:30-12:20p Speidel, Michael


Content:
The discovery of the sea routes from Europe to India, America, and the Pacific. The resulting sea-borne empires of Spain and Portugal and their impact on peoples, cultures, and economies.


Requirements:
To be announced.


Required Texts:
Diaz, The Conquest of New Spain; Columbus, The Four Voyages; Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America; Russell, Prince Henry the Navigator.


HIST 450 Topics in African History: African Revolutions and Decolonization (3)

TR 1:30-2:20p Njoroge, Njoroge


Content:
This course will provide an introduction to the history of colonial and postcolonial African societies, providing a sense of their diversity and complexity. Beginning with European imperialism and its consequences in the nineteenth century we will then examine the development of nationalist ideologies and independence movements in the early twentieth century; decolonization and the structure of newly independent African states since World War II; and the contemporary crisis of the state in much of Africa. We will examine the long and staggered transition to independence and the post-colonial conditions of contemporary Africa. Through readings, films, and music, we will explore the historical and cultural contours of African revolutions and the current predicaments facing African societies.


Requirements:
To be announced.


Required Texts:
Achebe, A Man of the People; Wilson, Steve Biko; Mamdani, When Victims Become Killers; Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth; Parker, African History: A Very Short Introduction; Birmingham, The Decolonization of Africa


HIST 460 Native American History (3)

MWF 12:30-1:20p Rath, Richard


Content:
History 460 covers the history of Native Americans from their origins in the Americas through the present. Where possible, primacy is given to indigenous perspectives and authors. Part of the course will be about methods and biases of the discipline of history, and how working from indigenous perspectives can change the practice of the discipline. We will spend several weeks on pre-contact histories, then explore the long violent processes of colonization and dispossession, first under the aegeis of Europeans, then Americans. Boarding schools, reforms, the arts, and resistance movements of the twentieth century will be discussed, and we will conclude with the recent history of Native Americans, covering such issues as land trust, nuclear dumping, gambling, and race relations among Native Americans, African Americans, and Whites.


Requirements:
Class attendance and participation, term paper, short assignments, midterm, and final. There are no prerequisites for this course.


Required Texts:
All reading material will be available online either through Amazon (there are Kindle apps available for all platforms, no kindle required) or electronically from professor.

  • Michael Leroy Oberg, Native America: A History (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010).
  • Theda Perdue, Sifters: Native American Women’s Lives, 1st ed. (Oxford University Press, USA, 2001).
  • Jane T. Merritt, At the Crossroads (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).
  • Tiya Miles, Sharon Patricia Holland, and Joy Harjo, Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds: The African Diaspora in Indian Country (Duke University Press
    Books, 2006).
  • Charles Eastman, The Soul of the Indian (Neeland Media LLC, 2004).


HIST 463 American Civil War Era 1841-1877 (3)

MWF 11:30-12:20p McGlone, Robert


Content:
United States political, constitutional, military, social, and cultural history in the Civil War Era. The course focuses primarily on the crisis of the Union. Was the Civil War inevitable or the tragic handiwork of a “blundering generation”? Why did President Lincoln and his party refuse to let the “rebel” southern states secede peacefully? Was the outcome of the war inevitable because of the North’s greater resources and manpower? Or did the Confederacy lose the war through internal problems, poor leadership, or its commitment to states rights? How did four years of carnage change the character of warfare? What were the war’s long-term costs and benefits? How successfully did Congress integrate the nearly four million African-Americans freed from slavery into American life during Reconstruction? Has the United States solved the dilemma of subordinating ethnic and regional identities to a national ideal?


Requirements:
Students may select from several areas of evaluation: brief essays, a research paper, class discussion, outside reading, essay exams, or a class presentation.


Required Texts:
McPherson, Tried By War; McPherson, For Cause & Comrades; Potter, The Impending Crisis; Walters, American Reformers, 1815-1860; Joyner, Down by the Riverside; Foner, A Short History of Reconstruction.


HIST 468 Viva Las Vegas! (3)

TR 12:00-1:15p Henriksen, Margot


Content:
Viva Las Vegas! is an upper-division lecture course designed to familiarize students with American history in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by tracing the transformations in Las Vegas over the last century. Major issues to be examined include: the politics of water and the building of Boulder (Hoover) Dam; Nevada’s legalization of gambling and easing of divorce laws; the militarization of Las Vegas during World War II and the cold
war, with particular attention to the atomic bomb tests that attracted tourists; the influence of organized crime and the rise of "The Strip"; an examination of gender, sexuality, and entertainment culture through studies of Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, and showgirls; the lure and failure of the American Dream in Las Vegas; and the recent re-invention and reconstruction of Las Vegas, first through family values and the designing of “casinos royale” and then through an adult-oriented reinvigoration of sex and sin: “What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.”


Requirements:
Students complete in-class quizzes on the visual materials (for attendance credit) and must take an in-class, comprehensive final examination. An option to write a midterm paper is also available.


Required Texts:
Albert, Brothel: Mustang Ranch and Its Women; Denton and Morris, The Money and the Power: The Making of Las Vegas and Its Hold on America
; Fox, In the Desert of Desire: Las Vegas and the Culture of Spectacle; Levy, Rat Pack Confidential; Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream; Venturi, Brown and Izenour, Learning from Las Vegas.


HIST 473 Slavery and Freedom (3) (X-List as AMST 432)

MW 10:30-11:45a Daniel, Marcus


Content:
This course traces the growth of Atlantic slavery in the C17th and C18th, the development of the African diaspora in the Americas, the impact on slavery of the American, French and Haitian Revolutions, the rise of abolitionist politics, and the process of slave emancipation in North America and the Caribbean.


Requirements:
Requirements will include two take home essays and a final term paper.


Required Texts:
Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of Gustavus Vasa; Smartt Bell, All Souls Rising; Hinks, ed., David Walker’s Appeal; Foner, Nothing But Freedom.


HIST 477 History of American Workers (3) (X-List as AMST 431)

TR 10:30-11:45a Kraft, James


Content:
American workers have had many faces: the skilled artisan, the plantation slave, the female domestic, the “white collar” employee and more. What have these workers had in common? What kind of work did they perform and how has it changed over time? How have they responded to changes in the work environment? What role has government played in shaping that environment? What problems do American workers face today? This course explores these and similar questions.


Requirements:
Midterm exam, 10-page research paper, final exam, and class attendance.


Required Texts:
Dubofsky & Dulles, Labor in America: A History; Boris, Nelson & Paterson, Major Problems in the History of American Workers;
Kraft, Vegas at Odds.


HIST 482 Pacific Islands II (3) (HAP Focus)

TR 10:30-11:45a Chappell, David


Content:
This course will cover Oceania’s past during the colonial and “post-colonial” eras, with special emphasis on indigenous resistance, the impact of two World Wars and the Cold War on decolonization, challenges of nation‑building, and ongoing struggles for sovereignty and identity. The theme will be the quest for self‑determination by modern Pacific Islanders within a context of increasing global interdependence.


Requirements:
Two exams, two book reviews, oral participation and regular attendance.

Required Texts:
Hau’ofa, Tales of the Tikongs, Spitz, Island of Shattered Dreams.


HIST 484 The Hawaiian Kingdom 1819-1893 (3)

TR 12:00-1:15p Arista, Noelani


Content:
The history of the Hawaiian Kingdom from pre-contact through 1893. It concerns selected topics for consideration based on available texts.

Requirements:
Papers, class discussion and analysis of assigned readings, and attendance are required.


Required Texts:
Kamakau, Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii; Brundage, Going to the Sources: A Guide to Historical Research and Writing; Perez Jr., The War of 1898: The United States and Cuba in History.


HIST 485 History of 20th Century Hawai‘i

TR 1:30-2:45pm Rosa, John


Content:
Formation of an American Hawaii with its unique local culture from 1898 to the present.


Requirements:
To be announced in class.


Required Texts:
Mohr, Plague and Fire: Battling Black Death and the 1900 Burning of Honolulu’s Chinatown; Coffman, Island Edge of America; Takaki, Pau Hana: Plantation Hawai‘i; Bailey & Farber, The First Strange Place: Race and Sex in World War II Hawai‘i; Howes & Osorio eds., The Value of Hawai‘i; Walker, Waves of Resistance: Surfing and History in Twentieth-Century Hawai‘i.


HIST 495D History in Oceania (HAP, WI Focus)

T 1:30-4pm Hanlon, David


Content:
This course focuses not on the history of Oceania, but on the practice of history in a region of the world deeply affected by colonialism, Christianity and capitalism. Conventional history continues to regard the citizens of Oceania as, to use Eric Wolfe's phrase, "people without history." Early written histories of the "Pacific" focused on the activities of the first Europeans into the region; explorers, traders, missionaries, and the like. This kind of history not only concerned the advance agents of colonization; it was itself colonizing in that it sought to impose upon a vast and diverse "sea of islands" a particular and culturally specific form of historical expression. This course begins with an examination of these assumed first histories, and then moves on to consider alternative approaches to the study of Oceanic pasts, not the least of which are indigenous and local histories as well as those that incorporate interdisciplinary methods. The variety of media through which history in Oceania can be done is also a focus of this course.

Requirements:
To be announced in class.


Required Texts:
Hau’ofa, We Are the Ocean; Hau’ofa, Tales of the Tikongs


HIST 496B Senior Tutorial: U.S. History (3) (WI Focus)

W 1:30-4:00p Daniel, Marcus PRE: History Major


Content:
This course introduces majors in American History to the disconcerting and exhilarating world of historical research! During the semester you’ll undertake intensive primary and secondary research on a historical topic of your choice, and produce a well-argued, well-written and well-substantiated research paper of at least twenty-five pages in length. This paper will be based on first-hand research in primary historical documents, demonstrate your familiarity with secondary sources relevant to your chosen topic, and develop and defend your own point of view or argument. Although the course is designed to develop your individual creativity and skill as a practitioner of history, it will also emphasize the collaborative and cooperative
character of historical enquiry.


Requirements:
To be announced in class.


Required Texts:
Storey, Writing History: A Guide for Students


HIST 496D Senior Tutorial: Asian History (3) (WI Focus)

W 3:00-5:30p Totani, Yuma PRE: History Major


Content:
This is a capstone course in history in which students undertake a major research and writing project in the field of special interest. The area focus
is Asia and the Pacific region. To assist students with research and writing experiences, the course is divided into three distinct yet inter-related
sets of instructional sessions. In Part I (Weeks 2-5), students will have common primary-source readings covering from around 1600 to the present in
order to develop an appreciation of the major historical events that defined the socio-economic, political, cultural, and military foundations of the
Asia-Pacific nations as we know them today. In Part II (Weeks 6-9), students will explore a wealth of archives, rare collections, oral histories, and social sciences resources including online databases and published sources that are available at the UH library. Part III (Weeks 10-16) will be to the development of individual term papers. To ensure students’ steady progress with research and writing within the limited time of the semester,
the instructor will schedule individual tutorials and arrange in-class progress reports on a regular basis as well as help students with editing of
draft papers.


Requirements:

Class attendance; write senior thesis (approx. 25 pages); complete assignments on time.


Required Text:

Course Packet (It will be made available as e-Reserve materials).


HIST 496E Senior Tutorial: World/Comparative (3) (WI Focus)

M 3:00-5:30p Romaniello, Matthew PRE: History Major


Content:
This course will assist history majors to write a substantial senior thesis based on original research of a topic in European history. To accomplish this exciting and formidable task, students will participate in individual and collaborative efforts to improve their ability to conduct primary research, to analyze historical evidence, and to organize and write a serious scholarly essay. In completing their senior thesis, students will be expected to deploy their knowledge and skills gained from HIST 396 (Historiography): a mastery of philosophies of history and the concomitant theories and methods used to interpret historical sources. The final thesis of 25-35 pages will be written in stages over the course of the semester, with regular writing assignments and deadlines creating a common framework for class participants. At the same time, students are encouraged to consider a historical event, development, problem, or theme from a specific era and field of history that most interests them.


Requirements:
To be announced in class.


Required Texts:
Storey, Writing History: A Guide for Students; Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations.