300 Level Courses

Spring 2012: 300 Level Courses

All information on this page subject to change without advanced notice.


HIST 302 History of India and South Asia since 1700s (3)

MWF 11:30-12:20p Bertz, Ned


Content:
This lecture and discussion course will survey the history of India and South Asia from the decline of the mighty Mughal Empire in the 1700s to the new millennium, including contemporary debates in India and Pakistan surrounding poverty and development, globalization and democracy, and terrorism and communalism. Starting with an orientation unit reviewing the history of ancient and medieval India and introducing modern South Asia, the course will then study the transition from Muslim to European rule. Special attention will be given to identifying the roots of religious conflicts which persist into modern South Asia. Following will be an in-depth look at the practice and consequences of British imperialism and the varied Indian responses of collaboration and resistance. The middle section of the course will analyze the encounter between colonialism and nationalism, featuring the perspectives of subaltern actors like peasants, prisoners, tribals, and women. Nationalism will be studied as a diverse force, encompassing many more shades than just the mainstream Gandhian narrative. Finally, Partition and post-colonial South Asia will be approached in part through voices represented in a diverse array of primary documents, including fiction and film. We will read three novels across the semester, one each representing the turbulent eras of colonial India, Partition, and the Indian ‘Emergency’ of the 1970s.
For extra credit, there will be an optional ‘Bollywood’ film series with movies screened in the late afternoon about every other week.

Requirements:
To be announced.

Required Texts:

Metcalf & Metcalf, A Concise History of Modern India; Kipling, Kim; Sidhwa, Cracking India; Mistry, A Fine Balance.


HIST 306 History of Modern Southeast Asia (3)

MWF 1:30-2:20p Kelley, Liam

Content:
This course is a survey of Southeast Asian history from the eighteenth century to the present. It covers the histories of the places that we now refer to as Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines.

Requirements:
Mid-term and final exams, 2 papers and some short assignments.

Required Texts:
Owen ed., The Emergence of Modern Southeast Asia; Toer, This Earth of Mankind; Manica, The Rice Mother.


HIST 312 China: 1600 - Present (3)

MWF 10:30-11:20a Davis, Ned


Content:
History 312 will introduce the student to the history of late-imperial and modern China. The lectures will focus on institutional, political, and social history. Three books are required: Ray Huang, 1587: A Year of No Significance (Yale, 1981); Jonathan Spence, The Search for Modern China (Norton, 2nd edition, 1999); Philip Kuhn, Origins of the Modern Chinese State (Stanford, 2002). Spence will serve as a textbook for the entire period.

Requirements:
Requirements for the course include a take-home, essay-question midterm and a final. Friday lectures will be devoted, occasionally, to class discussion of the reading. Attendance and participation are not required, but will be considered when determining your final grade. The week's reading assignments should be completed by each Friday (or by discussion). The course will emphasize the links and continuities between imperial and modern China and teach the student how to identify and compose an historical argument.

Required Texts:
Huang, 1587: A Year of No Significance; Spence, The Search for Modern China; Kuhn, Origins of the Modern Chinese State.


HIST 323 The Way of Tea (3)

MWF 1:30-2:20p Farris, Wayne


Content:
The tea ceremony is one of the most well-known cultural achievements of the Japanese. It evolved over several centuries and embraced a wide range of crafts, arts, and religious and philosophical beliefs, including ceramics, lacquerware, painting, calligraphy, architecture, garden design, flower arrangement, Shinto, Buddhism (especially Zen), and Confucianism.

The course will begin with an examination of the major religious and aesthetic traditions of early and medieval Japanese cultural history that set the stage for the creation and development of the tea ceremony. The remainder of the course will be devoted to the history of the tea ceremony and the way of tea from their origins in China and Korea to present-day Japan. Interspersed with lectures and discussion sessions will be trips to the University’s tea house, Jakuan.

Requirements:
A paper, a midterm and final exam (all essay), and attendance at the Jakuan practice sessions.


Required Texts:
Kanabata, Thousand Cranes; Sen, The Japanese Way of Tea; Varley, Japanese Culture; Varley & Kumakura eds., Tea in Japan; Keene, Anthology of Japanese Literature.


HIST 328 Modern Korea (3)

MWF 7:30-8:20a Yoo, Jun


Content:
This course aims to provide a general survey of the modern Korean experience. Rather than offering a mere narrative of the peninsula’s history, it focuses on particular episodes, events, influences, and historical ruptures that have shaped the way historians have interpreted and understood their past. Major themes include the country’s opening to the West, its colonial experience and subsequent fratricidal war, and the divergent post-colonial paths of the two separate Koreas. Throughout, we will address the tensions of Korean nationalism, authoritarianism, and industrialization in conjunction with the politics of gender and class.


Requirements:
To be announced.

Required Texts:
Cumings, Korea’s Place in the Sun; Jenkins, The Reluctant Communist; Moon, Sex Among Allies.


HIST 334 Ancient Rome: The Empire (3)

MWF 9:30-10:20a Speidel, Michael


Content:
Imperial Rome: amphitheaters, baths, temples, palaces, churches. Life in the capital, in the marble towns, in the countryside. Economic and administrative structure of the empire. The Roman army in three continents. History of the emperors: Nero, Trajan, Marcus Aurelius, Diocletian, Constantine. The crisis of the empire. M.Aurelius’ meditations, Oriental religions, Christianity. The classical style in art gives way to forceful expression. The new foreign army. The restoration of the empire by an iron fist. The all-regulating Later-Roman Empire, its imposing art, its fixed society, its fall.
A lecture course, but with student participation. Original documents will be read (at home) and discussed (in class). To infer historical knowledge
from color slides, shown in the classroom, is essential. Such slides cover excavations and monuments from Spain, France, England, Germany to Greece, Turkey, Syria, Egypt, Libya, Tunesia, Algeria, and Morocco. Sophomores welcome.


Requirements:
Enthusiasm, interest, curiosity, empathy, critique, presence. A mid-term and a final exam.

Required Texts:
Ammianus, The Later Roman Empire; Speidel, Riding for Caesar; Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars; Tacitus, Agricola and Germany.


HIST 342 The History of Economic Thought (3)

MWF 11:30-12:20p Hoffenberg, Peter


Content:
Economics and History 342 invites students to consider the many relationships between History and Economics in light of the development of major economic theorists and their ideas, since around 1700, or so. In doing so, we will also consider the connections between the history of economic thought and wider political, social, and ethical questions, such as policies towards the poor and the roles of government in the economy. What can the history of economic thought tell us about the modern world and modern society itself? What are the relationships between economic thought and questions of equality, freedom and globalization?

We will read, discuss and write about what Robert Heilbroner famously entitled the “worldly philosophers,” most notably, but not exclusively, in Great Britain, Europe, and the United States. Specific lecture, discussion and reading topics include: how we might integrate Economic thought in our study of the past, ideas and public policy; a comparison of how major theorists thought about significant common problems, such as prices and work; specific schools of economic thinking, among which were Mercantilism, Free Trade Liberalism, Marxism and Socialism; the relationship between the history of
economic thought and crises, including famine and the Great Depression; and the relationship between economic thought and the problem of poverty among and within nations. Students interested in the current discussion of globalization will also find in our readings, lectures and discussions significant
antecedents, analogies and origins in the major economic theorists and their ideas.
Readings include both primary and secondary sources, as students are encouraged to actively engage the various dimensions of modern economic thought and the historical development of that thought. Lectures, readings and assignments are generally chronological, although some will be organized around themes and case-studies.

Requirements:
To be announced in class and syllabus.

Required Texts:
Heilbroner, The Worldly Philosophers; Fusfeld, The Age of the Economist; Sen, Development as Freedom; Stedman Jones, An End to Poverty?; Coyle, The Soulful Science


HIST 348 Modern England (3)

MWF 9:30-10:20p Hoffenberg, Peter

Content:
History 348 traces the social, political, cultural, and economic development of “Modern Britain” between the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and the outbreak of World War One in 1914. We will use historical, literary and cinematic sources to better understand the birth, dynamics and anxieties of the first “modern” society and the various complementary changes in national identity, or “Englishness.” We begin with the seventeenth-century’s “days of shaking” and end by saying “goodbye to all of that” with the Great War of 1914-1918.
Among the specific topics to be discussed are the seventeenth-century inheritance of revolution, the English Reformation, civil war and regicide; the Glorious Revolution in 1688 and subsequent growth of political stability; the rise of the gentry as a ruling class; the growth and control of party politics; the roles of religion and the Church of England; Britain’s relations with France, India and the American Colonies during the eighteenth century; the Great Transformation of the agricultural and industrial revolutions; key developments in thought, art, and literature; England's “damnable” relationship with Ireland; economic, social and political Reforms; trade unionism, Chartism and popular Radicalism; the rise and decline of Liberalism; the problems and promises of Victorian and Edwardian cities; the nineteenth-century British Empire in India, Southern Africa and elsewhere; challenges to Liberalism around 1900 and the experiences and meanings of the Great War.
England was and is not an Island unto itself, so our course will try and place modern British History in four wider geopolitical contexts: England’s relationships with “The Celtic Fringe” of Ireland, Wales and Scotland; its vast empire, including, but not limited to, North America, India, Australia and Southern Africa, and the sugar and slave islands in the Americas; the European Continent, particularly Spain, France and Germany; and non-European ‘great’ powers such as the United States, China, Russia and the Ottoman Empire.


Requirements:
To be announced in class.

Required Texts:
Wilcox and Walter, The Age of Aristocracy; Arnstein, Britain Yesterday and Today, 1930 to Present; Defoe, Moll Flanders; Gaskell, North and South; Roberts, The Classic Slum.


HIST 354 Introduction to Islamic History (3) (ETH focus)

MW 10:30-11:45a Khan, Karim


Content:
HIST 354 focuses on the history and culture of the Muslim World from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to about 1500.


Requirements:
To be announced in class.


Required Texts:

Esposito, The Oxford History of Islam; Esposito, Islam: The Straight Path.


HIST 372 US Foreign Relations from 1898 (3)

MWF 11:30-12:20p Reiss, Suzanna


Content:
The United States’ presence in the world changed dramatically in the twentieth century. From the last decade of the 19th century to the present, the United States extended its political, cultural and economic influence around the globe. A century marked by dramatic decolonization movements in the Pacific, Caribbean, Latin America, Southeast Asia, Africa and the Middle East witnessed the rise of a new American empire. We will look at the expansion of US influence in the context of the wars of 1898, European colonial rivalries, the Cold War, the US Civil Rights Movement, worldwide anti-colonial and revolutionary movements, as well domestic struggles over race, gender, economic power and policing. The primary goals of this course are to examine how major domestic events were interwoven with political movements, cultural transformations and economic circuits firmly rooted in the international sphere and to have students leave with a better understanding of the importance of historical context to contemporary events and ideas.


Requirements:

To be announced in class.


Required Texts:
LaFeber, The American Age: US Foreign Policy at Home and Abroad, Vol. 2, Since 1896


HIST 374 American Thought and Culture: 20th Century (3)
(X-list as AMST 344)

TR 9:00-10:15a Rapson, Richard PRE: Instructor Approval (WI focus)

Content:
This description includes both halves of the yearlong sequence of History 373-374 (American Studies 343-344), though each course stands on its own and may be taken separately. The courses attempt to define the “climates of opinion” in America at different stages of our past. Consequently a wide range of material is dealt with, the intellectual aim being synthesis. An attempt is made to maximize the possibilities of discussion. Students can expect to attend lectures, hear music, watch movies, participate in several small discussion groups, etc. The first semester (373) moves from European antecedents of colonization to the early years of the 20th century. The second semester (374) concentrates on the more recent period. Students may take either semester, or they may take both in any sequence. Opportunities are offered for the student to fulfill the requirements of the course in a wide variety of ways. The course carries graduate credit, is limited to 20 students, and requires the permission of instructor to enroll.


Requirements:
Papers and book reports. No exams.


Required Texts:
Collins, When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women; Heilbroner, An Inquiry Into the Human Prospect; Nash,From These Beginnings, Vol. 2, (8th ed.); Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale:My Father Bleeds History/ And Here My Troubles Began (The Complete Maus, Vols. I & II); Toffler, The Third Wave; Rapson, Magical Thinking and the Decline of America

HIST 396B Introduction to History: Historiography (3) (WI focus)

R 3:00-5:30p Arista, Noelani PRE: History Major

Content:
This course is an introduction to the history of historical scholarship, and the ways in which historians have framed and written history. We will survey a variety of approaches to thinking and writing about the past used by historians in the past few decades. This class will give you the chance to practice analyzing historical sources, and acquire discipline specific forms of writing. This course is structured as a seminar, with brief introductory lectures by the instructor, followed by class discussions.
The courses emphasizes different approaches to the writing of history, but also investigates questions of scale: trans-national, national, regional, and micro. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each, and what kinds of sources are more suited to a particular frame?
I will also highlight methodological developments in Hawaiian and Native American history has and the potential to transform work on encounter, colonization, law, and empire.

Requirements:
To be announced in class.

Required Texts:
Brundage, Going to the Sources: A Guide to Historical Research and Writing; Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History; Perez Jr.,The War of 1898: The United States and Cuba in History and Historiography; Demos,The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America; Lepore,The Name of War: King Phillip’s War and the Origins of American Identity; Armitage, The Declaration of Independence: A Global History.


HIST 396C Introduction to History: Education (3) (WI focus)

TR 3:00-5:30p Matteson, Kieko PRE: History Major

Content:
This section of the required methods course is designed for history majors planning to go into education or secondary education majors with an emphasis in social studies. The class will discuss philosophies and methods of history as they relate to education, particularly examining different forms of
research and interpretation, state standards, pedagogies, and controversies. In addition to the books, we will use materials from national and state associations and participate in History Day.

Requirements:
To be announced in class.

Required Texts:
Bloch, The Historian’s Craft; Demos, The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America; Schivelbusch,Tastes of Paradise: A Social History of Spices, Stimulants, and Intoxicants; Johnson, The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic -- & How It Changed Science, Cities & the Modern World.