100 Level Courses

Spring 2012: 100 Level Courses

All information on this page subject to change without advanced notice.


HIST 151 World History to 1500 (3) (FGA Focus)

TR 12:00-12:50p Schwartz, Saundra


Content:
This course analyzes the historical development of human societies and their cultural traditions in all parts of the world, including Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, up to 1500 C.E. Lectures and readings offer integrated analyses of the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of human societies, as well as processes of cross-cultural interaction and exchange. In small weekly discussion groups, students engage in the study of writings, narratives, artifacts, or cultural practices of different peoples and societies. Overall, the course provides students with an intellectual foundation for responsible citizenship in the complex, interdependent, globalizing world of contemporary times.


Requirements:
To be announced.


Required Texts:
Bentley and Ziegler, Traditions and Encounters, Vol. 1: From the Beginning to 1500; Wiesner et al, Discovering the Past, Vol. 1: To 1650.


HIST 152 World History Since 1500 (3) (FGB Focus)

TR 9:00-9:50a Hanlon, David


Content:
This course analyzes the encounters between human societies in various parts of the world, including Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania from 1500 C. E. (Common Era) to the present. Lectures and textbook readings focus on (1) changing political and economic relationships and their social consequences, (2) the imposition of colonial regimes and systems of dominance, (3) the varying responses to these imperial and colonial forms of intrusions, (4) the massive and complex process of decolonization in the twentieth century, and (5) some of the more critical global dilemmas facing humankind in contemporary times. These histories of engagement will be examined against the enduring influence of various cultural traditions in the areas under study.

We will also give attention to the variety of approaches for studying the past. Indeed, there exists no single way to study the past; rather, there are many ways that range from emphases on political, economic, intellectual, literary, and religious themes to a focus on social, cross-cultural, gender, and transnational relations. We will sample liberally from these multiple approaches. The ultimate goal of this course is the development of a keen understanding of the diversity of human experiences, and the many and different ways in which these experiences can be presented and interpreted.
Requirements: Two mid-term examinations, one final examination, and four lab quizzes.


Required Texts:
Allyn, The 47 Ronin Story; Bentley & Ziegler, Traditions and Encounters: A Brief Global History, Vol. 2, 1500 to Present; Achebe, Things Fall Apart; Prince, The History of Mary Prince; Spiegelman, Maus I: My Father Bleeds History


HIST 152 World History Since 1500 (3) (FGB Focus)
TR 10:30-11:20a Henriksen, Margot


Content:
This course analyzes the processes and results of encounters between human societies and their cultural traditions in all parts of the world, including Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, from 1500 C.E. to the present. Lectures and readings analyze the establishment of economic and tradition relationships, the imposition of colonial regimes, struggles for hegemony between people of different societies, and the massive process of decolonization in the twentieth century, as well as the enduring influence of various cultural traditions throughout these global encounters. In small weekly discussion groups, students engage in the study of writings, narratives, artifacts, or cultural practices of different peoples and societies. Overall, the course provides students with an intellectual foundation for responsible citizenship in the complex, interdependent, globalizing world of contemporary times.


Requirements:
To be announced in class.


Required texts:
Bentley & Ziegler, Traditions and Encounters: A Global Perspective on the Past, Vol. 2; Jicai, The Three-Inch Golden Lotus; Achebe, Things Fall Apart; Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale (Volumes 1 and 2); Hosseini, A Thousand Splendid Suns.


HIST 152 World History Since 1500 (3) (FGB Focus)
MW 1:30-2:20p Bertz, Ned


Content:
This course employs a world historical approach to study the making of the modern world. We will analyze processes of interaction between people in all parts of the globe from 1500 CE to the present. Lectures and readings present integrated frameworks of political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of human societies created through cross-cultural encounters and exchange. In small weekly discussion groups, students will engage in the practice of history though the study of primary and secondary sources. Overall, the course provides students with an introduction to the discipline of history and a foundation to analyze the complex and interdependent world of the past and the present.

Requirements:
To be announced.


Required texts:
Bentley & Ziegler, Traditions and Encounter: A Brief Global History, Vol. II; Lindsay, Captives as Commodities: The Transatlantic Slave Trade; Prince, The History of Mary Prince: A West Indian Slave Narrative; Marx & Engels, The Communist Manifesto; Ghosh, The Glass Palace.


HIST 155 Issues in World History: (FGB Focus)
The World History of Human Disease (3)
MWF 2:30-3:20p Farris, Wayne


Content:
This course focuses on the role of disease in world history. Scholars have usually been keen to propose that politics, religion, and economics dominate as causes in world history, but until recently have neglected the role played by unseen microparasites. After defining some key terms, the course traces the relationship between viruses, parasites, and bacteria and the human host from the Plague of Athens around 500 BCE until the modern day. Besides examining the role played by disease during the Black Death and conquest of the New World, this course also looks at the nineteenth-century debate over the germ theory and the contemporary threat of bioterrorism. Attention to the HIV/AIDS epidemic begins and concludes the course.


Requirements:
One mid-term and a comprehensive final (all essay). There will also be an out-of-class essay. There will be several class discussions and participation is an important element in the final grade.


Required texts:
Gottfried, The Black Death; LeCarre, The Constant Gardener; McNeill, Plagues and Peoples; Crosby, The Columbian Exchange.


HIST 162A World Cultures in Perspective (3) (FGB Focus)
TR 10:30-11:45p Ziegler, Herbert


Content:
This course analyzes the processes and results of encounters between human societies and their cultural traditions in all parts of the world, including Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, from 1500 C.E. to the present. Lectures and readings analyze the establishment of economic and tradition relationships, the imposition of colonial regimes, struggles for hegemony between people of different societies, and the massive process of decolonization in the twentieth century, as well as the enduring influence of various cultural traditions throughout these global encounters. In small weekly discussion groups, students engage in the study of writings, narratives, artifacts, or cultural practices of different peoples and societies. Overall, the course provides students with an intellectual foundation for responsible citizenship in the complex, interdependent, globalizing world of contemporary times.


Requirements:
To be announced in class.


Required Texts:
Bentley & Ziegler, Traditions and Encounters: A Global Perspective on the Past, Vol. 2; Jicai, The Three-Inch Golden Lotus; Achebe, Things Fall Apart; Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale (Volumes 1 and 2); Hosseini, A Thousand Splendid Suns.