Second History Workshop

Professor Karen Jolly will present "Communities Imagined, Emotional, and Textual: English Identity and Hybridity in the Tenth Century" on Friday, October 1st as the second meeting of the new History Workshop. 

 

This year's theme is "De-Centering the Nation State: History Methodology within a Pacific Geography. Subsequent sessions will include presentations by Professors Liam Kelley, David Hanlon, Njoroge Njoroge, Ned Davis, Matt Lauzon, and Noelani Arista.
 

“Communities Imagined, Emotional, and Textual:

English Identity and Hybridity in the Tenth Century”
Karen Jolly, Associate Professor of History

 

Friday, October 1; 2:30-4:00

History Department Library, Sakamaki A201


With his crowned head bowed over an open book, Wessex King Athelstan (r. 924-39) offers to Bishop Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (c. 635-687) royal gifts for his religious community. This act of patronage crosses boundaries of time, place, and status and raises the question, who is patron for whom? What are the dynamics of power—geographic, political, and spiritual—that bind these two men and their communities together across time and space in an exchange of gifts? The “rise of Wessex” uniting the “English” is the usual story, but this presentation undermines that master narrative of nation-building by exploring counter-narratives of spiritual agency found in local, hybrid communities.  In doing so, the talk challenges the construction of a medieval/modern divide and the way it is used in political discourse to temporally marginalize people groups in world history.