Intellectual Property

In general, materials developed exclusively by a student as part of course work (including theses and dissertations) are the student’s property, the final disposition of which remains the student’s prerogative. Should materials so developed result in publication or other types of dissemination, the authorship or other credit shall be determined by the student. Note the following exceptions:

Materials from Funded Research

If a student develops materials with funding from a grant or contract, even partially, then provisions of the grant or contract may determine ownership of intellectual property. The student should ascertain the expectations of the funding agency with respect to the ownership of the materials developed from the research and secure necessary agreements in writing.

Materials from University Employment

If a student develops materials while working as a university employee or if the work involves more than incidental use of university resources, then the university may have a right to a share of the intellectual property. In addition, the student must disclose the development of the materials to the Office of Technology Transfer and Economic Development.