UH Mānoa Resources Overview


If you are in immediate danger or need immediate help, call 911


The University encourages victims of sexual violence to talk to somebody about what happened – so victims can get the support they need, and so the University can respond appropriately. While some victims of sexual assault are ready to file a formal complaint against an alleged offender, others may want time and privacy to sort through their next steps.

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa has many campus resources available to victims and survivors of sexual harassment, sexual assault and domestic violence. There are also local and national resources student victims and survivors may want to consider contacting. Below is a list of some of the resources available.

Please remember that different employees on campus have different abilities to maintain a victim’s confidentiality. Before revealing any information, please make sure you understand the reporting obligations of the person you are speaking to.

Please be aware that a criminal investigation is separate and distinct from UH Mānoa’s institutional response. You may choose both, one, or neither of these options, depending on your individual decision. These options are available simultaneously, and The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa will cooperate with law enforcement agencies if a criminal investigation occurs.


Support Services

Advocacy

The many resources available can sometimes be overwhelming. As such advocates can assist with navigating the many options available, helping to provide improved access to resources. While you have the final decision on how to proceed, advocates can assist in the decision making process through experienced information, allowing you to make the choices that best suit your individual circumstances. Advocacy is considered a confidential resource, meaning that assistance can be received without placing the University on notice of a specific incident. This is so you can receive needed assistance while still retaining control of your decision to report an incident to the University and/or law enforcement.

The Office of Gender Equity is considered an advocacy resource.

Counseling

Counselors can provide emotional support, as you process the many options available. Counseling is considered a confidential resource, meaning that assistance can be received without placing the University on notice of a specific incident. This is so you can receive needed assistance while still retaining control of your decision to report an incident to the University and/or law enforcement.


Medical Options

Medical Care and Evidence Collection

Although going to the hospital after a sexual assault may feel overwhelming, it is a safe place to get help. For example, at the Kapi`olani Medical Center for Women & Children, the acute forensic examination is available to adults and minors, females and males. Examinations are done within 72 hours of a sexual assault. If you are worried about sexually transmitted infections, HIV or other medical concerns, even if it is over 72 hours since the assault, it is important to seek medical care. Medical care following a sexual assault is important even if you have no visible injuries.

The acute forensic examination will:

  • Ensure that you are physically alright, and address concerns about the risks of sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy, and HIV.
  • It is a good idea to collect and preserve any evidence, even if you do not want to report the assault to the police. Sometimes people change their minds and decide later that they want to pursue legal action.

To preserve evidence:

  • It is best to not wash, bathe, douche, or brush your teeth (if oral activity took place). But even if you have cleaned up, you can and should still get a medical examination.
  • If you have not changed the clothing you were wearing at the time of the assault, keep these on as they can be collected at the time of the examination. If possible, bring a change of clothing.
  • If you have not changed the clothing you were wearing at the time of the assault, keep these on as they can be collected at the time of the examination. If possible, bring a change of clothing.
  • If you do change, put each article of clothing you were wearing in a separate paper bag and bring everything to the hospital.
  • Do not clean or disturb the physical location where the assault occurred.
  • If you suspect that you were a victim of a rape drug, medical care for testing and collecting evidence as soon as possible is important. These drugs leave your system very quickly.

For more detailed information, please visit http://satchawaii.com/get-help-what-to-do-overview.aspx

UHM Health Options

The University Health Services Mānoa (UHSM) is considered a confidential resource, meaning that assistance can be received without placing the University on notice of a specific incident. This is so you can receive any needed health services while still retaining control of your decision to report an incident to the University and/or law enforcement.

The University Health Services Mānoa (UHSM) is staffed by physicians, nurse clinicians, nurses, and other support staff, and offers a wide range of medical services and programs to UH Mānoa students, with many of the services also available to UH Mānoa faculty and staff and students from other UH campuses. Services include general medical care on a walk-in basis; women’s health, sports medicine, psychiatry, and dermatology clinics by appointment; pharmacy and clinical laboratory; and student training, employment and volunteer opportunities.


Safety Options

Campus Security Services

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Department of Public Safety provides protection and security at UH Mānoa 24 hours a day, throughout the year. The Campus Security patrol is responsible for enforcing UH Mānoa rules and regulations and its duties include detecting fires, detaining trespassers, preventing theft and vadalism, and investigating reports of suspicious persons and incidents. Also, upon a reasonable request, officers will provide an escort service from dusk to dawn for students and employees.

Reporting to campus security will put the University on notice of an allegation. Further, the University must use the information when compiling and publishing annual statistics for certain crimes reported that occur on or adjacent to University properties.

Interim Measures

The University encourages victims of sexual violence to talk to somebody about what happened – so victims can get the support they need, and so the University can respond appropriately.

As part of the University’s commitment to your safety, you have the right to reasonable and appropriate interim measures designed to preserve your educational experience, ensure the safety of all parties and the broader University community, maintain the integrity of the investigative and/or resolution process, and deter retaliation. These measures can be provided to you regardless of whether you seek formal disciplinary action.

Obtain a Protective Order

You have a right to live in a safe environment, free from the threat of harm from a family member or acquaintance. If someone you know is engaging in a pattern of harassment (including physical or sexual violence, verbal threats, property damage or stalking), you can seek protection by obtaining a temporary restraining order (TRO) against the perpetrator. If you need to extend your protection for up to three years, you can obtain an injunction at District Court of if the TRO is against a household or family member, you make a request for a protective order at Family Court.

If granted, the order sets guidelines aimed at protecting you. This can include prohibiting the defendant from calling or visiting you.

If the defendant is a family member, or has or had a dating relationship with the person seeking the TRO, please file through Family Court.

If the defendant is not related by blood and has never lived together with the person seeking the TRO, please file through District Court.


Reporting Options

Please be aware that a criminal investigation is separate and distinct from the University of Hawaiʻi’s institutional response. You may choose both, one, or neither of these options, depending on your individual decision. These options are available simultaneously, and the University will cooperate with law enforcement agencies if a criminal investigation occurs.

Report to the University

The University encourages you to talk to somebody about what happened – so you can get the support you need, and so the University can respond appropriately. Contacting the Title IX Coordinator will put the University on notice of an allegation. Additionally, any information shared with other employees must ordinarily obligates the employee to report the information to the Title IX Coordinator. The only exception is information shared with Confidential Resources.

Report to Law Enforcement

The decision to report to law enforcement is entirely yours. Some survivors say that reporting and seeking justice helped them recover and regain a sense of control over their lives. Understanding how to report and learning more about the experience can take away some of the unknowns and help you feel more prepared.

More information on reporting is available here: https://rainn.org/get-information/legal-information/reporting-rape