Chinese Language FLAS, Summer 2014

Congratulations to four UHM students who received FLAS support for intensive language study in China: Koa Webster, Ruby MacDougall, Duncan Aylor, and Melanie Nash.  Koa spent the summer at Hainan University studying Mandarin.  He writes: “Over the summer I noticed my listening skill became much better and my speaking became more fluid, I could figure out what people were saying if I didn’t know a word they were able to use Chinese to explain the meaning.  I believe I still have a lot more to learn, but the best part of the experience was feeling myself progress over the course of the program.”  Ruby studied Mandarin at Yunnan University in Kunming.  She says, “Before this summer, I was very intimidated by academic writing in Mandarin and this hindered my research progress. Now, I have much greater ability to understand academic sources written in Mandarin and I believe this will open up exciting new possibilities for my research and for future academic discoveries!”  Duncan studied Mandarin in Beijing.  According to Duncan, “The FLAS was extremely helpful.  The best part about it was that it allowed one to design their own program of study while in country, so one could tailor the studying to one’s specific needs.  I was able to focus on the skills I needed most, which was not only practical but also helped me to stay motivated. ”

Korean Language FLAS Students Summer 2013

seymour_0078Four UHM students study Korean language at Seoul National University this summer: Robert York, Philip Boulay, Joseph Michaels, and John Chow Seymour. At the National Traditional Music Museum at the National Gugak Center in Seoul,  John Chow Seymour (center), Ph.D. candidate in music composition and theory,  plays his own music.  John creates “new music for non-Western instruments, such as Korean traditional instruments.  I’ve had pieces performed in Korea four times now, but before this summer, I struggled to communicate with the performers playing my music.  Near the end of this summer immersion program, I met one of those performers, who played my music two years ago.  She was so grateful that I could communicate in Korean now, and we look forward to working together on artistic projects in the future. Truly, the opportunity to be in an immersive language learning environment will be an important step in my career as an internationally-focused artist and academic.

UH Law Professor Publishes Chinese Legal Primer

Lawrence Foster, Professor of Law at UH Manoa, has recently, with the help of colleagues Tiffany Yajima and Yan Lin, completed work on China Law Reader published by Long River Press.  The work’s primary aim is to introduce a foreign audience to Chinese law.   According to the authors, “the ideal user is someone who has completed at least two years of Chinese language study and is now ready to read actual law-related Chinese language texts in order to learn the specialized language of Chinese law.”  Funding for this work, which can be purchased at Amazon and comes highly recommended by the China Law Blog, was provided in part by the NRCEA.