Grants / Scholarships / Awards

 

GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH AWARDS

The Department of Biology offers several research and travel awards for graduate students made possible through donations and endowments from alumni and former faculty. Requests for proposals are circulated in early fall semester. Awards are made once a year by a selection committee appointed by the chair. Inquiries should be directed to the Associate Chair for Instruction, Dr. Peter Marko, Department of Biology (pmarko@hawaii.edu).  In order to apply for one of these grants, you must contact Dr. Peter Marko through email.

 

Charles Howard Edmondson: Hawaii’s First Marine Biologist

Lucius G. Eldredge

Hawaii Biological Survey, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu,

Hawaii  96817-2704

Charles Howard Edmondson was born October 14, 1876 in Milton, Iowa.  He received his bachelors (1903), masters (1904), and Ph.D. (1906) from the University of Iowa and was a professor of biology at Ohio Wesleyan, 1906-1907. Later, a professor of natural history and zoology at Washburn, 1906-1913, and the professor of zoology at the University of Oregon until his departure in 1920.

On February 1, 1920, Dr. Edmondson arrived in Honolulu from Oregon to teach zoology at the College of Hawaii (now University of Hawaii) and direct its marine laboratory and to take care of the invertebrate zoology collection at the Bishop Museum.  As director of the Cooke Memorial Marine Laboratory (located on the grounds of the old Waikiki Aquarium), he encouraged visiting scientists to use the facilities and sent specimens to world experts.  He was active in the organization of the First Pan-Pacific Conference (later the Pacific Science Association and Congress) in 1920.

Dr. Edmondson traveled extensively and took part in the Whipporwill (1924), Tanager(1923), and Kaimiloa (1924) expeditions bringing his studies into a broader Pacific experience.

When he retired from the University of Hawaii in 1942, he assumed the rank of professor emeritus and joined the Bishop Museum as full-time curator of the marine zoology collections for another 20 years, retiring from the Museum in 1962 at which time Edmondson Hall at the University of Hawaii was named in his honor.

His research interests were most varied.  His doctoral dissertation was on the Protozoa of Iowa followed by four additional papers on protozoans.  Dr. Edmondson’s life-long studies were on crustaceans which extended over some 41 years, beginning with stomatopods (1921) and ending with xanthid crabs (1962).  He published 64 new species of shrimps and crabs.  His works on ecology and growth of coral reefs are classics (1928-1929).  In the 1940-1950s he researched shipworms, describing ten new species, and conducted field studies on marine fouling organisms.  He described five new species of creeping and stalked medusae.

His milestone publication was “Reef and Shore Fauna of Hawaii” first in 1933 and revised to include fishes in 1946.  This work still constitutes the background for marine studies in Hawaiian waters.

THE CHARLES H. AND MARGARET B. EDMONDSON RESEARCH FUND- GRANTS IN AID OF RESEARCH AND PUBLICATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN THE AREA OF HAWAII MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY.

Information on the grant and application procedures can be found here.

Deadline: A call for proposals will be sent by email each Fall with a target deadline of mid-November. Applications and supporting letters must be submited electronically in PDF format. For more information, contact Dr. Peter Marko, Chair of the Grants and Awards Committee (pmarko@hawaii.edu).

Recipients in 2015:

James Murphy
Project title: Investiagtion of antioxidantdefenses in Hawaiian corals

Narrissa Spies
Project title: Characterization of the algal symbionts and reporductive strategy of the super coral, Leptastrea pupurea

Jamie Sziklay
Project title: Satellite predictions of coral disease outbreaks across the Hawaiian archipelago

Victoria Sindorf
Project title: Genetic basis of differential sensitivity of Hawaiian reef building corals to stress induced by competition with algae

Kaho Tisthammer
Project title: Understanding the adaptive ability of lobe corals to water pollution

Recipients in 2014:

Áki Jarl Láruson
Project title: Identifying pockets of genomic divergence in a globally distributed metapopulation

Elaine Y. Luo
Project title: Understanding climate change impacts: What drives thermal resiliency in Hawaii’s coral reefs?

Victoria Sindorf
Project title: Invasive algae as a source of acute and chronic stress on reef-building corals in Hawaii.

Rachel M. Wade
Project title: Exploring the interaction between Plakobranchus ocellatus (Opisthobranchia, Sacoglossa) and its algal kleptoplast sources in the Hawaiian Islands

Christopher B. Wall
Project title: Environmental and physiological factors affecting post-bleaching recovery in Hawaiian reef corals following a regional bleaching event.

Recipients in 2013:

Keisha D. Bahr
Project title: Some like it hot: Relative sensitivity of Hawaiian corals to climate change stressors

Raphael Ritson-Williams
Project title:  Patterns of genotypic diversity of the coral Pocillopora damicornis at multiple reefs on O’ahu.

Blake Ushijima, Department of Microbiology
Project title: The effect of the antibiotic produced by the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus strain OCN008 on the bacterial microflora of the coral Montipora capitata.

Christopher B. Wall
Project title: Assessing the functional role of Symbiodinium clades in the autotrophic nutrition and energetics of two reef corals exposed to elevated temperature and pCO2
 

Background Information on the E. Alison Kay and Jessie D. Kay Research Grants

Professor E. Alison Kay (1928 - 2008)

Professor E. Alison Kay was a member of the former Zoology Department from 1982 until her retirement in 2001. During this time she also chaired the graduate program of the department for many years, reflecting her tireless dedication to training the next generation of zoologists and her commitment to student education. She also acted as department chair, dean of graduate students, and was a member of the University of Hawaii Faculty Senate.

Professor Kay dedicated most of her scientific career to the study of marine mollusks and is to this day a highly recognized name in Malacology. A species of cowrie shell was named after her, Cypraea alisonae (Burgess 1983).

For many years, her book Hawaiian Marine Shells (1979) was the authoritative tome for both amateur collectors and biologists.

Beyond her interest in the taxonomy of Mollusca, Professor Kay was an active conservation biologist, science historian, and bio-geographer.

The Jessie D. Kay trust was created in the memory of Professor Kay’s mother to support graduate student research on the natural history of the Hawaiian Islands and especially marine malacology. The E. Alison Kay endowment was intended to encourage and reward outstanding students who have an interest in the natural history of the Hawaiian Islands with preference to students whose focus is whole organism natural history.

JESSIE D. KAY MEMORIAL RESEARCH GRANTS IN HAWAIIAN NATURAL HISTORY, ZOOLOGY AND MARINE MALACOLOGY

Information on the grant and application procedures can be found here.

Deadline: November 14, 2016.

No Recipients in 2015

Recipients in 2014:

Raphael Ritson-Williams
Project Title: Acclimatization of Coral Populations to Local and Global Stressors: Can Corals Adapt to Future Threats?

Caitlin M.U. Shishido
Project Title: Measuring thermal heterogeneity in the Hawai‘ian intertidal zone and utilization of microhabitats by the gastropod Nerita picea

Recipients in 2013:

Jessica Maxfield
Project title: Uncovering The Secret Of Sex Change: Mapping the Sex Change Pathway In a Hawaiian Reef Fish.

Nyssa Silbiger
Project title: Bioerosion rates and climate change in the Hawaiian Archipelago.
 

ELIZABETH ALISON KAY ENDOWED AWARDS FOR STUDENTS IN BIOLOGY/ZOOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA

Information on the grant and application procedures can be found here.

DeadlineNovember 14, 2016                 

Recipients in 2015:

Helena Barreto
Project title: Patters of oogonia and spermatogonia distribution in the non-partitioned ovotestis of the Hawaiian endemic goby species, Eviota epiphanes

Recipients in 2013:

Jonatha Giddens
Project title: Experimental removal of the introduced grouper roi (Cephalopholis argus) in west Hawaii; a community-based approach to coral reef system restoration.

Aki Jarl Larusen
Project title: Speciation across the Sea: Elucidating the Sea Urchin Genus Tripneustes.
 

DR. CHARLES AND SANDRA GUEST-VAN RIPER ENDOWED STUDENT TRAVEL AWARD FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

Information on the grant and application procedures can be found here.

Deadline: November 14, 2016Later applications will be considered on a continuing basis pending availability of funds.

Jean Fantel-Lepczyk
2016 North American Ornithological Conference (NAOC) in Washington, DC

Recipients in 2014:

Adrienne Copeland
7th International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Symposium on Marine Ecosystem Acoustics held in Nantes, France

Elizabeth Henry
Annual Meeting of the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) in West Palm Beach, Fla.

Nyssa Silbiger
Association for the Sciences of Limnology & Oceanography Society (ASLO) meeting in Granada, Spain

Recipients in 2013:

Jean Fantle-Lepczyk
The Society for Conservation Biology’s (SCB) North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB)