Singapore presentations by Dr. Barbara Watson Andaya

In February, Professor Barbara Watson Andaya was a presenter and keynote speaker at two conferences in Singapore.

On February 7, 2017, she gave a presentation to a workshop, ‘Circulating the Bay of Bengal Miraculously: Translating Wonder and Travel in South and Southeast Asia’ at the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore. Her presentation was titled ‘Underwater Kingdoms, Sea Creatures and Saintly Miracles: Religious Connections and the Mysterious Ocean.’

On February 9, she gave the keynote address for a conference on ‘Gender Perspectives on Asian Labour Migration within Colonial Asia’ held at the Asia Research Institute. Her presentation was titled “Goodbye darling, I have to get back to the ship”: Sailors and Prostitutes in Asia’s Port Cities.

Summer 2017 release from Dr. Abinales!

The second edition of Dr. Patricio Abinales’ book State and Society in the Philippines will be released this summer via Rowman and Littlefield Publishing Group.

About the Book:

People in the Philippines routinely vote, run for office, organize social movements, and call for good governance by the state. Why, then, is there a recurring state-society dilemma in the Philippines? One horn of the dilemma is the persistent inability of the state to provide basic services, guarantee peace and order, and foster economic development. The other is Filipinos’ equally enduring suspicion of a strong state. The idea of a strong Republic evokes President Marcos’ martial law regime of the 1970s and 1980s, which spawned two armed rebellions, cost thousands of lives in repression and billions of dollars in corruption, set the nation back years in economic development, and exacerbated suspicion of the state.

This dilemma stimulates thinking about the puzzle of state resilience: How has a “weak state” maintained the territorial integrity of the Philippines in the postwar period in the face of two major rebellions and an armed separatist movement, corruption, mismanagement, intractable poverty, weak sovereignty, and an often chaotic electoral system? Why does the inability to collect taxes, secure citizens’ lives and property, and maintain economic infrastructure not result in state failure?

State and Society in the Philippines engages the dilemma of state-society relations through a historical treatment of state formation and the corresponding conflicts and collaborations between state leaders and social forces. It examines the long history of institutional state weakness in the Philippines and the efforts made to overcome the state’s structural fragility and strengthen its bond with society. It answers these difficult questions by focusing on how the state has shaped and been shaped by its interaction with social forces, especially in the rituals of popular mobilization that have produced surprising and diverse results.

Job Talk: Permeable Policymaking: Foreign Firms in the Japanese Political Economy

The Asian Studies Program invites all to a talk by Dr. Kristi Govella, candidate for the position of Assistant Professor of Asian Studies. The talk is entitled “Permeable Policymaking: Foreign Firms in the Japanese Economy,” and will be held on Thursday March 2, 3:00-4:00 pm, in the Center for Korean Studies Auditorium.

Abstract: How does internationalization affect the politics of trade? Can foreign firms meaningfully influence policy? Japan is an interesting place to examine these questions because it was remarkably closed to foreign investment until a sudden influx in the 1990s. While foreign firms were initially dependent on their home governments to influence Japanese policy, opportunities for these firms to act independently increased with the opening of the Japanese economy. Interestingly, the manner in which a sector opened had lasting and sometimes unexpected consequences, creating cleavages among Japanese and foreign firms in ways that shaped their interests and the trajectory of policy change. This research sheds light on the ways that internationalization can enable foreign firms to impact policy debates directly from within a host country, potentially altering the dynamics of both domestic politics and international relations.

About the Speaker: Kristi Govella is an Associate Professor at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, specializing in Japanese politics and Asian regionalism. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

Job Talk: Interpreting Okinawa: Place-Making and the Nature of the Past

The Asian Studies Program invites you to a talk by Dr. Andrea Murray, “Interpreting Okinawa: Place-Making and the Nature of the Past,” on Monday, February 27, from 2:30-3:30 pm, in Bilger Hall 335.

Abstract: “Nature” in Okinawa is a thing of the past. This talk considers how a sense of unique ecological heritage is cultivated and expressed through facilitated interactions between human and non-human animal species, both for the education of tourists and for the benefit of residents. In a move to direct the island’s economy away from U.S. military base dependency, local entrepreneurs are reclaiming their past through engagement with the natural environment. “Nature” is also a matter of interpretation.

 

About the Speaker: Andrea E. Murray is an Associate in Research at the Reischauer Institute for Japanese Studies, Harvard University. Her book, Footprints in Paradise: Ecotourism, Local Knowledge, and Nature Therapies in Okinawa (Berghahn Books 2017), is an ethnography of island political ecology and sustainable tourism development.

Job Talk: (Re)Figuring South Asian Coolie Identities

The Asian Studies Program invites the UH Manoa community to a talk by Dr. Arunima Datta, candidate  for the Assistant Professor position in Asian Studies, from 1:30-2:30 pm on Friday February 24, at the Center for Korean Studies Auditorium.

(Re)Figuring South Asian Coolie Identities: Gender, Labor Migration and the Empire

ABSTRACT: Recently literature has been flourishing on the “colonial” manipulations of intimate relations, morality and domestic arrangements in the making of the Empire. This body of scholarship remains limited by its preoccupation with relations between European men and native women, rendering some bodies and relations more relevant than others. Colonial construction of migrant Indian coolie households often depicts coolie women either as immoral beings or as passive victims of skewed native patriarchy, while coolie men have been figured as irresponsible and violent partners. Such sweeping depictions homogenized all coolie women into a single category of ‘victims’ and likewise all coolie men as perpetrators of violence against their wives or mistresses, thereby disregarding the plethora of relations and identities coolie men and women experienced. This talk explores such neglected intimacies of Indian coolie households in British Malaya. In doing so, it introduces the concept of “situational agency” and in the process contributes to ongoing discussions in fields of gender, migration and labour studies by problematizing the dichotomous understanding of “agent” and “victim” as mutually exclusive categories.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Dr Arunima Datta is a postdoctoral fellow at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore(NUS) and simultaneously lectures for the South Asian Program, NUS. Datta received her PhD in Southeast Asian Studies from NUS and was awarded the Presidential Scholarship for her research. She maintains an active interest in the related fields of South Asian and Southeast Asian history/studies, women’s and gender history, race, gender and sexuality studies, colonial and postcolonial studies. She has authored articles on colonial law, Indian coolie women in Malaya during British Rule and during Japanese Occupation. She is currently working on two book projects, viz., Indian Coolie Women in Malaya, Travelling Indian Ayahs in Britain. Datta recently organised the Gender Perspectives on Colonial Inter-Asian Labour Migration; the first conference in the field of Inter-Asian studies to focus on gender and labour migration history. She also serves as Assistant Editor of the Journal of Malaysian Branch of Royal Asiatic Society and is also a member of the editorial board of Asian Journal of Social Science Studies.

New Publication from Prof. Barbara Andaya

Asian Studies Program Chair Prof. Barbara Andaya, along with Leonard Andaya, has published A History of Early Modern Southeast Asia, 1400-1830, with Cambridge University Press.

cover-for-early-modern-southeast-asiaReviews & endorsements

‘… the authors convey in remarkably clear terms the complexity of the entire region’s dynamics during the early modern age. Their coherent narrative will no doubt help bring Southeast Asian developments into the flourishing field of world history.’ Pierre-Yves Manguin, Emeritus Professor, Ecole française d’Extrême-Orient/Centre Asie du Sud-Est (EHESS-CNRS)

‘This is a stunningly ambitious, comprehensive and insightful overview of pre-modern Southeast Asia. It will serve both to energize regional specialists and to introduce the region to a wider public. A landmark history greatly to be welcomed.’ Victor Lieberman, Raoul Wallenberg Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of Southeast Asian History, University of Michigan

‘For once, the term magnum opus is truly appropriate for the Andayas’ stunning achievement. An ambitious and sweeping history reflecting their vast learning, a sure grasp of both region-wide developments and local adaptations, and an eye for the telling detail. No history of early-modern Southeast Asia is likely to surpass this high intellectual standard for the foreseeable future. We are all in their debt.’ James C. Scott, Sterling Professor of Political Science and Anthropology, Yale University, Connecticut

‘The Andayas have done a magnificent service for programs seeking to expand their global history offerings and craft courses that will build on the world history survey to provide depth for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students. The book’s vivid narrative interweaves political, cultural and economic history, with the men and women who made that history at the core of the story, but the physical environment of seas and forests ever-present as a force as well. Each chronological chapter is clearly laid out in a structure that moves from the global context to Southeast Asia as a whole to various sub-regions, allowing students and other readers to examine this key part of the early modern world at a range of geographic scales. Instructors who are not themselves historians of Southeast Asia could easily use this overview to anchor a course as they explore new areas for teaching, and departments could use it as a model for how to redesign their course array into a more comparative, coherent and connected whole.’ Merry Weisner-Hanks, Distinguished Professor, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Special Graduate Course Spring 2017: Making Indigenous Space along the Pacific Rim

This special course will be offered this term only, by our visiting Andrews Fellow, Michael Hathaway (bio below).

ASAN 620 Making an Indigenous Space Along the Pacific Rim: 

National and International Struggles from the 1960s-present

This graduate class explores the formation of an indigenous space as part of national and transnational actions between places located along the Pacific Rim. We will read materials and watch film clips from such places such as Japan, China, Canada, the US, Hawai’i, Australia, New Zealand and others to gain a better understanding of not only the comparative differences, but also the connections in forging new relationships within and beyond the nation-state. As Dorothy Hodgson argues, the template of indigenous rights was born in the Americas, and yet as groups from around the world, such as Africa, engaged in these platforms, this transformed the texture of indigeneity itself. This class extends that exploration, looking at the diverse ways that people in the Pacific Rim both engage their own neighboring social worlds and those across the waters in order to expand indigenous futures.

BIO: MICHAEL HATHAWAY (Visiting Andrews Fellow, Spring 2017)

Michael Hathaway is an associate professor of cultural anthropology at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia. His first book, Environmental Winds: Making the Global in Southwest China (University of California Press, 2013), explores how environmentalism was refashioned in China, not only by conservationists, but also by rural villagers and even animals. It also examines the ways that the politics of indigeneity and nature conservation emerged in China, and reflects on how these dynamics can illuminate struggles elsewhere.

His second major project examines the global commodity chain of the matsutake, one of the world’s most expensive mushrooms, following it from the highlands of the Tibetan Plateau to the markets of urban Japan. He works with other members of the Matsutake Worlds Research Group, looking at the social worlds this mushroom engenders in Canada, the United States, China, and Japan.

His work appears in The Journal of Asian StudiesCultural AnthropologyAmerican EthnologistConservation and Society, and Humanities as well as several books. His research has been supported by the Toyota Foundation (Japan); Social Science and Humanities Research Council (Canada); and the Social Science Research Council, American Council of Learned Societies, National Science Foundation, Wenner-Gren Foundation, and Environmental Protection Agency.

Michael Hathaway: Andrews Fellow, Spring 2017

The Asian Studies Program’s Andrews Fellow in Spring 2017 will be Michael Hathaway.

1475000399842Michael Hathaway is an associate professor of cultural anthropology at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia. His first book, Environmental Winds: Making the Global in Southwest China (University of California Press, 2013), explores how environmentalism was refashioned in China, not only by conservationists, but also by rural villagers and even animals. It also examines the ways that the politics of indigeneity and nature conservation emerged in China, and reflects on how these dynamics can illuminate struggles elsewhere.

His second major project examines the global commodity chain of the matsutake, one of the world’s most expensive mushrooms, following it from the highlands of the Tibetan Plateau to the markets of urban Japan. He works with other members of the Matsutake Worlds Research Group, looking at the social worlds this mushroom engenders in Canada, the United States, China, and Japan.

His work appears in The Journal of Asian StudiesCultural AnthropologyAmerican EthnologistConservation and Society, and Humanities as well as several books. His research has been supported by the Toyota Foundation (Japan); Social Science and Humanities Research Council (Canada); and the Social Science Research Council, American Council of Learned Societies, National Science Foundation, Wenner-Gren Foundation, and Environmental Protection Agency.