American Studies home page

Alumni Profiles

 

David Doolin (Ph.D.)

0-david-doolin-photo-ucd-2015-1

David Doolin

Dr. David Doolin graduated from the department with his Ph.D. in December 2011.  His research focus and family life took him, firstly to Boston on the east coast, where he worked as an adjunct professor teaching American Studies and History courses at MCPHS University and Wheelock College (Colleges of the Fenway Consortium).  Subsequently, Dr. Doolin returned to his home town in Dublin, Ireland in September 2014 after some ten years in the US.  He is currently lecturing in American Studies and history at the American College Dublin and part-time at the history department of University College Dublin (UCD).  In February 2016 he published his first book, Transnational Revolutionaries: The Fenian Invasion of Canada, 1866 adapted from the Ph.D. dissertation, written under the supervision of David Stannard at UH.  Dr. Doolin writes: “Having spent just over three years living in Honolulu on the journey to the Ph.D., I made some of my closest friends, (despite the current distance), had an amazing learning experience with the most engaged professors and peers I could have imagined in the American Studies Department, and I miss UH, the islands and the people every day!”  Currently, Dr. Doolin is developing new research projects focused American immigration; he is collaborating on a radio documentary for Irish radio being made about his book project; he is working on the editorial board of a new online journal titled Studies in Arts and Humanities (www.SAHjournal.com), [and he would be delighted to review submissions from UH American Studies postgraduate student’s and faculty].  He lives with his wife and two boys in the picturesque fishing village of Skerries, north of Dublin city, Ireland.”

Troy Andrade (Ph.D.)

Troy Andrade

Troy Andrade

Troy J.H. Andrade (’16) is a proud alumnus of the American Studies Department and currently serves as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Law and Interim Director of the Ulu Lehua Scholars Program at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa | William S. Richardson School of Law.  Professor Andrade begin his legal career clerking for Chief Justice Mark E. Recktenwald of the Supreme Court of Hawai‘i.  He then became a civil litigator with McCorriston Miller Mukai MacKinnon LLP, where his practice focused primarily on complex commercial litigation, administrative law, and appellate litigation.  Professor Andrade has represented clients in matters relating to the most contentious issues in Hawai‘i, including the regulation of genetically modified organisms and pesticides, homelessness, and Native Hawaiian self-determination.  Professor Andrade’s scholarly interests center on the political and legal history of Native Hawaiians; his dissertation specifically analyzed the often contentious history of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.  Professor Andrade currently serves as co-chair of the Hawai‘i State Bar Association’s Civic Education Committee and has also been appointed to serve on the five-member Executive Board of the Judiciary History Center.

Theresa Navarro

Theresa Navarro

Theresa Navarro (M.A.)

Since graduating, Theresa Navarro (M.A.) has embarked on a whirlwind career as a film and television producer.  She has worked on several independent fiction and documentary projects, including the sci-fi feminist feature ADVANTAGEOUS which won a Special Jury Prize for Creative Collaboration at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.  She is currently employed with the Emmy-nominated public television documentary series americareframed.com.  “AMERICAN REFRAMED” is the sister series of the long-running documentary series POV, and is co-produced with WGBH/WORLD Channel in Boston.  She continues to consult on creative and community education projects.  She is currently co-producing a transmedia documentary (withwingsandroots.com) that explores global migration using a comparative lens on the U.S. and Germany.  The project consists of curated collection of interviews), and educational workshops.  She has also pursued what she calls her “passion project” with the Filipino American Museum (FAM): filipinoamericanmuseum.com.  Now in its second year, FAM just completed a three-day reading of Jose Rizal’s NOLI ME TANGERE, which featured Jessica Hagedorn, Broadway’s Jose Llana, Harold Augenbraum.

Stephanie Nohelani Teves (M.A.)

Stepahanie Nohelani Teves

Stepahanie Nohelani Teves

Lani Teves (Kanaka Maoli) is an assistant professor of Ethnic Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies atthe University of Oregon where she teaches courses on Indigenous feminisms, Pacific Island Studies and Native Studies.  She is co-editor of Native Studies Keywords (University of Arizona Press, 2015) and has published articles on Hawaiian performance, film, and sexuality in the Pacific.  Her articles have appeared in American Quarterly, the American indian Culture and Research Journal, and the International Journal of Critical indigenous Studies.  Her manuscript, “Defiant Indigeneity: The Politics of Hawaiian Performance” (under contract with UNC Press) explores the spaces where Native Hawaiians perform the routines of everyday life; the overlooked zones of the Hawaiian undercommons (punk clubs, drag shows, hip hop venues); and the officially sanctioned domains of Hawai‘i culture industries (folk, regional theatre and music videos).  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan and was a recipient of the Ford Foundation Postdoctoral and Dissertation Fellowships.  She is a Hawaiian feminist born and raised in Ewa Beach, Hawai‘i and a founding member of Hinemoana of Turtle Island, a collective of Pacific Islander feminists residing in California and Oregon.

Nolan Brooke

Nolan Brooke

Nolan Brooke, Class of 2010 (B.A.)

By studying the many aspects of America, I have deepened my understanding of this country’s history and culture, and how America’s unique dynamic operates domestically and internationally. Today, I travel the US every week to help in “green” the fast food industry. Since graduation, I’ve been to New York, Virginia, Toronto, all over California, Texas, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, and many other cities and states. I like to think that one of the only reasons I got my job is because I decided to get my degree in American Studies, however weird that may be.”

Meighan Beckett

Meighan Beckett

Meighan Beckett, Class of 2010 (B.A.)
Senior thesis prize winner 2010

I was non-traditional student who returned to school at the University of Hawai’i after moving to Honolulu from Florida. I have always been interested in history and culture, but I wanted a contemporary edge to these interests; the American Studies Department curriculum offered this perfect combination. For my senior capstone project, I have chosen to analyze the commemoration of Hawai’i’s 50th anniversary of statehood. This project involves an investigation of Hawai’i’s history, Native Hawaiian issues such as land rights and sovereignty, and how statehood has benefited, or not benefited, the people of Hawai’i. After graduation, I hope to attend graduate school on the east coast and pursue a career in education.

Angelique Sabia

Angelique Sabia

Angelique Sabia, Class of 2011 (B.A.) 

The best thing I did during my time at UH was randomly sign up for an 
American Studies course. Dedicated professors and TAs, small class 
sizes, and interesting, as well as diverse course contexts, inspired 
and motivated me to become an active and engaged student and citizen.
 The department provides many unique opportunities to all of its
students – by working closely with two American Studies professors, I
 was able to participate in an internship with Governor Abercrombie’s
 Policy office my senior year. Since graduating Spring 2011, I have found work as a legal assistant and volunteer with Hospice while I
 prepare myself for future graduate school studies.